Rating:
2 votes

IC - Buffalo Creek Bridge

Photo 

Coggon Bridge

Photo taken at the History Center in Cedar Rapids.

Photo of photo at History Center

Enlarge

BH Photo #256824

Map 

Description 

Built using reused sections of a larger vertical endpost Whipple built by Keystone Bridge Co. at Dubuque, Iowa

Facts 

Overview
Lost Pratt through truss bridge over Buffalo Creek on Railroad (IC)
Location
Coggon, Linn County, Iowa
Status
Replaced by a new bridge
History
Replaced 1924
Builder
- Keystone Bridge Co. of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Railroad
- Illinois Central Railroad (IC)
Design
Vertical End Post Whipple through truss with what appear to be Keystone Columns
Also called
Coggon Bridge
Approximate latitude, longitude
+42.28498, -91.52748   (decimal degrees)
42°17'06" N, 91°31'39" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
15/621406/4682468 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Coggon
Inventory number
BH 56675 (Bridgehunter.com ID)

Update Log 

  • February 7, 2016: Updated by Art Suckewer: Added possible builder, corrected truss type
  • March 29, 2014: Updated by Luke Harden: Added categories "Pin-connected", "Illinois Central Railroad", "Railroad"
  • June 19, 2013: Added by Dave King

Related Bridges 

Sources 

  • Dave King - DKinghawkfan [at] hotmail [dot] com

Comments 

IC - Buffalo Creek Bridge
Posted February 7, 2016, by Luke

I'm fairly certain this bridge and the bridges at Janesville and Central City were built using parts from the original iteration of the swing bridge at Dubuque.

IC - Buffalo Creek Bridge
Posted February 7, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

The bridge almost certainly reused from another location. The original endpost baes would have been cast iron. To my eye, the enposts look like Keystone Columns.

Coggon Bridge
Posted September 20, 2013, by John Marvig (johnmarvig [at] chaska [dot] net)

I agree with Tony. Looks like a mid 1870s structure that could have served as part of a much larger crossing at one point.

Coggon Bridge
Posted September 20, 2013, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I think this is actually a railroad bridge...and an extremely early (ca.1870's) one at that.

The built-up endpost bases are very unusual.