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Posted February 20, 2014, by s.schiefer (polkaradio [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I worked at NX as towermen from 1960-1963 bridge is in Kearny,NJ not Newark

Oldest Bridge Book Ever Read
Posted February 20, 2014, by Jason Smith (JDSmith77 [at] gmx [dot] net)

Here's a question for the forum: What was the oldest bridge book you read and is there a book that is older than the one featured here? Check it out and place your comments here or in the Chronicles' social network pages: http://thebridgehunter.areavoices.com/2014/02/20/the-oldest-...

Looking forward to your stories!

JS

Posted February 20, 2014, by Sheldon Wiens (sheldon_wiens77 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Now you can go attack someone else now besides just me always, Anonymous!

Posted February 20, 2014, by J. Randall Houp (ghostbridgehunter [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This was not an easy bridge to get to. Land is being bought up and access is difficult due to several roads now sitting on private property. I had to climb down a steep bluff line to get to the bridge. A 4WD is highly recommended or possibly a boat trip on that section of the Arkansas River. Remote area is gorgeous and sits next to the Arkansas River. Ledwidge, Perry County, Arkansas, is now a ghost-town but until a serious flood in the 1950s was a thriving town that included a train depot, general store, post office, and school house, etc.. From the dates found on the 2 girders there is no doubt that an earlier bridge or trestle sat at this location. Sitting just to the east side of this bridge is a fascinating railroad cut-out. Please use common sense and be extremely alert when visiting this area.

Posted February 20, 2014, by K. A. Erickson

From what I been able to uncover is that the State of Florida found the bridge to be deficient during an inspection back in 2007. The City of Marathon which owned the bridge immediately closed it.

The city figured it would be easier and cheaper to buy out any property owners that where upset by the cutoff of access than to actually make repairs to the bridge. Most took the money offered but one decided to file a lawsuit. That owner had a radio antenna on the south west, a notable square section.

http://keysnews.com/node/17348

After two years there was a settlement.

http://keysnews.com/node/34872

The bascule span that was previously locked in the upright position was soon removed. The now inaccessible properties on Boot Key bought out by the city are being transferred to a type of nature conservatory group.

http://conchscooter.blogspot.com/2009/04/boot-key-bridge.htm...

Posted February 20, 2014, by Will Truax (Bridgewright [at] aol [dot] com)

I know this bridge is sometimes identified as a Haupt, however photos suggest to me it is not of this truss type. Logic even, suggests there is little possibility that it might be - Herman's patent dates to late December the same year this bridge was built, it is more than unlikely that even a prototypical example might have been built 450 miles afield from his home area.

In the coming weeks I will be working on a bridge just to the north in The Kingdom, and will work to swing by and document and photograph the Sayers and determine just what type it might be.

Posted February 20, 2014, by Victor (vlbrunton [at] juno [dot] com)

Does anybody read these comments?

Very mysterious, both the bridge and Vaca Key. Here, and in Google Earth, there are "street views" of traffic crossing this bridge. But all aerial views suggest the draw span is missing. But that is not all.

It also appears that 931 is the only vehicular access to Vaca Key. And all aerial views show no traffic at all on the island.

Yet the island appears to have been platted with streets and utilities. But there are no buildings or cars on any of those streets.

What happened?

Posted February 20, 2014, by Alexander D. Mitchell IV (LNER4472 [at] verizon [dot] net)

Read the description; that's exactly what happened.

Posted February 20, 2014, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Jason,

The bridges of the Erie Canal were designed according to a standard plan and built by a wide variety of contractors. Therefore, the similarities between the bridges cannot be used to associate a builder. Empire Bridge Co. was one of the contractors who built these bridges, but a variety of contractors actually executed contracts for these double-Warren trusses (and the lift bridges) on the canal. For example, other contractors who built nearly identical bridges include McMyler-Interstate Company of Cleveland, Ohio, and Lackawanna Bridge Company of Buffalo, New York. Example: http://www.historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowse...

Posted February 20, 2014, by Jason Smith (JDSmith77 [at] gmx [dot] net)

Karen, as far as info on the Peet Street Bridge is concerned, your wish is granted, together with the Wruck Road Bridge.

Link: http://thebridgehunter.areavoices.com/2014/02/15/erie-canal-... Although Wruck was built by Empire Bridge Co., it is most likely that Peet was built by the same company as the trusses are clearly identical. The only difference is the dates the structures were closed permanently. Hope this helps. :-)

JS

Posted February 19, 2014, by K. A. Erickson

What Jack Schmidt is doing is adding all the listings from the Dale J Travis Covered Bridge website that have not yet been added to the Bridgehunter website.

http://www.dalejtravis.com/bridge/washingt/htm/4702704.htm

This bridge was designed by a man facing Lou Gehrig's disease, Everette Bruce Johnson. Mr. Johnson wanted to construct a bridge over a draw on his property before he became too stricken. Friends, family, and neighbours pitched in. He got to see his dream realized before he passed away.

It was written up as a human interest piece in a local paper but the links appear to not have survived.

Posted February 19, 2014, by Ed Hollowell (erhollowell [at] aol [dot] com)

The old bridge trusses came down in Summer 2013. The new bridge is open on temporary piers with strict load limits. After the old trusses were down the piers were renovated and modified for the new bridge. The schedule calls for a 7 day closure while the new trusses are slid over on to the renovated piers which should happen sometime in March 2014.

Posted February 19, 2014, by Steven W Lindsey (SteveLindsey60 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

The local paper, the Concord Monitor, headquarters in its building complex on the east side bank adjacent to this bridge. The Monitor has fought tirelessly to see the bridge replaced.

South Canal Bridge (Massachusetts)
Posted February 19, 2014, by Steven W Lindsey (SteveLindsey60 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Status: Owned by city with plans.

Owned by the city now according to Lawrence Eagle-Tribune article. See: http://www.eagletribune.com/local/x1876429317/Lawrence-buys-...

April 18, 2008.

And an editorial: http://www.eagletribune.com/opinion/x1876429879/Our-view-Cit...

April 22, 2008.

Posted February 19, 2014, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

One of the oldest, most significant, and unique bascule bridges in Chicago is to be demolished this summer! As always, I have full details over at HistoricBridges.org http://www.historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowse...

Posted February 19, 2014, by Karen Fischer (jwperson [at] aol [dot] com)

I haven't had a chance to take photographs as of yet. Canaller, it would be nice to post them to this site as well to Chronicle the bridge. If I can get the chance, I will get up to get photos.

Posted February 18, 2014, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Comparing portals (pic 3) with this:

http://bridgehunter.com/sd/minnehaha/bh36190/

I'm going to speculate this is another Lassig.

Posted February 18, 2014, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

This bridge has a rare detail where it has riveted connections, yet a pin and u-bolt hanger hold the floorbeam in place. Usually u-bolt hangers only show up on pin-connected trusses.

Dave: Thanks for adding these photos from Ammodramus... please keep doing so! I added some of his photos a while back but I am too busy to finish the job. Ammodramus was very supportive of having his photos appearing on BridgeHunter. He has great photos of bridges that do not have photos and/or pages on BridgeHunter yet. If you poke through wiki commons you should find a lot of bridges from him.

Posted February 18, 2014, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)
Posted February 18, 2014, by Anonymous

Just when is the new bridge going to be slid on the permanent foundation?

Posted February 18, 2014, by Robert Thompson

I don't know where they got it, but it's the real thing, versus a Mail-Order Bridge.

Kudos to the Waterpark for the special effort to re-purpose this bridge!

Posted February 18, 2014, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I too noted that some elements of this span were not necessarily conducive to the WIBCo. normality. Standard might have went a little "throwback" with some of their earlier contracts...I have certainly seen other firms do this in their infancy.

Posted February 18, 2014, by Cat Cook (sales [at] theshortline [dot] com)

I have a customer who is looking for any video footage of Southern Pacific traveling on this bridge. Anyone have any ideas?

Thanks!

Cat

The Short Line

sales@theshortline.com

www.theshortline.com

Posted February 18, 2014, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

George,

If you read through the materials on the bridge listing you will see that your question has already been answered. If this does not convince you, you can look at the aerial/satellite photo options available next to the map, where you will see images of a nice new bridge.

How about posting some pictures of bridges you've seen and reporting on their status?

Regards,

Art S.

Posted February 18, 2014, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

has this structurally deficient bridge been replaced/if not,please let me know the current status.thanks.

Posted February 17, 2014, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

This is one of the most unusual bridges I have seen. Note the unusual bottom chord design. The Nomination Form associates the Standard Bridge Company with building the bridge, but apparently the date of construction is not certain, since ca. 1905 was used. Standard Bridge Co. was formed in 1900:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Standard_Bridge_Company

I agree the bridge looks like a pre-1900 bridge, but the bridge details such as the bottom chord and the design of the end post casting is unusual vs other Wrought Iron Bridge Company bridges. The use of threaded rod with nut connection details is not unique to Wrought Iron Bridge Company.

This may be a freak bridge that does not conform to the dates that we would expect them to. Like the bowstrings in Wisconsin:

http://www.historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowse...

Posted February 17, 2014, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

The old location for this bridge was totally off. No reliable info online, except that it was near the ice arena. I fixed the location to where Google Maps indicates a "Squire Whipple Path/Bridge" New GPS coords I posted might be a few meters off, but it should be close.

Posted February 17, 2014, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

The cast endpost connectors suggest a structure that is much older than the 1905 date given. It is more likely a Wrought Iron Bridge Co. span from about 1880.

Posted February 17, 2014, by James Baughn (webmaster [at] bridgehunter [dot] com)

The aerial imagery is inconclusive but there does appear to be something here.

265B Sunbeam Way Salt River MO
Posted February 17, 2014, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Following the google satellite images north a ways I came upon what looks like the remains of a bridge on 265B, Sunbeam Way. It does not seem to be listed. Any thoughts?

Posted February 17, 2014, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Jim Cooper's database does have an entry for the bridge, but no builder. He had a ca. 1890 date listed. However, those look like they could be star irons on the outriggers? If so, it might be much older. In my opinion, not for sure a Columbia, the composition of the end post and top chord is not identical to others I have seen.

State Bridge (Colorado)
Posted February 17, 2014, by Roger Deschner

The lodge at State Bridge, Colorado has been rebuilt, and it now hosts music festivals on its grounds in the summer. The piers of the old bridge were still visible in the river in 2012.

Posted February 17, 2014, by Steve Richards

The most recent Google Earth picture shows the remains of the bridge.

Posted February 17, 2014, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

The latest that I have heard is that the Bear Tavern Road bridge will be placed across Moore's Creek (same stream as the Hunter Road Bridge) adjacent to the bridge built in 1972 that carries Valley Road over Moore's Creek. Apparently there was a King through truss at this location prior to 1972.

Posted February 17, 2014, by Luke Harden (lukemh9 [at] gmail [dot] com)

According to the photographer, these are near Cutler, not Dunbar.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/7687126@N06/5558563468/in/set-7...

Posted February 17, 2014, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Another article, with picture of the destroyed bridge:

http://www.nevadadailymail.com/story/1828478.html

Regards,

Art S.

Wiley's Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted February 17, 2014, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Found another article:

http://www.wfmz.com/news/news-regional-berks/efforts-underwa...

By the way, can someone pull the content, including pictures and videos across so they are here permanently? Very often, the links die after a while.

Posted February 17, 2014, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Here is a fun article discussing the bridge's color:

http://www.mlive.com/news/ann-arbor/index.ssf/2009/05/east_d...

Posted February 17, 2014, by Kelly Tucker (ktucker [at] csh [dot] msstate [dot] edu)

This bridge was on the GM&ORR that came into Jackson from the NE. The station is still downtown right below the Old Capitol. I explored this bridge on 2/16/2014 and found the west approach trestle to be intact for about 2/3 of the way to the bridge with the last 1/3 having been burned thus the rails in the air without support. The trains had to climb up the trestle to get to the bridge. One can get to the bridge by going under the trestle and following the path around the burned out timbers; not a hard walk at all.

Posted February 17, 2014, by Don Morrison

This bridge may be a duplicate; The Dunbar Piers are shown on http://bridgehunter.com/oh/washington/bh57854/

I thought this bridge was the Dunbar Piers, and changed the info, then realized that the Piers were on the other page, so I changed the info back to what the original poster had. If these are definitely the Dunbar Piers, then this is a dupe.

Posted February 17, 2014, by Stacey (lane75941 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Is there safe access to this tunnel for photography? The closest access I saw was a crossing about .25 m away where you would have to walk down the tracks to access. Wondered if there was a better way. Thanks

Posted February 17, 2014, by Luke Harden (lukemh9 [at] gmail [dot] com)

It is, and it is already listed as such.

Posted February 16, 2014, by Ryan Saylor (galaxy25172 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Actually I think this might be a structure built by the M.C.&C. railroad as it is very near the former right of way....

Posted February 16, 2014, by Ryan Saylor (galaxy25172 [at] tahoo [dot] com)

Those are definitely the Dunbar Piers, but I am not sure what the name of the water way that they crossed is.I do have a couple pictures of the bridge in tact and with trains crossing them :-) I will upload a couple when I have more time....

Posted February 16, 2014, by Dave

Yes, the bridge still stands - and looks exactly like the photo on this page. The area around the bridge on the Duluth side is basically open park land (think, running around and throwing Frisbees). There's also a couple of picnic tables and a grill.

Red Bridge (Missouri)
Posted February 16, 2014, by Jason Smith (JDSmith77 [at] gmx [dot] net)

A romantic bridge in red in Kansas City. http://thebridgehunter.areavoices.com/2014/02/16/red-bridge-...

Red Bridge (Missouri)
Posted February 15, 2014, by Kelly McClanahan

The bridge still stands, now being part of a park, and is open to pedestrian traffic. On a local news station, they had a small report, that it is now some sort of "love lock" bridge. Couples put a lock on the railing, to "lock in their love" then throw the key into the river below. Last year, there were only three lock, now there are over a hundred.

Posted February 15, 2014, by Bryce Denny

This bridge is a swing bridge.

Posted February 15, 2014, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

While the rolled members certainly make that a possibility, I'm not sure if there is any documentation to confirm this.

Posted February 15, 2014, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

There was a plate girder railroad bridge closer to Augusta that was taken out recently. That might be the one. There has been interest in converting the railroad line further north into a rail trail. Obviously that would require a new bridge over the .Whitewater River. It would be nice if they would use a historic truss instead of a MOB.

Posted February 14, 2014, by Don Morrison

Wayne, I think you may be thinking of a bridge farther north at 37.672815,-96.999328

Google Earth shows it before 2010, gone after.

Posted February 14, 2014, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Is/was this Columbia Bridge Works?

Posted February 14, 2014, by Wayne Schlueter (mrrail [at] cox [dot] net)

Back in the spring of 2009, I believe, I took several measurements and photos of this bridge and made a 3d cad model. The bridge was torn out later in the year.

Posted February 14, 2014, by Zachary S

Expect a lot more to be written and posted here as I explore the site where this trestle once stood and the associated abandoned rail line.

Posted February 14, 2014, by Zachary S

Aww, sadface. Lol. Was hoping for a really rare bridge for the glory of our state.

The aerial image makes this bridge look much more like an older slab or stringer bridge than a truss. If the posted photo is of this one, I would say that this is indeed such.

Posted February 14, 2014, by Elliott Johnson (elliottsgon15 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

took a few pictures of this while I was in the area yesterday. this one is in pretty bad shape, but my gps still tried to take me across it. it looks like part of it is missing.

Posted February 14, 2014, by Elliott Johnson (elliottsgon15 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

This bridge was replaced in 2012.

Posted February 14, 2014, by Elliott Johnson (elliottsgon15 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

took some updated pictures of this bridge while in the area today.

Posted February 14, 2014, by Elliott Johnson (elliottsgon15 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

got some pictures of this bridge while in the area yesterday.

Posted February 14, 2014, by Fmiser (fmiser [at] gmail [dot] com)

Good to know it's still there! Flooding of the Spoon River took out the Tarters Ferry Rd bridge http://bridgehunter.com/il/fulton/tarters-ferry/ just a few miles upstream. Looks like maybe that same flood damaged the south abutment.

I'm sure hoping something is done to repair - or at least stabilize - the pier and abutment soon.

Posted February 13, 2014, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Weird, this just popped up on my radar but it happened in 08:

http://www.nbc4i.com/story/20725365/bridge-collapses-under-t...

Posted February 13, 2014, by brian dill (nowwiley [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Sometime in the 90's when gas was cheap and i had my first car, I was tooling around and came upon this gem from the flood plain side. When I got to the 90 degree turn at the other end i had to sit and marvel at it for a moment. It reminded me of the Red Iron Bridge over the Black River in Lesterville, another lost bridge of similar spec. i am really broken up over this. Truss bridges falling, all around.

Posted February 13, 2014, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Panoramio photograph of this bridge. The photograph is "All Rights Reserved", so I am just going to post a link.

http://www.panoramio.com/photo/101529660?source=wapi&referre...

The bridge is a 5-panel Pratt truss. If I had to guess a construction date, I would say ca. 1885-1895. It looks too heavy to be earlier than that, but it does not have the standardized appearance of a post-1900 bridge either.

Posted February 13, 2014, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Mr. Muninger:

It has been a few years since I have driven this road, but am relatively certain this bridge was still here ca. 2005, and the 2012 NBI does not indicate that it has been replaced recently.

My suspicion is the bridge is extant.

Posted February 13, 2014, by James McCray (jamesinslocomb [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I do not want to get anyone's hopes up since when I added this bridge I totally did not mean to label it as an inverted bowstring. From what I saw I thought it might be at least a through truss and when I hit the label I hit the wrong one. To tell the truth I have no idea what kind of bridge this is, and it could be anything--including an "inverted bowstring through truss." What is neat is that this bridge is only about 15 minutes from where I grew up and I never knew it was there. I'm wondering, since the road the bridge services is the old entrance to Fort Rucker, if that bridge is actually on the Army Base? Anyway, until it is confirmed, we can all dream that it is an inverted bowstring.

Posted February 12, 2014, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Hey Mr. Ben Tate... Can you check this one out on your way back from paradise? ;-)

Posted February 12, 2014, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

The 1883 publication "A Complete History of the New York and Brooklyn Bridge" indicates Kingsley's involvement with the bridge was to help raise the first $5,000,000 for building the bridge. He later was vice president and even later president of the Board of Trustees for the bridge. I include an image below.

Posted February 12, 2014, by Patrick S. O'Donnell (1 [dot] 991km [at] comcast [dot] net)

According to David McCullough's The Great Bridge, after the discovery of bad wire having been laid into the main cables, J. Lloyd Haigh was able to continue supplying wire, but he had to at his own expense provide the extra 150 wires that were added to each of the four main cables as compensation. The contract for the wrapping wire for the main cables was originally awarded to J. Lloyd Haigh, but that was quietly changed to John A. Roebling's Sons. No explanation was given for the change. No voices were raised about he Chief Engineer having a conflict of interest.

Apparently the only Roebling wire in the main cables is the wrapping wire around the main cables themselves.

I'm not aware who supplied the suspenders and diagonal stay ropes.

Posted February 12, 2014, by Mark Muninger (Mark [dot] Muninger [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I am trying to remember this bridge. I ran the roads around Humboldt over 30 years ago. Is there a picture to post? A few years back while I was driving around in the area I was disappointed that the 7-arch bridge had been demolished and replaced with one of concrete. Sad how old relics of character like that have to go..............

Posted February 12, 2014, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Whoa, do we have any photos to confirm that this is indeed an exceedingly rare inverted bowstring? The Google Imagery does not help.

Posted February 12, 2014, by Patrick S. O'Donnell (1 [dot] 991km [at] comcast [dot] net)

Actually it was neither William C. Kingsley nor Roebling (at least originally) that supplied the wire for the main cables. That was originally supplied by J. Lloyd Haigh. It was discovered during cable spinning that J. Lloyd Haigh was inserting wire that had been rejected back in with good wire. By the time this discovery was made too much was already spun into the main cables and thus Roebling added extra wires to compensate. I believe the contract for wire was then turned over to Roebling after this discovery of bad wire. William C. Kingsley was a contractor.

Posted February 12, 2014, by Ben Tate (benji5221 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Inverted Bowstring Truss?

Posted February 12, 2014, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Skip,

That's an interesting tidbit. I was under the impression that the Roeblings made the wire in Trenton, NJ. Can you elaborate?

Sincerely,

Art S.

Posted February 12, 2014, by Elliott Johnson (elliottsgon15 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I was in this area today and it looks like the southeast approach is starting to collapse. I took quite a few pictures (somewhat impeded by the snow) and noticed that the southeast approach was sinking and the gate was in pretty bad shape.

Posted February 12, 2014, by Elliott Johnson (elliottsgon15 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

this bridge needs a status change. it should say abandoned, as the bridge over mansion road does, since the abandonment of this rail line in 1997.

Posted February 12, 2014, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Looks like the bridge will be used as a hiking trail. The article also makes reference to the bridge's original location:

http://www.inlandnewstoday.com/story.php?s=32180

Posted February 12, 2014, by skip kingsley (skip_kingsley [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Little mention of my distant kin, William C. Kingsley, who manufactured the cable wires, without which there be no Brooklyn Bridge!

Any Kingsleys reading this if you are related to William,please feel to contact me @ skip_kingsley@yahoo.com.

Thank you,

Skip kingsley

Posted February 12, 2014, by Zachary S

These are neat finds. Judging by appearance, it looks like they have been abandoned for a rather long time.

Posted February 12, 2014, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

A photograph of the new bridge can be seen here.

http://cjonline.com/slideshow/2014-02-10/bridges-shawnee-cou...

I have driven over the old bridge a few times, but I never got a chance to photograph the substructure due to very heavy vegetation. You used to approach this bridge via a tunnel of trees from either direction. Crossing this bridge felt like taking a trip back to 1917. Although the old bridge no doubt had some problems, it also had outstanding historical integrity. The ornate balustrade railings were in much better condition that those on similar bridges in the region.

Posted February 11, 2014, by Brent Tindall (bizzat219 [at] yahoo [dot] com)
Posted February 11, 2014, by John Charles Stutz (john [dot] c [dot] stutz [at] nasa [dot] gov)

The Geysers Road, the Haupt Creek bridge, and the pre-1984 South Fork Guauala River bridge, are all typical 1870's era railroad bridges. Cal Trans documents mention drawings initialled GH&SA RR, suggesting the Southern Pacific's Texas subsidiary, and these spans are typical of those installed by the SP during initial construction of the Sunset and Oregon routes.

The 1909 build date quoted for the Geysers span, is actually when these spans were recycled to the NWP RR's Russian River branch, and installed above Monte Rio as a 3-span crossing. In the same time frame, similar spans were re-erected on the former NPCRR at Tomalas Estuary and Papermill Creek, and the Guauala RR's crossing of the North Fork. The later span still stands on the circa 1910 steel cylindrical piers, but was raised clear of the flood plain circa 1940.

Posted February 11, 2014, by John Charles Stutz

The Geysers Road, the Haupt Creek bridge, and the pre-1984 South Fork Guauala River bridge, are all typical 1870's era railroad bridges. Cal Trans documents mention drawings initialled GH&SA RR, suggesting the Southern Pacific's Texas subsidiary, and these spans are typical of those installed by the SP during initial construction of the Sunset and Oregon routes.

The 1909 build date quoted for the Geysers span, is actually when these spans were recycled to the NWP RR's Russian River branch, and installed above Monte Rio as a 3-span crossing. In the same time frame, similar spans were re-erected on the former NPCRR at Tomalas Estuary and Papermill Creek, and the Guauala RR's crossing of the North Fork. The later span still stands on the circa 1910 steel cylindrical piers, but was raised clear of the flood plain circa 1940.

Posted February 11, 2014, by John Charles Stutz (john [dot] c [dot] stutz [at] nasa [dot] gov)

The Geysers Road, the Haupt Creek bridge, and the pre-1984 South Fork Guauala River bridge, are all typical 1870's era railroad bridges. Cal Trans documents mention drawings initialled GH&SA RR, suggesting the Southern Pacific's Texas subsidiary, and these spans are typical of those installed by the SP during initial construction of the Sunset and Oregon routes.

The 1909 build date quoted for the Geysers span, is actually when these spans were recycled to the NWP RR's Russian River branch, and installed above Monte Rio as a 3-span crossing. In the same time frame, similar spans were re-erected on the former NPCRR at Tomalas Estuary and Papermill Creek, and the Guauala RR's crossing of the North Fork. The later span still stands on the circa 1910 steel cylindrical piers, but was raised clear of the flood plain circa 1940.

Daily Bridge (Missouri)
Posted February 11, 2014, by Fmiser (fmiser [at] gmail [dot] com)

Nice photos, Lisa! Next time you're nearby could you get some more photos, especially of... oh - is gone, isn't it. Torn down, gone forever. *sigh*

Except we have your pictures. Thank you!!

Since you added the photos as a comment, there isn't a way for you to specify licensing. (With an editor account, you can) That means I can't make a copy or edits to your photos without your permission. So I'm asking - may I edit and re-post some of your photos?

Posted February 11, 2014, by john mckenzie (backpckrmckenzie [at] aol [dot] com)

Bridge has collapsed during renovations, doesn't look good. The truss from the south side of the bridge is what is laying horizontal. The north truss and roof was down in the creek.

Posted February 11, 2014, by rick shelton (shltn [dot] rck66 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Just saw coverage on local news. Despite another news site describing it as a "portion" of the bridge, it looks like a total loss.

Posted February 11, 2014, by J.P. (wildcatjon2000 [at] gmail [dot] com)
Daily Bridge (Missouri)
Posted February 11, 2014, by Lisa Donahoo (poohdawg2 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I took some pictures of this bridge just a few days before it was taken out. Thought I would share them. Thanks Lisa

Posted February 11, 2014, by rick shelton (shltn [dot] rck66 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

As of the 5:00 p.m. news on 2-11-14 this bridge has reportedly suffered a catastrophic collapse into the creek. I'm thrilled we can pump billions into Iraq over the years but we had to let the last covered bridge in Clermont County sit for months after damage until it finally dropped. According to the news report a victory had just been won to restore it vs. replacing it. There were reportedly 4 workers on the bridge that are apparently OK. Since it took this long to win a restoration of the bridge, I have to wonder if there's any hope of a rebuild. Have not seen any pictures yet.

Posted February 11, 2014, by Anonymous

Remember if you eat your Wheaties you too can grow up to do big things. Then they might honor you with a bridge in your name.

The Luke Harden Memorial Floating Deck Truss perhaps?

Posted February 11, 2014, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The half-cent sales tax in Shawnee County has been used to replace many of the aging bridges in the county. Some bridges that were lost have been trusses, at least one was a Marsh arch, one was a triple span closed spandrel, and others were just old slabs.

This bridge is schedule to be replaced in 2015 using money from the tax.

A slideshow of projects funded by the tax can be viewed here:

http://cjonline.com/slideshow/2014-02-10/bridges-shawnee-cou...

or at the website for the Topeka Capitol Journal:

http://cjonline.com/

Most of the photographs depict the new bridges, but a few photographs at the end depict the old bridges awaiting replacement.

Grab some popcorn and enjoy the show!

Posted February 11, 2014, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

George,

I notice you have been asking about the status for a ton of bridges in Pennsylvania on this website. If a bridge has been demolished or replaced or even is at risk for demolition... and anybody who moderates this website knows... it would be noted on the pages for the bridge. There is a "Future Prospects" section and a "Status" section where relevant information would appear. Sometimes visitors add information to the forum at the bottom of the page. In regards to highway bridges in Pennsylvania, I try to keep both BridgeHunter and my website at www.historicbridges.org up to date with the current status of bridges. However, due to the demolition rate of bridges in Pennsylvania, often bridges that we think are still there have been demolished. Simply put, if you are visiting bridges in Pennsylvania, you are likely to waste at least some time visiting bridges that are gone. Its just how it goes.

In regards to this particular bridge on Cedar Street, I can tell you it was still standing as shown here when I personally visited the bridge on October 21, 2013.

Posted February 11, 2014, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

does anyone know the current status of this abandoned r.r. bridge?please let me know.thanks.

Posted February 11, 2014, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

does anyone know the current status of this abandoned r.r. bridge?please let me know.thanks.

Posted February 11, 2014, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

does anyone know the current status of this bridge?please let me know.thanks.

Posted February 11, 2014, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

is this bridge still there?please let me know because I did not see it on the map and if it is still there the current status.thanks.

Pennypack Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted February 11, 2014, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

does anyone know the current status of this abandoned r.r, bridge?please let me know.thanks.

Posted February 11, 2014, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

does anyone know the current status of this structurally deficient bridge?please let me know.thanks.

Posted February 11, 2014, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

does anyone know the current status of this abandoned r.r.bridge?please let me know.thanks.

Creek Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted February 11, 2014, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

does anyone know the current status of this closed r.r. bridge?please let me know.thanks.


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