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Posted December 29, 2016, by Randall Riccardo (randall_riccardo [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Probably the most important bridge from the past 500 years.

Posted December 29, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Nathan:

Thanks for the input. I have added WIBC as the likely fabricator. I also removed the Kansas Default Date of 1910.

Posted December 29, 2016, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Looks/sounds like it has all the hallmarks of an 1890s WIBC to me.

Posted December 29, 2016, by Dylan VanAntwerp (dylan_vanantwerp [at] live [dot] com)

I thought this was a huge timber trestle from aerial views, possibly the largest stand alone timber bridge in the state. However, it is actually a three span DPG bridge with a large timber trestle approach to the west. The west approach has had a large section in the middle torched pretty bad. There is an improvised walkway over the burnt area, but it looked so rickety I didn't even try walking over it.

I honestly don't know for sure how to list this bridge. It definitely has not been converted for trail usage. Google maps lists it as being on the Rolling Prairie Trail, but I am not even sure it that is correct. Listing the bridge as a Rolling Prairie Trail bridge might be speculative at best.

Posted December 29, 2016, by Chris huxtable (Tcpattycake1 [at] att [dot] net)

Correction;crystal beach rd,torch river,south end of torch lake,map is clam river,not torch river,used to reside there! Bridge no longer exists, was replaced early 70's......chris

Posted December 29, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Thanks for getting out in the mud and finding this one. I was not aware of it when I lived in Kansas - somehow I missed it in the NBI.

I would not be too surprised if this is an 1890s Wrought Iron Bridge Company span. I have seen A-frame portal bracing and "sideways" verticals on some of their bridges. I am not quite ready to say WIBC definitively however.

Interestingly, the hip verticals on this bridge look like they might be four-prong eyebars. If so, this would be a somewhat uncommon feature.

Posted December 29, 2016, by Dana and Kay Klein

Nick that first shot in morning sun REALLY captures bridgehunting, thanks for making the journey.

Posted December 29, 2016, by Nick Schmiedeler

Found the ol beauty today - down a VERY muddy (danger danger) still-open road (although it looks like private property) - talked to farm hand, said folks still, about twice a week haha, drive across it. Cool, solid Pratt.

Posted December 29, 2016, by Dana and Kay Klein

George think this is your bridge, NBI data may not be totally correct. Closed since 1956 but lists Average daily traffic of 910! Let me know if not the one you have been to.

Posted December 29, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Another great find! This one appears to be a Wrought Iron Bridge Company product based on the endpost/diagonals connections. I have removed the Kansas Default Date from ca. 1910 and changed it to pre-1900. This one could very possibly be pre-1890 however.

If you visit this one, make sure you look the other way if you need to sneeze. I don't know how much longer it can hold out...

"Bridging Urban America" film
Posted December 29, 2016, by Gil Graham (ggraham [at] baileybridge [dot] com)

Someone recently inquired about the film "Bridging Urban America" about Ralph Modjeski and his bridge design career. You can go to the website BRIDGINGUAMERICAFILM.COM and purchase or view it there for $20.00 I believe. For historical bridge enthusiasts, it's well worth it. I was curious if any of you historical experts were involved with its production.

Posted December 29, 2016, by Nick Schmiedeler

Fun one - as with so many, down long- abandoned road, this one south of 136th. Interesting bridge- utilization- extension project on south side at some point, long-since failed. Pretty area.

Posted December 29, 2016, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Don,i see the water spout.When i looked at the satellite imagery i didn't or basically see the water spout.Thanks for pointing that out.

Trap Rock Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted December 29, 2016, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Dana and Kay,i know about this bridge because i have been all along the Hay Creek.This bridge is in excellent shape from what i saw of the bridge itself.I'm pretty sure the quarry owners,Haines & Kibblehouse take care of and use this bridge because i have seen tire tracks in the snow crossing the bridge when following the stream looking for fishing spots.Here's something interesting you might want to know.There is a steel grate bridge in between this bridge and the end of Hay Creek Rd. which is Rte. 82 in Birdsboro Pa.Access to this bridge is only possible if you walk along the stream on the quarry side for about a half a mile.Anybody that has been to this area or lives in Birdsboro would know what i'm talking about.

Posted December 29, 2016, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Pin was on a nearby bridge listed only in NE. This should be straightened out but have a look at the

NBI to verify.

Posted December 29, 2016, by Don Morrison

George;

I see a structure called Ebenezer Spring at

41.223241, -79.401944

It is basically a stone wall with a water spout in the ornate center section.

Attached is a screenshot. I don't see another similar structure in the area.

Posted December 28, 2016, by Roger Deschner (rogerdeschner [at] gmail [dot] com)

Deck completely replaced in 2016. If the city spent that much on rehabilitation, this iconic bridge probably won't be demolished and replaced anytime soon. We can hope.

Posted December 28, 2016, by Dana and Kay Klein

Looks like another floating pin.....

Posted December 28, 2016, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

This one shifts between two locations in the NBI. It was probably at the location where I moved the pin. It disappears from the NBI in 2015 after showing as closed for a few years.

Posted December 28, 2016, by Dana and Kay Klein

Trap Rock Bridge almost due south of this one about a mile in woods by Gravel operation

Trap Rock Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted December 28, 2016, by Dana and Kay Klein

Found it. South of where current Haycreek road ends by a gravel pit. Thanks for guidence

Posted December 28, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I will try to see if I can sort this out. Even just a few years ago, Marshall County had a massive number of pony trusses, so we may have a process of elimination.

Posted December 28, 2016, by Luke

There was one set of NBI data from the 90s that gave me a pin located in central Norway.

Posted December 28, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Sometimes the pins migrate. I have had to move pins a mile or two to the appropriate bridge. While editing a West Virginia bridge entry a couple years ago, I had to retrieve the pin from China!

Posted December 28, 2016, by Nick Schmiedeler

This is the intersection of 2 dirt roads. No bridge or creek within 100 yard radius.

Posted December 28, 2016, by Dana and Kay Klein

Tammy thank you so much for sharing ! I have cropped and brightened photos and inserted into main Body of Bridge Description. If for any reason they don't meet your expectations let me know and I can delete and let a more qualified person have a go at it. Awesome family and Bridge history!

Posted December 28, 2016, by Tammy Lewis Priebe (tlewispriebe [at] gmail [dot] com)

I am uploading of three different photos of the Foster Bridge while it was being built to show the different stages of construction. My Great Uncle, Douglas Criswell took the photos while he was working on it in 1937. There is also a photo of the same bridge that my Great Aunt painted of the bridge as a gift for her husband. If the three photo's in the one image do not come out to your satisfaction, let me know and I will upload individual images in higher quality.

Posted December 28, 2016, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

This bridge appears to have an NBI listing implying it is owned by the city (ie the public, taxpayers, etc). However site visit reveals numerous No Trespassing signs posted BEFORE the bridge. Maybe the road after the bridge is private, but it is not appropriate for anyone to post such signs if, as the NBI suggests, this bridge is owned, inspected, and maintained by a public agency using taxpayer dollars. The signs mislead visitors into believing that it is unlawful to visit this bridge, which is not true if its owned by a public agency.

Posted December 28, 2016, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

This bridge appears to be quite rare based on report by Kentucky Transportation Center:

Built in 1917, this bridge is comprised of a pin connected Pratt deck truss and two pin-connected Warren deck trusses. This is the only bridge with this truss configuration in the state and one of only two pinconnected deck truss bridges in the state inspection inventory. The Pratt span is 115.2 feet long and the Warren spans are each 55 feet long. The bridge has been closed and barricaded since the 1980s and likely originally served as a railroad bridge. Last inspected in July 2011, the bridge is described as structurally deficient. Its ADT in 2006 was 300. Its projected ADT by 2026 is 1968. It is eligible for the National Register of Historic Places under Criterion C. It has pin connections and a rough cut stone substructure. On the NBI, the deck, superstructure and substructure are each rated respectively 0, 4, and 0. The channel and channel protection are rated 0. Its sufficiency rating is listed at 19.50. The operating rating is 0.0 tons and the inventory rating is 0.0 tons. It is closed. Mike West, the bridge engineer for District 11, said the bridge was closed because the deck is gone and the railings may be gone. The piers need grouting and the truss top is severely corroded. He estimated a cost of $500,000 to repair and paint. On a scale of one to ten, he rated this bridge a 9, but he thought it may not be preservable at all.

Posted December 28, 2016, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Don,we may have our wires crossed here.When heading out of Clarion on 322 before you cross the river take the first left onto old 322 to the end of that road.If you swing the satellite to the left you can see what looks like a metal door surrounded by stone.That's what i'm talking about.Doesn't look like a spring to me.

Posted December 28, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

If you look closely on Streetview, you will notice that this bridge has multiple markings and notes written on it by inspectors.

According to the NBI, this bridge is NRHP Eligible. I wish that I had known about it when I lived a few miles away. I still want to visit and document it.

KHRI Link:

http://khri.kansasgis.org/index.cfm?in=041-0000-00207

Piney Creek Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted December 28, 2016, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I noticed the bridge is gone but looked on satellite and saw abandoned railroad bridges both ways along with a tunnel on the row.Are these bridges and tunnel on Bridgehunters?

Trap Rock Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted December 28, 2016, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Dana and Kay,i have been down this road in years past and have been over this bridge.I don't remember this bridge being closed and also this bridge looks newer than what the description says.If you follow Rte.82 through Birdsboro Pa you can see this bridge on satellite imagery.Please get in touch with me about this bridge because i think the information might be wrong.Thanks.

Piney Creek Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted December 28, 2016, by Dana and Kay Klein

Look forward to it, enjoy the journey!

Piney Creek Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted December 28, 2016, by Brian Manville

I walked off Piney Creek Road to the left of photo #1 and down to the creek. The shot you see is part of the old railroad line that runs across the other half of the road and across the creek. I couldn't remember how to get there and was pressed for time. If I get a chance in the next couple of days, I'll take pictures.

The railroad bridge is about 100 yards south of where the old bridge was.

Posted December 28, 2016, by Don Morrison

Hey George;

That stone structure at the end of old 322 is a spring. There's a photo of it (as well as a photo of the old iron bridge) on this page:

http://www.roadsites.org/losthwy/us322/

Posted December 27, 2016, by Don Morrison

The "Stuff That's Gone" link (under sources) is ... gone.

Posted December 27, 2016, by m (m)

piers remain in river

Posted December 27, 2016, by Dylan VanAntwerp (dylan_vanantwerp [at] live [dot] com)

Technically, this bridge may not be a part of the Rolling Prairie Trail, since it doesn't seem to have been converted to trail usage before it was burned. However, it was definitely intended to become a part of the trail in the future, as it and the section of former railroad ROW it belonged on were purchased for that express purpose.

Information as to what exactly happened to this bridge is sketchy, but it is obviously severely damaged. I was not able to find any information searching Google, but a Youtuber commenting on a video about the Rolling Prairie Trail commented that it was a shame that the farmer burnt the bridge near Dumont. I was unable to find anything to corroborate this.

Piney Creek Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted December 27, 2016, by Dana and Kay Klein

Brian nice shots, Thanks! One of the coolest Bridge closed signs Ive seen. Where is Bridge in pic # 3?

Bidge Comment (Bridging Urban America)
Posted December 27, 2016, by Douglas Butler

Have anyone know about the documentary film of Ralph Modjeski of Bridging Urban America I might order me one.

Posted December 27, 2016, by Dave King (DKinghawkfan [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I believe the first couple photos are not the correct bridge. They belong here: http://bridgehunter.com/ny/washington/4418130/

Posted December 27, 2016, by Michael Quiet (mquiet [at] gmail [dot] com)

Agreed Nathan, that was actually my first conclusion. It looks like Canton might also have used this style of railing though, hence my guess:

http://bridgehunter.com/oh/allen/248029/

Trap Rock Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted December 27, 2016, by Dana and Kay Klein

George while looking at Berks county page noticed this 1908 Deck Arch bridge was listed as unverified from NBI data. If any where near you might be a fun venture to track down. Take pictures with phone or whatever available, be good to add......Happy Hunting!

Posted December 27, 2016, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Not a lot of detail in the photo, but the railing looks like Berlin Iron Bridge's design.

Posted December 27, 2016, by Michael Quiet (mquiet [at] gmail [dot] com)

That looks like a Canton Bridge Co. design to me. It would fit for the area

Berks County
Posted December 27, 2016, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Thanks Anonymous.Never thought of that.Still,wouldn't it be great to put these bridges i can get information on here on this site?

Posted December 27, 2016, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

There is a picture of this bridge from the 1950's in a book called The Passing Scene on page 167.The article goes into very great detail on the history of this bridge.Also shows 2 kids fishing with homemade fishing poles.How cool is that?

Berks County
Posted December 27, 2016, by Anonymous

Fred J. Moll stated in his book Berks County Covered bridges, there were 45 bridges built between the years of 1834-1885, seven of these were railway bridges. If you are interested in detailed facts about all these bridges they can be found in Mr. Moll's book, and purchased at the Berks County Historical Society book store.

Reading Iron Company iron truss bridge.
Posted December 27, 2016, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I forgot to mention this iron truss bridge was located at the end of s. 7th st. in Reading Pa.This should help in obtaining any information.

Fisher's covered bridge
Posted December 27, 2016, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I forgot to mention this bridge was located in Berks County Pa and also was located between Amityville Pa and Earlville Pa.

Leesport Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted December 27, 2016, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Anonymous,the bridge i was talking about was the Dunkels Church Rd-Sacony Creek iron truss bridge which was replaced with what looks like a concrete bridge,not this one.Thanks for asking.

Posted December 27, 2016, by Anonymous

George Oakley forum post mentions a lost Iron through truss, Maybe Precursor to this 1915 span at Wall Street Leesport? Just North of Reading PA

Fisher's covered bridge
Posted December 27, 2016, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I found this covered bridge in a book called The Passing Scene Vol. 24 on page 173.This bridge,erected in 1854 was located on Blacksmith Rd. between Rtes. 562 and 662 and was a 140 ft. long single span covered bridge spanning the Manatawny creek.The width is not mentioned.This bridge was dismantled in 1957.Unfortunately the bridge collapsed during dismantling injuring 2 men,1 fatally.This is all of the information i have.

Reading Iron Company iron truss bridge.
Posted December 27, 2016, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I found this iron truss bridge in a book called The Passing Scene Vol. 24 on page 34.This 2 span iron truss bridge was located behind the Reading Iron Company and crossed the Schuylkill River.I do not know when it was removed.All that is remaining is a piling in the middle of the river.I know this because i worked at Cambridge-Lee Industries which occupied the Reading Iron Company and also i have been to the river and seen the piling in the middle of the river.If anybody has any additional information on this bridge it would be greatly appreciated.

Posted December 27, 2016, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I just looked and found this bridge on the recent updates section Dana and Kay.Ignore that question i asked about this bridge.Thanks.

Berks county finds
Posted December 27, 2016, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Dana and Kay,i will see what i can find in Berks County as for old original bridges being that i can get most of the information from the books i mentioned earlier.I do have a question.When i listed the 3 bridges in Virginville Pa the bridge on Rte. 143 wasn't listed,was it?I didn't see it.

Posted December 27, 2016, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I have a question.If you go on street view to the end of old U.S. 322 is that an oven i see in the hillside surrounded by stone?I could be right,i could be wrong.If anyone knows please let me know because i know the area had a lot of kilns outside years ago.

Posted December 26, 2016, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

I agree David. They could have put something completely undistinguished there.

In the pre-interstate times we would go down US71 to US66 to reach the lake in Oklahoma. Every time one of the things along the route (bridge, motel, diner) disappears the road becomes less of what it was in reality and my memory. So little of the road retains its original look. I hate to see things replaced with "theme park" recreations that aren't what I remember.

Purely selfish, but that's part of why people are into historical preservation.

Posted December 26, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I did not get a chance to ask permission to visit this bridge on my last trip to Kansas, even though it has been on my bucket list ever since Sheldon discovered it.

The main span appears to be only about 100 feet long, yet it has 7 panels. In other words, the panels are only about 14 feet in length. Generally speaking, with Pratt through trusses, short panels such as these often indicate an older truss. Granted, this is not a hard and fast rule, but most post - 1900 Pratt through trusses have panels that are longer than 14 feet. Given the lightweight construction of this particular span, an 1890s, or even 1880s bridge is not out of the question. This may turn out to be a basic garden variety Pratt with A - frame portal bracing, but on the other hand, it might be a rather old and rare one with interesting portal bracing.

I still think that there might be a Queenpost pony on the north end.

Posted December 26, 2016, by Mike mitchell (Mmitchell [at] lrwillsonandsons [dot] com)

Trussel went from point of land south of your dot and went strait across Severn

I remember the trussle to the mid 80's

Posted December 26, 2016, by Mike mitchell (Mmitchell [at] lrwillsonandsons [dot] com)

Trussel went from point of land south of your dot and went strait across Severn

I remember the trussle to the mid 80's

Middle Fork Crow River -- Meeker County, MN
Posted December 26, 2016, by BS

26 Dec 2016

Just noticed that the wooden beam bridge over the Middle Fork

of the Crow River on County Road #3 - just east of Mannanah

has been replaced with culverts-

Likewise a smaller wooden beam bridge over a small stream about a 1/4 mile east of that location- another culvert

BS

Posted December 26, 2016, by Luke

Yet another good postcard find, Dana.

Keep up the good work.

Berks county finds
Posted December 26, 2016, by Dana & Kay

George glad to try and work with what you find. No promises as not in the expertise level of many on here but know they will correct any blunders! Its all good, its not history if its not recorded.

Posted December 26, 2016, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Was looking at the HAER documentation and I found that the floor beams were remodeled in 1940, at which time the Kingpost beams were added.

Dunkels Church Road/Reading Lehigh RR Bridges
Posted December 26, 2016, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Dana and Kay,i forgot about the copyright issue on the pictures.Thanks again for entering these bridges in Bridgehunters.If it wasn't for the books i mentioned earlier and that i always am on Bridgehunters these bridges might have never been mentioned.Would it be better to just give you the locations,descriptions and measurements instead of the pictures?Let me know.Thanks.

Dunkels Church Road/ Reading Lehigh RR Bridges
Posted December 26, 2016, by Dana and Kay Klein

George have successfully added your other two Bridge hunting finds. Photos in book you mentioned are copyrighted by(Old-time photos of Reading & Berks County by Gloria Jean & George M. Meiser, IX) If you see these folks out and about they may give permission for use. 4 Bridges in a couple of miles that's some fancy research George! Thanks for letting me share in the fun!

Dunkels Church Road Berks County Pa
Posted December 26, 2016, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Thanks for responding Dana and Kay.The bridge you mentioned is the one in Virginville Pa that crosses the Sacony Creek.The picture of this bridge is on page 134 of the book i mentioned earlier.Also this picture shows the other 2 bridges.

Rebers , Maiden Creek Bridges
Posted December 26, 2016, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Thanks for responding Dana and Kay.I saw the pictures in the book i had mentioned previously.This bridge sounds familiar to me.I thought i saw an article on Bridgehunters about this bridge.Anyway,the pictures are on pages 152 and 153 of the book that i mentioned.The picture on page 153 shows it being dismantled.

Dunkels Church Road Berks County PA
Posted December 25, 2016, by Dana and Kay Klein

George 3 creek crossings on Dunkels church road, is it the one at Virginville PA ?

Rebers , Maiden Creek bridges
Posted December 25, 2016, by Dana and Kay Klein

George added per your research. Check details for accuracy, maybe someone has old views of these two.

Bridge Geek
Posted December 25, 2016, by Anonymous

You know you are a bridge geek when you slide out of family dinner to check and see if you DO have a picture of South Duquesne Road Bridge..........

Posted December 25, 2016, by Joey Bane (bermann214 [at] embarqmail [dot] com)

This bridge has recently been closed to pedestrian traffic as well.

Posted December 25, 2016, by Joey Bane (bermann214 [at] embarqmail [dot] com)

This structure has been destroyed and replaced.

Posted December 25, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Yep, looks like a potential bedstead - assuming that the vertical endposts extend through the deck. This one looks like it might have been built ca. 1900, which would make it a rather old bridge for Oklahoma.

Posted December 25, 2016, by David Backlin (us71 [at] cox [dot] net)

A lot of Route 66 fans want to see more of these. At least it's better than a cheap metal culvert.

Reber's covered bridge Berks County Pa.
Posted December 25, 2016, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I found 2 pictures of this bridge in a book called the Passing Scene Vol 24.This covered bridge was located on Reber's Bridge Rd.Built in 1838 it measured 129 ft and was a single span with an 11ft 8in clearance.There is no mention of when it was definitely removed except for one picture shows the dismantling in 1951.Currently there is a metal grate bridge where this bridge once stood.

Reber's covered bridge Berks County Pa.
Posted December 25, 2016, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I found 2 pictures of this bridge in a book called the Passing Scene Vol 24.This covered bridge was located on Reber's Bridge Rd.Built in 1838 it measured 129 ft and was a single span with an 11ft 8in clearance.There is no mention of when it was definitely removed except for one picture shows the dismantling in 1951.Currently there is a metal grate bridge where this bridge once stood.

3 bridges in Virginville Pa. located in Berks County
Posted December 25, 2016, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I was looking through a book called the Passing Scene Vol 24 and found 3 bridges.The first bridge was originally a covered bridge.This was a 164 ft long covered bridge that spanned the Maiden Creek.This bridge was built in 1850 and removed in 1909.currently this is a concrete bridge on Rte 143.The second bridge was a wooden semi-covered railroad bridge over the Sacony Creek erected in 1874 for use by the Reading & Lehigh RR.It was removed in 1909.There are pilings in the creek suggesting this bridge was here.The third bridge was a iron-truss bridge built in 1900 126 ft long and 18 ft wide.I don't know when it was removed because there is no mention of it and also currently the bridge is a concrete bridge on what is now called Dunkels Church Rd.The picture in the book is very descriptive.

Posted December 25, 2016, by DJ Hight (djhight [at] ymail [dot] com)

Does anyone have any pics of the old wooden bridge on south Duquesne Rd? Thx

Safe and Happy to All
Posted December 24, 2016, by Dana and Kay Klein

and many bridges in the new year!

Posted December 24, 2016, by James Baughn (webmaster [at] bridgehunter [dot] com)

Clark,

Yes, I hope the county commissioners don't sprain their shoulders patting themselves on the back for this.

The new railing doesn't look like anything else I've seen in Missouri. Illinois used a style like this in the 1940s but that's about the closest I can find.

I guess this is better than Jersey barriers but that's not saying much.

Posted December 24, 2016, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

As of 24 Dec the cable stayed is winning. SMH

Posted December 24, 2016, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

I don't consider the tarted up railings with "art deco" features as "preserving" the appearance of the old bridge. They tampered with history here.

Posted December 24, 2016, by Mike Piontka

Not at all folks. That is a great photo.

When I last saw the bridge, it wasn't safe for pigeons.

Posted December 24, 2016, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

I moved the pin to a bridge built in 1998 just ENE of where the NBI showed this bridge before it disappeared from their listing. I suspect this was the location of the truss bridge.

The bridge to the SSW shows a 1935 build date. The county road map in 1936 doesn't show any roads other than the ones currently in use.

Posted December 24, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I have wondered about these bridges. There is a similar one over the Whitewater River that was supposedly built in the 1960s. I am thinking maybe these are good examples of post WWII low budget bridges.

Posted December 24, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Yes, BRIDGES. That we can all agree on!

Posted December 24, 2016, by Nick Schmiedeler

City of Lecompton also, few miles from me here in Lawrence, also a hub of early pro-slavery actions of course, that history one of the key tourist-attraction selling points of that town for years - appreciate the interesting history but not all KS history is rosey stories...very much admire resolve of people like John Brown, James Lane that fought against slavery...anyway...BRIDGES!!!

Posted December 23, 2016, by Richard Schott (stjorickster [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge was bypassed in the late 1980s on a realignment. The bridge was soon demolished after the new bridge was completed.

Posted December 23, 2016, by Richard Schott (stjorickster [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge is still intact although closed to all traffic. Pics to follow.

Posted December 23, 2016, by Dana and Kay Klein

Mike nice find, feel free to move card view back if fits your history Better. Thanks for all your research!

Posted December 23, 2016, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Nathan,

Unfortunately, my day job and my health have a bad habit of getting in the way. A certain Pratt has priority and I'm still waiting on something from Nels for it. The fun thing is that while the bridges sleep, the paperwork is slowly grinding forward.

Regards,

Art S.

PS. Thanks for the clarification of the patent. I must admit I didn't reread it prior to posting.

Posted December 23, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Also, many thanks to Mr. Beavers for researching Geary County bridges. Having a personal connection with landowners is a great benefit.

Posted December 23, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

TL;DR: Many Kansas counties, such as Doniphan, Davis, and Atchison, were named after southerners by the 1855 "Bogus Legislature"

In 1855, Kansas Territory, with the help of their "friends" in Missouri, elected the Pro - Slavery "Bogus Legislature. Now, Kansas Territory might have actually elected a Pro - Slavery legislature without the help of the Missourians, but we will never know for sure.

What we do know is that the Bogus Legislature met in Pawnee, Kansas which is now on Fort Riley. Interestingly, Pawnee was located almost immediately across the Kansas River from this bridge. The original Capitol building was restored in the 1920s and still stands.

The Bogus Legislature quickly moved their operations to the Shawnee Indian Mission in present day Fairway, Kansas. The Shawnee Indian Mission, which is now a museum, was only one mile from Pro - Slavery Missouri.

The Bogus Legislature named several new Kansas counties after southerners. Davis County, as you might imagine, was named after Jefferson Davis.

Eventually, some of the Confederate named counties got renamed. Geary County was named after former Kansas Territorial Governor John Geary, who also served as mayor of San Francisco.

If you wish to visit the First Kansas Territorial Capitol, you will need to enter the Fort Riley checkpoint off of I 70. Bring ID, proof of insurance, etc. and plan for a wait to get in. Check their website in advance.

Here we go! 1950'sTbeems? 1949 Girder?
Posted December 23, 2016, by Dana and Kay Klein

Posted 3 spans today, East Henrietts Road over Erie Canal Rochester NY. BH 74873 (2016 Bridge) BH 74872 (1949 Girder) and BH74875 (Pre 1949 of unknown design). I realize the only one that hands down meets Bridgehunter criteria is the one I know nothing about BH74875. How ever as quick shots show 1949 Girder will not exist probably by first of year or sooner. I get the cookie cutter bridge from the highway expansions mid century took some of the Design pride away however historically it changed the US and the world. Some how the preservation of the sequence seems of significance. So I posted a 1949 Girder UCEB replaced by another UCEB. Sorry! Find me a picture of what was there pre 1949

Posted December 23, 2016, by Nick Schmiedeler

Thanks, Dana and Kay. Cool info as always, Robert.

Posted December 23, 2016, by Nick Schmiedeler

Oh wow, that is too cool, great article find!! "Davis County" threw me off, I knew there had been some extinct counties in Kansas but I had to look it up, not surprised "Free State" Kansas was adamant about changing a county named after some Confederate - curious how that happened in the first place. Anyway, neat article, would love to see a photo of the Mills on that site that were referred to. Thanks!

Posted December 23, 2016, by Dana and Kay Klein

As Usual Pontist Warrior Nick finds a treasure! Thanks Dude


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