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Kings Mill Creek P&E trestle

Photos 

View from road.

Photo taken by Patrick Cooney in April 2015

Enlarge

BH Photo #354479

Map 

Description 

Timber trestle built by the Big Four Railway, and used by the Peoria and Eastern, Penn Central and Conrail. Was abandoned in the mid 1980s after the line was truncated at Bloomington when a bridge in Mackinaw was washed out and Conrail opted to use Trackage Rights on the Norfolk Southern line to East Peoria.

Facts 

Overview
Abandoned Timber stringer bridge over Kings Mill Creek on Conrail ( Formerly Peoria & Eastern )
Location
Twin Grove, McLean County, Illinois
Status
Derelict/abandoned
History
Built as part of the Big Four line from Indianapolis to Peoria IL, this section of the Peoria and Eastern was abandoned in the mid 1980s by Conrail after a bridge in Mackinaw was destroyed by flooding.
Railroads
- Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St. Louis Railway (CCC&StL)
- Conrail (CR)
- New York Central Railroad (NYC)
- Penn Central Railroad (PC)
- Peoria & Eastern Railroad (P&E)
Design
Timber stringer
Approximate latitude, longitude
+40.50318, -89.09892   (decimal degrees)
40°30'11" N, 89°05'56" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
16/322152/4485724 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Normal West
Inventory number
BH 72460 (Bridgehunter.com ID)

Update Log 

  • June 7, 2016: Added by Patrick Cooney

Comments 

Kings Mill Creek P&E trestle
Posted July 18, 2018, by Cameron

I recently explored near the stone archway. It still stands and Is very interesting!

Kings Mill Creek P&E trestle
Posted January 25, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Ross,

Do you happen to have a photo of the arch over the old roadway? I find abandoned stone arches like that fascinating!

Kings Mill Creek P&E trestle
Posted January 25, 2018, by Ross Brown (bluehavanaross [at] gmail [dot] com)

The stone arch over the roadway is still there. On the satellite imagery, you can see it to the left of the current roadway. The road was realigned and cut through the railroad right of way in the mid-90s.