Rating:
3 votes

Butler Ford Bridge

Photos 

HAARGIS photo

Enlarge

BH Photo #165448

Map 

Facts 

Overview
Lost concrete arch bridge over Salt Fork Vermilion River on County Highway 36
Location
Vermilion County, Illinois
Status
Replaced by new bridge
History
Built 1910, replaced in 1982
Builder
- Frank Payne of Danville, Illinois (Design engineer)
Design
Closed-spandrel concrete arch
Also called
Anderson Hill Bridge
Approximate latitude, longitude
+40.10229, -87.71558   (decimal degrees)
40°06'08" N, 87°42'56" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
16/439009/4439356 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Danville SW
Inventory number
BH 45260 (Bridgehunter.com ID)

Update Log 

  • May 6, 2013: New photos from Jacob P. Bernard
  • November 5, 2012: New photo from Mike Roegner
  • December 27, 2010: Updated by Mike Roegner: Corrected river name and added design engineer.
  • September 6, 2010: Updated by Robert Stephenson: Changed common name and build date
  • May 16, 2010: Added by Robert Stephenson

Sources 

Comments 

Butler Ford Bridge
Posted November 4, 2012, by Bob Hageman (hageman [at] fairpoint [dot] net)

The approach to the east end is on private property(homeowners association). However the approach on the west side is on a public road. I was just there a few days ago but didn't look to see if there are any remains of the bridge. I will look closer next week.

Vermilion River Arch Bridge
Posted May 17, 2010, by Mike Roegner (roegner [at] soltec [dot] net)

Here's a couple of photos - one photo I took in 1971. The other with the horse and buggy was taken by Clarence Tadd Church (1884-1960), a noted Catlin photographer who took lots of pics of the Catlin area. The common name for this bridge was the Butler Ford bridge. I can't discount the build date, but the Catlin Historical Society claims the photo by Tadd Church was made about 1910. Someone has a date wrong, or Tadd Church had some unique photography skills. This bridge crossed the Salt Fork river in an area that was heavily strip mined in the early 1900's.

I don't know how accurate the location needs to be, but the location given is great for the Anderson Hill bridge, its replacement, but the Butler Ford bridge was a little farther upstream. The road that accessed it is now a private road, so it doesn't show up on maps. I've included an aerial view from MSR maps. The white dot in the river shows it's approximate location. Note the little area of white on the far bank. That' some concrete left from the bridge.

Webmaster's note: The photos that were here have been incorporated into the main site.