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Posted July 28, 2015, by J.P. (wildcatjon2000 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Made a quick stop and the bridge is sitting and rusting. Hoping it finds a home soon.

Posted July 28, 2015, by J.P. (wildcatjon2000 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Made a quick stop and the bridge is sitting and rusting. Hoping it finds a home soon.

Posted July 28, 2015, by Curtis Herring (curtis [dot] herring55 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge is 105 years old and would make a nice walk over bridge for years to come . a good piece of history for future generations. it shouldn't be torn down

Posted July 28, 2015, by Ed Hollowell (erhollowell [at] aol [dot] com)

Had a look at the piers on July 17, 2015 and the high water would have had the approches on the east side flooded.

Posted July 28, 2015, by Andy Peters (anpete [at] yahoo [dot] com)

the Washington State DOT is going to move this bridge and store it and possibly reuse it elsewhere.

http://www.thenewstribune.com/news/local/community/puyallup-...

Posted July 28, 2015, by Travis Macklin (tmac2540 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I was just there yesterday. Its a shame all the decking boards have been removed but still it is something to see. like the other guys messaging I remember traveling across as a child.

Posted July 28, 2015, by Cathy Burton (cb7801 [at] aol [dot] com)

My father's family is from French Lick Indiana. We know there were four different Burton families in Orange County when dad was growing up. (he will be 83 this year.) We just recently learned there was a "Burton Tunnel." Do you know who the tunnel was named after?

Posted July 27, 2015, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

This rare pin-connected Camelback truss is being offered for reuse, which likely means its otherwise doomed.

http://www.modot.org/freebridges/BigCreekBridge.htm

Posted July 27, 2015, by Robert Elder

Funny, I was wondering the same thing. I don't know of any others this far west. Wyoming has the Fort Laramie Bridge. Kansas and Nebraska have a few King Bowstrings, but I am drawing a blank on anything from the Rockies on west.

Posted July 27, 2015, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I got wondering if this is the most westerly confirmed King Bowstring...

Tuffton Bridge (Minnesota)
Posted July 27, 2015, by Robert Elder

This is a beautiful pony truss. I like seeing bridges like this on a trail.

Posted July 27, 2015, by Robert Elder

Thanks for the photo. You can't beat a good bowstring.

Posted July 27, 2015, by Robert Elder

I just had a look at the Crown Point Bridge on Nathan Holth's website. That was one awesome bridge! I missed it...

Posted July 27, 2015, by Anonymous

Plus, the silver railings mitigate the loss of the Crown Point Bridge.

Posted July 27, 2015, by Anonymous

Art Deco Revival seems like an appropriate description given that this is a near replica of the Hill to Hill Bridge in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania.

Posted July 27, 2015, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

"Granite" from previous 1877 bridge discovered during demolition.

It was a King Bowstring.

http://www.rgj.com/story/news/2015/07/23/unexpected-finds-vi...

Posted July 27, 2015, by Anonymous

It does look quite superhero-esque...

Posted July 27, 2015, by Anonymous

Immortal, strong jawed structure, superhero!

Tuffton Bridge (Minnesota)
Posted July 27, 2015, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

A bridge thought lost has been relocated instead.

http://www.crowrivermedia.com/independentreview/news/local/b...

Posted July 27, 2015, by Anonymous

Boring! Blasé! Common-place!

Posted July 27, 2015, by Robert Elder

If laughter is the best medicine, these comments are going to keep us alive until 2115.

Posted July 27, 2015, by Anonymous

Enlightenment? Simple, one look at the proportions of this bridge.

Posted July 27, 2015, by Anonymous

Actually by 2115, this will be the ONLY bridge. Apocalyptic structural integrity was built into the physics.

Posted July 27, 2015, by Anonymous

One look at the profile of this bridge will immediately double facial symmetry, triple life-expectancy, and quadruple one's generosity of spirit.

Posted July 27, 2015, by Anonymous

One look at the profile of this bridge will immediately double facial symmetry, triple life-expectancy, and quadruple one's generosity of spirit.

Posted July 27, 2015, by Erik Hoffman

Personally I think that this bridge isn't safe for pedestrians or anything else because it's all rusted to heck and the piers are falling over.

Posted July 27, 2015, by Anonymous

The poor Piss Creek Bridge must be feeling unloved with all of the attention being given to this one today.

Posted July 27, 2015, by Anonymous

Where is the Half Star Bandit when you need him?

Posted July 27, 2015, by Anonymous

I'm also going to call bullshit on the 4.25 star rating with 43 votes.

Posted July 27, 2015, by Anonymous

The bridge was added by the architect's business partner, so the "praise" in the description is pretty self-masturbatory if you ask me.

Posted July 27, 2015, by Don Morrison

It is not the bridge that is drawing attention here, it is the gushing praise in the description and some comments.

It's kind of like the opposite of trolling; drawing comments by being overly positive. LOL

Posted July 27, 2015, by Erik Hoffman

I like this bridge. It is very quaint.

Posted July 27, 2015, by Fred Jefferson

Actually, Anonymous, we are talking about the Brooklyn Bridge. By the year 2115, historians will consider the two bridges to be of roughly the same architectural significance.

Posted July 27, 2015, by Anonymous

Come along come along with your boatie and your song

My ain bonnie maids, my twa bonnie maids

For the night it is dark and the Redcoat is gane

And ye are dearly welcome back to Skye once again

Posted July 27, 2015, by Anonymous

In terms of fantasy it looks like a Jedi-bridge.

Posted July 27, 2015, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Jason, please provide citation and elaboration on your update. What safety reasons? What time schedule? I am curious to know more because this appears to be a pointless demolition and loss of a bridge that is important in New Hampshire Context.

Posted July 27, 2015, by Anonymous

In terms of insanity, it is comparable to the Asylum Bridge in Kansas.

Bridge comment
Posted July 27, 2015, by James Ferguson

A lot of folks got upset when the Turkey River Bowstring Bridge in Iowa was demolished. Yet, this bridge has more historical significance than any Bowstring in the USA. Bowstrings are flimsy, mundane, and low budget yet for some reason some folks like them.

Bowstrings < Covered Bridges < This beautiful bridge.

Posted July 27, 2015, by Anonymous

Aluminum handrails and Eastern Hemlock decking do not make up culverts.

Healthy debate is productive where we learn and share ideas objecitvely. Those that like this bridge have conveyed that they too like historic bridges as well and have never been directly offensive, simply stating their point, albeit it exaggerated at times for sure (the comment about the New River Gorge Bridge brought some needed light and humor). Those opposed to the bridge have been directly negative, denying any existence that this bridge looks simple and clean. I wonder if we're looking at the same pictures... We're not talking about the Brooklyn bridge here no, but one should objectively admit that this bridge is certainly more than acceptable...

Posted July 27, 2015, by Paul Johnson

In terms of beauty, it is comparable to the Mackinac Bridge in Michigan.

Posted July 27, 2015, by Anonymous

In terms of engineering, the bridge is a beam on some concrete with some steel handrails, made out of the same materials as culverts. It may do the job. And it may look acceptable, but now these glorified comments have crossed into spam. I would rather see a historic truss here, as would many other contributing members of this site.

Posted July 27, 2015, by Nathan Conroy

Let it be. It does its job. It's not offensive.

Posted July 27, 2015, by Mark Wilson

In terms of engineering feats, this footbridge is comparable to the New River Gorge Bridge in West Virginia.

Posted July 27, 2015, by Robert Elder

Wrought Iron would be a good choice here for durability.

Posted July 27, 2015, by Mick Lions

Galvanized steel is a good choice here for durability

Posted July 27, 2015, by Anonymous

You definitely need 65 tons of concrete for the abutments in Vermont even for shorter span bridges because the snow melt runoff is fierce.

Posted July 27, 2015, by Anonymous

I love the way the light reflects off the aluminum in picture number 10!

Posted July 27, 2015, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Wonder how much it cost because a reused pony truss would have worked well for about 40k. There are so many that need homes.

Posted July 27, 2015, by Anonymous

Fits in there nicely with the snow.

Posted July 27, 2015, by Mick Lions

The aluminum railing looks sleek. I've never seen one like it. I agree. Also here the galvanized steel and the decking looks really sweet. The size is makes sense allowing snowmobiles and small excavators to cross without making the opening too wide for larger vehicles.

We all have our opinions which is great. I like historic truss bridges but here would it be too dark for these particular surroundings with all the evergreen trees. This bridge works because it's light and airy here in the location.

Posted July 26, 2015, by Don Morrison

I'm with Robert Elder on this one - It's certainly not a bad bridge, but despite the bombastic description, it's not really much more than a simple beam bridge with nice wood decking. Bridge-strength concrete for abutments? It's a pedestrian bridge.

The "truss" is just a decorative railing bolted to the decking.

I'd be much more pleased to see an historic truss bridge here, they could just put in bollards or boulders to prevent large vehicles from trying to cross.

Posted July 26, 2015, by Anonymous

I like the Ironton-Russell Bridge because it makes a cool noise when I drive across it.

Posted July 26, 2015, by Scott Riesling

Take a deep breath, clear your head, enlarge the first picture in the scroll and let's all admit to ourselves that yes new bridges when done well can look awesome!

Posted July 26, 2015, by Tyler Riley

This site is seemingly a place mostly for historic bridges– very cool. But what I've seen of most new bridges, this one almost looks historic itself– also very cool!

Posted July 26, 2015, by Bill Eichelberger

Talk about a waste of bandwidth.

Posted July 26, 2015, by Tyler Riley

Looks cool to me.

Posted July 26, 2015, by Tom Frank

The uproar and the insecurity here is strange and unnecessary. If you look at it closely, it fits it well with the environment and makes a stance for the future without being different for different's sake. Everyone loves historic bridges as well, nobody is denying that. This bridge too will one day have a history of its own. Picture 6 indicates pooling water and picture 7 a hearty spring runoff.

Posted July 26, 2015, by John Wellspring

I agree, no huge technical leaps in regards to any of the types of bridges for awhile. Aesthetically, this bridge is different. The fact that this bridge has garnered so much attention from this post is reason 1 for uniqueness. Reason 2 would be the combination of galvanized steel and eastern hemlock. Reason 3 would be the railing formation; verticals and horizontals put together in an symmetrically unique fashion. Reason 4 would be, though new, it doesn't look like a oversized green snake than many modern pedestrian bridges resemble. Reason 5, try to find one that looks like it, you can't.

Posted July 26, 2015, by Jake Jackson

Technically, this is a beam bridge, as in technically there are arch, cantilever, truss, suspension, and cable-stayed bridges. Nothing new under the sun for awhile in terms of any of the basic bridge types.

Posted July 26, 2015, by George Jones

Looks like the bridges on the Merritt Parkway headed into or from New York City.

Posted July 26, 2015, by Robert Elder

Seriously question...how does this bridge stand out for "pure uniqueness"? I have read all of the glowing comments and the flowery essay, but nobody has provided a discussion of what technological advances set this bridge apart from modern stringers. If there is something unique about this bridge, I would love to know what it is. Please be specific.

Posted July 26, 2015, by Robert Elder

I think that we are just going to have to agree to disagree. This bridge just looks like a stringer placed on concrete abutments. I just hate to see 19th Century wrought iron trusses sold for scrap when they could be placed on hiking trails such as this one.

Posted July 26, 2015, by Ian Martin

Would anyone be opposed to me converting this entry to represent the entire stone section of the Park Avenue Viaduct, which runs from 102nd St. to 110 St.? There's an arch like this one at every block in between, and it seems sort of redundant to add them all as independent structures.

Posted July 25, 2015, by C.M. Conkle (msplinter1964 [at] gmail [dot] com)
Posted July 25, 2015, by Scott Riesling

Except seeing one that is capable of carrying both tradition and innovation.

Posted July 25, 2015, by Robert Elder

I can't say I am a fan of modern welded trusses (MOBs) either. There is nothing better than seeing a relocated historic bridge on a trail like this.

Posted July 25, 2015, by Eric Root (ejort [at] att [dot] net)

Vegetation on either side has been cleared. Now there is a sign informing that the road will soon be closed for 75 days. Oh, and there's a crane parked next to the road. I fear this bridge will very soon be gone.

Posted July 25, 2015, by Scott Riesling (Scott [dot] riesling78 [at] gmail [dot] com )

Surely a bit waxed and a bit poetic but I get it. If you look at contemporary designed bridges, they're either generic (boring), historical copies (handsome, but still boring), or awkwardly modern (wonky). Many new pedestrian or small vehicle bridges built today are made to look awkward and asymmetric on purpose which the architect certainly did not do here. No did he reproduce a warren or pratt truss which we've all seen a thousand times. I think this bridge DOES stand out for pure uniqueness; find one that looks like it, you can't– yet it's simple, novel and handsome. Hard to do.

Posted July 25, 2015, by Robert Elder

It is not a bad little bridge, but the description sure waxes poetic. My apologies, but I am not THAT impressed. A relocated historic truss would look nice here.

Posted July 25, 2015, by John Wellspring (Jwellspring45 [at] gmail [dot] com )

I greatly appreciate the architect's nod to historical proportion and symmetry, yet the bridge doesn't look tired and dated– rather streamlined and forward-looking, with strong sense an optimism. Reminiscent of the American 1930's Works Progress Administration style with Art Deco accents. Rare to see any designed and over engineered like this. Well done; strong, timeless, and easy on the eyes.

Posted July 24, 2015, by clay manly (cmanly [at] bellsouth [dot] net)

New photo

Posted July 23, 2015, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Don,

No big deal if they are just pipes. I was curious as to if it was something worth targeting. But I have enjoyed looking at your finds (including the one near Osage that I believe was yours).

Best regards with the continued work,

John

Posted July 23, 2015, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Here's some odd news:

http://wqad.com/2015/07/22/mayflies-force-shutdown-of-savann...

Snowplows in July!

Adding Bridges
Posted July 23, 2015, by Ian Martin

Royce,

Generally I give predecessor/successor bridges separate pages, but in the case that the successor bridges are modern it's sort of case-by-case. If the newer structure is interesting or significant in a unique way, I'd give it its own page. If it's a simple beam or girder span over a highway, I'd probably just mention the newer bridge in the description for the older bridge. Not sure what kind of bridges you're looking at so I'm not sure which approach fits best. Just my opinion, others are welcome to chime in.

Cheers,

Ian

Posted July 23, 2015, by Douglas

A crazy naked man was on top of the raised drawbridge May/ 26/15 this time.

Posted July 23, 2015, by Erik Hoffman

Interesting! I will add him to the builders category.

Posted July 23, 2015, by Anonymous

I am busy with my website and other bridges on this site and vacations and all, so I am leaving this page to you to do whatever you wish with it.

Erik

Posted July 23, 2015, by Danny Parker (barnamus1966 [at] aol [dot] com)

1930's aerial of the Argentine Blvd bridge.

Posted July 23, 2015, by Danny Parker (barnamus1966 [at] aol [dot] com)

Argentine Blvd bridge. East end looking west.

Posted July 23, 2015, by Danny Parker (barnamus1966 [at] aol [dot] com)

Recently found a few more photo's of the Old Southern Bridge (Argentine Blvd Bridge), between Armourdale, and Argentine in Kansas City Kansas.

Posted July 23, 2015, by Danny Parker (barnamus1966 [at] aol [dot] com)

I was recently searching a new website I found called Historic Aerials . com, and done a screen grab from a 1959 aerial of the Bonner Springs bridge, thought I would share.

Posted July 23, 2015, by Danny Parker (barnamus1966 [at] aol [dot] com)

I was recently searching on the web and found a site Called Historic Aerials . com, and done a screen grab of the ATSF bridge at Bonner Springs. and thought I would share.

Tex Wash Bridge (California)
Posted July 23, 2015, by Kevin Dawber (kdog59 [at] att [dot] net)

The Ragsdale road bridge described here I concur would not be able to withstand large trucks. Does anyone know if it sustained enough damage to prevent lighter weight vehicles from using it. Passenger cars and trucks are mostly all less than 10,000 lbs. I've driven over it before in a car. If so, wouldn't it have been an option to at least allow these vehicles to pass over this route instead of putting families and other passenger traffic on a 2 lane highway with big rigs and all the dangerous risks of passing in reverse traffic lanes. All of this through a very desolate area on the 177 to 62 route? There are no gas stations, restrooms, or anything but open desert for at least 1.5 hrs on that route. Middle of summer breakdowns in 100 degree plus weather is also a bad situation for those who may not be prepared for that kind of a detour.

Posted July 23, 2015, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

as per an article printed in the reading eagle 7-23-15 this bridge is now open for traffic after repair work on this bridge.

Posted July 23, 2015, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

One reason for posting poorly documented structures is so they can be researched. Almost always people locate more info and add to the site. I think this is the first instance of a total fake and the fact that it was posted here led to additional research that will probably lead to the fake source being corrected.

If this page stays it should be clearly noted that it's a joke page and we might encourage Butleresque drawings of the unique chain deck, destruction, repairs, and the location/setting. NSFW toilet humor should be avoided....

James has the delete button and we should watch for his decision and guidance.

(Who voted for this thing? Three votes??)

Posted July 23, 2015, by Don Morrison

Hey, John

Yes, there are the "tubes", where the "Old Roundhouse Trail" / "Wapsi Great Western Line Trail" crosses Mead Creek, and a smaller structure crossing a waterway farther north on the trail.

I haven't walked the trail in a few years. 8^(

The tubes are a pair of large culverts, I can't recall what the other structure is.

I never considered them as significant enough to document, I guess. Perhaps they are historic, since the CGW crossed on them.

I'm thinking that there is another very small culvert up near Lylah's Marsh as well.

There exist abutments three miles south on the north end of Alta Vista too, but the time I tried to photograph them, the photos weren't very good. (Old CGW ROW across Elk Creek.)

You can see parts of the old ROW all the way to:

Sumner, where it crosses the Little Wapsi in Google Earth.

Dundee, where there appears to be a large pier in the maquoketa river, and this - 42.577095, -91.526909.

Manchester, looks like a trestle. 42.556595, -91.429337

I think I can follow the old ROW all the way to Dubuque. Lots of bridge hunting opportunities.

I'll try to get some photos near Elma soon.

I guess this page needs a "Rail to Trail" category, too

Posted July 22, 2015, by Roger Deschner (rogerdeschner [at] gmail [dot] com)

The Riflesight Notch Loop was planned and built as a single structure by the railroad for the purpose of gaining elevation in a limited space. To do that they had to build a tunnel and a bridge (trestle), together at the exact same location. (See photo) They probably had to be built very carefully, to avoid one damaging the other during construction. Historians consider them as one structure. If they were to be considered separately, they would have the exact same geographic coordinates. I do not see how that is different from the Navy requiring a string of bridges and tunnels to traverse Chesapeake Bay. That is why I tagged Riflesight Notch Loop as a bridge-tunnel, because that's what this single structure is. I have been to both. If Riflesight Notch Loop is two separate structures, then the Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel is several separate structures as well, related as "same project". It has 15 separate Virginia Bridge Numbers. For simplicity, let's just keep both bridge-tunnels as single entities here.

Posted July 22, 2015, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Big NBI Rating Drop in 3 Years.

January 2010 Inspection:

Superstructure Fair [5], Substructure Good [7], Deck Good [7]

July 2013 Inspection

Deck condition rating: Fair (5 out of 9), Superstructure condition rating: Imminent Failure (1 out of 9), Substructure condition rating: Serious (3 out of 9)

Posted July 22, 2015, by Erik Hoffman

You are welcome.

Now here is the big question:

Should we delete this or keep it here as a joke?

Posted July 22, 2015, by Erik Hoffman

Sorry about that. I should have known by the name that this was a phony structure that some fool had put in there. I now see that that attraction register is not a dignified site and one should not rely on their info.

Posted July 22, 2015, by Anonymous

This will be a freely flowing joke for a long time.

Posted July 22, 2015, by Anonymous

El Dorado County - that is just golden!

Posted July 22, 2015, by Anonymous

I feel so relieved. Urinal lot of trouble when the internet police catch you...

Posted July 22, 2015, by Erik Hoffman

Hello all, Erik here.

I figured out why nobody can find this structure.

Being very confused about all this, I contacted the Webmaster of the attraction register regarding the credibility of their information. The Webmaster did not know what the heck I was talking about, and after some research, we concluded that some idiot had snuck this bridge, which is completely phony in every way, into the local register, as a prank.

Sorry I troubled you for falling for such crap.

Posted July 22, 2015, by Luke

The category was made for three structures at Norfolk/Virginia Beach/Hampton, Virginia that are bridges with tunnels underneath the main navigation channels.

The structures were built that way due to the Navy being worried about a bridge being targeted to shut down the navigation channels, thereby crippling the Atlantic Fleet, which is based out of Naval Station Norfolk.

Posted July 22, 2015, by Patrick Feller (nakrnsm [at] aol [dot] com)

Much as I'd like to see a bridge tunnel or a trestle tunnel, this trestle and tunnel appear to be two entirely separate structures, functionally and structurally independent of each other.

Posted July 22, 2015, by Chester Gehman (gehmanc2000 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

We have so many meaningless categories on this website I have to ask: what is a bridge-tunnel? And if Tunnel 33 does not qualify, according to our expert, what is it? A trestle-tunnel?

Posted July 22, 2015, by Kyler K.

Visited the bridge today. The bridge is not accessible from the Benton side but is able to be accessed pretty easily from the Haskell side. There's a gravel road that leads right up to it. There's a little picnic area by the bridge which looks like it's used by local folks. I was able to get some cool pictures of the bridge. Really neat place.

Posted July 22, 2015, by Bob Waterhouse (bobwaterh [at] aol [dot] com)

Nathan, thanks for the suggestion. I've contacted them, and will post any answers they provide

Posted July 21, 2015, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Hey Don,

Just wondering if you've found the other two structures in Elma. They appear on satalite imagery, but I'm wondering if you know more.

Both are over forks of the Little Wapsipinicon River, just north of town

-John


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