Rating:
4 votes

Hog's Back Bridge

Photos 

Photo taken by Robert Elder

Enlarge

BH Photo #110355

Map 

Street View 

Facts 

Overview
Arch bridge over Dry Run Creek on US 52 in Decorah
Location
Decorah, Winneshiek County, Iowa
Status
Open to traffic
History
Built 1963
Builders
- Iowa State Highway Commission of Ames, Iowa (Design)
- Paul F. Barnard of Ames, Iowa (Design)
- Welden Brothers Construction Co. of Iowa Falls, Iowa
Design
Open-spandrel arch
Dimensions
Length of largest span: 84.0 ft.
Total length: 103.0 ft.
Deck width: 30.2 ft.
Recognition
Eligible for the National Register of Historic Places
Approximate latitude, longitude
+43.29572, -91.80880   (decimal degrees)
43°17'45" N, 91°48'32" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
15/596626/4794343 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Decorah
Average daily traffic (as of 2014)
4,280
Inventory numbers
IA 52540 (Iowa bridge number)
BH 14730 (Bridgehunter.com ID)
Inspection report (as of March 2016)
Overall condition: Fair
Superstructure condition rating: Good (7 out of 9)
Substructure condition rating: Good (7 out of 9)
Deck condition rating: Fair (5 out of 9)
Sufficiency rating: 80 (out of 100)
View more at BridgeReports.com

Update Log 

  • October 3, 2018: New photo from Lee Smith
  • May 4, 2018: Updated by Luke: Added builder
  • May 7, 2014: New Street View added by Luke Harden
  • July 22, 2012: Photo imported by Luke Harden

Sources 

  • Robert Elder - robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com
  • Luke
  • Lee Smith - ljsmith_32 [at] hotmail [dot] com

Comments 

Dry Run Creek US 52 Bridge
Posted January 30, 2007, by Susan Jacobsen (sjacobsen45 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Orginally named the "Hog's Back Bridge," but the name never took hold. In the late 1940s a cut was made through a limestone ridge - called the "Hog's Back" - to divert the Dry Run Creek directly into the Upper Iowa River. Prior to that, Dry Run Creek ran through Decorah and every year it would flood. The diversion of the Dry Run Creek plus a dike along both sides of the Upper Iowa River eliminated the problem with annual flooding.