Rating:
2 votes

BNSF - Pine Creek Bridge

Photos 

Photo taken by Steve Conro in March 2012

Enlarge

BH Photo #227512

Map 

Description 

There is an overlook on a hiking trail within White Pines State Park where this bridge can be viewed straight on but a couple hundred yards away.

Facts 

Overview
Stone arch bridge over Pine Creek on BNSF (former CB&Q)
Location
Ogle County, Illinois
Status
Open to traffic
History
Built 1894
Railroads
- BNSF Railway (BNSF)
- Burlington Northern Railroad (BN)
- Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad (CBQ)
Design
Stone arch
Dimensions
Total length: 60.0 ft.
Also called
White Pines RR Bridge
Approximate latitude, longitude
+41.99769, -89.46504   (decimal degrees)
41°59'52" N, 89°27'54" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
16/295837/4652459 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Grand Detour
Inventory number
BH 51685 (Bridgehunter.com ID)

Update Log 

  • November 24, 2018: New photo from Dana and Kay Klein
  • March 13, 2012: Updated by Daniel Hopkins: Added category "Railroad"
  • March 12, 2012: Updated by Steve Conro: Added category "Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad"

Sources 

Comments 

BNSF Pine Creek Bridge
Posted March 15, 2012, by Steve Conro (sconro [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Clark, the workmanship on this has to be seen to be appreciated. The hand craftsmanship is everywhere.

Tony, It looks like some sort of scaffold where you climb down that ladder but it looks very old. There is some sort of foam looking sealer on the roof of the arch that didn't photo well.

BNSF Pine Creek Bridge
Posted March 13, 2012, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Any idea what the steel beams and boards underneath the bridge are for Steve? Looks like they have either done work on it at some time and left their stuff there...or some kids have a fort under there, lol.

BNSF Pine Creek Bridge
Posted March 13, 2012, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

The chisel marks (in photo 8) distinguish these older structures from modern ones. I can't look at a UCEB and see any connection with the humans involved in making it. This bridge shows the marks left by a hand how many generations ago.