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Posted November 18, 2020, by Randall L Bingham (rbingham81 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The bridge that predates this one was known as the Vandeveer Bridge 1872. Looks like it took the same path.

Posted November 15, 2020, by erica w

So glad that bridgehunter encourages location..... 😭😂🤣🙄Right, jeremy?!

Posted November 15, 2020, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Tony, I deleted the photo. Would you strip the page ?

Posted November 14, 2020, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Robert, thank you. I'll make changes or delete.

Posted November 13, 2020, by Dan Hardy (wdhardy [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I found this article in the paper and I believe it is about this bridge. I don't know if you can use it or not but thought I'd pass it on.

Posted November 13, 2020, by Tim (springfieldbridges [at] gmail [dot] com)

Photo Credit: Roger Long

Posted November 13, 2020, by Robert G Stephenson (seinfeld99 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Looks like this bridge is the same as the Browns bridge.

The postcard shows a view of the bridge looking north from the Railroad trestle bridge.

First Bridge (Illinois)
Posted October 29, 2020, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Interesting story - the Effie Afton's owners would sue the Rock Island Bridge Company over the collision, in Hurd v. Rock Island Bridge Company. The company would hire Abraham Lincoln to defend them.

Short version: Hung jury, 9 to 3 in favor of the company. For those interested in the long version, I'll add a link.

Posted October 27, 2020, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

Yes! This is a HIGHLIGHT!

Posted October 27, 2020, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

John, it's one of my favorites and I'd Love for you to photograph it !

Posted October 27, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

It appears that about 70% of the truss portion of this bridge is in Indiana.

Posted October 27, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

This is the bridge in question. "Doomed" tag was placed on it as early as 2013.

Posted October 27, 2020, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I can’t confirm anything, but I looked a little further. Apparently $7M was earmarked for a replacement of the back channel bridge nearby. I can’t imagine $7M covers replacement of this bridge. I would expect this size bridge to be around $50M if not far more. There are two documents put out by the IL DOT, neither which is real clear. I’m going to guess the $7M is going towards the back channel bridge, and the lesser amount towards engineering studies (as seen in the other document).

http://www.idot.illinois.gov/Assets/uploads/files/Transporta...

I’m really hoping this one isn’t on the chopping block. I’m not sure if I can get down there this winter, but I would love to hit it. It is a very unique and important structure in the area.

Posted October 27, 2020, by Ed Hollowell (erhollowell [at] aol [dot] com)

It seems that bridges across the Wabash at the state line are always a problem. Illinois owns most of the river and has to pay for the bridge in most cases. Because of that there are few highway bridges across the southern Wabash and bridges like the New Harmony bridge and this one. New Harmony was built by a federally chartered company and this bridge was a strange example of a private person taking ownership of an existing bridge and re-purposing it from a rail bridge to a highway. I'm not sure what the motivation was for Illinois to get involved. Maybe they were just embarrassed that such a need was not being met in this area.

Posted October 27, 2020, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Wow, that’s a huge bummer. I haven’t seen any official news releases about it, but I’m sure that is coming. The only redeeming possibility is that specific program has a large budget shortfall due to COVID, so maybe it buys this bridge some time.

It would be nice if they would leave the old bridge standing, especially since it is a landmark

Posted October 26, 2020, by Ed Hollowell (erhollowell [at] aol [dot] com)

Illinois DOT has announced plans to replace this bridge main span and overflow span starting in 2021.

http://www.idot.illinois.gov/Assets/uploads/files/Transporta...

Posted October 26, 2020, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Satolli, thanks again for the video! Loved it!

Posted October 26, 2020, by Satolli Glassmeyer (info [at] HistoryInYourOwnBackyard [dot] com)

Here's a video on the bridge I just posted a couple of days ago: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4AHrH1ROedc&t=160s

Posted October 25, 2020, by Tyler

This page is for the old bridge but most of the photos are of the replacement bridge. This should be split to two pages

Posted October 21, 2020, by DENNIS KIENZLER (gecko1941 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Slated for replacement spring of 2021

Posted October 21, 2020, by mark boettcher (markwboettcher [at] gmail [dot] com)

Two photos from 1999

Posted October 19, 2020, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I've heard rumors that the Illinois Railnet may soon cease operations over this bridge, as cars stored on the line south have been moved out to be scrapped and there are no more customers south of it. Because this bridge is definitely considered to be a navigation hazard, this bridges future is extremely cloudy.

Posted October 14, 2020, by Tyler

I found my answer. According to http://chicagoloopbridges.com/bridges12/NB16/NB-Bridges.html this bridge as well as grand ave, Ohio ave, Halsted st, and formerly Chicago ave are still kept operable

Posted October 13, 2020, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I’ve been waiting to hear more about this one. I wasn’t sure if they were actually going to keep it in place. This seems like the kind of bridge they would give up on and bulldoze so the project is “sleek and modern”

Posted October 13, 2020, by Tyler

This bridge will be kept in the open position as a viewing platform while a new bridge will be built across the river for an extension of the 606 trail as part of the Lincoln Yards megaproject.

https://www.lincolnyards.com/sites/default/files/floorplans/...

Posted October 8, 2020, by Tyler

I see no rivets or built up beams. I think this truss might be modern

Posted October 5, 2020, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I am still curious about this one. It appears to be a railroad design, and appears to be a Chicago & North Western span. Numerous spans as such ended up being reused from railroad spans, and redeveloped into highway spans to cross the railroads. The link Tyler posted appears to be a similar bridge. I’m also curious what the history of that bridge was. I asked around at various historical societies about this bridge, and got no response

Posted October 5, 2020, by Tyler

Perhaps this bridge is the same as this https://bridgehunter.com/il/cook/addison-avenue/

It was replaced a very long time ago and it’s the same design.

Posted October 3, 2020, by Tyler

The sidewalk for the bridge is in the process of being widened. Pedestrian and bicycle traffic is diverted between the center truss lines. The construction can be seen in the photo I posted.

Posted September 30, 2020, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge shows up as a 103' deck truss in 1968 track charts. Pretty clear the truss was replaced with the current bridge, which appears to have reused a girder span.

Posted September 28, 2020, by Will (wwoozniak062 [at] gmail [dot] com)

File not found on the bridge pic..

Posted September 27, 2020, by Art S. (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Thanks Luke!

Posted September 27, 2020, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This one is curious. Three truss lines typically indicate the trusses were modified. I would expect these trusses to be very late 1880s to mid 1890s. The line was not constructed until 1913. In photo 1, it appears the trusses were strengthened at the ends with solid members, instead of laced members like what would be expected. I know there are two deck trusses in the Springfield area to the north that reused early 1880s trusses. I would assume this one was built out of reused trusses as well.

Posted September 27, 2020, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I've been meaning to comment on this one for a while. The main truss is apparently 1891, but the line was not built until about 1913. This makes me believe that the span was probably relocated. The two large deck girders may very well be original to this location. The two smaller deck girders were probably added in the 1920s.

Posted September 27, 2020, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I agree. At least some of the deck girders were added in the 1920s. It seems that a lot of stuff was upgraded about 10 years after this line was originally built. I didn’t realize it was fairly tall as well. The piers are unusual, I’m not sure I’ve ever seen anything like that before on a railroad bridge. Even with the safety platforms, I’m not sure I would even attempt to walk over this one. I’m not sure what kind of traffic comes down this line either.

Posted September 27, 2020, by Steve Conro (sconro [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This was far more impressive up close than on Google Earth. Huge undertaking back in the middle of no where. I'm guessing current approach structures added later?? Input?? Had it not been for the small decks about every 125' you wouldn't even attempt it.

Posted September 26, 2020, by Topaz Stodgel (topazm [at] hotmail [dot] com)

this seems to be a double with PRR, has exact same coordinates.

Posted September 26, 2020, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This one is a beauty..too bad it has no visible date. Looks fairly old.

Posted September 26, 2020, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

It looks like one of the three spans is different. Very unusual to see one approach different but not the other. Perhaps the original approach was damaged?

Posted September 23, 2020, by Tyler

It appears from the pictures that the bascule leaves were replaced some time in the past. I would expect a 1930s bridge to have riveted girders rather than welded ones

Posted September 21, 2020, by Tyler

This is the only rainbow arch in Illinois

Posted September 21, 2020, by Roger Deschner (rogerdeschner [at] gmail [dot] com)

I believe it is still operable, though it is only rarely actually raised. The warning lights and closing gates appear to still be in good condition. If you needed it to be raised for a boat, you would likely need to make special arrangements, but it might still be possible.

The Kinzie Street bridge is one of the lowest to the water, so it still might need to be raised for a boat that could fit under the other bridges, including the higher Chicago Avenue Bridge which has been replaced by a fixed bridge.

It's adjacent to the CNW - Kinzie Street Bridge, which is stored in the raised position, and lowered once a year for maintenance by the UP RR.

All of the moveable bridges on the North Branch Chicago River are endangered by the loss of heavy industry along the waterway. It is becoming only a recreational waterway.

Posted September 20, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I'm not finding anything to suggest it still does.

Nathan Holth... This is a question you could likely answer.

Posted September 20, 2020, by Anonymous

Does this bridge still operate?

Posted September 17, 2020, by Tyler (Tyanderson72 [at] yahoo [dot] com )

HOW TALL IS THAT BRIDGE AT HIGHEST POINT AND AT WHAT WATER LEVEL WAS THAT TAKEN?

Posted September 13, 2020, by Art S. (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Very cool!

Thanks Luke!

Posted September 12, 2020, by Luke

Boyington & Rust, along with L.B. Boomer & Mortiz Lassig, formed American Bridge Works https://books.google.com/books?id=07osAAAAYAAJ&pg=PT2&dq=%22...

The following link shows a contemporary advert:

https://books.google.com/books?id=9-aL1YjAHoUC&pg=PP13&dq=%2...

Posted September 12, 2020, by Art S. (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Nathan,

As a fan of Chicago bridges, any thoughts or comments?

Have you heard of Boyington & Rust?

Note the timber piers! Also, the rest of the structure, the edge of which is just caught in the image, may be more substantial that originally described in the 1935 article.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted September 12, 2020, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The main span on the old bridge was definitely a 1960s or 1970s span.

Field Bridge (Illinois)
Posted September 11, 2020, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Railroad records indicate this bridge was installed in 1911, and maintained by the ATSF. It seems to be a common theme that railroads install old railroad bridges or construct highway bridges and maintain the road crossings of creeks if it is within or near the RR right-of-way. This one is another good example:

http://bridgehunter.com/ia/lucas/226590/

Posted September 8, 2020, by Tyler

Interpretive signage says that the bridge is open for service vehicles. Updated status

Posted September 5, 2020, by Tyler

I found the plaque on this bridge. I would expect the other similar bridges on this canal to have the same builder

Posted September 3, 2020, by Darren (Ram50V8EFI [at] yahoo [dot] com)

My ex's grandfather drove a horse drawn wagon hauling out excavation for that tunnel.

Posted September 1, 2020, by Lyon_Wonder (lyon_wonder [at] yahoo [dot] com)

IDOT has completed a 3 year environmental impact study on replacing the IL-106 Florence bridge on the Illinois River and IDOT says the new bridge will be a UCEB that's 300 feet south of the existing bridge and will be similar to the new US 54 Champ Clark bridge that opened last year.

https://wlds.com/hearing-for-new-florence-bridge-set-for-sep...

Posted August 30, 2020, by RDB (bluehavanaross [at] gmail [dot] com)

The bridge is still standing but closed to all traffic. A new bridge has been built connecting 2950N Rd, and the road going over the main Middle Fork bridge to the north now curves around the creek to connect at the west end of the new bridge.

Posted August 30, 2020, by RDB (bluehavanaross [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge has been demolished and replaced with a new concrete bridge aligning 2950N east to west.

Posted August 26, 2020, by Roger Deschner (rogerdeschner [at] gmail [dot] com)

What a pity, and also a waste of taxpayer funds because preservation would have cost less than demolition. I'm glad I was able to visit it with my camera in February.

Pictures of the bridge have just disappeared from the Village of Millbrook's official website. It's like it was never there. There is no longer any reason to visit Millbrook.

One of the best documentation is the drone inspection on YouTube, posted above. The Bridgehunter Chronicles entry also contains a number of photos, including post-demolition.

Since the bridge structure and deck itself was in fairly good condition, it is a pity that relocation was not considered, as with the South Smith Road Bridge in Rock County, Wisconsin.

Posted August 26, 2020, by Jason Smith (flensburg [dot] bridgehunter [dot] av [at] googlemail [dot] com)
Posted August 24, 2020, by Linda Riggs Mayfield (l_r_mayfield [at] ymail [dot] com)

I host a Facebook page named Seeking Siloam Springs on which I post historical photos and stories of the village of Siloam that existed from about 1883 until 1943. Everyone is invited to share stories and photos and ask and answer questions. The long-term goal is a book that preserves all the history I can collect. My husband's ancestor Isariah Mayfield was the first settler in Beverly Twp, and his son, John, was one of the first Siloam settlers and Isariah spent the last years of his life there with John. Their descendents were still there when the community was torn down to make it a park, and Turner Mayfield, my father-in-law, was the first park ranger. The post office stood very near this bridge, and his mother, Olive (Dolly) Johnson Mayfield, was postmistress at one time. Please join the web page and share what you know. Linda Riggs Mayfield

Posted August 23, 2020, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Mike, Boo Berry perhaps?

Posted August 23, 2020, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

Cool! Maybe this should be called Frankenberry

Posted August 23, 2020, by Tyler

Found this a few months ago. It’ll probably last forever. When I added this, every single MOB on this trail was on the site but this wasn’t. Very confused

Posted August 21, 2020, by Anonymous

Plot Twist Part 2:Nathan chartered the bus

Posted August 21, 2020, by Tyler

Plot twist: Nathan was on the bus and told the driver to cross it

Posted August 21, 2020, by Anonymous

Interesting that usually historic bridges are destroyed by truckers following their GPS too closely and ignoring signs.. now we have an historic bridge destroyed by a driver ignoring their GPS. Go figure.

Posted August 21, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

It's a shame the bus didn't just "collect" the stupid lid and drive off with it!

Posted August 21, 2020, by Matt Lohry

The bus was rented, and the driver listened to the obviously brainless (and maybe drunk) occupants rather than her GPS, which was STRONGLY telling her not to cross with that vehicle...glad I’m not the one who has to explain this to the owning rental company when it’s time to turn it back in!!

Posted August 21, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Wow, a lot of stupidity today. You are saying they demolished and replaced this bridge, designed for TRAINS... with a MOB.... umm... why??? If the bridge clearance was too low the solution is simple, jack the bridge up. Whoever made this decision DOESN'T KNOW JACK!

Posted August 21, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

What a senseless waste... a centerpiece attraction in a forest preserve and the ONLY TRUSS IN THE COUNTY. Welcome to TRUSSLESS status Kendall County... one less reason for people to visit your county.

http://www.wspynews.com/news/local/demolition-of-historic-mi...

Posted August 21, 2020, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

"elegant pedestrian bridge"....wow. Not that this was a significant bridge, but what a waste of money. I'm guessing that it has to do with the clearance of the old bridge.

Sad that they can find the money for a MOB, but nobody can seem to find the money or answers to get this one a home:

http://bridgehunter.com/il/kane/bh48253/

Posted August 20, 2020, by Matt Lohry

The bus was rented, and the driver listened to the obviously brainless (and maybe drunk) occupants rather than her GPS, which was STRONGLY telling her not to cross with that vehicle...glad I’m not the one who has to explain this to the owning rental company when it’s time to turn it back in!!

Posted August 20, 2020, by Tyler

Replaced by a MOB: abutments and all. Waste of money and the many months that the trail has been closed so far.

Posted August 20, 2020, by Roger Deschner (rogerdeschner [at] gmail [dot] com)

What's hilarious about this second stupid driver trick, is that the ABC7 reporter was interviewing a local shopkeeper about the bridge, when it was struck for the second time. You can actually hear it being hit on the video!

I predict it will soon become restricted to pedestrians and bicycles. Or just outfit it with garish signals and flashing lights, like the infamous "NS - Gregson Street Guillotine" in Durham NC. Maybe even a siren, so the locals can come out from their candle and ice cream shoppes and watch the carnage. Put a webcam overlooking it.

Posted August 20, 2020, by Tyler

Eventually he’ll get a crane and demolish the cover himself

Posted August 19, 2020, by Art S. (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Nathan's persistent and stubborn campaign to free the little pony truss continues! Round two for this week. Listen to the video! Keep it up Nathan! You are wearing them down!

https://abc7chicago.com/long-grove-bridge-accident-crash-hit...

Regards,

Art S.

:^)

Posted August 19, 2020, by Nicholas Kuhl (kuhl [dot] nicholas [at] hotmail [dot] com)

The bridge was removed/demolished sometime in late June. It appears they are currently building a new bridge in it's place.

Posted August 19, 2020, by JaredStanonis (pontiacrevenge [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Are you sure that’s Mill Creek? The spot pegged on the map is Big Creek. Mill Creek is farther south.

Posted August 17, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

That is absolutely outstanding. If only they would have just appreciated the beautiful historic metal truss bridge they have... all this unpleasantness could be avoided!

Posted August 15, 2020, by Roger Deschner (rogerdeschner [at] gmail [dot] com)

Is there a bridge category for "Hilarious"? I mean, when I saw the newspaper picture of the school bus stuck in it, I broke down laughing. Our local media has covered it (pun intended), including its misadventures over the years, with a straight face. But this is truly karma striking it, disguised as a bus. This is easily the funniest bridge on this site. What that poor 1906 pony truss has endured. Perhaps the "Haunted" category would be better.

The current google street view shows the bridge naked, protected by big yellow headache bars. Put those big steel headache bars back up on the outside of the faux wood covering. Then add flashing lights, like on the truck-eating bridge in Durham NC. The bridge is already silly; why not?

Posted August 15, 2020, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

Long Gone "Covered" Bridge

Posted August 15, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

...Or just cover it with one of those big Yellow height limit signs!

Posted August 15, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Doesn't look too bad... A little Duck Tape should fix it!

Posted August 15, 2020, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

It lasted a day. Wow.

Posted August 15, 2020, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

Cheap Trick or Tom Petty's "Damn The Torpedoes"

Posted August 15, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Nathan couldn't hear the locals screaming at him to stop...

He had Cheap Trick's "Gonna Raise Hell" blaring through the bus speakers. 🤣🤣🤣

Posted August 15, 2020, by Tyler

The average school bus is 12 tons, way past the 5 ton posted limit, yet it crossed the bridge without damaging the truss

Posted August 15, 2020, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Ha Ha Ha, Nathan strikes again! Nathan, the use of a school bus was a bold choice; considering all the schools are closed :^)

Though I must admit, targeting the covering two days after opening definitely makes a statement. Maybe you'll finally get your wish and the pony will be set free :^)

https://www.lakemchenryscanner.com/2020/08/15/school-bus-dam...

Regards,

Art S.

Posted August 15, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I'm trying hard not to laugh... My only concern being that they'll scrap the whole damn thing for a slab!

Off-structure Headache Bars for the win!!

Posted August 15, 2020, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

Destiny! Destiny! Covered Bridge is Not For Me!!

Posted August 15, 2020, by Tyler
Posted August 14, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

This bridge and it's counterpart remind me of those pony trusses (in New York state I believe) that are made from rail stock. I get the feeling they are historic, and original to the park. They likely had lower chord that were replaced with metal stringers at the same time the decks were concreted.

Posted August 14, 2020, by Tyler

The bridge was reopened. The new fake cover doesn’t rest on the bridge which allowed the weight limit to increase to 5 tons.

Posted August 14, 2020, by Howard Keil (howardkk [at] comcast [dot] net)

I found the missing "spindle" and "handrail" section in the foreground of photo 3 submerged in the creekbed below the creek in about 2015. I brought the section up and placed it next to the road right next to where it goes on the bridge. The next time I walked it was gone a few weeks later. I hope the maintenance moved it to safekeeping.

Posted August 10, 2020, by Theodore H Ellis (tellis01 [at] frontiernet [dot] net)

The photo shown was probably taken in 1953. The original bridge as shown in the photo was built in 1923. The bridge was reconstructed in 1953. At that time the 3 truss spans were removed and replaced with steel girders, the abutments and piers were widened and a new deck was constructed. At least one of the truss spans (maybe 2) were moved to the Golden Gate road (county Highway 3) and re-erected over White Oak Slough. In 1981 the Wabash River bridge was reconstructed again. The 18 approach spans to the east were removed down to the original pier stems, new wider caps were constructed and new structural steel and concrete deck added. The 1981 construction is what exist today.

Posted August 9, 2020, by melonfan74 (melonfan74 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

From July 2020

Posted August 9, 2020, by melonfan74 (melonfan74 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

From July 2020

Posted August 9, 2020, by melonfan74 (melonfan74 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I just went there today. Would have been cool to see it.

Maybe the City will put a nice fountain in?

Posted August 9, 2020, by melonfan74 (melonfan74 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Another picture of the progress of the new bridge, with the current one in the background. Looking to the East.

Posted August 9, 2020, by melonfan74 (melonfan74 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Looking South toward the Bridge

Posted August 9, 2020, by melonfan74 (melonfan74 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Cool shot from underneath the McClugage Bridge looking East