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EIRR - Snake River Bridge


EIRR-Snake River Bridge

Looking SW

Photo taken by Royce and Bobette Haley in August 2014


BH Photo #297011


Street Views 


Whipple through truss bridge over Snake River on Eastern Idaho Railroad (EIRR)
Burley, Cassia County, Idaho, and Minidoka County, Idaho
Open to traffic
Built Ca. 1890
- George S. Morison of New Bedford, Massachusetts (Probable Designer Based On Style)
- Eastern Idaho Railroad (EIRR)
Two Double-intersection Whipple through truss main spans with Three steel plate girder approach spans
Length of largest span: 250.0 ft.
Total length: 750.0 ft.
Deck width: 15.0 ft.
Also called
Burley-Heyburn Railrod Bridge
Approximate latitude, longitude
+42.54847, -113.76512   (decimal degrees)
42°32'54" N, 113°45'54" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
12/272968/4714380 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Inventory number
BH 51870 (Bridgehunter.com ID)

Update Log 

  • October 25, 2016: Updated by Nathan Holth: Added probable designer.
  • October 3, 2014: New photos from Royce and Bobette Haley
  • March 25, 2012: Added by Mike Goff

Related Bridges 


  • Mike Goff - michael [dot] goff [at] hotmail [dot] com
  • Royce and Bobette Haley - roycehaley111 [at] yahoo [dot] com
  • Nathan Holth


EIRR - Snake River Bridge
Posted September 14, 2016, by Luke

John and I had the exact same thought a couple of days ago.

An article on the construction of the new bridge confirms that they were relocated:

(Clipping source: https://books.google.com/books?id=zhY4AQAAMAAJ&q=rolling+a+n... )

EIRR - Snake River Bridge
Posted September 14, 2016, by Mike Boehne (mikebon088 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

The second Omaha bridge had four 250-foot, eleven-panel Whipple trusses, and two tracks. The first Plattsmouth bridge's two Whipple spans were moved to a Des Moines River bridge, UP moved Pegram trusses to Idaho, and C&NW moved spans from the first Blair bridge to Wyoming. Some chance that these two spans are from Omaha?

EIRR - Snake River Bridge
Posted February 18, 2015, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Surprised nobody has commented about this bridge. The bridge shows evidence of widespread alteration, since there are a massive number of empty river holes on the portal and sway bracing. My first guess would be that the bridge was narrowed... which also makes one wonder if the bridge was relocated and reused at this location. It would be interesting to know. Finally, taking into consideration the alterations, what I can see of the bridge leads me to believe that this bridge may be the work of famous engineer George Morison. The large lattice portal and sway bracing, Whipple truss configuration, and the arrangement and composition of some of the truss members are what suggests this possibility.