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Marbury Creek Tributary Bridge

Photos 

Photo taken by Amber Rhea in August 2016

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BH Photo #413389

Map 

Description 

Text from Historic Resources Survey Report 2nd Addendum for GDOT Project CSNHS-0008-00(430)/P.I. #0008430:

Location: The resource is located along the east side of SR 11 on a bypassed portion of the highway, approximately 200 feet northeast of the existing SR 11 roadway and approximately 1,000 feet northwest of SR 316.

Date(s) of Development: According to State Highway Department plan sheets (attached), the bridge was constructed around 1920. A portion of SR 11 was realigned in the early 1940s, and the current culvert was constructed in 1942, according to the GDOT Bridge Inventory Data Listing. Aerial imagery from 1944 shows SR 11 on its current alignment, with the bypassed segment visible alongside it (see Figure 2).

Description: The Marbury Creek Tributary Bridge is a two-span reinforced concrete tee beam bridge with standard two-rail high concrete railings and concrete abutments. Each span is 22 inches long, and the concrete deck is 22 inches wide. The bridge is a well-preserved standard design tee beam bridge located on a bypassed segment of an early 1920s state highway. The bridge retains a high degree of integrity, with minimal damage or spalling. Monroe-Winder Road – later designated SR 11 – was planned as part of the first generation of improvements to the state highway system. SR 11’s alignment was shifted in the early 1940s, bypassing the section that included the Marbury Creek Tributary Bridge. The original portion of the road has been obliterated and is now overgrown with trees and no longer discernible in the landscape.

National Register Criteria and Level of Significance: The Marbury Creek Tributary Bridge was evaluated under Criterion A and appears to possess a state level of significance in the area of transportation. Monroe-Winder Road – later designated SR 11 – was part of the original 1919 state highway system, and the Marbury Creek Tributary Bridge was designed as a component of this system. The bridge is in good condition and exemplifies the State Highway Department’s earliest transportation planning efforts and the statewide impetus to bring roads up to a standard in keeping with the Good Roads Movement of the early 20th century. For these reasons, the Marbury Creek Tributary Bridge is considered eligible for the National Register until Criterion A.

The Marbury Creek Tributary Bridge was evaluated under Criterion C and appears to possess a state level of significance in the area of engineering. The bridge uses a standard design that was used by the State Highway Department throughout the 1920s. A study of similar bridges included in the updated Georgia Historic Bridge Survey (GHBS) revealed that fewer than 60 identified pre-1930 tee beam bridges remain (see examples in Appendix B). The Marbury Creek Tributary Bridge was not previously evaluated as part of the GHBS because it was bypassed and abandoned so long ago that it was no longer included in GDOT’s Bridge Inventory. The bridge is a well-preserved example that retains high integrity and is able to convey significance as an early concrete tee beam bridge. Therefore, the Marbury Creek Tributary Bridge is considered eligible for the National Register until Criterion C.

Integrity: The Marbury Creek Tributary Bridge has been determined to possess integrity in the areas of location, design, materials, workmanship, feeling, and association. The bridge remains in its original location. Its design matches the 1920 plan sheet, and its original materials have had relatively little damage. The intact design and materials allow the bridge to convey the workmanship of the era in which it was constructed. Considered together, the bridge’s narrow width, intact materials, and standard tee beam design with concrete railing easily convey the feeling of an early 20th century bridge and an association with the first generation of highway improvements undertaken by the State Highway Department in the 1920s.

The Marbury Creek Tributary Bridge has been determined not to possess integrity in the area of setting. The bridge is no longer situated along an active stretch of highway and is now abandoned and becoming overgrown in the woods. The roadway that the bridge carried has been obliterated and is no longer discernible on aerial imagery or within the surrounding landscape.

Facts 

Overview
Concrete tee beam bridge on SR 11
Location
Bethlehem, Barrow County, Georgia
Status
Intact but closed to all traffic
History
Built c. 1920, bypassed early 1940s
Builder
- State Highway Department
Design
Tee beam
Dimensions
Length of largest span: 22.0 ft.
Total length: 44.0 ft.
Deck width: 22.0 ft.
Recognition
Eligible for the National Register of Historic Places
Also called
Old SR 11 Bridge
Approximate latitude, longitude
+33.94487, -83.71693   (decimal degrees)
33°56'42" N, 83°43'01" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
17/248899/3759368 (zone/easting/northing)
Inventory number
BH 79634 (Bridgehunter.com ID)

Update Log 

  • December 8, 2017: Updated by Clark Vance: Added category "Fence guardrail"
  • December 7, 2017: Added by Amber Rhea

Sources 

  • Amber Rhea