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I&M Canal Little Vermillion Aqueduct

Photos 

Photo taken by Steve Conro in December 2011

Enlarge

BH Photo #221640

Map 

Description 

I & M Canal Bike Trail crosses on a later constructed side deck. Aqueduct still carries water.

Facts 

Overview
Aqueduct over Little Vermillion River on I&M Canal
Location
LaSalle, LaSalle County, Illinois
Status
Open to foot, bike and canoe traffic
Design
Riveted Steel Plate Trough
Recognition
Listed as a contributing resource to the Illinois and Michigan Canal Historic District
Approximate latitude, longitude
+41.32767, -89.08346   (decimal degrees)
41°19'40" N, 89°05'00" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
16/325643/4577226 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
La Salle
Inventory number
BH 49832 (Bridgehunter.com ID)

Categories 

Aqueduct (73)
Girder (7,966)
I&M Canal (24)
Illinois (3,842)
LaSalle County, Illinois (83)
LaSalle, Illinois (11)
NR-contributing (110)
Open (36,591)
Owned by state (13,695)
Through girder (2,952)

Update Log 

  • February 14, 2017: New photos from GS
  • February 15, 2014: New photos from Jim Allen
  • December 13, 2011: Updated by Steve Conro: added photo's
  • October 16, 2011: Added by Steve Conro

Related Bridges 

Sources 

Comments 

I & M Canal Little Vermillion Aqueduct
Posted May 25, 2013, by Lynne Victorine (bach_canal [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This aqueduct was restored in the early 1970s by Lou Mahnic, the town's blacksmith, and all his welding pals. When the canal boat project needed to have an engineering report on the structure's stability and ability to hold the weight of water and loaded boat, we wondered if 40 years might not have taken its toll. As it happened, the report came back 'good to go,' and the whole family breathed a sigh of relief. Lou's reputation, "when I fix it, it stays fixed" remained intact long after his death in 2003. (Sidebar: he learned his trade beginning in the Charleston Navy Yard, repairing primarily British ships between 1940 and 1943. He then moved back to Illinois with his family and supervised the shipbuilding at Seneca, where he was deemed too important to the war effort to be drafted.)