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RE: RR Overpasses
Posted June 28, 2014, by Luke Harden

Considering that MKT hasn't existed since 1988 when it was merged into the Missouri Pacific, you should list former MKT bridges as UP or whatever railroad currently/last used uses the line.

Rr overpasses
Posted June 28, 2014, by Anonymous

I think it should be listed as whoever is currently using the line.

Previous operators should also be added as alt names.

Posted June 28, 2014, by Jen Savage (r)

Stopped to shoot a photo of this bridge on 6/27/14

RR overpasses
Posted June 28, 2014, by Royce and Bobette Haley (roycehaley111 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

If an Overpass is built by MKT RR but was purchased or being leased by UP. For our purposes of naming it should it be MKT or UP

Royce

Posted June 28, 2014, by Ralph Demars (rdemars1 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

A new bridge has been built alongside it. Probably closed to all traffic.

Posted June 27, 2014, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Article mentioning the bridge's preservation:

http://www.pennlive.com/midstate/index.ssf/2014/06/penndot_t...

Posted June 27, 2014, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Well, I guess the pictures of the two bridges are scrambled. I still say the finials are over the top :^)

Posted June 27, 2014, by Luke

The bridge with the finials is the Augusta Street Bridge: http://bridgehunter.com/tx/bexar/augusta-street/

Posted June 27, 2014, by Margot

I think these are different bridges. I seem to remember the one with the finials having pictures with cats.

Posted June 27, 2014, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

So, what happened to the huge finials that were on the corners? Those were over the top!

Posted June 27, 2014, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Nice bridge. However, a frontage road is impractical due to the maintenance costs of the bridge. How big is the group that wants the bridge maintained? If the group can convince the state that it can remain at its current location, who will maintain it? Who will accept liability? Why would they? If whomever wants the bridge saved can answer these questions, then they have a chance at saving it.

By the way, what is the load limit? If its high, maybe it could replace the Pond Eddy bridge across the Delaware!

Regards,

Art S.

Posted June 27, 2014, by Anonymous

The entire trail was built on the ROW of the interurban

Posted June 27, 2014, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Was this part of the line ever used for interurban or was it just on the eastern side of the state?

Posted June 26, 2014, by James Wireman (jameslovesbridges_86 [at] ymail [dot] com)

This tunnel is not Doomed hey this tunnel is not Doomed! I think this tunnel can be saved.

Posted June 26, 2014, by Anonymous

This bridge still looks okay enough to be Repaired to be saved. Please don't let them Tear this bridge Down. This bridge still looks too Fine for that. This bridge still looks fine.

Posted June 26, 2014, by James Wireman (jameslovesbridges_86 [at] ymail [dot] com)

I still Think that This Bridge can Be Saved as Preferably as a No Truck Frontage Rd. Bridge. Please I don't want this bridge to go so soon. I would Like for this bridge to stay up and running for at least until somewhere in the year 2025 or even until the year 2030. Please don't tear this Pretty cool looking bridge down. I'm Going to keep on Fighting to save this bridge until the end. I do not want this bridge to go so soon. Please don't let them Have this bridge torn down.

South Presa Street Bridge
Posted June 26, 2014, by royce haley (roycehaley111 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Guess I should have asked. Is there a way to move them to the correct bridge?

Royce

South Presa Street Bridge
Posted June 26, 2014, by royce haley (roycehaley111 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I'm sure this has probably been pointed out, however just in case it hasn't, pictures #5 thru #15 are pictures of the Augusta Street Bridge not the South Presa Street Bridge. Possibly posted by Max Johnson.

And while I'm here thank you very much all who helped with the panel question I had earlier. It made things much clearer for me.

Royce

Posted June 26, 2014, by Anonymous

Luke check out Nanseann May 2013 and you will see the actual bridge in New Bern NC

Posted June 26, 2014, by Luke Harden

They aren't the same bridge, because the abandoned Conrail one Tony linked to is mounted on concrete piers, whereas this bridge appears to be mounted solely to timber bents.

Posted June 26, 2014, by Anonymous

She looks all right. I'd walk with her. Also a couple cuties following her!

Posted June 26, 2014, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Tony,

Are we certain that they are not the same bridge? I pulled the location off Flickr.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted June 26, 2014, by Ralph Demars (rdemars1 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Here's the painting by Claude Monet, actually called "White Water Lilies". See the resemblance?

Posted June 26, 2014, by Ralph Demars (rdemars1 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

BTW I know it's not the real bridge from "Water Lilies". I'm just saying it looks like it very much.

Posted June 25, 2014, by Luke Harden

Hec Edmundson Bicycle/Pedestrian Bridge Replacement: http://www.washington.edu/facilities/transportation/tip/proj...

Posted June 25, 2014, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

See photo #13 for a poor quality photo showing the combination plaque/finials that once adorned this bridge.

Canton Bridge Company was reportedly started in 1892, so this bridge has to date to after that. My guess is its somewhere in the 1892-1900 range.

Posted June 25, 2014, by Ralph Demars (rdemars1 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Accidently deleted the street view. Please add it back.

abandoned bridges
Posted June 25, 2014, by Maury Hegman (Hegmanart [at] aol [dot] com)

Section line Road in Yazoo County near Holly Bluff has a bridge over the Silver Creek Drainage District Ditch does anyone know if it is abandoned?

Posted June 24, 2014, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Wow, when I first saw the picture I thought i was looking at this one...

http://bridgehunter.com/in/hamilton/bh42651/

Posted June 24, 2014, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)
Posted June 24, 2014, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)
Posted June 24, 2014, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)
Posted June 24, 2014, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)
Posted June 24, 2014, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)
Posted June 24, 2014, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Pic from 2011 with the new bridge next to the old:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/caving/12120730413/

Posted June 24, 2014, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Picture from November of 2013:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/caving/12197612715/

Hobbs Bridge (Tennessee)
Posted June 24, 2014, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Picture and history of the bridge:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/caving/13218526434

Posted June 24, 2014, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Here is a photo of the builder's plaque:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/sethgaines/14207812583/in/phot...

once on Flickr, the photographer has a number of other shots of the bridge.

Posted June 24, 2014, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)
Posted June 24, 2014, by Bruce Bridges (railfan727 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Here is an excellent series of photos of the collapse: http://mdmccoy.blogspot.com/2014/06/ledbetter-bridge-progres...

Perhaps we can obtain permission from Mr. McCoy to integrate these into the main site?

Posted June 24, 2014, by Judy askew (mzmayor1038 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Continuing saga. The State of Kentucky finally found out that their Brookport Bridge had received such a hard hit that a girder was crumoled on impact with some large piece of equipment four days ago. We on the Illinois side had known about for six weeks. For more information, check either WPSD or KFVS.

Re: Bridge comment - Panel points and repair.
Posted June 24, 2014, by M. Goff (michael [dot] goff [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I agree that the truss is six panels, without question.

I will also state that the truss is a Warren with verticals that has been "strengthened". As stated before the cables or tension rods were added at a later date to increase the load rating/capacity. I have found this to be a fairly common strengthening measure utilized on these types of short railroad trusses.

Posted June 24, 2014, by Alexander D. Mitchell IV (lner4472 [at] verizon [dot] net)

Under heavy restoration summer 2014:

http://democratherald.com/news/local/federal-program-helps-p...

(Includes two photos of this bridge)

Posted June 24, 2014, by Alexander D. Mitchell IV (lner4472 [at] verizon [dot] net)
Posted June 24, 2014, by Lawrence Cloyd (lawrencecloyd [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I was the first person on the scene of the bridge just 3 minutes after the collapse by chance. I captured some of the first pictures of the collapse. All pictures are my original works.

Posted June 23, 2014, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

According to the National Register Nomination Form the 1890 date for this bridge was a "circa" date. So the 1899 date could absolutely be correct. See attached.

Attachment #1 (application/pdf; 484,860 bytes)

Re: Bridge comment
Posted June 23, 2014, by Fmiser (fmiser [at] gmail [dot] com)

That is a 6 panel bridge.

I'm not sure those tension diagonal "counters" are original. Just because a bridge has something on it doesn't mean it isn't pointless junk. I have seen quite a few "repairs" that are either useless or even counter-productive.

I think I would call it a Warren with vertical, but it's not clear cut.

On a Pratt, the counters are to deal with the real world situation of the load traveling onto the bridge. With the load in the center of the span, the counters are useless - but when the load is, say, one-third of the way on, the bridge is "twisted" and the counters are useful.

On this span, the tension diagonals are going to perform just like a pratt diagonal and carry tension when the bridge load in is the center of the span. But when the load is not centered, then member that would be a tension counter-brace on a Pratt is a strut on this span! So maybe this is a Pratt with strut counters.

Or maybe it's a Warren with pratt-like center diagonal to assist with center span loads.

Or possibly we should call it a Franken-span, alluding to the Frankenstein monster built with many different parts.

Posted June 23, 2014, by Fmiser (fmiser [at] gmail [dot] com)

I talked to a local resident. He says the bridge was built in 1899. How trustworthy is the "official" 1890 date?

He also said the approx. 3 feet of concrete on the top of the stone abutments was added about 1950 to raise the bridge.

And, during the flooding in 2014, he was on the bridge with a chainsaw to clear driftwood from the superstructure. I suspect it was that sort of driftwood that toppled the Tartar Ferry Road bridge...

Bridge comment
Posted June 23, 2014, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I'm with Nathan here... 6 panels

Posted June 23, 2014, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

KYTC photo from just before collapse.

Posted June 23, 2014, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I dug up a photo from KYTC.

Asher Bridge (Missouri)
Posted June 23, 2014, by Joe Meissert (joe [dot] meissert [at] gmail [dot] com)

Joe Meissert (My Great Grandfather) was the bridge superintendent for Stupp Brothers, that built this bridge. He married Ruth Coontz.

re: Bridge comment
Posted June 23, 2014, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Royce,

I count six panels on this bridge. No sure what you mean about the bracing changing the panel count. I find it easiest and most reliable to count panels by counting joints (connections) along the portion of the truss aligned with the flooring system... in this case the bottom chord. They usually line up with the floor beams.

I have no idea how the function of the added tension diagonals on this bridge might change the function of the bridge, but with those turnbuckles, seems like they are acting as counters? In either case, the original function is Warren truss and as historians we are going to be more interested in listing this bridge as a Warren truss.

Bridge comment
Posted June 23, 2014, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Chester,

I must admit, your response confused me.

I thought the bridge in Royce's post was a 6 panel Warren truss with verticals. I thought the number of panels was the number of spaces between truss connections on the lower chord.

Also, while I agree that cast iron is only for compression, I was under the impression wrought iron could be used for either compression or tension.

I held off posting because I wasn't certain in my knowledge but some of your statements differ from my understanding. How confident are you in your statements?

Regards,

Art S.

Posted June 23, 2014, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)
Dix Bridge (New York)
Posted June 23, 2014, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

nice article with pictures and history:

http://www.hudsoncrossingpark.org/virtualtour/dixbridge.html

Why all truss bridges are doomed
Posted June 23, 2014, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Governments need to protect idiots from themselves:

http://www.yohaig.com/linda-ikeji/photo-horrible-auto-accide...

What they fail to realize is that nature will just build a better idiot:

http://blogs.examiner.co.uk/thasavinmeon/2009/04/football-ma...

Remember, stupidity kills... but not fast enough.

Bridge comment
Posted June 23, 2014, by royce haley (roycehaley111 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Hello all,

Need a little help here. Do you count the diagonal bracings at the end of a truss as a "panel" or just between the verticals? So on this particular picture is it a 6-panel or a 4-panel. Also it looks like they added diagonal cables for support to the middle two panels. Does this magically make this a Pratt truss now or is it still a Warren truss? Thank you in advance.

Royce

Posted June 23, 2014, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Article with nice photos of the move and installation:

http://www.ohio.edu/lancaster/newsroom/newsArticle.cfm?Artic...

Posted June 23, 2014, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Rich,

I can't tell you about the route, but the bridge is a pin connected Pratt type pony truss. It almost certainly dates from before World War 1 and may be considerably older - some of the experts on here can probably provide more info.

It is in remarkably original and remarkably good condition. The built up floor beams have not been replaced and are not rotted out. If you have ownership and want a farm access point, you could probably get away with simply adjusting the tension members and installing new wood stringers and deck.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted June 23, 2014, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)
Posted June 23, 2014, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Close! But it was a little west of where you had it. I fixed it.

Posted June 23, 2014, by Douglas Butler

I think it's the location

Posted June 23, 2014, by stephen Kokoska (xtevencom [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Spring, 2013

Posted June 23, 2014, by stephen Kokoska (xtevencom [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Photo of the Morris Goodkind Bridge taken from the Edison side

Posted June 23, 2014, by Ja Fehr (jafehr [at] acm [dot] org)

Mobile coordinates are actually

30.723276

-88.044052

Posted June 22, 2014, by Jim Benton (jcbenton [at] blackfoot [dot] net)

I dropped the ball with communicating about the blackfoot river bridge. I believe it may just be forgotten about. I don't know any specifics about it other than it was somehow made in Missoula Montana in 1907 and I would bet there aren't any others from that period still around. Just hate to see it get to the point where it has to be torn down. It is currently still in use.

Posted June 22, 2014, by Rich (Lboehne [at] twc [dot] com)

We are the owners of the farm on the Washboard Road end of this bridge (versus the 177 end). If anyone has some history about this bridge or the route it used to serve, let us know. Thanks. Rich

Posted June 22, 2014, by Steve Quarrella (fishpope [at] iname [dot] com)

Bridge was moved in February 2011 to the Public Works facility on Marshall Creek Rd, just east of US 377. It is behind a fence, at coordinates N 33 0.9594' W 97 12.8866'. After restoration and site determination, it will be permanently placed in one of the Roanoke city parks as a walking bridge.

Posted June 22, 2014, by Sean (Smilanovits [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge is still in use. A train crosses it weekly to drop box cars at south side recycling.

Posted June 22, 2014, by Tom Engel (tengel1952 [at] aol [dot] com)

The bridge is inspected yearly. To get close to the critical components, wire suspended scaffolding is required.

Posted June 22, 2014, by Alex Wood

The approach span has collapsed on the western end of the bridge. Guess that seals the deal.

Posted June 21, 2014, by James Wireman (jameslovesbridges_86 [at] ymail [dot] com)

Hi there again, I still would like to have this bridge saved preferably as a no truck frontage rd. bridge and I would for it to be able to gain ground someday and I know that there is still hope for that and please don't think that there is not. Think positive because I do not want this bridge to go so soon. Please do not let them Demolish this bridge.

Posted June 21, 2014, by J.P. (wildcatjon2000 [at] gmail [dot] com)
RE: Saved pony truss in York Co. PA
Posted June 21, 2014, by Luke
Saved pony truss in York Co. PA
Posted June 21, 2014, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)
Posted June 21, 2014, by Ed Hollowell (erhollowell [at] aol [dot] com)

Don, The tunnel and ford are Happy Hollow Rd Tunnel listed on Bridgehunters.com

Posted June 21, 2014, by Mark Milat (mmilat2000 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Several additional shots of this bridge. Note also that the reference to the "Northeast" Cape Fear River is incorrect. This is the Cape Fear River. The Northeast Cape Fear River flows generally SSW into Wilmington where it joins with the Cape Fear River.

Posted June 21, 2014, by Mark Milat (mmilat2000 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Just saw the posting for the CSX - Cape Fear River Bridge. This is a great bridge, used every day with traffic going to and from Wilmington NC. I have about 50 pictures of this bridge, mostly detail shots as I would love to build this in 1/87 scale. I have included several photos all taken in August of 2013, and could provide others if there is interest. The only way you can get pictures of this bridge, without a boat, is to stand on the bank of the river directly south shooting N to NE from private property. One fortunate day I was allowed access to this property, so all of these are shot from that position.

An interesting story was related to me about this bridge from a life long resident of the area. Sometime during the '60's, the railroad decided to replace the fixed portion of the bridge. Early that morning, all of the local kids took up position on the south bank of the river to watch. The railroad had a flooded barge placed under the bridge during low tide. As soon as the last train of the morning came over the bridge, the railroad started pumping out the barge. Between pumping the water out, and the tide coming in, the barge quickly rose under the bridge, making contact and lifting the bridge off it's piers. It was then moved downstream and the new bridge, which had been built earlier, and waiting on a barge upstream, was moved into position. As they say, timing is everything. At this point the tide had turned and started to go out. Between the flooding of the barge and the tide going out, the new bridge quickly settled down on to the piers. Within what seemed like minutes to the observer, the next train of the day approached the bridge and stopped short of the new section, but was waved through by the work crew. The gentleman I heard this story from said that he thought this whole process took less than 6 hours. If true, and I have no reason to doubt him, this is a testament to the railroads and their workers on how they keep America's goods moving.

Posted June 21, 2014, by Anonymous

Couple photos of the little drawbridge

Posted June 21, 2014, by Anonymous

here a picture of and old bridge

Posted June 21, 2014, by Jeremy Porter (jkporter74023 [at] att [dot] net)

Sad day, this bridge is now gone. Went to shoot it with a friend...only to find it was being taken down while we were there.

Posted June 21, 2014, by ben demars

I love the Vermont DOT. They preserve almost all of their bridges. If they do demolish one, they don't make it boring. Their new bridges have flair just like the old ones did. Meanwhile, the Maine DOT does just the opposite. No offense, DOT, but we need more trusses here in Maine.

Maybe Vermont can give us a few of their trusses. But if Vermont doesn't want to, that's fine with me.

Posted June 21, 2014, by Edward Tyson (edwardtyson1978 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Actually this was a Bascule bridge according to these two photos found on the Florida Memory website. There's also some vintage pictures, videos and all sorts of stuff about the State of Florida. The website is www.floridamemory.com

Posted June 20, 2014, by Jason Smith (JDSmith77 [at] gmx [dot] net)

Tell you whyt, let me use a couple of your bridge pics and I'll post an article about it in the Bridgehunter's Chronicles. That way everyone knows and we might have someone willing to tell us about the bridge and its current situation. Send me an e-mail if this is fine. Thx.

JS

Posted June 20, 2014, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Looking at the replacement bridge in the street view it seems they used a design that is strongly reminiscent of the older bridge.

Posted June 20, 2014, by Fmiser (fmiser [at] gmail [dot] com)

When was it built?

Trying to guess a truss bridge age from photos is tricky. One of Murphy's law corollaries is that none of the photos will include what I want to see. *smiles* And as bridge technology advanced, not every building progressed at the same rate.

That said, it is pin-connected, thus probably prior 1925. The eye-bars are upset, which often means later than 1890. The lower joint pins are at the very bottom, which suggest older as does the knee-braced sway braces.

So, based only on what I can see from the limited detail of the pictures, I'd guess 1895 to 1910.

But that is pretty close to a _wild_ guess.

Re: UP-Gibb Sprawl Overpass
Posted June 20, 2014, by Fmiser (fmiser [at] gmail [dot] com)

That looks like pre-cast (and probably pre-stressed) concrete box beams. Not really a slab as those boxed sections are hollow. Calling it a "stringer" would probably be more accurate than "slab".

Posted June 20, 2014, by Rich (richoff [at] hotmail [dot] com)

when was this bridge built?

Posted June 20, 2014, by Jason Smith (JDSmith77 [at] gmx [dot] net)

According to Bing Maps, the bridge is long gone. Apparently it must've been removed even before 2011.

Re: Pony truss bridge, Windham, ME
Posted June 20, 2014, by Luke Harden

Actually, it's not a rail-trail, it's something far less common, a road=trail.

Thank you very much for the info!

Posted June 20, 2014, by Luke Harden

NBI states 1973 as a build date.

Posted June 20, 2014, by Travis (mailcatcher [at] yahoo [dot] com)

It was never torn down. There was an incedint where a semi decided to use it to back up to turn around even though he relized he was exceeding the weight limit. When he backed up on it, his semi broke through and the bridge caved in. He was not hurt. This is all according to the news I watched years ago and what I remeber.

Posted June 20, 2014, by Anonymous

The CSX rolling lift bridge replaced an earlier Strauss bascule bridge Seaboard Air line RR

Pony truss bridge, Windham, ME
Posted June 20, 2014, by a.noonie mis tip

A pony truss on a rail trail lurks in Windham, at the end of Gambo rd. Please add!

Posted June 20, 2014, by a.noonie mis tip

*in south windham

Posted June 20, 2014, by a.noonie mis tip

There is a railroad overpass over Mallison falls road/Mallison st. Looks old.

Great Flood of 2014 in the Upper Midwest and Bridges
Posted June 20, 2014, by Jason Smith (JDSmith77 [at] gmx [dot] net)

REMINDER: In connection with the most recent storms and floods that devastated the upper Midwest, including Minnesota, Iowa, South Dakota and Nebraska, I'm looking for photos and info on the bridges affected for an article to be produced asap. If you have any, please let me know post haste so that they can be included. Your name will be accredited accordingly. Thanks you. The Bridgehunter's Chronicles.

Posted June 19, 2014, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)
Posted June 19, 2014, by Perry King (Kykid58 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Can you tell me what year or years this was built?


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