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Posted September 20, 2014, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Another town that is full of bridges. Hopefully more will come on line in the next few years. I have put an arrow to the three on this map, two Marsh Arches and the other an abandoned truss with a sidewalk. There is another King Iron Bridge over Marmaton in the lower left quadrant. You can find them all in this county. Hopefully Long Shoals will be moved here in the foreseeable future.

Posted September 20, 2014, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Yep, there are two Marsh Arch bridges within a couple blocks of each other there. One over Mill Creek and one over the Marmaton River. The first time I drove through there, I thought I was seeing double.

Posted September 20, 2014, by Jodi Christman (masterofchaos [at] outlook [dot] com)

As of Mary 2014 it was abandoned but intact

Posted September 20, 2014, by Jodi Christman (masterofchaos [at] outlook [dot] com)

Intact, closed, abandoned as of May 2014

Posted September 20, 2014, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I'll try to take a shot at Green Bay and this bridge next week. Hopefully all works out.

Posted September 20, 2014, by Ralph Demars (rdemars1 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Love the second one. Beutiful.

Posted September 20, 2014, by Ralph Demars (rdemars1 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

What happened?

Posted September 20, 2014, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)
Posted September 20, 2014, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)
Posted September 19, 2014, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Interesting comments from the locals (below the political comments):

http://www.centraljersey.com/articles/2014/09/19/hopewell_va...

Posted September 19, 2014, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)
Posted September 19, 2014, by Connie Cutrona (ctcut [at] aol [dot] com)

Remember Penn Station!!

Posted September 19, 2014, by Patsy (hcrdriver [at] gmail [dot] com)

Sorry that is the bridge back behind Max's, use to take you to Humboldt St., turn left you would go to Riverside Cafe, right to the Button's Salvage and the Sale barn. Keep going west, Pavey's Ford and three mile corner.

Posted September 19, 2014, by Patsy (hcrdriver [at] gmail [dot] com)

Through arch bridge over Mill Creek on N Crawford St in Fort Scott? there is no bridge on north crawford street in Fort Scott, that is the bridge on north National Street. I use to cross it every morning on my mail route. born and raised in Fort Scott.

Posted September 19, 2014, by Dale Gathright, Jr. (dalegathright [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This is the Kansas City Southern Railway mainline and yard in Ashdown...

Posted September 19, 2014, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I loved this little bridge and was happy to go see and photograph on my Texas Bridgehuntin' trip. I contacted the City of Rosebud to see how we could help them install this bridge correctly. They were very interested to collaborate and we are generating a list including Texas Historic Commission, Falls County, Preservation Rosebud and other interested parties to put together a "Workin' Week in Rosebud, Texas. Jim Schiffer, PE, SGI and Nels Raynor of BACH Steel, the Workin' Bridges team will lead the efforts." The city administrator Keith Whitfield was very interested, contacting the city council and Preservation Rosebud. The inquiries are going out and we are putting together a Scope of Work and Estimate to supply more details.

Our goal is to get four or so, young or old, men or women, to be part of the paid apprentice crew to work with Nels and his team, sometime next year. Still figuring out what qualifications one would need to apply. Most importantly an interest and desire to know how to work with these historic bridges.

The Scope will include: repairing of repairs to "in kind" engineered restoration that we specialize in, building block abutments to get this thing off the ground, heat straightening and replacing nuts and washers with historic hillside washers and showcase maintenance plans that mostly include washing the iron and keeping the deck sealed.

And a plaque. this bridge needs a plaque.

Thinking big it would be nice to work on the other extant bowstring at the same time, but that one is still in use. It does need some work though so we have called the Commissioner in charge of that road.

Anyone that would like to join this effort, figure out how to fund the restoration and workin' week is invited to get in touch. Please share, we don't want anyone feeling left out of this good work.

Posted September 18, 2014, by Mike Goff (michael [dot] goff [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Scottsburg Bridge took a lickin and kept on ticking today!

Posted September 18, 2014, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Now they need to re-dub this section of road as "Not quite as Historic Route 66" since they chose to destroy this beauty.

Skippack Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted September 18, 2014, by Thomas H. (Trhols514 [at] comcast [dot] net)

For clarification...this bridge, as well as Germantown Pike, carried US 422 from 1966 to 1985 (source: pahighways.com). Once the expressway from Pottstown to King of Prussia was completed, that road took the route number. The road on which Skippack Bridge is located is now known simply as Germantown Pike. As for the bridge itself, modern traffic is pushing its capacity to the limit, for sure.

re: Changes
Posted September 18, 2014, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Tony,

IF there are any very rare bridges in Indiana that need our research let me know. Often when we come in, we spark more of a local interest. Given that, where we really need to be in the schedule is way before Section 106, at the inspection stage where we can make a difference.

Indiana was way ahead of the game and you were part of that. But the states getting the bad raps from bridge hunters are the states where there are a lot of bridges. Each state is looking at their inventory and trying to categorize so that at least some can be saved. We all know that we can't save them all. W'B supports those that are looking at different ways to mitigate loss.

In Ohio, they are going to remind those that used "Leave In Place MOAs" that they also have a responsibility to maintain. Texas is doing work now on those MOAs where bridges were left in place, it didn't work out so well down there to just leave them to rot, unless the counties and commissioners are reminded that they need to be maintained. Excellent picnic and fishing, too often the decks are rotting and debris is laying on and around. Or that bowstring in the dirt in Rosebud. I have asked to work with Texas Historic Commission on trying to build a bridge restoration workshop around that beauty.

We also have to support our clients that want to re-use these bridges, even those on private land where the bridges will not be public anymore, their functional life lives on. I used to think (only months ago) that the "PUBLIC" option was the rule, but it turns out it isn't. Opens up a lot more opportunities for re-use. We have to try to find ways to help those people figure out the costs, one way is if the owner is required to pull and disassemble, rather than scrap, those bridges that have life left in them. Part of that is a real Scope of Work before a project begins. Our scopes have little in common with "Inspection Reports" and I believe we will see more engineering firms offering solutions to their clients. Then it gets into training the craftsman, more opportunities where they come to actually help work on a bridge disassembly, repair or assembly is where that will happen. If you know anyone that has that interest please have them contact us.

Thanks.

Julie

re: Changes
Posted September 17, 2014, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Just for the record my experience is that Indiana is more challenging than other states to relocate bridges out of state as they are more protective. That's fine in my view... as long as all available bridges are being preserved in state. If they aren't and bridges are being scrapped, then this policy may needs to be revisited.

Also, many of those abandoned bridges in Texas cannot be moved without reopening Section 106 because the outcome of Section 106 MOA for many of them was that they would be left in place.

Posted September 17, 2014, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Should be dismantled and "Bridge-banked" for later reuse.

If I was to hit the lottery (guess that would require me playing it) I would create such a place to acquire and store these landmarks.

Posted September 17, 2014, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)
re: Changes
Posted September 17, 2014, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Hey Jules...

I do want to clarify something.

By no means would I ever want to see an historic truss bridge go into the scrap pile as opposed to being moved elsewhere...even out of the vicinity or the state. I do, however, think that every possible avenue of local preservation should be exhausted before a span is trucked to another area. It is always very disappointing to me when a bridge seems to be void of identity and therefore considered disposable.

A pony truss from Southern Indiana recently ended up in Texas at a new children's ranch being developed. My initial response was disbelief that a bridge would be moved a thousand miles to a state that has abandoned bridges by the bounty. This bridge had even been bypassed with a new bridge and I figured that the county might have had some consideration of saving it. But after seeing a short video clip of the bridge in it's new location I realized that this span will enjoy a very long and useful second-life that it might not have had sitting in it's original spot.

So, if that Portland Waterworks Bridge can't be saved and reused in the Portland area, then it's THEIR loss and somebody else' gain!

So keep up the good work Jules... But don't expect me not to put up a fight if you try to snag an Indiana span! }:-O

Posted September 17, 2014, by James McCray (jamesinslocomb [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Yes........I agree. With a name like Trussville, there should be no excuse.

Posted September 17, 2014, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I think EVERY bridge in this town ought to be a truss bridge.

Posted September 17, 2014, by James Holzmeier (wabashry [at] gmail [dot] com)

Actually, you can see them in the Google Map on this page. Zoom into the corner of Olive and N. 3rd in Satellite view. You can see them in Street View too!

Posted September 17, 2014, by James Holzmeier (wabashry [at] gmail [dot] com)

Years ago I discovered what I believe to be two of the old bridge's approach span bases in St. Charles. They were being used as plant boxes in a vacant lot. It was odd to see these two large bases, neither of which were perpendicular to either the street or the sidewalk, at an angle coinciding with the curvature of the west approach spans leading up to the St. Charles depot. I'll see if I can find the photos I took of them.

Posted September 17, 2014, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I agree, a fascinating detail! While rare, it is not unheard of for trusses to have bottom chords that are not connected at the hip verticals (and extend over two panels), however the method of guiding the bottom chord is quite unusual here... wish we knew who built it. FYI, here is another bridge with a guide only for the bottom chord at the hip vertical:

http://www.historicbridges.org/pennsylvania/redmill/swpenn07...

http://www.historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowse...

Posted September 17, 2014, by Mike Goff (michael [dot] goff [at] hotmail [dot] com)

That bottom chord connection in the photo is interesting. I am not sure if I have ever seen a truss panel framed in like that.

The vertical and floor beam essentially just freely hang from the top chord and the connection is simply clamped to the continuous bottom chord eye bars to stabilize the floor beam.

I guess this eliminated an additional pin in the assembly of this small truss.

Interesting photo, thanks for adding it!

Posted September 17, 2014, by Jeanette Bergen (jbergenphoto [at] gmail [dot] com)

Willow Springs Road Bridge is an interesting bridge to visit. The community has brought the bridge to life. I recommend a visit, maybe you'll find a note in the railing or some other ornament on the bridge. This bridge has inspired a group of artists & writers to create a project based solely on the bridge.The back history on the project: Once a month The Gallery at Round Top hosts "A Conversation", where artists and creatives come together to share ideas and enjoy stimulating conversation. The Willow Springs Bridge Project, "One View, Many Viewpoints", is a product of these conversations. Over thirty artists, poets, and writers created and exhibited their art in June of 2014 at Arts for Rural Texas in Fayetteville, Texas. You can see their work here: http://willowspringsbridge.weebly.com/

To view my work on the bridge click: http://www.jeanettebergenphotography.com/willowsprings

Posted September 17, 2014, by Don Morrison

Patrick;

Your photos are very good. Nice colors. I'd have the shaky knees walking out on the deck stringers like that. 8^)

I have interest in this bridge because I found it in Google Earth or Bing Bird's Eye view and added it to Bridgehunter.

I wasn't able to find any info on the bridge, but a lot about Conneaut. Sounds like a neat place to visit.

Posted September 16, 2014, by Luke

According to the attached link, this and the bridge over the Schuylkill, are going to/have become part of the Bartram Trail Section of the Schuylkill River Trail:

http://pahistoricpreservation.com/past-present-future-transp...

Posted September 16, 2014, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Span 1: Dropped. KYTC photos.

Posted September 16, 2014, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

If it was smashed up in 2011, its stuck around for a long time. It was still standing as of late August 2014. I would encourage someone with time, resources, land and a bit of money to see if they can get those spans out of there. Judging by the situation, I'm sure the current owner would love to see someone else deal with the burden of getting it out of the current state, as he has not complied with the county since the damage occurred in 2011.

Posted September 16, 2014, by geoege oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

according to the map i see 2 abandoned r.r. bridges.does anyone know the current status of these 2 abandoned r.r. bridges?

Posted September 16, 2014, by david yates (david_y [at] bellsouth [dot] net)

The fire looks suspicious and abandoned railroad bridges have been torched in the past rather than be converted into bike trails.

Posted September 16, 2014, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

does anyone know the current status of this abandoned r.r. bridge?

Posted September 16, 2014, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

does anybody know the current status if this abandoned r.r. bridge?

Posted September 16, 2014, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

does anyone know the current status of this abandoned r.r. bridge?

Posted September 16, 2014, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

does anyone know the current status of this abandoned r.r. bridge?

Posted September 16, 2014, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

does anyone know the current status of this abandoned bridge?

Posted September 16, 2014, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The bridge here was built in 1913 after the Great flood of 1912 destroyed the former wood truss. These trusses were modified, and reportedly built 1890 at another location.

Posted September 16, 2014, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The 1913 date is evident of the rebuilding after the great flood of 1912, which destroyed the previous bridges on this island. The two trusses which are still seen were placed prior to this flood, although the through girder was placed in 1913.

Changes
Posted September 16, 2014, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Hey Tony,

I wanted to address your comments about bridges moving to new locations, often out of state. I believe this is a good thing. I also believe it has come about, partially or almost wholly, from bridge hunters working on state and federal levels and raising the awareness. There are a lot of changes coming out of cultural resources as they put their years of experience into interpreting law and figuring out creative ways to save a bridge. These projects are so expensive that even if we don't agree with some of the techniques for mitigation or we run into the wrong side of those, for the most part this is a good thing. Finding clients that can take on these bridges is our job and having some value added (like a bridge that has already been disassembled) is a good thing. We were really just lucky that Portland Water Works had not already been scrapped, truly.

Where preservation falls apart is at the county and township levels from what I can tell. Elected officials, through county engineers and state professional inspecting engineers, are told that even if they save a bridge, the costs for maintenance and replacement (outrageous estimates) in the near term or in twenty years is what they have in front of them. In many cases just abandoning a bridge doesn't take away the maintenance, inspection and liability. We have tried hard to change minds, but that has to come again at that level from inspecting engineers who can do more than fill in a blank. I spoke to Volkert Engineering who does large bridge inspections about this on my latest trip across country. It calls for changing the scoring at the inspecting level if a historic bridge is in the mix. We also believe that a restored bridge will last for generations if it is washed and checked regularly for debris or damage. Fatigue has to show and engineers have to trust the science of longevity in pin connected and old iron trusses, they just have to. That is my job, to elaborate on those things.

I just walked across the Piano Bridge with the commissioner from Fayette County. It was the first time in three years he had gotten out of his truck and no one had given him any maintenance plan. There was moss growing on the paint system and very loose decking. He was going to get a crew out there to do their part and I hear that in Texas they are coming up with county maintenance plans, just as they are in Minnesota, Ohio, Pennsylvania and many other states who are upgrading their inventory of historic bridges. They want ways to save them, it just always comes down to money. Always.

Tony, when we start we always suggest that a bridge remain in place, but if it can't we will help to find a new home, if we can. We will also help tell the story of a bridge move, after all it is what they were designed to do. And that is what helps us sell a bridge move as preservation.

Respectfully, and with much regard, to you and all bridge hunters.

Julie

Posted September 15, 2014, by Don Morrison

Agreed, Nathan.

I was asking because there was an update - Tony added the common name recently, and I was curious what was changed. Saw Lundy Bridge in the alternate names and thought Lundy Bridge was downstream of this bridge.

Tony must have changed it from 143rd Ave Bridge.

Someone has removed Lundy bridge from the alternate names now, so all is well.

Posted September 15, 2014, by Kevin (weatherbum [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Bridge likely no longer exists. Google Earth imagery from 2012 indicates that this bridge has been replaced.

Posted September 15, 2014, by John Goold (BlueWilliamus [at] yahoo [dot] com)
Posted September 15, 2014, by Kevin (weatherbum [at] hotmail [dot] com)

This bridge was removed by the county, probably in late 2012 or early 2013. The bank supports remain but the rest of the structure has been removed. Aerial imagery confirms it existed in mid-2012, but it had been gone for some time when I drove by it in July 2014.

Cobban Bridge (Wisconsin)
Posted September 15, 2014, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

This is the last Pennsylvania truss in the state yet is at risk for demolition.

http://chippewa.com/news/local/residents-consider-options-fo...

Hotel Bridge (Massachusetts)
Posted September 15, 2014, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

A push is being made to save the bridge:

http://www.gazettenet.com/news/townbytown/northampton/134725...

Posted September 15, 2014, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Explosives were actually placed today. They blow it up tomorrow (the 16th).

Posted September 15, 2014, by Nolte (panamal [at] bellsouth [dot] net)

I know this comment is about the RR bridge, but that's my interest. Is the RR bridge CAGY or IC (now operating under CN)? I've heard both. I'm doing some historic preservation work on these RR bridges and need to know.

Posted September 15, 2014, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

As far as I know this isn't Lundy Bridge, this is: http://www.historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowse...

Posted September 15, 2014, by Lawrence Cloyd (lawrencecloyd [at] yahoo [dot] com)

The bridge is scheduled to be air blasted at 8:00 am on September 15, 2014.

Posted September 15, 2014, by John Goold (BlueWilliamus [at] yahoo [dot] com)

ODOT is seeking comments for replacing this bridge in 2016

Posted September 14, 2014, by Don Morrison

Is Lundy Bridge not the bridge on Lundy Bridge Road, Northeast of this bridge at 43.347951, -91.620283?

I see it listed as an alternate name for this bridge.

Posted September 14, 2014, by Mike Goff (michael [dot] goff [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Tony,

The report stated that since the adjacent Lusted Road Bridge already had pedestrian facilities and pedestrian traffic volumes were low, the justification for leaving the bridge in place as a pedestrian structure was not sufficient.

I agree it will be a great local loss, but knowing the truss will be preserved is a great victory!

Posted September 14, 2014, by Mike Goff (michael [dot] goff [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Great news Julie, glad you could make the connection before the bridge was melted down! Cheers!

Posted September 14, 2014, by Steven M. Kish, Jr. (skish271571mi [at] comcasy [dot] net)

The bridge was built between 1889 and 1899 (NOT 1923), to be one of five 88 foot Pony Truss bridge sections that replaced the wooden Belle Isle side of the original bridge. The original wooden section were supported by closely spaced pilings, which forced boaters to row out into the channel. The 88 foot Pony Truss sections were supported by steel framework and were mounted on small pilings, which then allowed boaters to row closer to the Belle Isle shoreline. After the Belle Isle Bridge fire of April 27th, 1915, the five surviving 88 foot Pony Truss sections were floated around 150 foot down stream of the no destroyed bridge, and in 1916 became the part of the temporary Belle Isle bridge. It remained as part of the temporary bridge until the new bridge (called the George Washington Bridge) was completed in 1923. The George Washington Bridge was renamed to the MacArthur Bridge during World War II. Once the new bridge was open, the temporary bridge was disassembled and one of the 88 foot PonyTruss sections was purchased in fall of 1923 by the Swan family of Grosse Ile and floated downriver on a Dunbar and Sullivan barge and erected over the 75 foot wide Swan Island canal that Dunbar and Sullivan had dredged out earlier.

Posted September 14, 2014, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

With all of the local history surrounding this bridge... Portland is ABSOLUTELY crazy if they let this bridge leave the area!

Of course, with this being in the area of a park, I'm at a loss of understanding as to why this wasn't simply converted to a pedestrian bridge!

Posted September 14, 2014, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Actually, it was the lower chord eyebars (iron) and their connection with the steel vertical where the major section loss occurred

Posted September 14, 2014, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I was working for an engineering firm in 2006 that designed the restoration on the Furnas Mill Bridge in Johnson County, IN http://bridgehunter.com/in/johnson/60270/

I based the date of this bridge on that one as ca.1885.

The Furnas Mill Bridge was actually a mixture of wrought iron and steel. That early steel didn't play well with the iron and created many issues. The iron eyebars were in excellent shape with nice sharp edges...The steel verticals had large areas of section loss where the diagonals (iron) were attached. The steel in the endposts and upper chord were also compromised and had to be strengthened with a hidden tubular "skeleton" that gave the structure enough strength to be reopened to vehicular traffic.

As far as styles go Julie... It's hard to say how the firms decided what to use and where. This style seemed to be fairly commonly used by King from about 1885 to the early 1890's.

Posted September 14, 2014, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Decatur County really needs to employ a stonemason as part of the road department! They could work out a deal with the surrounding counties that also have stone arches to pay a portion of his wages!

Posted September 14, 2014, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The recipe for steel changed in the late 1890s. There was more silica in the mix in the iron. That is one reason you can not use ultrasound (UT) technology on wrought iron bridge components, as the silica reads as a void when it isn't. Eye-bars, pins, bridges have been closed because of this, so the word must go out for more testing before demolition.

We have seen a mix of steel and iron in bridges in the early 1900s as parts like eye-bars and pins may have been iron and verticals with channel and plate made of new steel by any one of many iron and steel companies. I've just learned this working with Nels Raynor on Workin' Bridges projects.

It is interesting to go further and see what Nels has to say about the quality of steel from some of those companies. I think he has a presentation on that subject, and I know he discussed it at last years 57 Annual Transportation Conference put on by Auburn and AlDOT.

The x's and o's might help determine date. By the way, what is the difference in the different King choices?

Posted September 14, 2014, by Tom Hoffman

I wonder what the future holds for this bridge and the Carquinez Strait Bridge. The eastern Oakland Bay bridge was replaced saying because it was not earthquake safe. That deck collapse could have happened to the suspension bridges too. The cantaleiver truss bridges are just as great as the wire suspension bridges. I just dont fully understand what they think would happen in an earthquake. The two bridges I mentioned should be left alone except for needed repairs.

Posted September 14, 2014, by Tom Hoffman

Being an 1880s bridge, Is this bridge made of iron or steel? Seeing the map and pictures, it looks like the road and bridge had been abandoned for awhile. This would be a great bridge to restore.

Posted September 14, 2014, by Tom Hoffman (tehoffm [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Finally, I took a look at the bridge project yesterday 9-13. Unfortunately, a UCEB deck is being used. As of now there are no culverts under the arches. The arches should just be touched up with mortar and not with culverts. Just don't know what the plans are. Decatur County has a great collection of stone arch bridges. They can be good and strong for a long time and yes get narrow and obsolete. There has to be a better way to retrofit a stone arch bridge if needed, at least with no culverts.

Posted September 14, 2014, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

It sounded like this save was "just in time"! Also known as Sandy River Bridge, Workin' Bridges has signed a letter of intent to save this bridge for a new client. A Scope of Work and Estimate is being prepared and a big move planned. The end result - another very historic bridge is to be saved using best practices. We are very excited but as always cautious until the final documents are signed and our client reveals their intents regarding historic bridges.

cheers!

Posted September 14, 2014, by Don Morrison

I see a metal object on the ground near the abutment. Could that be the top of a decorative finial that once adorned the portal?

Was there a spot where the plaque had been removed?

Looking forward to more of your photos.

Posted September 14, 2014, by Don Morrison

Gotta agree. The bridge has a nice look from a distance, but I like the old cantilevers much better.

Judging by the name of the ODOT presentation, they learned some lessons, so the next bridge here will be better. ;-)

Posted September 14, 2014, by Don Morrison

Patrick;

Thanks for getting pictures of this bridge. Is that Carl Finlaw memorial brick just painted? It doesn't look like much preservation work has been done to the site.

Maybe it was Carl's favorite fishin' hole.

Posted September 13, 2014, by Calvin Sneed (us43137415 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

As a bridgehunter, I am not fond of cable-stayed bridges (there is a plethora of them on the Ohio River now), I can see the elegance and grace in them. They do have a place in the skyline of bridge majestry that I can appreciate. I tend to agree with Luke and Nathan on this particular one.

But I will have to admit, the historic cantilever that this one replaced, was the more elegant, more magnificient structure. Sorry to see it go, and sorry I did not get to see it before it was summarily dismissed and pulled down.

Posted September 13, 2014, by Barry Schriver (bschriver11 [at] comcast [dot] net)

This railroad bridge was built by the Georges creek and Cumberland railroad which was later bought by the Western Maryland railway,the round house was located here where southern states is now located.

Posted September 13, 2014, by Daily Commuter (Trhols514 [at] comcast [dot] net)

Meanwhile...PM rush hour traffic heading west at Collegeville, Rahns, and Schwenksville is a joke because it became necessary to shut down this bridge, and also because the bridge at Graterford is now closed. I agree both bridges are too dangerous for motor vehicles, but they can't be repaired or replaced soon enough.

Posted September 12, 2014, by Lynn Rich Palmer (blppsp [at] comcast [dot] net)

My father was the focus of an intense search in 1957, with Milam Bridge as one of the Command Centers. My sister has just written a book about the mystery entitled "Rolling Waters", author Phyllis Rich Carpenter.

We sisters revisited Milam Bridge in the 1970's when it was still possible to walk across it. I am planning to take my sons and grandson back there soon. Is there a way to get close enough to the bridge safely now?

Thank you for any help in this matter.

Sincerely yours.

Posted September 12, 2014, by Justin (Crocker)

Yeah the road was pulled up when they strip mined that area. What you need to be aware of is on the other side of that strip mined area is the other end of the road. It dead ends on an overgrown concrete bridge of roughly the same height and length. You have to drive on a closed portion of road to get there. Along the way you have to drive over another short concrete bridge over an active railroad. All of this is on a closed road.

Posted September 12, 2014, by Calvin Sneed (us43137415 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Echo that.. what a beautiful structure!

Posted September 11, 2014, by Ben Tate (benji5221 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Great find!!

Posted September 11, 2014, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Patrick... that's hilarious I didn't think about that barn-like aspect!

By the way, your hobby of bicycling to bridges is quite interesting... particularly since my own website started that way. Round trips of 100-200 miles were common as I photographed the bridges of southern Michigan and northern Indiana. I got a lot of bridges this way since I lived in Port Huron and then moved to Kalamazoo during the time I was doing this. Sadly I am so busy these days I lack the time to do such long bike trips. I do miss it sometimes. http://www.historicbridges.org/truss/bighill/pict1116.jpg

Posted September 11, 2014, by Jack (jftrolley [at] aol [dot] com)

Bridge has be re-installed.

Posted September 11, 2014, by Douglas Butler

This vertical lift bridge was the Southern railroad before Norfolk Southern and CSX Railroad both owned this bridge.

Posted September 10, 2014, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

If this bridge was built in 1927 then I am the President of the United States. It has ornamental knee braces, pin connections, and EXTREMELY lightweight construction. It may be pre-1900 and one of the oldest highway swing bridges in the country.

Posted September 10, 2014, by Anonymous

Well. I THOUGHT I created a page for it. I stand corrected. I could've sworn I made a page for this bridge already. My apologies. I'll upload my pics of the bridge for this page.

Posted September 10, 2014, by Anonymous

No. You are mistaken. The bridge you have mapped on THIS page is already listed here on the website and I posted pictures of it. I didn't know the name of the former rail line, so i named it LA 500 rail bridge. Your mapped bridge is the same location as the bridge page I created a few years ago. If you intended to list a DIFFERENT bridge then check your coordinates and location.

Posted September 10, 2014, by Ben Tate (benji5221 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Great find!!

Posted September 10, 2014, by Ben Tate (benji5221 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Definitely looks like a Warren deck truss to me.

Carlton Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted September 10, 2014, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Thanks for the photosPatrick! Did you introduce yourself to Nels Raynor?

Regards,

Art S.

Posted September 10, 2014, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I think the areas that concern pontists and bridgehunters are the loss of the historic bridge being one, and the other being the way in which aesthetics are attempted in the replacement bridge. This is a prestressed girder with fake arch facades. Rather than make my own argument I will let the exact words of famous bridge engineer Ralph Modjeski speak for themselves:

"There seems to be a prevalent idea among even some of the best engineers of our country that the addition of a few cast iron stars, bent bars, perforated plates in the portals or corkscrews on the hips will make any bridge look handsome. If the skeleton of the bridge or of any structure is not designed aesthetically, such petty ornaments only make things worse and should always be discouraged. It is impossible to take the skeleton of a hunchback and make an Apollo of him by covering it with any amount of beautiful flesh and skin. If a structure is to be beautiful its aesthetic side must be given equal importance and attention with its stability. Both have to guide the designer from the very conception of the project; the skeleton must be built in harmony with the ornaments." -Ralph Modjeski, In 1898

Posted September 10, 2014, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I always thought covered bridges looked like barns over water, but wow, this one has even got the barn doors!

Posted September 10, 2014, by tom tweed (thomasjtweed [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I have walked both bridges, the new and the old, many times.

The sidewalks on the new one are about 3 times wider than

the old one, and now include observation platforms. The new

bridge is much "friendlier" to all users, no doubts there.

Take a walk & see. By the way the speed limit on Adams St is 25 mph, it is a park area.

Posted September 10, 2014, by tom tweed (thomasjtweed [at] yahoo [dot] com)

There is another bridge on the Big 4 RR just about 10 miles

west of this one, over the Stillwater River. It is a high

bridge compared to this one, and could be easily photographed from the modern road bridge on Ohio 55 which is

just south of the abandoned RR bridge.

There were several interesting but long-gone bridges at

Ludlow Falls, where this Big 4 RR and Ohio 48 crossed the

Ludlow Creek at its falls. Also a DC&P (electric) trolley

bridge over the Big 4 AND Ludlow Creek about 100 yrs ago.

Posted September 10, 2014, by Julia McLemore Wilkerson (juliamcw [at] bellsouth [dot] net)

I live on the other side of the bridge from Russellville Rd. I have lived here for 40 years and crossed this bridge every day going to work or in to Bowling Green. It saddens me to see that it can no longer be used and apparently no one is getting in any hurry to see it replaced. I would like to know what the last traffic count was before it was deemed "unsafe".

This bridge has been here since my father, now deceased, was a young man. He was born in 1905. He and my grandparents used this bridge to get between Russellville Rd and the Richpond community. It seems to me that this bridge has served the community well and should be saved as an historical structure. I hope someone has the foresight to see that it gets relocated. Perhaps eventually our community will get a new serviceable and safe bridge but it won't have the character of this old bridge.

Posted September 10, 2014, by tom tweed (thomasjtweed [at] yahoo [dot] com)

As for the name, as I recall, it is a contraction of the name Ellen Dean. Local Troy historian Thomas B. Wheeler,

who wrote Troy, the Nineteenth Century around 1970, was a

well-known local author. His daughter was also named

Ellen Dean Wheeler, and I believe he was descended from the

original owners and builders of the grain mill and elevator

complex that was located at the canal lock there at Eldean.

Allen & Wheeler was the grain business name, they also had

their own canal boat to transport grain from other buyers.

Since every canal lock had a falling-water "waste gate" the

site was perfect for a water-driven grain mill.

There is still a large grain elevator & buyer at the old

canal lock location today, just west of the covered bridge.

The rail spur that serves the elevator is notorious as its bridge over Eldean Road has

only 9'8" clearance and many trucks have been given "haircuts" when their drivers fail to heed the signs.

Posted September 10, 2014, by Nathaniel (erudil at columbus dot rr dot com)
Posted September 10, 2014, by TM (apmarino1966 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I forgot to post the photograph I took. It is a nice old bridge, but the rust is getting heavy on the underside.

Posted September 10, 2014, by TM (apmarino1966 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I was in Bedford a few months ago, and this bridge was opened. It has a new wooden deck with an asphalt overlay. The county also poured some new concrete on the roadway at each end of the bridge. The work on the wooden deck is not the best, as some of the planks are still loose and banged when I drove over it.

Posted September 10, 2014, by Zachary S

Wow. Unless another is discovered abandoned in the woods somewhere, this would be the only bedstead truss in the entire state!

Posted September 9, 2014, by Barry Lauver (bllauver [at] toad [dot] net)

I can see the gallery for the mules. How did the towrope get through or around the truss?

Posted September 9, 2014, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Spent a couple hours here one day talking to the late, great Amos Schwartz while he was working on this bridge...

Something I'll never forget!


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