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Posted March 23, 2017, by Brad Noack (bradnoack [at] hotmail [dot] com)

The bridge is officially reopened as of 3/20/2017 as a pedestrian/bicycle only bridge after complete rehabilitation.

http://www.chicagotribune.com/suburbs/daily-southtown/news/c...

Posted March 22, 2017, by Diane L Clark (graciehillfarm [at] juno [dot] com)

My mother used to tell me about how she and her family would go swimming in the creek under the bridge. She said there were huge Billy Gars (fish) in the creek, but they never bothered them. My great grandfather, Marion Rice, owned the general store in Fall Creek, next to the RR tracks, and earlier, he owned the farmhouse with the large barn and silos with the turquoise roofs at the intersection of the present day highway (36?) and the old highway 57 (I think) that runs from Quincy to Marblehead and then Fall Creek. I don't live in that area so am just going from memory.

My mom also said there was an old school house in the Fall Creek area where local folks used to picnic. I think the school was closed but the area people would use the school grounds for picnics.

The train would run from Quincy to Marblehead to Fall Creek and beyond. My grandmother would take the train to visit her relatives (Hickersons, Rice, Rollins) in the county.

So sad that so many area artifacts are either falling down or have been replaced. The last time I was in the area with my mother (who was born in Quincy), we drove up a road and ran across a scenic overlook that had an historical marker about Fall Creek, etc. It was looking pretty ragged at the time. I went back after Mom's death and couldn't even get up the road. It was closed. Very sad. I know my relatives in Adam's County pay some seriously high taxes. Why aren't the historical areas being maintained? They mean a lot to some people. Do we have to start a campaign? I look at what's left of Creightown Cemetery outside of Marblehead and it breaks my heart, how so much of it has been swallowed up by the trees and field grass. Not to mention the damage and destruction to the remaining headstones. Isn't there anyone there, in the area, who still cares and can do something about it? I live far away but I'd be willing to try to help!

Posted March 18, 2017, by Douglas Butler

Yep that's correct it was a McDonald's drive thru prank

Posted March 18, 2017, by Anonymous

Is that why he only makes himself appear on McDonalds food nowadays?

Posted March 18, 2017, by Anonymous

........back to that same old place, sweet home Chicago.......

Posted March 18, 2017, by Douglas Butler

God used the ship to hit this rail bascule bridge for the fact the blues brother's had a saying quote they're never get caught they're on the mission from God and God is not mocked Galatians 6:7, now I see why the Pontokratis ship had struck it in May of 1988 because of that quote!

Posted March 9, 2017, by CConkle (msplinter1964 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I don't know who handles maintenance, but this bridge badly needs it.

Posted March 4, 2017, by David Huffman (davhuffm [at] mindspring [dot] com)

The infamous unsolved murder at this bridge may have been solved.

I was ten when the woman's body was discovered and living in nearby Charleston.

http://jg-tc.com/news/local/arrest-announced-in-airtight-bri...

Posted March 2, 2017, by T Keating (popeish [at] hotmail [dot] com)

It was a double tracked bridge until 1989. They cut half of it off, centered it and raised it a few feet so the C&NW could get container trains under it on all three tracks. For a couple years before that, the C&NW reconditioned a fourth track (on the south) that they had dug lower to clear the bridge. That track was taken out shortly after the work on the bridge was completed.

Posted February 18, 2017, by David Huffman (davhuffm [at] mindspring [dot] com)

From the satellite photo it appears the bridge is gone.

Posted February 12, 2017, by Bryan (likinglifetoday [at] gmail [dot] com)

I am saddened to lose this bridge. First time I crossed it was in 1966. I was 8. We lived on the other side of Illinois and were on a family outting for the day and drove across this bridge. I got on my great grandpas lap and hung my head out the passenger window. I will never forget looking through the decking to the river below. We threw pennies out the window, into the river for luck. I didnt have any idea where we were back then, but I never forgot that bridge. Fast forward to 2002. I bought my first Harley, which I still have, and went on a ride to the river with some friends. I couldn't believe it when we turned onto this bridge. It was my long lost friend. As we rode across, I teared up with emotional memories of my first trip across that bridge. The guys thought I was nuts when I turned around and rode back over it again, then returned. I have rode out to that bridge at least once every year since, just to ride over it and remember. Goodbye old friend. You will be gone, but not forgotten......

Posted February 6, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

What a great bridge - complete with laced endposts, lattice portal bracing, interesting plaque, and date inscriptions on the abutments! I hope that the folks in Illinois keep this one around.

Posted February 6, 2017, by Douglas Butler

Maybe it's the 9th street that you have posted. Just guessing probably this one.

Posted February 5, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

or maybe 9th?

Posted February 5, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

Luke and Doug cant tell which is 16th and which is 9th?

Posted February 1, 2017, by jake (jwatchin1 [at] gmail com)

we had a cabin in the area as a youngster should have pictures of the wreck somewhere....

Wyton Bridge (Illinois)
Posted February 1, 2017, by Mike Roegner (mroegner [at] dancomnews [dot] com)

The old steel bridge is still there. It's buried under tons of dirt.

I remember seeing a photo of the repaired bridge, and the east end of the bridge was a timber pile bridge, but I didn't notice how the river was spanned. After the concrete "twin 50" concrete arch was built, the Peoria & Eastern RR started running trains across the old steel bridge and dumping dirt. One article mentioned that as of May 10, 1903, 150,000 yards of fill had been dumped and it was not yet up to the level of the old steel bridge.

The plan was to fill in the area up to the level of the old bridge, then the tracks would have to raised another 20 feet. That would eliminate the grade that began at Chandler Street, and would allow elimination of the fire-prone wooden bridge over the tracks at Logan Ave. There wasn't any mention as to where they were getting all the dirt.

I wish the small photo was a little larger. Since the steel bridge isn’t showing, I think that shows the bridge after the fill work was done.

Following are a couple of articles from the newspaper. I can't guarantee the accuracy of the math. Journalists like to write, but I'm not they can add all that well.

****

May 10, 1903

MUCH DIRT

Has been dumped into P&E Fill, Yet it is not up to trestle.

Since the work of filling in the new arch over the North Fork was commenced a few weeks ago the work has gone on steadily and the Italians employed there have frequently been ordered to work an hour or two overtime as it is desirable to complete the work as soon as possible. More trains than are now in the service here would be in the way of those now working else more trains would be placed in the service, but with the number now working there dirt and gravel is being piled into the hole very rapidly.

More than 150,000 yards of dirt and gravel have been dumped at the bridge or more than 200,000 tons and yet the fill is not up to the steel frame of the old trestle and will not be for a day or two, though by the last of next week it is thought the dirt will have reached to the old trestle work and then will remain only a few hundred cars to be put in until a force of men will begin raising the track. After the fill is completed to the trestle work it then remains for the men to raise it a good twenty feet more, which will require many thousand cars of ballast.

There has already been dumped at that point more the 200 train loads of nearly 4,000 cars. In all about 250,000,000 pounds of ballast have already been unloaded there and it will readily be seen that there is a vast amount of work to done on the structure yet before it is completed.

May 5, 1903

RAISE TRACKS

Chandler Street and Harmon Avenue crossings will be raised some.

The plans for the raising of the tracks of the P&E at the east end of the new arch are now in the hands of the city engineer and, as the improvement will not only benefit the railroad company but the city in general, it is probable that they will be approved as they stand.

The tracks at Logan Avenue will be raised about twenty so that the viaduct over Logan Avenue will be done away with and a grade crossing takes its place. At that place and also at Grant Street there is a cut of several feet so that the raise of the tracks will not affect the streets but at Chandler Street the tracks will have to be raised a few feet, but the raise will be so little that with the street sloping up to the track it will be hardly noticeable as is the case with Jackson Street. Harmon Avenue will be disturb but a few inches and just beyond that street the grade runs out, though on the bridge or arch just completed the raise is about forty feet. When completed the tracks will be so near level that the trains which now run at high speed through the western portion of the city so they can easily get a start up the hill can easily get up without a run and they will then have to conform to the ordinance governing the speed of the trains in the city limits.

MANY VISIT THE ARCH

May 5 1903

Sunday being a nice warm day quite a large number of people were attracted to the North Fork river where the P&E arch has just been completed. It is estimated that more than three hundred visitors viewed the great piece of engineering during the day and yet at no time was there more that fifty people on the structure. The general opinion was that the work was a credit to both contractors and to the company.

Posted January 27, 2017, by Bill Beckemeyer (bckmyr [at] sbcglobal [dot] net)

I am trying to determine who the architect/designer/builder that built this bridge.

I've heard that Henry Waeltz might have had something to do with the construction.

Field Bridge (Illinois)
Posted January 26, 2017, by David Backlin (us71 [at] cox [dot] net)

My guess is it's a privately owned crossing for a local farm owner

Posted January 20, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The ca. 1910 postcard reveals that an endcap and finial had already gone missing. I like the fact that the postcard was intellectually honest about this.

Posted January 19, 2017, by Mark Cook (pvkscooks [at] aol [dot] com)

Hauberg Bridge.

Posted January 19, 2017, by Mark Cook (pvkscooks [at] aol [dot] com)

Hauberg Bridge.

Posted January 19, 2017, by Mark Cook (pvkscooks [at] aol [dot] com)

Hauberg Bridge.

Posted January 19, 2017, by Shayla Pfaffe (shaylapfaffe [at] gmail [dot] com)

The bridge "deck" is in the process of being replaced.

Posted January 16, 2017, by Ross Brown (bluehavanaross [at] gmail [dot] com)

Satellite photo shows this bridge has been removed.

Posted January 12, 2017, by Roger Deschner (rogerdeschner [at] gmail [dot] com)

Bridge is now threatened, and a group is organizing in Long Grove to save it. Newspaper article: http://www.dailyherald.com/article/20170111/news/170119721/

It's a kind of a crazy bridge - a 1906 metal pony truss that gained a covering in 1972.

Posted January 3, 2017, by Anonymous

Poop Quake!

Posted January 3, 2017, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I can't imagine the piers or the approach are anywhere near original. Most trestle pieces are replaced every 30-40 years from what I've seen. Even with this being a spur, a good bet is they were last updated in the first couple decades of the 20th century

Posted January 2, 2017, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I stumbled upon this article which suggests although Chicago Northwestern RR operated the line, that Mr. Carpenter's company funded the bridge, so maybe the ownership by landowner (not railroad line) is a result of this event, over a century ago?

http://www.homesbyotto.com/carpentersville/

I agree with Clark, the substructure appears to be non-original.

On a sidenote, there were once other truss bridges in town, per this historical photo in the article.

Posted January 2, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

I can't imagine these are the original supports. The picture of the bearing plate sitting atop wood seems wrong.

Posted January 2, 2017, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Clark,

When I researched the bridge, it mentioned that this structure was built here in 1879. The line was built as a spur to serve industries located along the opposite bank of the river.

Posted January 2, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Has this bridge been relocated? I see wooden pilings holding it up. This doesn't seem like a system that would have endured as long as the bridge. I associate spans of this age with ashlar piers and abutments.

Posted January 2, 2017, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The bridge is not scheduled for demolition, but likely could succumb to flooding in the near future. As for how Otto ended up with the bridge, I assume it was on land they purchased. I know the owner has expressed interest in preserving the structure.

Posted January 2, 2017, by Nathan Holth (nathan [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

How did an engineering firm end up owning this bridge? And what is the current status of the bridge... are demolition plans being made at this time?

Posted January 2, 2017, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

A petition has been started to preserve this extremely historic bridge! Give it a read and a sign!

https://www.change.org/p/otto-engineering-inc-save-the-carpe...

Posted January 1, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Yes Nick... We jokingly refer to this one as the "Pumping Iron" Bridge! (See pic #2)

Posted January 1, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

That's a beauty!!

Posted December 31, 2016, by Anonymous

Visited this bridge today. I got as close as I could without trespassing. There's not much left of it. Looks like it's only a couple good floods away from being in the creek.

Posted December 31, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This one had some interesting hip verticals. The eyebars look like they were looped around a pin was that attached to a short built up member. I have seen a few similar examples, but I have found it to be uncommon.

Posted December 31, 2016, by David Huffman (davhuffm [at] mindspring [dot] com)

The bridge is gone. Only the piers and some metal remain.

Posted December 29, 2016, by Dana and Kay Klein

NICE! Thanks for making the trip.

Posted December 28, 2016, by Roger Deschner (rogerdeschner [at] gmail [dot] com)

Deck completely replaced in 2016. If the city spent that much on rehabilitation, this iconic bridge probably won't be demolished and replaced anytime soon. We can hope.

Posted December 22, 2016, by Pete Kroeger (Geerheadpete [at] aol [dot] com)

This bridge was tore down December 21 2016. It took Miller Trucking and Excavating 25 hours to demo , build retaining walls, place rock fill and ballast for new track . They worked around the clock to have the track operational the morning of the 22 of December 2016.

Posted December 3, 2016, by Archie Marsh

FWIW

Posted November 19, 2016, by Anonymous

Be careful not to cut yourself on that edge, boy.

Posted November 19, 2016, by Tom Boggs (Boggsmack67 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Hopefully it was put to good use, in a bonfire.

Posted November 19, 2016, by Fmiser (fmiser [at] gmail [dot] com)

I'm convinced this one was a truss. The joints, position of the members, and the rigidity of the structure are what convinced me that the sides are truss webs and not just a railing.

Dana and Kay Klein - put 'em up. Especially if it's not a plain stringer or some sort of Mail Order Bridge (MOB). I figure if I find it fascinating others will too. I have been given grief for some of my choices, though *smiles*

Posted November 19, 2016, by Dana and Kay Klein

Love Pontist Purists! They SAVE bridges. They also promote dialogue, those of of us with limited Pontist training benefit greatly from said dialogue. This pick up truck load of lumber has created Bridge Dialogue so I guess that is good.

Posted November 19, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

There is a bit of Pontist Puritanism on here, but don't let that concern you. It was a reaction to the massive numbers of MOBs that were being added at one time. Now that MOBs are not being added, the Puritanism is not nearly as strong as it was.

Posted November 19, 2016, by Dana and Kay Klein

Not an engineer, but if each member acts as in a pin connected design this thing would carry quit a load. If only capacity of bottom chord not so much....Interesting how we see things differently after visiting a bridge or two. Have seen some creative designs at clubs and Golf courses in my travels but dare not the wrath of purists to actually put on here.

Posted November 18, 2016, by Royce and Bobette Haley (roycehaley111 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Looks like a beam bridge not a truss

Posted November 18, 2016, by Dana and Kay Klein

Check list:

MOB? No

Significant amount of engineering? Quantify SIGNIFICANT? Maybe not

UCEB, No

Notable? Got a lot of looks and comments

Historic? Its Gone! Glad someone photographed it.............

Posted November 17, 2016, by Fmiser (fmiser [at] gmail [dot] com)

I walked out to the bridge site from the south (after dark, so no pictures) - but it's down. Rubble from the truss is still in the river. This is not one of the registered "Nine Metal Highway Bridges of Fulton County Thematic Resources", but it's still sad.

On public property, with an old roadbed to make it easy to tie in to the hiking trails - it would have been nice it it had been maintained and made accessible to pedestrians. Too late now, though.

Posted November 17, 2016, by Fmiser (fmiser [at] gmail [dot] com)

Currently a new wide sidewalk is being installed all along the road. The grading for it appears to have required the removal of this little bridge.

While not historic, it sure was unusual. Lost in the quest for progress, I guess.

Posted November 5, 2016, by Douglas Butler

This picture should be at BNSF Carnal Street Lift Bridge Dave I believe that bridge is still in operation

Posted October 30, 2016, by MAH

They unfortunately tore down the bridge.

Posted October 17, 2016, by Bill (kutz_bill [at] hotmail [dot] com)

My Father grew up near this bridge, (well Starr and Folkers) and they used to get on top and see if the steam locomotives could blow them off. If the engineers would see them, they'd stop most of the steam going out the stack, and the cops would come and chase them away. Kickapoo Creek was deep enough that they'd dive off the bridge into the water. So damm dangerous! The last time I checked the creek was about 8 inches deep under the "temporary" bridge they put up for construction purposes under the RR bridge.

Posted October 13, 2016, by David Healy (dghealy3242 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Who owns this bridge and responsible for it's maintance!

Posted October 2, 2016, by Luke

I've edited the history section to reflect that.

Posted October 2, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Thanks Luke!

Just a thought: should we list this as an 1872 bridge re-erected here in 1890?

Regards,

Art S.

Posted October 2, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Luke,

This is a double entry. That said, thanks for explaining the history of the structure.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted October 2, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)
Red Bridge (Illinois)
Posted September 27, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Nathan:

That was my theory as well. Too bad most of the bridges in the catalog are long gone.

Red Bridge (Illinois)
Posted September 27, 2016, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

The pony in that catalog is pin-connected however. Perhaps they replaced an original pin-connected pony truss of this design "in-kind" sort-of, albeit with riveted connections.

Red Bridge (Illinois)
Posted September 27, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Apparently, P.E. Lane did use pony trusses with truncated top chords as seen on this bridge.

This brochure shows a P.E. Lane Bridge over the Neosho River in Chanute, Kansas that features such pony spans:

http://historicbridges.org/indiana/darden/pelane.pdf

Source: Nathan Holth http://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=in...

Posted September 21, 2016, by Nathan Holth (Webmaster [at] HistoricBridges [dot] org)

I neglected to mention in my earlier comments that the name Carnegie was being rolled into steel and iron coming out of mills bought by Carnegie years before the official formation of the company. I'm standing in front of an 1885 truss bridge right now with Carnegie on all its original channels.

Posted September 19, 2016, by David Eike (eikes [at] sbcglobal [dot] net)

The attribution in the historic photo is incorrect. This is the Illinois & Michigan Canal.

Posted September 16, 2016, by Zander Donat (zanderdonat [at] gmail [dot] com)

I'm going to take a few more pictures to see if that helps. The Carnegie stamp is very faded but it should show up in a photo. Thanks for all of the input from everyone!

Posted September 16, 2016, by John Marvig

Nathan,

I'll look more into the date for this bridge. It's likely in an annual report somewhere. The bridge in wisconsin is possibly an accurate date, although I will ask the owner where that date came from.

Posted September 15, 2016, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

John... while certainly there is the potential for a bridge of this design to date to 1883 from a technological standpoint (in my earlier comments I overlooked the 1880 Redstone Bridge as an earlier all-riveted truss), my point is that's still a pretty significantly early date, and quite an outlier... even as you state this bridge design was built over a period of years... of which I would suspect 1883 is at the early end of the spectrum. Also, I am not clear what the source cited for the 1883 date of the Lammscapes bridge is. I wouldn't trust the signs that private owner put out unless there is further evidence than I am unaware of... which by the way would be fairly noteworthy.

In any case, I would caution against adding a speculative date to BridgeHunter (without adding underlying detail in the description) since as is clear here some visitors may interpret as "confirmed construction date" what should be at best a "circa" date and at worst an "estimate."

Posted September 15, 2016, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Nathan,

This identical structure:

http://bridgehunter.com/wi/washington/lammscapes-railroad/

was built by the same railroad in 1883. This design was very common along this railroad between the early 1880s and 1900. The difference is, this is one of the few structures that did not end up getting retrofitted with new floor beams and ending up in road use. While the date may be an error, I do not believe that this type of structure was exclusively built later in the 19th century.

Posted September 15, 2016, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

If this bridge were built in 1883 it would be tied with the Rocks Village Bridge for oldest known surviving bridge using riveted connections. I think this date highly unlikely on that fact alone. Pony truss railroad bridges are rare, and many lack a confirmed build date. However, based on bridges I have dates for, (and my own experience in general) the bridge likely dates from ca. 1888 to ca. 1896. I cite these bridges as representative technology (note the Milford Bridge was originally on a railroad)

http://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=oh...

http://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=ne...

http://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=mi...

Photos of the Carnegie brand on the bridge and information on which member(s) the name has been found would be immensely helpful (Carnegie varied their font over the years, and can help to some extent with dating). Do any other mill names appear on the bridge?

Posted September 15, 2016, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Zander, It's possible that there was an earlier bridge on site here as the stone abuts do suggest a pre-1900 span. I do think the bridge is at least 1890's but am not up to speed on steel mill history to comment further. Nathan Holth could probably tell you with more certainty. Either way it is definitely a very cool span!

Oh, and "God Bless Mooseheart"!

Posted September 15, 2016, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Zander,

The date was assumed based on the type of bridge, as well as the original date of construction at this location. I am curious. Is it a single member, or several that are stamped with this? What are the members? To me, the bridge certainly looks like an early to mid 1880s railroad structure.

Perhaps you could shed some light on the bridge? Do you have any information on it?

Posted September 15, 2016, by Zander Donat (zanderdonat&gmail [dot] com)

This site claims erection of this bridge in the year 1883. The bridge is stamped with "Carnegie Steel" which was founded in 1892. I work for the municipality that owns this structure and I am curious of the facts surrounding it. Clearly there's some different information here. I'm contacting the Batavia Historical Society to see if they have any other info. Either way it's a great piece of history in my home town!

Posted September 15, 2016, by Zander Donat (zanderdonat&gmail [dot] com)

This site claims erection of this bridge in the year 1883. The bridge is stamped with "Carnegie Steel" which was founded in 1892. I work for the municipality that owns this structure and I am curious of the facts surrounding it. Clearly there's some different information here. I'm contacting the Batavia Historical Society to see if they have any other info. Either way it's a great piece of history in my home town!

Posted September 14, 2016, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Looks like it was an early example of a bridge built by Smith Bridge Company of Toledo, Ohio. I say it looks like an early example because it has a lightweight design, and the portal bracing lattice arrangement is slightly different from the typical form... although it is positioned below the top chord as in their later examples. The finials and plaque are shaped typically for the company.

Posted September 14, 2016, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

That bridge at the treatment plant has a fresh coat of White paint on it and looks to be in really good condition. Hopefully it is adequate for the limited traffic needs and will serve there indefinitely.

I just hope the county will save the Armstrong Bridge as the last surviving span on a county road.

Posted September 14, 2016, by Meinart (Meinart5962 [at] sbcglobal [dot] net)

Grayson is right. I lived at the end of chester. I always called it the Penn central tracks or the " low' tracks. 72 I started walking these both directions. Just walked em this year some. 2016

Posted September 14, 2016, by Meinart (Meinart5962 [at] sbcglobal [dot] net)

Finally figured out where the old road was. Wish they would quit tearing all these down. Johnson hill etc.. old bridges and roads are addicting. Im always lookin. That one near the old powerplant is next. Fished there In the mid 60s.

Posted September 13, 2016, by Roger Deschner (rogerdeschner [at] gmail [dot] com)

The bridge is open again after rehab. See the Daily Southtown article about the reopening in the links section for a description of the design flaw that hastened corrosion on this bridge. This design flaw was apparently corrected in the rehab. Nice to see the nearby Chatham Street bridge also being repaired.

Posted September 13, 2016, by Roger Deschner (rogerdeschner [at] gmail [dot] com)
Posted September 6, 2016, by DENNIS KIENZLER (ekienzler [at] halversonconstruction [dot] com)

Work has begun on the extension of the Sangamon Valley Trail extension. The main structure will remain but the deck will be reworked for bicycle/pedestrian usage.

Posted September 6, 2016, by DENNIS KIENZLER (ekienzler [at] halversonconstruction [dot] com)

Work has begun on the Sangamon Valley Trail extension. Main structure will remain but the deck will be redone for bicycle/pedestrian usage.

Posted September 5, 2016, by Ray Cunningham (cunningham [at] uif [dot] uillinois [dot] edu)

Construction of the Covered Bridge

The years of the Civil War slowed progress in the town but the destruction of the Salt Fork bridge in the spring flooding of 1862 effectively cut North Homer off from the village. The ford was impassible during and after storms and a permanent solution to the destruction of the 1859 bridge was needed.

The Township Trustees included the older settler James Freeman. Freeman had been a resident of the Salt Fork area since the 1830s and was one of the signers for the Atwood tavern in Old Homer. Freeman, a pioneer of North Homer, was a Pennsylvania native married to Rebecca Ogden, the family namesake for the future town. Their 20-year-old son, James L., enlisted in the 26th Illinois Regiment.

In the early days of the republic a man from the country, unsophisticated in the ways of the city, would come to “see the elephant,” or gaze upon the ways of the city. Chicago was such a place and full of “sharpers,” awaiting the arrival of those less sophisticated. The spring of 1863 in Chicago was a time of confidence scams perpetrated upon travelers, farmers, and country men coming to trade. It was in this environment that James Freeman brought the down payment to the L. B. Boomer Company for the covered bridge.

Freeman arrived in Chicago and was walking down the street when he encountered a well-dressed man who called him by name and was delighted to see him. Being older, Freeman did not know the man but figured that he had forgotten. After speaking for a few minutes the man promised Freeman to take him to dinner. A moment later a man came up to the two and was obviously familiar with Freeman’s supposed acquaintance. He presented the man with a bill and Freeman watched as his “acquaintance” showed the man that had only a $100 bill for the $80 dollar debt. Freeman was asked if he could accommodate the request and be repaid when they went to dinner. Freeman handed over the money and they all went over to a building where the two would exchange receipts. The two men went inside for just a moment and promised to return. After one-half hour, Freemen went inside and found that the man had no office in the building and was unknown. He immediately went to the police. Freeman quietly replaced the money and said no more.

The episode would have remained a secret were it not for the Homer readers of the Chicago Times. Those reading the article could see through the pseudonym given in the paper and discovered Freeman’s folly. While the amount swindled was in dispute, the story was told in Homer as late as fifty years later by Levi Hall.

The covered bridge was completed in August 1864. The Howe truss bridge was brought by rail and constructed on the site of the previous bridge washed away by the 1862 flood. The covered bridge abutments were originally made of square timbers at each end, not the stone abutments known to generations. Grading of the approaches, digging of the north side, and building up of the south side cost $100, bringing the final cost of the project to $2836.66.

Footnote: The stone abutments for the covered bridge were installed by E. W. Burdick in September 1884. The bridge was constantly in need of work and was repaired and rebuilt numerous times, the first in 1876. Rotten timbers were found in 1907 and replaced under the approaches. The bridge collapsed April 5, 1934.

Posted August 30, 2016, by Dan Nichols (Jinkslingr [at] aol [dot] com)

Wow! Another bridge by Gould Construction! Thank you for researching!

Posted August 27, 2016, by Dave King (DKinghawkfan [at] hotmail [dot] com)
Posted August 24, 2016, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Anonymous,that is cool being able to street view along the river.Comes in handy when searching for bridges.

Posted August 23, 2016, by Anonymous

You can move on the street view in the map to move along the river. If you look between the two bridges, it looks like they share a control house. The platform and ladder connect the one bridge to the adjacent bridge.

The two separate structures couldn't share a counterweight as they move separately from each other.

Posted August 18, 2016, by Kelly (Kellygreen [at] gmail [dot] com)

I grew up in Paducah - the Brookport Bridge is terrifying.

Posted July 29, 2016, by Kevin Davis (kevin [at] kevincdavis [dot] net)

I remember seeing the crash site when I was a kid.

Red Bridge (Illinois)
Posted July 25, 2016, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

While riveted connections were used as early as 1883 (1883 spans of the Rocks Village Bridge in MA) most examples were like that bridge found in the eastern USA. And I doubt any were continuous from that period. Not only is this pony likely an alteration, the extension of the top chord to meet the end post was likely a decorative detail. Structurally, the continuous pony has vertical end posts.

Red Bridge (Illinois)
Posted July 25, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

That is very possible. The USA has had some creative county engineers, so this might be another option. I have not seen anything exactly like this either.

Red Bridge (Illinois)
Posted July 24, 2016, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I'm almost thinking that this pony wasn't built like this...

That it might have just been moved here and modified into the structure. Either way, it's actually very interesting!

Red Bridge (Illinois)
Posted July 24, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

That makes sense. I was on a mobile device and did not inspect it as close as I should have.

Red Bridge (Illinois)
Posted July 24, 2016, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Well, I'm 99.5% sure that this pony was an addition. Don't think they knew what a riveted Warren even was back then. Just bizarre to think that it was basically molded into the through truss, and even the support underneath is atypical.

Red Bridge (Illinois)
Posted July 24, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Leave it to P.E. Lane to think outside the box.

Red Bridge (Illinois)
Posted July 24, 2016, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

This was a beauty with very unique portal bracing.

Also the way that the Warren pony truss was incorporated directly into the through truss is something I haven't seen before.

Posted July 10, 2016, by Kim Harvey

Only possible to get a photo in the winter months. I was with another person and it was hell to go through the old roadbed for a photo in the summer months due to thick brush right before the bridge. It is view able from Route 40 itself but best viewing is in the winter.

Posted July 10, 2016, by Kim Harvey

I don't like the quality of the video either but unfortunately since that video 2 of the overpasses in the area have been closed to traffic underneath the bridge.