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Posted October 29, 2012, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

http://forestcowi.wgxtreme.com/ is the county GIS site with owner info. Two owners along the creek with an ambiguous sliver at the creek itself. The right person would probably let someone cross their lot for a picture or two. Too far for my weekend drives....

Posted October 29, 2012, by J.P. (wildcatjon2000 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Derailment was North of the Bridge and the bridge itself is not effected but is closed until the clean up is complete.

Posted October 29, 2012, by julie bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

we are somewhat involved in Ash Creek. Tricky location for removal with the crane set.

Posted October 29, 2012, by Mike Goff (michael [dot] goff [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I'm really not sure what is going on here. This appears to be a case of the old farmer saying "I'll take that there bridge." It has sat there for over five years now; maybe the county is trying to find it a home.

I also think Siskiyou County is still trying to find a home for the Ash Creek Bridge if there is an interested party out there. http://www.bridgehunter.com/ca/siskiyou/2C0041/

Posted October 29, 2012, by Luke Harden (lmharden [at] iastate [dot] edu)

It's been replaced.

Posted October 29, 2012, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Is that considered the answer by historical parties or what is going to happen to this one. Pretty cool.

Posted October 29, 2012, by Jim Grey (mobilene [at] gmail [dot] com)

The Google Maps image shows a concrete slab here now. Is the location correct, or is this bridge now lost?

Posted October 29, 2012, by jp

train derailment this morning, near or on this bridge. its been declared a level 3 hazmat situation. not sure of damage to bridge.

Posted October 28, 2012, by Sherman Cahal (shermancahal [at] gmail [dot] com)

Wrong bridge photographed. This is a Pratt through truss on WV 250/2 at Durbin, a much lighter span. Query Back River bridge or some variant for similar vantage points.

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Posted October 28, 2012, by Luke Harden (lmharden [at] iastate [dot] edu)

Thanks for that information.

Posted October 28, 2012, by John Friske (drumlinequip [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I grew up less than 6 miles from this bridge and just recently stopped to view it again. Inscribed on both ends of the bridge at the top arch stone is the year 1880 not 1902 as stated in your description. This coincides with the building of the railroad starting in 1878. I stepped off the length at about 80' not including the wing walls. My great uncle was a stone mason and helped build it. It is in excellent condition for being 132 years old. John Friske

Posted October 28, 2012, by Robert Thompson

I suppose Mill Street Bridge would suffice. It appears that this is part of Mill Street, taken over for private use by the sawmill.

Consider it done.

Posted October 28, 2012, by Bill Eichelberger (wallyum [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Why not go with Rat River Bridge or Mill Street Bridge, at least on a temporary basis?

Posted October 27, 2012, by Keith Todd (ktodd [at] vci [dot] net)

Additional history info is at http://www.hendersonkyhistory.com/BridgeBoom.htm

Posted October 27, 2012, by Robert Thompson (rkt,engineering [at] gmail [dot] com)

When did you pass through, Nathan? I live just a quarter mile north of this bridge!

Posted October 27, 2012, by Anonymous

Well, the new UECB replacing the old UECB has been completed and opened. They are going to shut down the pedestrian path on this bridge for the winter, but there is talk about re-opening it next summer. Here's hoping!

Posted October 27, 2012, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

One link further shows the bridge in stills from the movie.

http://www.georgeduning.com/soundtracks/Picnic/Picnic_Filming_Locations/Halstead--Picnic_Filming_Locations.html

A very noteworthy bridge.

Posted October 27, 2012, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] comwe)

We generally need a local that has taken an interest or I go out and do cold calls once a bridge is DOOMED, trying to shed a little light if you will..

Or then one day you get a call, hey I need a bridge..

So when you go to these bridges discuss with the locals...

JB

Posted October 27, 2012, by Matt Lohry

Julie, I'm not sure if you have boundary limits for your project considerations, but this bridge would be an excellent candidate for a Workin' Bridges restoration project!

Posted October 27, 2012, by Matt Lohry

The article that I set a link to also mentions reports of "unnatural" incidents, such as "cries and screams" being heard late at night at the bridge, and a "phantom black car" that chases drivers and disappears just before running into them, so I added the category "haunted" to the list. I have a tough time believing that myself, but just in case anyone is interested or has had encounters themselves, the category is there.

Posted October 27, 2012, by K. A. Erickson

According to this website the bridge appears in the background to one scene in the movie "Picnic".

http://www.georgeduning.com/soundtracks/Picnic/Picnic_Filming_Locations.html

There is another image of the bridge to be found here.

http://prairiedust.net/PrairieDust/index.php?showimage=610

Posted October 27, 2012, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Workin' Bridges is headed to Kansas next week to do a site visit, prepare a scope of work and a final estimate to preasent to the Ford County Commissioners. The contracted engineer is following a trend in Kansas to replace bridges which provided access during bad weather as well as good weather with a low water crossing. The culverts costing 70k would be partially paid for by scrap....when the pin needs only around 15k to repair. Doesn't make sense on any level ....until you look in the shadows.....yep seen this before.

Follow the money....we don't live in that county but someone from their stands to make a bit.....

The request for permit probably shocked the engineer when Army Corp sent to KSHS and Section 106 was triggered....I was surprised too becauawe no federal funds were being used.....it was the water shed issue......

Posted October 27, 2012, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

The classic movie Picnic was filmed in this park. Anyone remember whether the bridge is in the movie?

Posted October 26, 2012, by Luke Harden (lmharden [at] iastate [dot] edu)

Looks like we have a redundancy: http://bridgehunter.com/mo/clay/bh52765/

Railroad bridges with wooden deck category
Posted October 26, 2012, by John Marvig (johnmarvig [at] chaska [dot] net)

Clark, that is true. There are some bridges with that ballasted deck which can be extremely historic. "Aren't ballasted tracks the norm on concrete deck arches and deck girders? If they are, there will be a flurry of updating and adding. Is there a way to have a special category for something unusual without having to tag a lot of normal things?"

Anyone have any opinions, or is adding the Ballasted track category the way to go?

Posted October 26, 2012, by Lisa (meandthecats [at] gmail [dot] com)

Both Easley and Swann covered bridges in Blount County re-opened to traffic on 10/22/12. Horton Mill is set to reopen in another month. http://blog.al.com/spotnews/2012/10/covered_bridges_of_blount_coun.html

Posted October 26, 2012, by Wolfgang Dirnbeck (Dirnbecks [at] aol [dot] com)

This bridge is still used for foot traffic every hunting season including 2012/13 season. It is a lifeline between the hunting areas and cabins located on rocky forest road. The quarry owner is trying to halt us from using this public right of way. Any help to prevent this would be of great appreciation. We are care takers of the bridge and its historical significance.

Posted October 26, 2012, by Shawn McGuire (shawn [dot] mcguire [at] att [dot] net)

I think the last commenter is totally false. This bridge has always been on a county road, as US 56 doesn't ever align there in a NW-SE direction. As well, until the 80s-90s, 56 went through Marion, a mile south of here.

Appears to be a rather fancy (IMHO)county bridge.

Posted October 26, 2012, by Wonder Boy (wonderboy [dot] 1949 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I really enjoy bridges and this is one of my favorites in Cherokee County. There is a similar bridge just NE of Cherokee. One of my hobbies is geocaching and I have many geocaches near bridges on gravel roads in Cherokee County. This one is no longer open to vehicle traffic and has barriers on both ends. I'd certainly like to see this bridge added to the National Register of Historic Places as there are so few of these style bridges left.

Posted October 26, 2012, by James Gentner (jfgentner678 [at] aol [dot] com)

It is very hard to photograph this bridge. I've seen it done. You can take the small trail that goes under the bridge and try that. You can hit it from the overlook, but it has to be the right combination of clear and no foliage. Or, you can rent a plane or helicopter and go from there... but I don't have the money for that :)

Posted October 26, 2012, by David Backlin (us71 [at] cox [dot] net)

A view of the bridge on Bing maps: http://binged.it/RPmvST

Posted October 25, 2012, by J.P. (wildcatjon2000 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I was laughing when i read the post, I was trying to remember if we brought James kids with us. Then I looked at the photo and laughed.

Posted October 25, 2012, by Matt Lohry

Wow, really? Sorry James; this must be one enormous bridge! Standing next to the endpost connection, he looks small! Too funny!

Posted October 25, 2012, by J.P. (wildcatjon2000 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Just a correction, not a kid. Assuming we are talking picture 4. That's James McCray.

Posted October 25, 2012, by Matt Lohry

The kid appears to be standing on the concrete abutment on the outside of the truss, so he's safe from trains, but you're right, one must be careful around RR bridges.

Posted October 25, 2012, by Matt Lohry

This bridge is still closed, but thankfully still extant as of 10-24-12.

Posted October 25, 2012, by Luke Harden (lmharden [at] iastate [dot] edu)

I found a sketch I drew whilst bored in Chemistry class in 2008 based off of picture #1.

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Posted October 25, 2012, by Anna (cutlelilscavenger [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I'd be scared I'd get creamed by a train up on an open RR bridge...I saw a little kid in one of the pics, not sure that's a good idea...

Posted October 25, 2012, by Michael Watson (msfwatson [at] rogers [dot] com)

You're incorrect, Mick. Read all three of my posts. There are two new bridges, one north and the other south of Greenwood. The one that appeared in the movie is SOUTH of Greenwood. The one that she was pictured walking over in the magazine and that she said was similar to the bridge she wrote about in the song was the one near Money, NORTH of Greenwood.

MW, Toronto

Posted October 25, 2012, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Also worth noting that PennDOT has triggered Section 106 with this bridge. The proposed undertaking is currently described as a rehabilitation project.

Posted October 25, 2012, by Rusty Hufnagel Pittsburgh Rigging (rustyhuf [at] gmail [dot] com)

Bridge is posted for a 7 ton weight limit Our crew will be rigging bridge for a safety inspection 10/29/12.... I will get some more pics for this site..........Rusty

Posted October 25, 2012, by corwin oats (coriwoa [at] comcast [dot] net)

Sounds like a false rumor. I doubt it will be removed any time soon. Looks pretty tough to get at. I wonder what a bridge like that weighs in scrap iron. Would it even pay for the expensive demolition?

Posted October 25, 2012, by Will Truax (Bridgewright [at] ymail [dot] com)

Those with an interest in this bridge, or Simeon & AJ Post and their trusses, may have an interest in this blog entry bio I put up awhile back.

I was recently reminded of it when there was a spike in readership recently, homework related research I'm guessing.

I probably should work to steal the time to condense it into an essay for this page...

http://bridgewright.wordpress.com/2011/12/09/new-beginnings-marked-by-an-end/

Posted October 25, 2012, by Roy Hodgens (DallasCop2566 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Wish I had a hundred dollar bill for every accident I investigated here involving insufficient vertical clearance.

Clearance plainly marked at 12 feet 9 inches, but when they were denied the request to make trailers longer back in the late seventies, they made them taller and drivers just could not adapt rapidly.

Let the air out of the trailer tires, use a heavy duty wrecker and DRAG IT OUT-------.

Trailer repair companies LOVED IT-----

Railroad bridges with wooden deck category
Posted October 24, 2012, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Aren't ballasted tracks the norm on concrete deck arches and deck girders? If they are, there will be a flurry of updating and adding. Is there a way to have a special category for something unusual without having to tag a lot of normal things? I really don't know enough about RR stuff to have a firm idea of what needs to be done.

Now I need to go (carefully) walk a lot more RR bridges.

Railroad bridges with wooden deck catagory?
Posted October 24, 2012, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

John,

If nobody has any objections, that seems the way to provide the most value to people with the least amount of work. Also, there is no reason why down the road, someone could add a wooden tie deck category as well.

Posted October 24, 2012, by Matt Lohry

I think one thing they should have done that they didn't with the restoration of this bridge is to put runner planks on the deck--it would look right with a bridge of this era, and it would make the base deck last a lot longer, as they would just have to replace the runner planks as they wear out...

Posted October 24, 2012, by Matt Lohry

I typically like bold colors that stand out too, but somehow, this one to me really looks right in the gray. The Boner bridge looks good in its bright red too. There are so many historic bridges in Indiana, I wish I had a month all to myself so I could visit them all! I just moved to Wisconsin from Florida, and they have one or two here and there, but nothing like the Hoosier state! Florida is just plain pitiful as far as historic bridges go, however...

Railroad bridges with wooden deck catagory?
Posted October 24, 2012, by John Marvig (johnmarvig [at] chaska [dot] net)

Sure, sounds good. So open tie deck bridges without any deck category and ballast deck bridge with a new category, correct?

Posted October 24, 2012, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Glad you were able to stop in Indiana and see this and the Boner span...definitely 2 of the Hoosier State's finest!

I have mixed feeling on the Grey paint as it almost looks too much like primer for my liking. I have gotten rather fond of them being done in bright Reds and Oranges. But hey, at least it IS restored and ready to go for many more years! I tip my hat to the folks in Warrick County for their efforts in saving this and the bowstring spans!

Posted October 24, 2012, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I was happy to see a new floor installed on the bridge when I was there last month. The deck that was installed during the rehab in 2006 was in terrible shape apparently due to the wood being too green and not properly seasoned. It had warped and split and was getting almost dangerous to drive on.

Railroad Bridge categories
Posted October 24, 2012, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

My experience is that, at least with those bridges which have historical significance, that ballasted decks are much less common. Maybe just a category for these bridges, and then wood can be assumed for all the others?

Posted October 24, 2012, by kathy (weathergirl719 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This bridge has been destroyed more than once by mother nature. It crosses the Red River on the Trail of Tears....some locals say it is cursed. It is very close to the Bell Witch Cave too...I walked all the way across this bridge in the summer of 1995. It TOOK A LOT to take this bridge down..from what I understand the flood finished it off. I use to live in Clarksville and really loved this area.

Posted October 24, 2012, by CANALLER

IT WAS OPEN THE LAST TIME I WAS THERE, SUMMER '10.

Posted October 24, 2012, by Roy Hodgens (DallasCop2566 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This unique part of Dallas was designed by my great uncle, Victor Cochrane.

There are family stories of him along with the construction engineer overseeing the construction and correcting even the smallest flaw, the battle of the perfectionists---------

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Railroad Bridge categories
Posted October 23, 2012, by John Marvig (johnmarvig [at] chaska [dot] net)

Yeah, I totally agree. A little more imput from others would be a good idea.

Posted October 23, 2012, by Luke Harden (lmharden [at] iastate [dot] edu)

I don't think they're able to be zapped, because the 20+ redundant builder's pages whose names I've changed to things like "twerwgg" are still listed.

Posted October 23, 2012, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

So it was.... I got the name off the map I linked to in the description. James needs to zap the new category that arose.

Posted October 23, 2012, by Luke Harden (lmharden [at] iastate [dot] edu)

Clark, a clarification, the railroad was just called "Pacific Electric"

Posted October 23, 2012, by Matt Lohry

I also got to see this one on my visit to Warrick County--it's a beauty! I was standing on it when a Jeep went across. Lots of bouncing, but it carried the load well!

Posted October 23, 2012, by David Backlin (us71 [at] cox [dot] net)

The bridge is still there as of 2012, but it's now restricted to one lane traffic.

Posted October 23, 2012, by Matt Lohry

I got to see this beautiful bridge on my way from Florida to Wisconsin; terrific job on the restoration! The gunmetal gray color looks nice with the new wood deck.

High Street Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted October 23, 2012, by Musti (mustidivulge [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This bridge was removed in the last 5 years.

Posted October 23, 2012, by Luke Harden (lmharden [at] iastate [dot] edu)

Volunteers from CMRR are trying to replace ties and, eventually, rails, in order to re-open this branch for excursion traffic.

Posted October 23, 2012, by Kyra (chiwawaz [at] gmail [dot] com)

Jack, just now seeing this response that you posted. My Mom alerted me to it. I sure would like to see more pictures. I am aware of the state of my childhood home. I don't go by there because it makes me sad. When we lived there, there was a split rail fence, flower beds, vegetable garden, horses, and an apple orchard. The man who owned the barn across the street had ponies and a wagon and would give rides to all the kids. He would let me feed sweet grain to the horses. It was a beautiful place.

Kyra

Posted October 23, 2012, by Joel Wyman (jwyman2242 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Sadly this bridge was closed around 2006.

Posted October 23, 2012, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

A rather old and lightweight pinned Pratt of 4 spans. Pier is cut stone that has been partially encased in concrete. I think it is safe to say this bridge dates to around 1890.

Posted October 23, 2012, by T.M. (apmarino1966 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Julie: I saw your message and set you an email to your gmail account with my contact information. Please feel free to contact me and I can give you more information about this bridge restoration project.

Posted October 23, 2012, by Joel Wyman (jwyman2242 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

If it isn't bad enough that historical bridges are being destroyed at a feverish rate by modern day humans mother nature herself is also having her way. Very sad loss

Posted October 23, 2012, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

great work. who else was on your team? we at Workin' Bridges sre developing a roster of engineers, craftsmen, fabrixators to work in different states.

Posted October 23, 2012, by T.M. (apmarino1966 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I visited the Briscoe Bridge again to collect some more photographs of the completed restoration project. As the structural engineer-of-record for this project, I am very pleased with the final results. Hopefully there will be many years that others will be able to enjoy and appreciate this old bridge.

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Posted October 23, 2012, by Don Morrison

Hey J.R.

Welcome to my neck of the woods!

Congratulations on getting to these Floyd County bridges first! ;-)

Posted October 22, 2012, by Matt Lohry

Jason,

Thanks for the fill-in on the history of this bridge, both with its portal bracing and the overall structure in general. I was unaware of the bridge's history, only knowing that it was originally built in 1877 somewhere near Sauk City and relocated three times since...they did a nice job with the duplication of the original bracing. It would have been nice to include the curved knee braces too.

Posted October 22, 2012, by Jason Smith (JDSmith77 [at] gmx [dot] net)

In response to Matt Lohry's comments about the portal bracings on the bridge, here is my opinion about the bridge that is worth noting. Not exactly similar to the original but awfully close enough:

http://thebridgehunter.areavoices.com/2012/09/17/tracking-down-a-bridges-history-part-2-examples/

Railroad bridges with wooden deck catagory?
Posted October 22, 2012, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Perhaps our RR RKIs could suggest other categories and/or comment on what would be most useful. Adding categories will require additions to many pages so we need to get some other input from people who will use the new categories.

Railroad bridges with wooden deck catagory?
Posted October 22, 2012, by John Marvig (johnmarvig [at] chaska [dot] net)

Perhaps the best thing to do is create categories for both open tie railroad deck and ballasted railroad deck...

Railroad bridges with wooden deck catagory?
Posted October 22, 2012, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

I'm far from a RR guy but the RR bridge decks I've seen seem to be either ballasted or open tie. Concrete arch usually ballasted, truss open tie and girder can be either. When I think of categories I think of them as possible search terms for someone wanting to isolate a particular characteristic for study. Is distinguishing between ballasted and open tie something that will help people find something they are looking for? I wish I knew more about RRs....

Posted October 22, 2012, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

That's some nice additional information about the decoration on the bridge. I don't recall hearing the clock hands story before. This bridge has some history that's not visible until one digs around a bit.

Tennessee bridge
Posted October 22, 2012, by joel hightower (jtower [at] otelco [dot] net)

I am looking for the name of this bridge in Tennessee.

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Railroad bridges with wooden deck catagory?
Posted October 22, 2012, by John Marvig (johnmarvig [at] chaska [dot] net)

Should wooden deck be added to open tie deck railroad bridges, or should a different category be created, or neither?

Posted October 22, 2012, by John Marvig (johnmarvig [at] chaska [dot] net)

The bridge is actually a 1,608' long bridge made of multiple designs...

Posted October 22, 2012, by julie bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

todays work. I am getting better at it .... come on out / over and play work with me.....

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Posted October 21, 2012, by J.R. Manning (thekitchenguy [at] sbcglobal [dot] net)

Recently, most analog clocks on display have been set at 10:10, but for many years, clocks were displayed with the time showing 8:18. A very popular misconception for decades held that all display clocks were set to 8:18 to commemorate the death of President Abraham Lincoln.

Actually, Lincoln was shot at 10:13 in the evening and died the next morning at about 7:20. So much for that wives' tale. (I first heard it from my grandmother when I was about 8 years old, she was backed up by several relatives who agreed with her. Sorry, Grandma, but 'tain't so!)

Today, the time is often set on display clocks to 10:10, not because of the time that Lincoln was shot, but because the hands form a "V" that frames the clock (or watch) maker's logo on the face.

In the days when the 8:18 time was displayed, it was determined to be the most symmetrical position for the two hands on the face of the clock. The hands are equidistant from the 12 and with about 3/4 of the face visible above the hands, there's more room for advertising copy.

This is a most interesting, and unusual, bridge decoration and honors Elgin Watch Co. Even though is is cast in concrete, it's correct twice a day!

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Posted October 21, 2012, by Douglas W. Jones (jones [at] cs [dot] uiowa [dot] edu)

I put a photo of the low bridge clearance warnings for this bridge (and the bridge itself) on Wikimedia Commons:

-- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:IowaAvenueTelltale.jpg

The bridge clearance is a bit low, and since I came to Iowa City, this bridge has peeled the tops off of several trucks and once, a truck hauling a piece of heavy construction equipment knocked the bridge a few inches sideways, necessitating significant repair to one bridge abutment.

Aside from the multiple clearance warning signs, the bridge is now protected by classic railroad-style telltales, so that any over-height vehicles will announce themselves with a clatter of chains.

I've released all copyright on the bridge, if you want to upload the photo to this collection, feel free to do so.

Posted October 21, 2012, by Nathan Holth ( )

Marion,

Contact me through www.historicbridges.org and when i get back from a trip i am on i can help you.

Posted October 21, 2012, by Nathan Holth

Field visit of bridge today. Bridge remains open to pedestrians despite new highway bridge being open to traffic. Plywood pedestrian deck surface will not last however. Already feels spongy.

Interurban category
Posted October 21, 2012, by Luke Harden (lmharden [at] iastate [dot] edu)

Alright Clark, I've gone through and added all the interurban bridge I knew offhand and could find by searching interurban.

If anyone else knows of any interurban bridges, add them to the tag via the add categories section because I've found out that going into "edit" an d typing Interurban into the categories box just creates a new interurban "design" category, which is rather silly.

Posted October 21, 2012, by Bob Davis (bobdaviscfi [at] earthlink [dot] net)

This is the original L&N Railroad bridge across the Tennessee at Knoxville built in 1903. It was planned by the Knoxville Southern. Efforts by the Marietta and North Georgia and the Atlanta, Knoxville and Northern (AK&N) built the bridge. L&N got control of the AK&N and the Knoxville, LaFollette and Jellico to complete the L&N from Louisville to Atlanta using this bridge in 1904. At the same time the L&N's Knoxville Passenger Depot was being built and opened in 1905. Online see Rule's History of Knoxville at http://knoxcotn.org/about-knox-county/31-history/18-history-of-knoxville-chapter-14-transportation?start=6

Bridge comment
Posted October 21, 2012, by Bob Davis (bobdaviscfi [at] earthlink [dot] net)

This is the original L&N Railroad bridge across the Tennessee at Knoxville built in 1903. It was planned by the Knoxville Southern. Efforts by the Marietta and North Georgia and the Atlanta, Knoxville and Northern (AK&N) built the bridge. L&N got control of the AK&N and the Knoxville, LaFollette and Jellico to complete the L&N from Louisville to Atlanta using this bridge in 1904. At the same time the L&N's Knoxville Passenger Depot was being built and opened in 1905. Online see Rule's History of Knoxville at http://knoxcotn.org/about-knox-county/31-history/18-history-of-knoxville-chapter-14-transportation?start=6

Interurban category
Posted October 21, 2012, by Luke Harden (lmharden [at] iastate [dot] edu)

Actually you can just edit it out, which I shall do now.

Interurban category
Posted October 21, 2012, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

So, shall we see if James is agreeable to removing the "other" and start marking interurban bridges with that category?

Posted October 21, 2012, by Ed Hollowell (erhollowell [at] aol [dot] com)

The state border was set at the rivers north bank long ago. Since it was set the river has wandered. The border stays where it was before the river moved. Some places the the river moved south and in those places both banks of the river are Kentucky, such as at Evansville. Other places the river moved north and in those places the border is in the river. Cincinnati is one of these places where part of the river is in Ohio.

Interurban category
Posted October 21, 2012, by Luke Harden (lmharden [at] iastate [dot] edu)

Since there is already the "other" interurban category, we could simply edit out the "other" and just use that, since it's been pre-started. I think an Interurban category would be helpful to the railfans/model railroaders who visit this site, as there are niche railfans/modelers who specifically study/model interurbans.

Interurban category
Posted October 21, 2012, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Interurban railways have long passed into transportation history. Remaining bridges, whether abandoned or repurposed, are a bit of history that should be documented.

I suggest that we attempt to come up with a category that will allow quick access to bridges that at one time carried interurban lines.

Some lines had the word Interurban in their name, others did not. Some bridges have the word Interurban somewhere on the page and will appear in a keyword search, others do not.

What is the least complicated way to ensure that all such bridges are easily found in a search? Should there simply be a category "Interurban" applied to all, even those with it in their name?

Posted October 21, 2012, by Marion Sweet (msweet607 [at] comcast [dot] net)

As you know the Martins Creek Viaduct will be 100 years old in 2015 as will the Tunnkhannock Viaduct. Nicholson Heritage Association (see our web site) is planning a 3 day celebration that year. Also I understand Brooklyn Historical Society is interested in doing something for the Martins' Creek Viaduct. When we did our 75th celebrationin 1990 we could not anyone interested in doing something for the little brother bridge "up route 11". Could someone do a brochue with the stats of the bridge? And some history? Would love to see that!

M. Sweet

Chairman Nicholson Heritage Association

Posted October 21, 2012, by Gary Sprandel (jaidite [at] aol [dot] com)

The entire Fox Valley was totally spider webbed with rail lines both interurban and steam road through the 20th century so tracking what right of way was what can be a bit difficult.

That bridge is actually part of the C&NW's Aurora branch from Geneva to Aurora.

If you follow the ROW south into Aurora(difficult due to development over the years)you'll see an old abandoned bridge over the Fox River on the south end of the city and that was where the C&NW interchanged freight with the CB&Q.

If you follow it north from the bridge you posted the ROW goes up through Batavia and you can follow a treeline across Rt 31 at Fabian Parkway through the subdivisions to Geneva.

You'll notice streets that curve and wind for no apparent reason and a curving treeline just west of the current Geneva Metra depot that was where the branch joined up with the C&NW's west main.

If you look on the north side of the tracks you'll also see a similar ROW for the branch that ran north along 31 to St.Charles.

Both branches were pulled up in the mid 1980's.

Posted October 21, 2012, by Gary Sprandel (jaidite [at] aol [dot] com)

That's the CA&E's Elgin branch ROW.

What ever was mounted on the one bridge rail may have been something related to the signaling or communication as the CA&E switched from overhead trolly wire to third rail just south of National St.

Posted October 20, 2012, by Travis Kelley (travlark [at] hotmail [dot] com)

My grandfather lived in Garland City in the 1980s - 1990s. I have fond memories of traveling over the big blue bridge en route to and from visiting him.

At a truck stop/restaurant on the north side of US82, I remember seeing a photograph of the bridge with the center span in the water. can't speak for the veracity of the following, but I was told that a ferry operator at that location had objected to the free bridge (no toll) being built because it killed his business, and that he was responsible for the crime.

I also remember my grandfather telling me that the bridge was essentially tied together with steel cables by the mid-1980s because of structural deterioration. It's only hearsay, of course, but it was common gossip in the town during that period.

I'm sad that this icon of my childhood is gone. From the generic highway bridge that replaced it upstream, I guess it's true what they say: They don't make 'em like they used to.

Posted October 20, 2012, by ? (jimpicou [at] rocketmail [dot] com)

Painted by Bloomfield Painting Inc.

Posted October 20, 2012, by Luke Harden (lmharden [at] iastate [dot] edu)

Pioneer Railcorp (Keokuk Junction/Peoria & Western) acquired a significant amount of TP&w trackage in 2004, so it's likely they acquired this bridge and the other trackage.


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