Rating:
1 vote

Fairmont Lane Bridge

Photos 

Overview

Photo taken by Bill Burmaster

BH Photo #102336

Map 

Street View 

Facts 

Overview
Cable-stayed bridge over I-70 on Fairmont Lane in Collinsville
Location
Madison County, Illinois
Status
Open to traffic
History
Built 1960; rehabilitated 1984
Design
Cable-stayed cantilevers on both ends of a 2-span curved T-beam center span with a concrete bent.
Dimensions
Length of largest span: 78.0 ft.
Total length: 266.0 ft.
Deck width: 23.9 ft.
Recognition
Eligible for the National Register of Historic Places
Approximate latitude, longitude
+38.66944, -90.04201   (decimal degrees)
38°40'10" N, 90°02'31" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
15/757350/4284247 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Monks Mound
Average daily traffic (as of 2016)
900
Inventory numbers
IL 060-0170 (Illinois bridge number)
BH 15492 (Bridgehunter.com ID)
Inspection report (as of December 2018)
Overall condition: Fair
Superstructure condition rating: Fair (5 out of 9)
Substructure condition rating: Satisfactory (6 out of 9)
Deck condition rating: Fair (5 out of 9)
Sufficiency rating: 61 (out of 100)
View more at BridgeReports.com

Update Log 

  • June 2, 2012: Updated by Fmiser: added photos, expanded design description
  • June 1, 2012: New photos from Fmiser
  • March 9, 2010: Updated by Kim Harvey: street view
  • September 25, 2009: New photo from Kim Harvey
  • January 23, 2006: Posted photo from Bill Burmaster

Sources 

Comments 

Fairmont Lane Bridge
Posted June 7, 2012, by Fmiser (fmiser [at] gmail [dot] com)

"continuous concrete stringer/girder with a single cable-stayed approach span at each end." Interesting.

Maybe I'm misunderstanding the labling, but I wouldn't think the cable-stayed portion could be called an approach since they are supporting the ends of the main span. Which is why I figured those should be called cantilevers.

So maybe this conglomeration defies stuffing it into a category.

-- fm

Fairmont Lane Bridge
Posted June 4, 2012, by Mike Goff (michael [dot] goff [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I am going to pull one from the playbook of my manager here and use the "In Oregon we"...

In Oregon we would describe this as a continuous concrete stringer/girder with a single cable-stayed approach span at each end. We do not use the NBI coding for Tee Beam during our inspections.

This is definitely unique and interesting alternative to just tearing down a bridge and replacing it during a freeway widening. Good find and good discussion.

Fairmont Lane Bridge
Posted June 2, 2012, by Fmiser (fmiser [at] gmail [dot] com)

The NBI lists this bridge as "cable-stayed". Upon examination, I'd say it's cable-stayed cantilevers on both ends of a 2-span curved T-beam center span with a concrete bent.

I can't find that in the list of designs categories. *smiles*

So should it be listed in "cantilever", "concrete tee-beam", and "cable-stayed"?

Fairmont Lane Bridge
Posted March 9, 2010, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I think the original bridge type is actually a concrete curved t-beams. Curved t-beams were built on freeways in a number of states. Not to brag, but my state of Michigan has beautiful curved t-beam overpasses because they include Michigan's attractive R4 railing design.

The 1960 construction date for this bridge is well within the milieu of curved t-beam overpass construction. One of the reasons for their use on limited access highways was increased under-bridge clearance.

Fairmont Lane Bridge
Posted March 9, 2010, by Ed hollowell (erhollowell [at] aol [dot] com)

This was a stringer bridge originally but when they wanted to widen the freeway it passes over, rather than rebuilding they made the extensions at either end and left the middle of the bridge as it was. There is an overpass on I-465 on the east side of Indianapolis which has had a similar treatment.