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Posted March 18, 2019, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)
Posted March 18, 2019, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

This bridge could have and should have been saved. Nobody wanted to spend the money that was required to mobilize a crane and get these spans moved. Just another example of how covered bridges get more preservation dollars than metal truss bridges, since ALL of Iowa's covered bridges are preserved, but the same cannot be said for these nationally significant bowstring trusses.

Posted March 17, 2019, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The loss of this bridge is a catastrophic setback for bridge preservation in the United States. This bridge was not just significant on a county or state level (it was) but it had very high National significance as well. Granted, all remaining bowstring bridges are nationally significant but this one was arguably among the very best examples of bowstring bridges.

Flooding is a very serious threat to many of our historic bridges in the United States. Unless a truss bridge has been seriously over-engineered for its crossing, it can be taken down by flood and ice. Not to mention the lally columns and stone pylons that can give way.

If our most historically significant bridges must remain over their waterways, consideration must be given to strengthening, replacing, and/or raising the pylons in order to keep the trusses above water.

Every Spring, we lose bridges to flooding. Thus far, the Spring of 2019 is off to a particularly devastating start.

Posted March 17, 2019, by Kevin Skow (weatherbum [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Verified its demise...

Posted March 17, 2019, by Kevin Skow (weatherbum [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Saw a post on Facebook that this bridge collapsed yesterday (March 16) due to flooding and ice damage. Haven't seen any photos yet. Can anyone confirm this?

Posted March 16, 2019, by George Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Thanks for clearing that up,Luke.

Posted March 16, 2019, by George Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Thanks for clearing that up,Luke.

Posted March 16, 2019, by Luke

The company is directly to the left of the bridge and both quarries have been filled in.

Here's an aerial image from the 1960s showing them before:

http://ortho.gis.iastate.edu/client.cgi?zoom=2&x0=483657&y0=...

Posted March 16, 2019, by George Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I saw the first picture of the bridge and read the article about the bridge and I have a couple of questions.I read the bridge was built to handle the quarry trucks going to the plant.I don't see the quarry on satellite and where is the company that's supposed to be near the bridge?

Posted March 16, 2019, by George Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I saw the first picture of the bridge and read the article about the bridge and I have a couple of questions.I read the bridge was built to handle the quarry trucks going to the plant.I don't see the quarry on satellite and where is the company that's supposed to be near the bridge?

Posted March 16, 2019, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

A section of the long trestle approach collapsed last night. Fortunately, the steel components of this bridge were not damaged.

Posted March 15, 2019, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Reportedly collapsed approximately 3:00 AM today (3/15/19)

Posted March 4, 2019, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

By the way, I was correcting my own post in the previous comments.

Posted March 3, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

So I see a bridge at this location... My initial excitement that the bridge might have been fished out of the drink and rebuilt was tempered by zooming in on what appears to be a modern welded bowstring-style pony.

Somebody else can make a page for it if they want... I'm not feeling it!

Posted February 27, 2019, by Barbara Wilson Hennessey (daveandbarb [at] iowatelecom [dot] net )

My father grew up in Greene where his father was the local dentist in the early 1900's through the 1930's. His office was on that corner above the bridge. He could look out his office window and see his sons diving off the old bridge into the Shell Rock River. As a young girl visiting my grandmother, I would stand on that bridge with my little windmill spinning. It held alot of good memories.

Posted February 24, 2019, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Looking at Nathan's documentation of this bridge, it appears that this is another example of a railroad bridge reused for a road. There were at least two more examples in the Twin Cities of this along Minneapolis & St. Louis tracks, both which were confirmed to be railroad spans with valuation material. Unfortunately, this is the last survivor of M&StL pony truss overpasses.

On a side note, it is unknown where these came from. There is no record of the railroad ever using these for railroad use anywhere on the system. As a smaller railroad, is it possible they bought the secondhand spans from another railroad?

Posted February 12, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

No problem Luke... I'll have to search for it!

Posted February 11, 2019, by Luke

The current names are correct, as those are the ones used by both the state (The cited study.) and the locals who drove across them (A Facebook group called Lost Des Moines + multiple other articles in both the DSM Register and DSM Tribune that use Hubby/Hanley vs Hubbly/Hanlon.).

For those wishing to see for themselves, search away: https://www.newspapers.com/search/#lnd=1&t=86,84

Tony, would you be willing to scan that booklet and post the scans to the appropriate pages, if you still have it?

Posted February 11, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Several nice truss bridges were lost due to the creation of Saylorsville Lake. I have a booklet that I received at a historic bridge workshop that tells about eyebars from the Hubbly and Chestnut Ford Bridges being "Harvested" for fracture testing at Iowa State University.

Posted February 11, 2019, by Joel Bader (joenonac [at] hotmail [dot] com )

I noticed there were two spellings for the name Hanley--Hanley and Hanlon. I also noticed the spelling for the Hubby Bridge was "Hubbly". After seeing the misspellings for the Hubby Bridge, I have to wonder which spelling is correct. Thoughts?

Posted January 30, 2019, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I believed I may have solved the mystery of this structure. It appears that it these spans were the two end spans of the second Byron, Illinois bridge:

http://bridgehunter.com/il/ogle/bh76931/

The reasoning being that the Byron Bridge is an unusual structure, with heavily skewed trusses. According to Milwaukee Road blueprints, the Byron Bridge had end span lengths of 160 feet on the 8-panel face, but 176 feet on the 9-panel face (20 foot 6 inch panels, 16 foot 6 inch end panels). Another bridge confirmed to have been relocated from the same structure (http://bridgehunter.com/mn/blue-earth/maple-river/) was cut down when moved.

At 140 feet long and 7 panels, it appears that this bridge would have been cut down, with one panel being removed (two on the skewed face) when moved. This would also explain the unusual appearance that was interpreted as a swing bridge initially. When comparing to the Minnesota Bridge, which blueprints confirm was from Byron, this structure is virtually identical, other than the normal non-skewed ends.

Unfortunately, I have been repeatedly looking in the Milwaukee Road Archives for structural plans for this structure. Since 2014, I have found virtually nothing for this bridge, other than it was installed in 1911. The Byron Bridge was replaced in 1910. Between the matching timelines, identical structural details, photographic evidence, I believe that this is the match for this structure.

Do others agree?

Posted January 26, 2019, by Erik (theduke30 [at] live [dot] com)

Hello everyone, I was the original person along with Heide to get this bridge listed on here, we stumbled across it while out for a ride on our quads, as it is almost a mile walk/ride from any direction to access from low maintenance roads, I have since met the owner and he gave me permission to share the first few photos and location on here with everyone a few years ago, He wanted me to add that this bridge is priveately owned, on private property, and DO NOT attempt to visit this location during any open hunting season as well.

Posted January 26, 2019, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Big kudos to Luke on this one. There are/were 10 trusses of this design (all 159’8” with a flat topped pedimented portal bracing) that were moved to South Dakota and Wyoming in 1927/1928. While a historic bridge report for the railroad in SD listed all 8 of the trusses there as being from Winona, Minnesota, only five of this size were built in Winona. This had been stumping me for over a year.

The replacement bridge for this structure has 10 spans of deck girder for a total length of just over 798 feet, or when divided by 5 spans, 159’8” truss spans were replaced. The article posted also explicitly states the trusses would be reused. It looks that Luke solved this mystery. The fun now becomes finding which of the spans came from where. These are four spans that have slight differences from the ones confirmed to have come from Winona, and likely came from this structure:

http://bridgehunter.com/sd/haakon/bad-river/

http://bridgehunter.com/sd/pennington/cheyenne-river-rr/

http://bridgehunter.com/sd/stanley/bh62504/

There are two other spans in SD that I have not documented yet, so I cannot tell if they have the slightly flared end like the Winona spans. There were also two in western Wyoming that have been removed. The four above do not seem to have flared ends. More to come..

Posted January 24, 2019, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

While attempting (unsuccessfully) to find information about the numerous girders along this route, I found that this bridge (Denison) was not in place in 1944. However, it was in place in 1973, and the substructures were dated 1948. About 50 miles west, I came across a bridge with similar dimensions that was replaced in 1947 (Ascot). It seems that Ascot is the most likely location it could have originally been constructed. I have attached the 1944 and 1973 track charts for each bridge. My question about the truss is, would it have been possible for the truss to be shortened by two feet upon relocation?

Also, I cannot be certain that this was the original location of the approach girders. Several crossings of the Boyer River were filled in around the same time, and there are a few other 45' through girders that were relocated through the 40s, 50s and 60s along the route with identical structural details. This route was constructed between 1899 and 1900.

Posted January 24, 2019, by Luke

Bridge was single-track.

Posted January 24, 2019, by Jeff Wieland (jjwieland [at] gmail [dot] com)

The piers were probably built that wide to accommodate a second track.

Posted January 20, 2019, by Luke

Those are the piers for the predecessor bridge: https://bridgehunter.com/ia/louisa/hogback-iowa-river/

Posted January 20, 2019, by George Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com )

I saw 2 piers in the river when looking at street view and satellite.Was that the original location of this bridge or was there another bridge where the piers are?

Posted January 16, 2019, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

Phooey! I think a better location would be Big Bone Lick, Kentucky. It just rolls off the tongue, excuse the pun. Another bonus is that Sugartit is just around the corner

Posted January 16, 2019, by Don Morrison

Hey - how come I see a Delete button on the comment from October 14, 2012, by Butt-head?

Oh, yeah.

That was me.

I and a friend visited many a bridge within 50 miles or so of Ames (also quite a few in northern Iowa) back in the day, spent a lot of time following rivers and streams and on canoe and tubing trips.

Wish I had photos.

Posted January 15, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

I enjoy the low water crossing

Posted January 13, 2019, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Noting that this bridge was built by a small interurban, it appears that the trusses on this bridge are actually older than 1905. It also seems that there are two different designs on this structure.

This bridge:

http://bridgehunter.com/mn/hennepin/luce-line-trail/

was built by a major railroad but purchased and moved by a small electric railroad. It appears a similar situation may have happened here, and further research will be conducted.

Posted January 11, 2019, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Not my cup indeed but the background information makes it fit and probably helps people understand why its here. It's older than I am!

Posted January 11, 2019, by Luke

Historic (Built ca 1913 during the upgrading of the road from rural dirt road to the Red Ball Route highway.) + Notable (Example of one of the ISHC's early standardized designs; One of two remaining original structures along the IC→NL segment.) = meets Jame's own criteria.

I get that concrete culverts aren't everyone's cup of tea, but c'mon.

Posted January 11, 2019, by Travis Tygart

Now. Now. Luke worked really hard to find this one, painfully distinguishing from all the other pipes in the area.

Posted January 7, 2019, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Dylan was half right. It looks like a bunch of scrap spans were moved here from unknown locations. The pile piers may date from the 1970s, or the 2000s. It is possible that the bridge was originally repaired with timber piles and later rebuilt. I have to imagine that the scrap spans were from routes that the Rock Island scrapped.

Posted January 7, 2019, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Found a date carving on the west abutment, which supported a short deck girder until it was replaced in the 1980s. Not sure if I believe the 1890 date for the main spans. Does anyone have any input on that?

Posted January 6, 2019, by Dana and Kay Klein

Ni, ping, Nee-wom

Posted January 6, 2019, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

Someone grab him a herring.

Posted January 6, 2019, by A. Polecat

Now leave before I spray you a second time.

Posted January 6, 2019, by Luke

You rang?

Posted January 3, 2019, by John Marvig

Even a small truss like this could be narrowed down and reused for a trail or light vehicle crossing. It would add a lot more charecter to American parks and green spaces.

Posted January 3, 2019, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Counties could learn about reuse from the money-conscious railroad companies. We'd have a lot more preserved road trusses if they moved them to lesser roads when they need to be replaced.

Posted January 3, 2019, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge appears to be another example of a pony truss that was originally built ca. 1885 as a railroad bridge, and later reconstructed with a new floor to serve as a railroad overpass. The bridge did not show up in a 1917 inventory of railroad structures, indicating a post-1917 date.

Posted January 2, 2019, by Luke

This is the DMU's own bridge.

Posted January 2, 2019, by Tyler eide (eide [dot] tyler [at] gmail [dot] com)

I have a map showing the DMU had there own bridge across the raccoon river at some time. Is there any proof to this?

Posted December 31, 2018, by Luke
Posted December 27, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

bridge troll

Posted December 24, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Pipeline appears to point to the wastewater plant SW of town.

Posted December 23, 2018, by Luke

My guess is it's a pipe associated with the municipal water system, as it's not showing up a gas/hazmat/oil pipeline map I found online.

Posted December 21, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

The 1958 Burlington 250,000 topo shows the road open.

Posted December 21, 2018, by Luke
Posted November 26, 2018, by Luke

To be re-decked, with an attempt to save the railings in the process: https://www.thegazette.com/subject/news/community/cedar-rapi...

Posted November 22, 2018, by Ross Brown (bluehavanaross [at] gmail [dot] com)

One span of the bridge collapsed in 1992 after a traffic accident, and the rest was removed in 2001. A pedestrian bridge opened in its place in 2014.

Posted November 17, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

According to the Monroe County GIS server, this bridge (as well as the others) are still in Union Pacific ownership.

https://monroe.iowaassessors.com/

Posted November 8, 2018, by Anonymous

Did you even make an attempt to see if this was already added?

https://bridgehunter.com/ia/van-buren/mount-sterling/

Posted November 7, 2018, by Matt Glawe (mdglawe [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Here’s another picture of this bridge that I thought would be good to have on here.

Posted November 4, 2018, by Daniel Barnes (barnes [dot] daniel34 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Really shocking condition for a bridge still in use. I had tried to visit this one a while ago & wondered why it looked so strange from the satellite pictures.

Posted October 31, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Being a railroad bridge engineer probably wouldn’t lead to the same creativity as it did a century ago. Today, everything is built with pre cast spans. I wonder what made the railroads chose to reuse scrap spans in the 20th century. Wars? Depression? The fact they were a private business?

Posted October 31, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

It would be fun yet sometimes sad to work as a bridge engineer for a railroad.

Posted October 31, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I wonder if any additional strengthening was done to the bridge at the time of installation. It appears the main span is a 1930s or 40s span, so I’m guessing it was part of a channelization project. Don noticed something that I did not. More than likely, these approaches came from a girder of approximately 80’(like this one: http://bridgehunter.com/ia/shelby/bh78378/)

I would be curious in finding some more information on this bridge. Biggest thing I wonder is if the approaches were built from the former bridge, or if it was a spare span relocated from elsewhere. Also can’t help but wonder if the middle section still exists somewhere. Railroad bridge engineers were really crafty with spare material. It really is fascinating.

Posted October 31, 2018, by Don Morrison

It sure looks like the approaches were cut from one span, but not half. The cut ends both look like they are located at a reinforced area just after an angled strut. Some length must have been cut from the middle.

Posted October 30, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

It sure looks like they did that here. They didn't even put any sort of bearing on the squared end, just plopped it on some wood. Just reusing a piece of scrap steel....

Posted October 30, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Looking at this bridge, it appears as if the approaches could’ve been built out of one span and split in half. Is this structurally possible?

Posted October 28, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Visited this bridge today. It is apparent that this is an early deck girder span, however it has been heavily modified and a second set of girders added to “double up” the structure. Based on the railroad, the late 1910s substructures and the very early girders, it is also likely it was relocated to this location. The structure also bears some resemblance to this structure, which was built in 1879 (confirmed by railroad documents):

http://bridgehunter.com/mn/fillmore/bh36297/

Further research will be conducted. Unfortunately, this bridge was demoted as a Y-series bridge, which the Milwaukee Road Archives has had little to no luck on finding information.

Posted October 25, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Visited this bridge recently. It appears to have been an old turntable or bridge for railroad use, rebuilt and converted to road use. There is one structure confirmed to have been constructed using this technique for the same railroad in Minnesota. I will request additional information on this bridge from the Milwaukee Road Archives.

Posted October 24, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

At least there are one or more pictures of it somewhere out there....

Posted October 23, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Well that’s a shame. I would’ve been curious to see the previous structure. I visited the current structure this weekend, which appears to use the substructure of an older bridge.

Posted October 23, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

The source links to an ebay seller page. Not showing now so probably sold.

Posted October 23, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Was there a postcard or similar picture associated with this bridge? Google searches turned up nothing.

Posted October 20, 2018, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Luke and Nathan,

Writing patents is a pain, I remember sitting with a rather pricy patent attorney and discussing more accurate words to replace 'at' in a draft claim. After about hour we settled on 'proximate' - it's now my most expensive word :^)

That being said, figuring out patents isn't that bad if you put yourself in the right state of mind. Start with the claims. At the end of the day, these are relatively easy to read. The independent claim is the basic and broadest idea with each dependant claim adding a tidbit or feature.

If what is taught in the independent claim is observed in the product (in our case the bridge) then it conforms to the patent. If it conforms to the dependant claims, that's a bonus.

The text and figures (drawings) support the claims and 'teach' how to use them. While they should be correct, they don't have to be clear (and the texts often aren't). The drawings are usually quite useful.

Looking at Linvilles 1865 patent, and the drawing Luke posted, you can go tihrougkh the details like how the cast panel point blocks are used. Such as the 'fingers' on the bottom panel points which are used to connect and space apart the lower chord components. Many of the details are unique to Linvilles bridges.

It's interesting to learn this stuff looking back 100 - 150 years as what is quaint today was intense back in the day! Keystone fought Phoenix all the way to the Supreme Court! Lowthrop defended the use of cast compression members with some pretty strong language but lost anyway. These were some pretty sharp guys pushing the bounds of state of the art technology in their day and they really did transform the county'.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted October 18, 2018, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I haven't the time to research this in the detail that Art and Jim Stewart have been, however in my understandings, I have always been guided by the idea that while we often refer to many bridges (like a Wrought Iron Bridge Company bowstring) as "conforming" to a particular patent, one must also remember that patents were NOT engineering documents, they were LEGAL documents intended to defend the interests and profits of the company. The actual designed and constructed bridges might vary from the patent, yet the companies that built them would nevertheless aggressively defend their bridges as patented designs. The actual design constructed in the field apparently did not need to 100% exactly replicate the patent to be defensible, only some features needed to be present.

Posted October 18, 2018, by Luke

According to this: https://books.google.com/books?id=IzsjAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA619&dq=p...

Reeves/Phoenix sued Linville/Keystone in 1872 over the truss patent. The writing is full of technical jargon, but does make mention of columns (Among other things.)

People like Art and Nathan are more in tune to decipher it, while it looks like cuneiform mixed with hieroglyphs to me.

Posted October 18, 2018, by Luke

Thanks, Clark!

Posted October 18, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

That's some good hunting Luke.

Posted October 17, 2018, by Luke

Unfortunately, I do not.

Posted October 17, 2018, by Art S.

Thanks Luke, any thoughts on its correct location?

Posted October 17, 2018, by Luke

Art, the bridge this entry is for was built in 1928.

Posted October 15, 2018, by Luke

I'd misread the source that mentioned Linville & Bollmann in the same breath.

Linville was the designer/engineer for the PRR (Not the B&O) starting in 1862, and stopping in 1865 when Keystone formed.

It's very unlikely that any of the spans in question came from the PRR.

Posted October 15, 2018, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Also,

Patent 34183 with its cast iron upper chord is pre civil war; 50723 is post civil war with Keystone Columns. This one and possibly one other govern the first generation of bridges across the Ohio and Mississippi rivers that Keystone did.

Regards,

Art S.

PS. When was Linville with the B&O? Could these recycled spans come from a B&O based bridge?

Posted October 15, 2018, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Luke,

The original bridges - yes. What is the evidence that these sections were from that bridge?

Regards,

Art S.

Posted October 15, 2018, by Luke

Here are two patents awarded to Linville.

This appears to be the original Linville Patent: https://patents.google.com/patent/US34183A/en?oq=USNNo.+34%2... ()

This appears to be the early/basic Linville & Piper varaint patent: https://patents.google.com/patent/US50723A/en?oq=US50%2c723

Posted October 15, 2018, by Luke

And you'd be wrong that Keystone didn't make it:

https://books.google.com/books?id=SC8jAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA33&dq=du...

And this Structuremag article says that Linville himself designed it, so I'm fairly certain that it's a further evolution of his own truss design, as Linville, like Wendell Bollman (Whom he replaced at B&O) he was fond of using his own designs over any other design:

https://www.structuremag.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/D-Gr...

Further supporting that idea is this historic article, which mentions Linville & Piper trusses as an option, so I think these may be smaller scale versions of the L-P truss, which I've yet to find a patent diagram for (And the article with the most info is locked behind the ASCE's paywall.

https://books.google.com/books?id=xY0yAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA23&dq=du...

Posted October 15, 2018, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Luke,

While I highly doubt Keystone made this bridge, it definitely does not conform to the Linville patents. The design details are different. The way the bridge, especially the lower cord is connected and rigged is very different than Linville.

To me this looks like Phoenix's version of a bridge designed to PRR's spec.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted September 23, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge bears a resemblance to a bridge in my hometown:

http://bridgehunter.com/mn/carver/mcknight-road/

The Minnesota bridge was built using girders that were rebuilt for road use. It would not surprise me if that was the case here as well.

Posted September 18, 2018, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Does anyone have a status update on this bridge? Have the remains been secured?

Sincerely,

Art S.

Posted September 13, 2018, by Jackie Neighbors (sagebird [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge was demolished last winter and another is being built in its place as we speak.

Posted August 21, 2018, by Don Morrison

It kind of looks like rumors of this bridge's demise may have been mistaken. It looks like a truss in satellite imagery.

it's on my list to visit.

At any rate, one of the bridges in this area is closed and two are doomed.

From

http://www.crescotimes.com/news/howard-county-bridge-road-pr...

"Bigalk Bridge

One of the two bridges near the Bigalks trout stream was closed last fall due to not meeting national bridge inspection standards. Both bridges are on the list to be replaced, just not in 2018. Rissman said it typically takes two years to design a bridge, which will put the replacement into 2019 or later. "

Posted August 18, 2018, by Ich Sage dir

Bruckentroll

Posted August 18, 2018, by Don Morrison

Bah. Progress sucks.

Blackhawk Bridge is perfect in this rural area.

How about they route the big trucks and RVs and motorcycles to Prairie Du Chien.

Emergency vehicles can serve their respective sides of the river. It's just lonely scenic roads through the bottoms leading to small river towns in the region anyway.

Hell, for all I care, they could even dredge a straighter channel from DeSoto to Lansing. That would remove the bend in the river to ease shipping.

Just don't take that bridge! It's been rough the last few years for my favorites list:

1. Blackhawk Bridge

2. Gilliece Bridge lost 2017

3. Wagon Wheel Bridge lost 2016

Posted August 17, 2018, by Luke

The bridge, while not officially slated for demolition, is having its replacement planned:

https://www.waukonstandard.com/articles/2017/08/16/public-le...

Posted August 11, 2018, by Dixie west (Jansen) (dixiewest76 [at] gmail [dot] com)

We lived in the house on the corner of 1st Street and 2nd ave. until 1942. The old RR trestle was visible from our yard. I have pics of my sisters and I having a tea party with the trestle in the background.my grandparents, Frank and Becky Smith moved into that house after we moved out. I guess they bought it from my parents.

Also, I went to 1st grade at Lincoln grammar school until we moved to Milford. I used to walk across the swinging footbridge every day going to and from school.

There was a park (Riverside Park) on the other side of hwy 9 where we used to go for picnics and there was a band shell there at that time.

Posted August 11, 2018, by Dixie west (Jansen) (dixiewest76 [at] gmail [dot] com)

We lived in the house on the corner of 1st Street and 2nd ave. until 1942. The old RR trestle was visible from our yard. I have pics of my sisters and I having a tea party with the trestle in the background.my grandparents, Frank and Becky Smith moved into that house after we moved out. I guess they bought it from my parents.

Also, I went to 1st grade at Lincoln grammar school until we moved to Milford. I used to walk across the swinging footbridge every day going to and from school.

There was a park (Riverside Park) on the other side of hwy 9 where we used to go for picnics and there was a band shell there at that time.

Posted August 10, 2018, by Luke

Based on this aerial image from 1963, it was usable up until 1965.

Posted August 10, 2018, by Nancy R Andresen (NRANDRESEN [at] msn [dot] com)

Was the bridge usabable until 1965 or was part of it washed out about 1947 and the remains destroyed in 1965?

Is it possible to find the location now?

Posted August 7, 2018, by Luke

Based on the 70s/80s GIS views, my I agree that the bridge was relocated here in the late 70s/early 80s

70s GIS: http://ortho.gis.iastate.edu/client.cgi?zoom=1&x0=439722&y0=...

80s GIS: http://ortho.gis.iastate.edu/client.cgi?zoom=1&x0=439722&y0=...

Posted July 28, 2018, by Daniel Barnes

I have travelled this road for years. There is no pony truss bridge here.

Posted July 28, 2018, by Daniel Barnes

I'm Glad you visited this bridge John. I hadn't gotten the chance to do more closeup shots of the other plaques last September. I was attacked by hornets just North of the bridge when taking the South-facing shots through the trees!

Posted July 23, 2018, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Cool bridge!

Posted July 21, 2018, by Don Morrison

You're gonna need one of those amphibious bikes. Bridge has been down for 3 days now.

http://www.kimt.com/content/news/Demolition-of-historic-Char...

...and yes, I bet it will be a MOB. The old bridge was 255 feet long. (45.6716 Smoot)