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Posted October 1, 2013, by John Marvig (johnmarvig [at] chaska [dot] net)

The pony truss on this structure is odd as it was clearly built by Lassig Bridge & Iron Works in 1894, yet it is riveted and has almost zero lacing. Anyone want to weigh in on if the 1894 date is correct? The line was relocated here that year, and double tracked in 1911

Posted October 1, 2013, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I kinda want to create a new category for this type of bridge called "Whomper-Jawed"

Posted October 1, 2013, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Kinda like the bowstring I "found" one day while eating at a KFC!

Posted October 1, 2013, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Yep... I guarantee you it was a height issue...

And yep... It did ruin the aesthetic value of this bridge...

Charles Dana Bridge (New Hampshire)
Posted October 1, 2013, by Steven W Lindsey (SteveLindsey60 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Issue of vibration discussed by Jason at Bridge Hunter Chronicles... See: http://thebridgehunter.areavoices.com/2013/09/30/bridge-vibr...

Posted October 1, 2013, by J.P. (wildcatjon2000 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This might be one of my favorite bridges, it has a wendy's basically attached to it. Heck YEAH!!!!

Posted October 1, 2013, by Luke Harden (lukemh9 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Yep. This is one of several railroad bridges in Iowa that were reused as road bridges.

Another MILW example would be the arch bridge in Lost Nation, Iowa's Gilroy Rustic Park.

Posted October 1, 2013, by Tim Courtney (timothycourtney [at] gmail [dot] com)

This was actually a bridge originally constructed by the Milwaukee Rd line between Wadena and West Union. I believe it could have been a narrow gauge line originally, but not 100% sure about that. With careful observation in the winter time, some of the original ROW can be seen.

Posted October 1, 2013, by Brian Higgins (brianrotc [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Amazing to see this picture. I own the cabin on the now private road that used to lead to the County Line Bridge before Truman Lake came in. I was 5 when the lake came in and have only heard stories of the bridge from my Grand Father who still lives 1/4 a mile away from the cabin.

Please contact me via email if there is anyway I can get a copy of the picture to hang in my cabin.

Brian

Posted October 1, 2013, by Michael Miller (michael_a_miller [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This is a coal tipple. Coal was carried by conveyor belt, across the road and then stored in the silo until it could be loaded into rail cars for transport to market.

Posted October 1, 2013, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

http://www.clipsyndicate.com/video/playlist/19054/4388811?ti...

Very positive meetings with most of the interested parties. Two more today. Proud of the friends and whst we are able to accomplish.

Raising funds for site visit by Nels Raynor and Jim Schiffer.

They will help with planning design and maintenance plans.

Posted September 30, 2013, by Logan Carmichael (loganthedj [at] gmail [dot] com)

This should actually be listed in Marion County, TN...not Claiborne. This is in South Pittsburg, just off Hwy 72 near the "River Park" alongside the Tennessee River -- in the shadow of the Shelby Rhinehart Bridge. The tunnel formerly carried trackage for the Sequatchie Valley Railroad, which now follows a different route.

Posted September 30, 2013, by Jim Grey (mobilene [at] gmail [dot] com)

I just added a photo to the gallery of the bridge showing that the unique "link" railing has been altered. The railing was cut at about street level, a row of concrete blocks was inserted, and the original railing was placed on top of that.

I have to assume this was done to meet some standard for bridge railing height, but it ruined the aesthetic of this unique structure.

Posted September 30, 2013, by Luke Harden (lukemh9 [at] gmail [dot] com)

It's in PA.

Posted September 30, 2013, by J.P. (wildcatjon2000 [at] gmail [dot] com)

based on the lattice on this bridge, pretty sure 1962 is a rehab date.

Posted September 30, 2013, by Jodi Christman (masterofchaos [at] outlook [dot] com)

Where is this bridge? The GPS coordinates indicate Pennsylvania yet the bridge information provided says Allegany, Maryland.

Ravenswood Bridge (West Virginia)
Posted September 30, 2013, by Michael Miller (michael_a_miller [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I noticed that as well and I corrected.

Posted September 29, 2013, by Jason Smith (JDSmith77 [at] gmx [dot] net)

Julie, as I indicated before, Iowa Bridge Company was responsible for the rehabilitation of the bridge in 1913. This was according to the IaDOT bridge records which I have in my possession. If you want a copy of the records, I'll be happy to provide them to you....

James, please ensure that the bridge builder is mentioned as well. Thank you!

Posted September 29, 2013, by John Marvig (johnmarvig [at] chaska [dot] net)

Anybody have anything to say about this odd bridge? It has very light connections, but very heavy members. Built on stone and concrete, the line was relocated here 1899, but it does not look like an 1899 bridge to me. Its a very odd bridge.

Posted September 29, 2013, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Beautiful shot J.P.!

Posted September 29, 2013, by Jodi Christman (masterofchaos [at] outlook [dot] com)

Does anyone know who the builder / contractor was for this bridge? Thanks in advance.

Posted September 29, 2013, by Luke Harden (lukemh9 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Actually, it's a timber stringer bridge bookended on one end by a DPG with a steel stringer in the middle, and with a eve-so-slight s-curve in the bridge.

Yes, timber stringers are the bridge equivalent of a penny, I think this one is pretty neat because of the s-curve.

Posted September 29, 2013, by John Marvig (johnmarvig [at] chaska [dot] net)

http://www.dot.state.mn.us/d4/projects/hwy75kent/documents/k...

US-75 will be rerouted, bridge to remain. Project begins 2016

Posted September 28, 2013, by donald stoops (sarahstoops [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I'm a construction worker replacing the old bridge. We have saved bridges like this in the past in fact the company I work for rebuilt the Cedar bridge in Madison co Ia and did a major repair on the Hammond bridge in Marion co Ia. We have rehabbed several truss bridges by adding steel plating to their beams, and replacing piling but the Taer bridge was rusted out to the point that repairing the bridge, well not impossible, would have cost 2 to 3 time the price of a new bridge

Posted September 28, 2013, by Scott Gavin (fatpiecat2 [at] charter [dot] net)

Well, it is only a wooden trestle with a plate girder span in the middle. It's not like it's really unique, special, or antique. Bridges like this where the railroad equivalent of the ubiquitous concrete highway bridge.

Posted September 28, 2013, by J.P. (wildcatjon2000 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Rare look a the top of the Tyrone High Bridge at the end of the Bluegrass Railroad Line.

Posted September 28, 2013, by Anonymous

No worries. I just realized that this is a duplicate listing.

Posted September 28, 2013, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

What might they be tending!?

Possibility is a river monitoring station, enclosed with access from top of pier.

Green River Bridge (North Dakota)
Posted September 28, 2013, by Ben Tate (benji5221 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Is that your crane in the photo, Steve?

Posted September 28, 2013, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Bridge tenders' facilities???

Posted September 28, 2013, by Carla (gcfrazier55 [at] att [dot] net)

The arsonists were Michael Clouse, James Boyll and Richard Hedden. I work at the Rockville Public Library in Parke County, IN and looked it up. Thank you for responding.

Attachment #1 (image/tiff; 211,792 bytes)

Attachment #2 (image/tiff; 185,017 bytes)

Posted September 27, 2013, by John Marvig (johnmarvig [at] chaska [dot] net)

The last Carver stone arch is gone. To be replaced by a wider bridge

Posted September 27, 2013, by Luke Harden (lukemh9 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Thanks for adding this.

It's neat.

Also, rather conveniently, the DPG span is in a picture on Wikipedia!

Too bad it's being demolished though, but I think needing more track, especially for public transit trains, is at least a legitimate reason

Posted September 27, 2013, by Luke Harden (lukemh9 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Thanks for catching that.

I was editing in haste and just copied the original "carries" up to the title for the new name.

My bad.

Posted September 27, 2013, by Luke Harden (lukemh9 [at] gmail [dot] com)

1) I was merely pointing out to Russell that the bridge being listed as "BNSF" was not a glaring mistake" as Russel had described it as.

It was not my intent to come across as rude or haughty.

2) "Ergo" means the exact same thing as "therefore".

Also I don't know why you're getting all pissy about my choice of terminology when it has no bearing on your claim

3) "Listen & learn"

I'm going to presume that you are trying to imply that I am unwilling to learn with that quip.

A claim which is rather unfounded.

Also: I thanked Russel for the information that the bridge had been used by the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul & Pacific Railroad (Given the build date, they probably built it as well)

Ps: Now, I may have misinterpreted Mr.Holter's post, and if I have, my bad.

Posted September 27, 2013, by K. A. Erickson

I added this for Luke, et al. It is due to be demolished to make way for a bigger trestle that can carry more tracks. Sounder trains are planned to increase their runs as time goes by. They need to be able to pass by each other, extra line for repair use, etc.

Posted September 27, 2013, by K. A. Erickson

I have not seen any trains go over it. BNSF uses the low lying Pratt to the North of the Eells and the tracks south along the Puyallup. Union Pacific uses the skewed 1948 bridge south of I-5.

This bridge is owned by Tacoma Rail, the intent to distribute products from companies along a "Mountain" line to the Union Pacific yards East. Their "Terminal" line is far more profitable, busy. The "Mountain" lines are mainly used for storage by other rail companies, park some cars, etc. at x dollars a day.

Posted September 27, 2013, by Kelly McClanahan

This web site can be fun, and very helpful. I have a 1958 MHD (MoDot) map, and by using this web site I was able to identify the bridge on the cover of the map as the Lake Taneycomo Bridge. If I ever get a chance, I will scan it, and add it to the site. It looks vastly different back in 1950's when the picture was taken.

Posted September 27, 2013, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Ergo....really?. or just twisted logic. Listen to the locals and learn.

Ergo? Stop being rude.

Posted September 27, 2013, by mike (mike31_48823 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This bridge is still in use as of 9-27-13 and has been verified as still open!!!

Posted September 27, 2013, by Anonymous

One slight correction. It is North Bend. (Singular) Thanks.

Posted September 27, 2013, by The Independent Rage (theindependentrage [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I recall this bridge still being used to carry the southbound US 71 lanes until some point in the mid-1980s, when it was bypassed for good with the building of a new bridge and two new lanes to the east.

Posted September 27, 2013, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I believe it was a group of kids from Terre Haute

Posted September 27, 2013, by Kelly McClanahan

This video came to me in a MoDot Email. It shows a video of the original, 1955 bridge being built. It is about 40 minutes, but worth it. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-N3woUdiG6A

Posted September 27, 2013, by Carla (gcfrazier55 [at] att [dot] net)

Who burned down this bridge in 1976?

Posted September 27, 2013, by Donna Baker (donna [dot] baker3889 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Attn: Austin Bridge Co. of Dallas,TX. The sister Bridge underpass to this bridge is nextdoor to this one on S. 1st Street and Cedar St. and is the reason for this email 'ALERT". Huge chunks of concrete debris are rapidly deteriorating from underneath every main support wall structure unit; built in 1936. Have emailed City Mayor's Office, he gave me the blow off. State DPS Roads and Bridges- they gave me a thank you and blew me off, too. Then sent email over to T&P RR,they gave me non concern answer response, said they'd take care of it. Action taken to date-"NONE". Can someone in your company please take me seriously enough to send a Civil Engineer or whomever takes care of your Bridge Inspections to this bridgesite?

If I owned a camera, I would download photo attachments to you myself, unfortunately I do not. All city management here are in complete denial that a serious problem with this underpass bridge currently exists; an in-the-flesh site inspection done by certified inspector is the onlly answer. By doing this, your company can get the jump on your competition in securing the job bid, if you know what I mean.

My deepest regards,

Donna Baker/Citizen of Abilene,TX

donna.baker3889@yahoo.com

Posted September 27, 2013, by Russell Holter (rails2paradise [at] netscape [dot] net)

Gentlemen,

I need to point out a glaring mistake on your website. The bridge you have identified here at the BNSF-Puyallup River bridge is the Tacoma Rail Bridge nee, Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Pacific.

For the sake of accuracy, I thought you might consider revising this entry.

Russell Holter

Posted September 27, 2013, by Jordan Leopard (jordan [at] augustairon [dot] com)

The bridge shown is the 5th Street Bridge. Here is a photo of the swing span pier.

Posted September 27, 2013, by Jason Smith (JDSmith77 [at] gmx [dot] net)

Robert Thompson, do you mind me using a couple of your photos for my Bridgehunter's Chronicles' article about this bridge? Please let me know via e-mail as soon as you get a chance. Thanks!

JS

Posted September 26, 2013, by Bill Eichelberger

It kills me that you feel the need to publicly complain about a photo contribution that someone else has made to the site. I'm embarrassed for you, so don't feel like you need to bother. It's handled.

Calvin, keep firing away. Some of us appreciate the effort.

Posted September 26, 2013, by Ed Hollowell (erhollowell [at] aol [dot] com)

So using photos to demonstrate a point.

188104-L is a useful, worthwhile photo.

188105-L which was posted right after is a mess.

Take 188104-L and crop it to resemble 188105-L and you have a nice photo of what 188105-L was supposed to be, only better. This clear, sharp photo is 188104-LCS.

Why the photographer, after spending hours getting photos couldn't spend a few minutes getting the best images posted I'm not sure. Maybe there is a "story" in the blurry photos I missed. If I want to see the rivets and the pins and the bearings and pier I don't don't need to see 188105-L because that detail is blurred out because it's out of focus.

Posted September 26, 2013, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Fun day on the water. Advance team for Workin' Bridges. One of the next for Nels Raynor and Jim Schiffer to take a look at.

Wolf Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted September 26, 2013, by Wes B (Hypersonixu2 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Closed again today, and likely doomed. I can see it being replaced more than refurbished.

http://www.pennlive.com/midstate/index.ssf/2013/09/deficient...

Posted September 26, 2013, by Bette Jo Ramsey (bjayr85 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

When one of my sisters and I were small my great aunt Thelma would take us for a walk when she babysat. Somehow my sister would whine enough we always ended up on top of the bridge. I hated it. When a car or truck would drive across the entire thing shook and of course made all sorts of noises. I just knew that bridge would collapse with me on top of it. My sister on the other hand loved it. She would crawl all over the bars on it and would have climbed up it if anyone had let her. One thing I will say it had was character. Much more than the new one. I hated to see it go and was right there a block away when they blew it up.

Posted September 26, 2013, by Clay (yalc [at] yalc [dot] com)

Looking at a satellite view of the Jake's Garage area, you can see there used to be two bridges. One was east of Jake's Garage, over the Deep Fork. This is the site of the abutment with the Jake's Garage sign painted on it in the Flickr photo. The other bridge was northeast of Jake's, to cross the railroad tracks (which are gone).

I agree with you this probably was part of the bridge over the Deep Fork, though maybe not the main span. I was unable to find information on the date that alignment of Rt 66 was abandoned.

Posted September 26, 2013, by Clay (yalc [at] yalc [dot] com)

It's gone.

Posted September 26, 2013, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Google Streetview indicates that there is no bridge at this location. It appears to be lost, assuming that the streetview shows the correct location.

Posted September 26, 2013, by mike caldwell (micaldwell [at] bluemarble [dot] net)

my grandfather isaac caldwell and his father ran a ferry at the river. this bridge put him out of buisness. never could understand how people would put the welfare of their families ahead of saving a few minutes. things change though. he would shut the ferry down in the winter when the river would freeze. climate change put a end to that

Leo Frigo bridge closed
Posted September 25, 2013, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)
Posted September 25, 2013, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Here is a photo of the replacement MOB:

http://cavecountrycanoes.com/media/photos/facilities/milltow...

I see the old piers of the historic bridge are still there. It definitely could have been left standing next to its replacement. This is yet another example of how Indiana's management plan is severely flawed. There obviously are ways to get around preserving a select bridge.

The replacement bridge is so dissimilar and ugly compared to the historic bridge that I find the bridge insulting to the memory of the historic bridge.

Posted September 25, 2013, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I see they tried to emulate the old bridge by adding a smaller pony span to the new MOB pony...didn't work.

What stinks is that they built the new bridge next to the old one and could have simply retained the historic bridge for foot traffic. I will have to check to see if the trusses were dismantled and stored since this was a Select span.

Regardless, the uniqueness of the stepped pony trusses is forever gone.

Posted September 25, 2013, by Tammy (tammynickell [at] gmail [dot] com)

I am interested in knowing the names of the people that died in the bridge collapse September 21, 1965 in warsaw mo

Posted September 25, 2013, by Tom Hoffman (tehoffm [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Now that is ridiculous. Especially since Crawford County has restored most of their metal bridges. I'm glad I got too see this bridge once. Was such an unusual and neat bridge where either way the three truss spans changed size. At least the old Rothrock Mill was saved. But a modern truss bridge to replace a demolished rare historic truss is crummy.

Posted September 25, 2013, by Bruce Bridges (railfan727 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This bridge no longer exists. It was removed and replaced with a modern steel pony plate girder last year when I-65 was widened from two to three lanes in each direction.

Posted September 25, 2013, by Tom Hoffman (tehoffm [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I have been to the sight of this bridge. The UCEB that replaced the covered bridge is becoming dilapidated. Also the same thing is happening to the UCEB that replaced the Lowell Covered bridge down to the south. I'm sick of historic metal truss bridges like in Ohio and elsewhere being demolished and replaced with modern covered bridges. UCEBs build between 1955 and 1990 becoming dilapidated are the ones to replace with modern covered bridges.

Posted September 25, 2013, by booniewalker (kentuckian2 [at] gmail [dot] com)

As my wife just commented, this is a fantastic bridge. We spent about 2 hours there and not one train came by. I thought it was the main line. There should have been at least one train in that time. Two would be more likely, for the main line. Don't understand why there was no train, unless something happened to delay them.

Posted September 25, 2013, by booniebees (booniebarb [at] yahoo [dot] com)

My husband and I drove to Tennessee from KY yesterday, to view this 'wonder' in person. I must say, you have great 'shots' posted that intrigued us to take this closer look!

So I wouldn't worry too much about a tinge of jealousy heard in some of the poster's comments about your photos...:-)

This bridge is a sight to see! The sheer magnitute of its size, and being under it and looking up, is one that will hold you in awe, as you are so small in comparison!! We were there for almost 2 hours, and the peacefulness of that area was awesome as well! We didn't get to see one train though. Slow day I guess...:-)

The only other area we have been, to see something close to this spectacular, is on the KY river under the "High Bridge" in Jessamine Co., built in 1877...

Thanks for your ejoyable website!

Re: World's Widest Bridge
Posted September 24, 2013, by Ed Hollowell (erhollowell [at] aol [dot] com)

The bridge which carries the runways at LA International Airports over State Road 1 is 2060 ft. wide.

re: Height and weight detector for high truss bridges
Posted September 24, 2013, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Jason,

The over height indicator lights don't work very well on this bridge: http://11foot8.com/

Personally, I like what the railroad did on that bridge. They went a step further: They also put a reinforced headache bar that will absolutely destroy any overheight vehicle that ignores the warning lights. Its no less than the ignorant truck drivers deserve.

Posted September 24, 2013, by Tim Courtney (Timothycourtney [at] gmail [dot] com)

The fourth truss span fell into the river secondary to a rail car derailment bringing loads across the river from John Deere in early 70's.

Posted September 24, 2013, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

The photos for this bridge show what is almost certainly a replacement. Note the lack of rivets, and the plain, ugly, uninspired girders.

Posted September 24, 2013, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

This is a rare bridge since it is a Warren truss with no verticals. Looks to be hard to photograph.

Re: World's Widest Bridge
Posted September 24, 2013, by James Baughn (webmaster [at] bridgehunter [dot] com)

I peeked at the NBI and found quite a few bridges that are wider than 258 ft., mostly interstate spans. Perhaps Guinness is only talking about major bridges, although they don't say that on their page. The Erie Canal tour guides at Lockport are quite adamant that their Main Street Bridge is the widest in the world.

Posted September 24, 2013, by Teresa

Is the Rogers Bridge still over the river? I am a descendant of the Rogers. Yes, they were married to the Cordery sisters and their mother was an indian, Susannah Sonicooie. She and her husband had a trading post and she last lived in Old Town Suwanee.

Posted September 24, 2013, by J.P. (wildcatjon2000 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Not sure but this looks like a warren pony truss based on the shadow.

Height and weight detector for high truss bridges
Posted September 24, 2013, by Wayne Kizziar (wayne1701 [at] cableone [dot] net)

Jason I have seen these systems in use here in East Texas as well. Most of them, like your example, used at older plate girder railroad underpasses. I do not have any stats to offer but a friend of mine that works for the department of public safety told me the incidents of over height trucks striking the bridges has dropped considerably where these systems are in use.

Height and weight detector for high truss bridges
Posted September 24, 2013, by Jason Smith (JDSmith77 [at] gmx [dot] net)

In connection with the Skagit Bridge disaster and talk of going on a witch hunt to replace through truss bridges, I found a mechanism which is affordable and can catch people with oversized vehicles before crossing the bridge. Read this article and please comment on this idea....

What do you think of this idea? http://thebridgehunter.areavoices.com/2013/09/24/height-dete...

World's Widest Bridge
Posted September 24, 2013, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I found that the Guinness World Records is listing the Oakland Bay Bridge Replacement Eastern Spans as the widest bridge in the world with a total deck width of 258.33 ft. Aren't there other wider bridges? I know "Big Bridge" in Lockport, New York was 307 feet wide as originally built but I think the NBI lists a 400 foot width. Either way, by my calculations, that's wider.

http://www.guinnessworldrecords.com/world-records/6000/wides...

Posted September 23, 2013, by Clay (okbridges [at] yalc [dot] com)

I photographed this in Apr 2010. I see from Google Maps satellite view that it is gone now.

Posted September 23, 2013, by John Marvig (johnmarvig [at] chaska [dot] net)

This isn't real far from me so I might try to hit it at some point in the near future. There are a few other stone arches and tunnels around Mankato as well

Posted September 23, 2013, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Maybe try visiting the bridge on a Sunday when nobody is working? I doubt the Quarry runs much traffic over this bridge given most of their traffic would be too heavy for the bridge. Looks like they are running a small black hose or something over it based on the imagery.

Posted September 23, 2013, by J.P. (wildcatjon2000 [at] gmail [dot] com)
Posted September 23, 2013, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Looking at the 1980 topo, it shows a much smaller quarry and Vance Avenue running all the way south across the bridge to the highway. Obviously the county abandoned the road so they may have given up the bridge as well. My guess is the quarry kept the bridge since the creek divides the site.

Posted September 23, 2013, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I have uploaded James L. Cooper's outstanding report that at long last revealed the unknown history and significance of this bridge to the world on my page for this bridge:

http://www.historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowse...

Direct link to the article:

http://www.historicbridges.org/indiana/patoka650/jamescooper...

Posted September 23, 2013, by Anonymous

Another beautiful restoration by Nels Raynor & James Ahrens. Good luck on all your future work anywhere & everywhere you can go to restore these graceful structures of steel. I know it takes a lot from you physically and emotionally, but they are transcendent. Makes me proud.

Posted September 23, 2013, by Tom Hoffman (tehoffm [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Wow, I had no clue William T Washer build iron truss bridges as well. Just knew he built lots of covered bridges in Southwestern Indiana. Is this the only one of his metal truss bridges still standing?

Posted September 23, 2013, by Anonymous

From the satellite view, the bridge looks to be on a haul road through the divide between an active section of a stone quarry and a section that has already been mined out and re-claimed. This isn't the type of place that unannounced visitors are welcome. So be safe and smart and keep your wits about you,especially if tomorrow is a blasting day.

Posted September 23, 2013, by Dave King (DKinghawkfan [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I can definitely see now it is not. Thanks guys. That shadow had me spoofed. I will try to access it if at all possible tomorrow when I'm out that way.

Posted September 23, 2013, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Take a look at this Bing view and you can see a 5 panel through truss that looks to be an older pinned Pratt. Not a bowstring unfortunately...but still looks like a very nice find!

http://www.bing.com/maps/?v=2&cp=qzpjfs77w82p&lvl=19.81&dir=...

Posted September 23, 2013, by Luke Harden (lukemh9 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Looking at it in Bing Bird's Eye, it's definitely NOT a bowstring.

It looks like a Pratt through truss to me.

Posted September 23, 2013, by Dave King (DKinghawkfan [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I just found this on satellite looking around where I will be tomorrow and noticed this. Looks to be a bowstring but I can tell if pony or through. Any thoughts?

Posted September 23, 2013, by Matt Lohry

This is a basket-handle arch, very similar to the new Lowry Avenue Bridge in Minneapolis, but that one's a highway bridge.

Posted September 23, 2013, by Luke Harden (lukemh9 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I couldn't find any documentation showing that this bridge is open to pedestrians (At least officially.)

Posted September 23, 2013, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Looking at the wire and splice in picture 11 you can see a telegrapher's splice. The wire resembles the wire used for telegraph lines which makes me wonder if that's where they sourced the steel wire.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Western_union_splice

Posted September 23, 2013, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Pretty modern, Pretty non-historic, but Pretty.

Edna Griffin was "The Rosa Parks of Iowa".

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/State_of_Iowa_v._Katz

Posted September 23, 2013, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Nels. Can't wait to get ahold of all the footage for the next movie. Glad these are done and you are coming to Iowa and Alabama for some Workin'Bridges expert consulting. Outstanding in kind restorations of pin connected trusses.

Posted September 23, 2013, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Not doomed. We have a grant letter to bring the Workin' Bridges experts in anyway for the Friend of the Bridge. More will be revealed. We didnt bail on this project. FHWA made us.

Posted September 22, 2013, by James Wireman (jameslovesbridges_86 [at] ymail [dot] com)

I said This bridge is not Doomed. It says it is but its not.

Posted September 22, 2013, by James Wireman (jameslovesbridges_86 [at] ymail [dot] com)

The Bridge is not doomed. Do you hear me? The bridge is not doomed. This bridge is Restorable. This bridge is not Doomed, This bridge is not doomed.

Posted September 22, 2013, by James Wireman (jameslovesbridges_86 [at] ymail [dot] com)

This Bridge/Overpass is not Doomed


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