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Posted March 10, 2013, by Will Truax (Bridgewright [at] gmail [dot] com)

A question worthy of asking, because it is a bit hard to categorize. The asking though, (in this instance at least) perhaps raises more questions than answers.

While many if not most Wooden patent trusses are liberally peppered with iron, including large Rods, and there were simple short span “King-Rod” trusses , I know of none to have been greater than two panels. No “MKP” variants seem to have had that name appended to them. This truss type always has wooden tensile elements which define the panel points.

That said, despite Coyote Creek everywhere being described as a Howe, it lacks a number of design details common to this truss type. Foremost among these are Counter Braces – While bridge engineers and builders have long discussed and even argued the need for their presence in panels towards the end of any given span, (while yes there is little reason for them in conveying loading in end or even second panels, as a builder I would argue that their presence is useful and necessary in both developing and maintaining camber) I know of no other named example which lacks Counters in the panels at mid-span. Doubled Braces are also absent in this truss, as are Angle Blocks / Shoes at the truss terminus – Always present in Howe's, in this instance the end panel Braces appear to be heeled into the Bottom Chord in a wood to wood joint.

Howe Truss panels which lack Counter Braces, can and do appear MKP like, they are none the less part of Howe type trusses...

The Coyote is however, in my opinion, not – It is a mongrel variant, more akin to a Modified Queen than a Howe.

Nelson does not seem to speak to it in his “A Century of ” - I am uncertain if Coyote Creek is like so many others, one of the State Highway Commissions standardized designs. Being part of Oregon's 20th Century wooden bridge legacy, somewhere in the record there is likely to be some sense of what its designer named it as being in Truss Type.

Posted March 10, 2013, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

ARMY Corp has requested a meeting with Ford County officials and their engineer, KSHS and Workin' Bridges. It was scheduled for next week but of courswe those officials had prior commitments. ACE said that they did not address the mitigation of an adverse effect. While claiming that w

the bridge was in immenent danger of collapse they didn't block it off, we had a meeting of neighbors there. The engineer sited our info on the axle as a replacement part.

W'B submitted photos, drawings and assessment/estimate for the repair/of the pin which would totally mitigate the adverse condition of SCRAPPING.

First time for me to see Section 106 in action. More will be revealed. If Wayne hadn't done his research, if Bridgehunter hadn't been there that research and support it would not have been in a process at SHPO to update the history and find it eligible for NRHP status and when the county applied for a permit it wouldn't have triggered Section 106: Wayne's appeal slowed things down enough that the county didn't get it scrapped and now can't. If they do something rash, it will affect their work with ACE for permits in the future.

Good job everybody!

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Posted March 9, 2013, by John Goold (BlueWilliamus [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I went down to the location today, wish I had my camera and located the bridge. The bridge is 3-4 miles north of the truss bridge in the street view. That area is loaded with 1980s era pony trusses like the one in the street view. This bridge has a wooden roadbed and is in ok shape except it needs painted. I am also kind of disappointed that there is a guardrail added. Overall this bridge is a good find because it has the built up beams etc you would expect with a 1905 bridge. It is a pratt pony truss. I have never been able to work the street view very well but this bridge is findable for somebody who is a little better versed.

Posted March 9, 2013, by Ed Hollowell (erhollowell [at] aol [dot] com)

Sometimes Google changes the images that it uses which causes the historic image to disappear. The only way to insure that the right image is available in the future is to save it as a photo. Other wise it is at Google's whim that it remains the same image.

Bridge 8 (Indiana)
Posted March 9, 2013, by AR

Oh. My bad. Sorry.

Bridge 8 (Indiana)
Posted March 9, 2013, by AR

Oh. My bad. Sorry.

Seven Island Bridge (North Carolina)
Posted March 9, 2013, by AR

Council extended its deadline to allow more interested parties to come forward. The next meeting is March 27.

Posted March 9, 2013, by Anonymous

Dammit, Dimmit! That's no way to treat an important historical artifact! Silly Texas; cemeteries are for people!

Bridge 8 (Indiana)
Posted March 9, 2013, by Luke Harden (lukemh9 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The inspection numbers are for the replacement.

Posted March 9, 2013, by Mike Page (mike [dot] page [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I'm not sure what all this entails, whether good or bad.

Condemnation suit could be pursued in effort to force opening K&I Bridge to walkers, bicyclists

http://www.courier-journal.com/article/20130309/NEWS01/30309...

Bridge 8 (Indiana)
Posted March 9, 2013, by AR

The last inspection stats look really good; why was this bridge replaced?

Posted March 9, 2013, by Chip Ford (maxford1980 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I was there today. 3-9-13. Bridge was demolished over the winter...IT IS GONE!

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Posted March 9, 2013, by Caroline Lynch Minor (carolinelynchminor [at] gmail [dot] com)

Indeed this was an unfortunate loss of a beautifully designed bridge! As the saying goes, 'they just don't make them like this anymore!' Just a few miles below where this wonderful structure stood is the B. B. Comer Bridge. The state wants to demolish it, as well! The B. B. Comer is the LAST remaining memorial toll bridge in Alabama! A 2000+ member strong group is working to save this bridge, and convert it to a public attraction.

The Kirby Creek Bridge and The B. B. Comer were built around the same time on the same stretch of AL Hwy. 35 in Jackson County. They both served to link Sand Mountain with Scottsboro, and the rest of Jackson County. Both were / are historically significant.

Posted March 8, 2013, by Caroline Lynch Minor (carolinelynchminor [at] gmail [dot] com)

If you are interested in helping save the last remaining memorial toll bridge in Alabama, please join our effort on Facebook at Friends of the B. B. Comer Bridge! Thank you!

The following photos include a view from the bridge, at sunset, by Caroline Lynch Minor, a 1930's postcard of the B. B. Comer Bridge, a photo from the M. H. Lynch Family photos of Corrine Lynch and Hazel Alspaugh, 14 year old Sarah Campbell at the Reopening, releasing the toll in 1936 from the family photos of Gary West, and a 1970's photo of the bridge taken by Hugh Williams. You may view these and many more on our group page.

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Posted March 8, 2013, by Caroline Lynch Minor (carolinelynchminor [at] gmail [dot] com)

If you are interested in helping save the last remaining memorial toll bridge in Alabama, please join our effort on Facebook at Friends of the B. B. Comer Bridge! Thank you!

The following photos include a view from the bridge, at sunset, by Caroline Lynch Minor, a 1930's postcard of the B. B. Comer Bridge, a photo from the M. H. Lynch Family photos of Corrine Lynch and Hazel Alspaugh, 14 year old Sarah Campbell at the Reopening, releasing the toll in 1936 from the family photos of Gary West, and a 1970's photo of the bridge taken by Hugh Williams. You may view these and many more on our group page.

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NS East River Bridge (West Virginia)
Posted March 8, 2013, by Loyd Lowry (loydplowry [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This bridge was constructed by the Virginian Railway.

Posted March 8, 2013, by John Goold (BlueWilliamus [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Every now and then I need to ask a question. Does this look like any kind of 1905 era bridge? According to this picture it is a pony truss.

Workin' Bridges Documentary
Posted March 8, 2013, by julie bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Now for your viewing pleasure.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3PeShK09czU

It is my first movie. Be gentle but share share share....

Let me know what you think.

Posted March 7, 2013, by Craig Nunn (dystopicnj [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge (NJ Route 3 bridge over the Passaic River) is now demolished and replaced with a new bridge. Here is an article about the demolition of the old bridge: http://www.nj.com/bergen/index.ssf/2013/02/final_explosion_a...

And here is a photo of the new bridge on one of the days the piers of the old bridge were being blown up: https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=201930499939111&set=....

Posted March 7, 2013, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Great question. Did Cambria change thwir mark over that time? Or any of the steel makers?

Rebecca Burrows, were you studying that?

Posted March 7, 2013, by Luke Harden (lukemh9 [at] gmail [dot] com)
Posted March 7, 2013, by Luke Harden (lukemh9 [at] gmail [dot] com)

It appears that there is still an arch bridge at the crossing, so at LEAST they kept the aesthetic charm of the location.

Posted March 7, 2013, by K. A. Erickson

Wouldn't the BSCO Cambria stamp on the metal in picture 36 narrow the time of construction for this bridge?

I was looking at a piece of Cambria Steel the other day and decided to see what other bridges here had steel from that company. After 1923, per Wikipedia, it was a wholly owned subsidiary of Bethlehem Steel.

The updates say that J.P added year built and builders, but only the likely steel provider is here?

Posted March 7, 2013, by Robert Elder's Car

I see what you did there.

Posted March 7, 2013, by Rebecca Burrow (rgburrow [at] gmail [dot] com)

Why is this bridge (and others like it) considered a Howe Truss and not a Multiple Kingpost? Thanks.

Posted March 7, 2013, by julie bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

At that time that would have been how they did names. I have seen it on tombstones, in books and signed documents. It probablt gad to do with space and the handwritten beautiful script. So use both but don't just change the names.

Posted March 6, 2013, by Dave Loggins

... ♫ Please come to Boston for the spring time. ♫ ...

Posted March 6, 2013, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

More like ca.1900

Hulton Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted March 6, 2013, by John Goold (BlueWilliamus [at] yahoo [dot] com)
Posted March 6, 2013, by Luke Harden (lukemh9 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Is it really Chas F. Loweth, or should it be Charles Frederick Loweth?

Posted March 6, 2013, by Luke Harden (lukemh9 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Really wish the bridges still existed.

They'd make a nice trail.

Posted March 6, 2013, by Luke Harden (lukemh9 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Hopefully it can become part of the Hoover Trail in the future.

Posted March 6, 2013, by Rebecca Burrow (rgburrow [at] gmail [dot] com)

The only two other Bullen Bridge Co. bridges in Oregon that I am aware of were both originally part of the same bridge. It was the original Burnside Bridge in Portland. Attached is an article from the Oregonian about the opening of that bridge in 1894.

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Posted March 6, 2013, by Robert Elder's Car

Aww, shucks...I prefer Chelsea Creek...

Posted March 6, 2013, by Dylan VanAntwerp (dylan_vanantwerp [at] live [dot] com)

According to what I've ascertained, Tyson Foods actually owns the bridge.

Posted March 6, 2013, by Dylan VanAntwerp (dylan_vanantwerp [at] live [dot] com)

I just visited the remains of this bridge a few days ago. You can access it from the west by walking down the old ROW, which is now part of the Hoover Trail.

Posted March 6, 2013, by julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The span is still looking for a new home while the new bridge piers are coming in. Of course the old span cant stay because it is upstream and might pose. A hazard. I get tired of the risk management they choose to enforce but what can one girl do. Found out that it is very little. Oh well.

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Posted March 6, 2013, by julie bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

My talking to the phone is atrocious....sorry.

One of the first things we did when we started talking to this golf course was to see what access could be had simply because of the public funds for grants. and these are all Iowans, you gotta understand.

Don is right, this is a great place to actually get on the river.

The hardest part will be to see if SHPO will actually particpate in a meaningful way.

also looking for new home in Minnesota for the Kern bowstring. any ideas????

Posted March 6, 2013, by Don Morrison

1. Winter access should be easy. Just bring a sled and your camera, go to the top of the hill, and sled right down to the bridge. 8^P

2. In summer, put your canoe or inner tube in at Spring Park below the dam, float past the golf course bridge to the T-38 canoe access. Bonus - float past the remains of the old Pierce's Bridge between the golf course and T-38. Touch the old center pier!

3. Ask a friendly member. I know several of them.

Sure hope the bridge move goes through!

Don

Posted March 6, 2013, by ChrisH (truckerchris [at] gmail [dot] com)

The bridge was rebuilt in late 2012 and yesterday when I was there, it was looking beautiful. Everyone needs to check it out.

Posted March 5, 2013, by Don Morrison

Two culverts over Cheslea creek are shown on the NBI to exist on Nettle Avenue, therefore this must be Cheslea Creek and not an unnamed tributary.

Also it is a common mistake for folks to call this Chelsea Creek, but it is in fact, Cheslea Creek.

Posted March 5, 2013, by Gene McCluney (gmacfilm [at] live [dot] com)

If it is pin-connected, then it wasn't built new in 1940.

re: potential site Sunny Brae Bowstring
Posted March 5, 2013, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I agree with Tony that open, public access is best. All options for public access solutions should be investigated and exhausted first. However, I always say anything is better than a scrap yard. We have a golf course in Michigan that saved five pony truss bridges by putting them on their course. They would certainly have been scrap metal otherwise, so even though they are not open to the public for viewing (unless you pay to play the course) they are still extant and perhaps serve to inspire golf players who might otherwise never be exposed to historic bridges.

Posted March 5, 2013, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I am pretty sure the lack of citation is traceable to the consultant ODOT hired to produce the inventory. I provided photos for this same consultant when they updated Michigan's inventory. However, I included a watermark on the photos I provided with my name on them, which apparently was a good idea. The Ohio inventory is extremely useful but it does have a few quirks like this.

In my experience, I have found that the sustainability found through the maintenance and rehabilitation of existing bridges is the best bet for affordability, efficiency, and reduced environmental impact. Sustainability is something I have recently been exploring and promoting as yet another benefit of preservation.

Posted March 5, 2013, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

No photos for this bridge anywhere I could find. All the Historic Bridge Inventory has is the scan from the older historic bridge inventory, which I include here. It has only thumbnail photos.

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Posted March 5, 2013, by K. A. Erickson

I suspect that Ryan Marthey himself took the pictures, seeing as he is one of the chiefs at the Medina County Engineer's Office. ODOT probably asked for images at some point maybe for a list of historic bridges by county or some such but from that moment on, the individual credit was lost.

Ryan Marthey, P.E. has conducted seminars along with the University of Toledo regarding, "the design and construction processes for the replacement of bridges in Medina County to be something that is affordable, efficient and environmentally friendly."

Seeing as there are but a few historic bridges left in this county one wonders what "affordable, efficient" design is in the works for this and the Bagdad Road pony truss.

Posted March 5, 2013, by Nathan Holth

I fixed the photo source error. The photos in the Ohio Historic Bridge Inventory as provided to me by ODOT (which includes these photos) don't have individual captions so I have to guess as to their original source.

potential site Sunny Brae Bowstring
Posted March 5, 2013, by julie bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The bridge can of course be viewed from the river anytime but during normal golfing hours if asked nicely 1 can go view and take photographs of the bridge. This is a 9 hole course who has some random times during the season also to golf if one isn't a member. The golf course is also the sledding hill for the community during the winter.

But this is an expensive project and I was informed that are supposed doesn't like to help fund those to the grant writing process. I hope since they all signed off on the program attic agreement regarding bowstrings that this time it will be different but it sure does give one pause to try to work through a system that it has already made decisions. we have a meeting set up in a few weeks with all of the Jurisdiction and more will be revealed then. at least the golf course will know if they're all being played or weather in the system is going to try to work with them.

On the other hand Tony if we can save a bridge we can save a bridge. and if the classic golf course I want you to be a member to see it then that's their choice I guess, although if they get grant funds they need to make it as open as possible.

Posted March 5, 2013, by Steve Conro (sconro [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Isn't adding a google snap shot redundant when google map is already on the page? Photo's mean photo's.

Hulton Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted March 5, 2013, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

You can paint it a Rainbow of colors, cover it in rich fabrics and lace, sprinkle it with glitter and rhinestones, and polish it to a mirror-like finish...

But a turd is still a turd!

Posted March 5, 2013, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I found those to be a bit much as well Matt. Not sure if the idea here was to protect the endposts...or if the designer was attempting to match the mailbox post.

Potential Site Sunny Brae Bowstring
Posted March 5, 2013, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Will this be a public access site Julie?

This can be an issue when a golf course is involved, but hopefully an agreement can be reached that would allow for us bowstring aficionados to visit.

Hulton Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted March 5, 2013, by John Goold (BlueWilliamus [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I love how they are defending the UCEB by calling it simple but elegant. I have found no matter how they package a UCEB it is still a UCEB with money wasted. It seems both ODOT and Penn Dot are sparing structurally deficient and in need of repair UCEBS and Steel Stringer Bridges to replace rather then rehabilitate beautiful truss bridges.

Posted March 5, 2013, by Ryan Marthey

Photos were taken by the Medina County Engineer's Office, not ODOT.

Posted March 5, 2013, by Ryan Marthey

This bridge is no longer in service and has been removed as of November 2012.

Posted March 5, 2013, by Ryan Marthey

This bridge is no longer in service and has been removed as of February 2013.

Posted March 5, 2013, by Matt Lohry

It is nice to see it preserved and put to good re-use...however, I'm not a fan of Newell posts at the ends; these are large and overwhelm the actual structure, IMHO...

Posted March 5, 2013, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Luke:

Having lived in Decorah briefly, I am thinking that this bridge may be in Phelps Park.

Posted March 4, 2013, by John Marvig (johnmarvig [at] chaska [dot] net)

John,

It appears you might be right. A 1930s photo shows a straight south approach, while the current photo shows something different. According to Wikipedia, this was about 1976, which is weird as it is about 10 years after the ill fated I-35W bridge opened.

minnetonka stone arch
Posted March 4, 2013, by AR

While Google-imaging for stone arch bridges, I found:

http://minnetonkascenes.blogspot.com/2008_12_01_archive.html

see entry for Thu Dec 4 '08.

Posted March 4, 2013, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

The first photo here is incorrect and needs to be deleted.

Posted March 4, 2013, by Anonymous

The great picture is also shown as Branch Tilley Ditch Bridge...which one is it?

Posted March 4, 2013, by Anonymous

The first photo is also seen under the Deshee Bridge entry...wtf?

Posted March 4, 2013, by AR

I hope it looks as good in its new setting as it did in its old one.

Posted March 4, 2013, by AR

Them stars is right spiffy!

Posted March 4, 2013, by AR

Well, that's one way to recycle! Would this qualify as any kind of railroad bridge, or do railroad bridges require actual rails & trains?

Posted March 4, 2013, by john (johnnycaboose [at] yahoo [dot] com)

i believe the orignal Cedar Ave bridge was a straight approach bridge from the south coming from Cedar Ave, Now the south approach is from 19th Avenue. i think they change the south approach in 1972 and completed in 1976. Or was the south approach changed around the time of the new 35w bridge in 1964?

Posted March 4, 2013, by Mat (majohnso [at] cwc [dot] edu)

Bridge to be removed in Spring of 2013.

http://county10.com/2013/03/04/county-transportation-set-to-...

Posted March 4, 2013, by Kevin Comer (kcomer300 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Tunnel is under US 31-W not under CSX as you have stated.

Posted March 4, 2013, by D. Bennett

Being torn down this month.

Posted March 4, 2013, by Jason Smith (JDSmith77 [at] gmx [dot] net)

This bridge has been closed to traffic due to a cable snapping at the top of one of the towers. See link:

http://theintelligencer.net/page/content.detail/id/582091/Ca...

Posted March 3, 2013, by Anonymous2

You can find the strange story of William Branham's vision of the bridge at http://en.believethesign.com/index.php/The_Municipal_Bridge_...

Posted March 3, 2013, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

FYI, I believe what the poster below refers to is only a particular stage in the heavy rehabilitation of this bridge. The overall project is longer in duration. My records indicate that expected completion for the entire project is November 2013.

Posted March 3, 2013, by Melody (Princes [at] gwtc [dot] net)

When I was in grade school in Lagro we raised money to save the bridge. My name was on a plaque in side the bridge.

Posted March 3, 2013, by Roger Deschner (rogerdeschner [at] gmail [dot] com)

The historic Wells Street Bridge is currently closed for one week for rehabilitation. CDOT and CTA hope to correct the "Serious" superstructure condition noted in the most recent inspection.

The timeline for this project is being kept as short as possible, because of the disruption to Downtown traffic and to the two extremely busy CTA "L" rail lines that run on the upper deck of the bridge. They also want to complete this project before the annual springtime migration of sailboats down the river into Lake Michigan, which will require the bridges to be lifted. While the bridge is closed, "L" passengers are being carried around it on shuttle buses and on (already crowded) Red Line trains. It is a major disruption, affecting the entire North Side of Chicago, because regardless of its historic quality, this bridge is a crucial link whose maintenance is vital.

Posted March 3, 2013, by Lauren McKinnon (bimini3 [at] ymail [dot] com)

Bridge closed

Posted March 3, 2013, by Don Morrison

Unsure about name of bridge.

Looks like landowner M.P. Canneff on the old plat map at

http://digital.lib.uiowa.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/a...

Also should be east branch Beaver Dam creek, or at least a tributary thereof.

Don

Posted March 2, 2013, by John Marvig (johnmarvig [at] chaska [dot] net)

http://www.stanleyconsultants.com/markets-we-serve/transport...

Clearly states Red Bridge was built 1891

Posted March 2, 2013, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)
Posted March 2, 2013, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

the postcard is very cool. Thanks for posting that.

Posted March 2, 2013, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Hey Ya'll,

Motorcycle Raffle Drawing April 1. $10 per. Send a check, get 6 for $50. Paypal at skunkriverbridge.org or PO Box 332, Grinnell, IA 50112. Delivery not included but we will work hard to help figure that out.

or

Pick it up now

or get it at the 5th Annual Historic Bridge Conference this summer.

Great way to go bridgehunting.

Seriously, we have finished the project engineering, need some working drawings and we need to start fabrication. Every penny helps. Prefer the documentary, it's fun and your family will start to understand why you do what you do.

Thanks again for your support.

Julie

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Posted March 1, 2013, by Luke Harden (lukemh9 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The book in the sources section, where the dates came from, lists several different build dates, including 1898, which is what the cutout actually reads.

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Posted March 1, 2013, by Josh (joshkingwv [at] gmail [dot] com)

I'll be honest with you, I hated going across this bridge. It's very narrow and makes for a stressful crossing, especially during rush hour. But, although I hated crossing it, I hate to see it replaced with something that has little to no personality and no historical significance. I wish they could have done the same thing to this one that they did to the Winfield Toll Bridge - even though they are different types of bridges.

Posted March 1, 2013, by John Marvig (johnmarvig [at] chaska [dot] net)

Not true on build dates. Photo shows bridge on right with portal that says 1896

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Postcard-Chicago-North-Western-Railr...

Posted March 1, 2013, by Shirley (Cartwright) McKenzie (surelyjean [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Thank you for posting these photos and comments. I am a family researcher especially interested in Tippah County, MS. I have a special interest in specifically where people lived and would like to know more about the roads and communities in the past. I didn't know CR 600 was old Hwy 72. I would like to know more about that.

Posted March 1, 2013, by John Marvig (johnmarvig [at] chaska [dot] net)

Take a close look at the historical photo. Dated 1910, we see false work under the right span.

Posted March 1, 2013, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Adding to the confusion is the nearby township named Four Mile. I chose to use the USGS name since that's the one that seemed to work best when searching official documents. Not being a local I was hesitant about changing the name since the government has made errors in the past. Naming convention here probably should be to use whatever makes it easiest for people to find things, so common usage should trump "official" as the primary name. If locals use two words for this creek the "official" nomenclature can go in the AKA field.

Posted March 1, 2013, by Gene McCluney (gmacfilm [at] live [dot] com)

Wow, another road bridge with Phoenix Columns!!

Posted March 1, 2013, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Two other bridges showed up in a search for Bullen in Oregon.

You might check with Mike Goff at ODOT.

Posted March 1, 2013, by Sharon Bullen Coxen (sharilyn [at] ortelco [dot] net)

This bridge was built by my great great grandfather! The information I have is very limited coming from the Colorado State Highway Department. Do you know where I might find information of other bridges built by Bullen Bridge Company throughout the state? I know they were also in eastern Oregon. - Sharon Bullen Coxen

Posted February 28, 2013, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I actually just started the award :) As I am sure many historians do, I have often wished to be able to travel back in time. Imagine the stir it would create if I suddenly started posting color digital camera photos for bridges demolished 80 years ago!

Posted February 28, 2013, by Jason Smith (JDSmith77 [at] gmx [dot] net)

Jeez Nathan,

I didn't know you had another award for a HB. But it definitely makes sense. I'm actually going to add this to my Mystery Bridge category for the Chronicles, together with another pair of Pennsylvania through truss bridges located in Clinton and Lyon Counties. I'm really curious to see how many Pennsylvania trusses were actually constructed in Iowa, for according to HABS/HAER records, they were rarely used, but from my point of view, I really disagree- they were used just as much as the Parker and Pratt through trusses.....

Posted February 28, 2013, by Luke Harden (lukemh9 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Apparently the official USGS name for the waterway is Fourmile Creek.

However, I'd wager that it's one of those "It really doesn't matter" sort of situations about the waterway's nomenclature. Ergo, does not matter whether we spell it "Fourmile" "Four-Mile" or "Four Mile", as it's gone by all of those variations in nomenclature.

However, for specificity's sake, we should leave it as Fourmile.

Posted February 28, 2013, by John Marvig

Just like to point it out Clark, Polk county refers to the creek as "Four Mile Creek" and other sources refer to it as "Four-Mile Creek"

The more common name is probably Four Mile Creek, not fourmile creek.

Posted February 28, 2013, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I'd give this bridge the TARDIS Award (A bridge that would be high on my list to visit if I had a time machine). Very sad to see the awesome bridges that once existed but are gone now.

By the way, its hard to tell, but it looks like this bridge's main span had intermediate connections and was actually a Pennsylvania truss not a Parker truss.

Uploaded file: JPEG image data, JFIF standard 1.01, 24818 bytes

Posted February 28, 2013, by Luke Harden (lukemh9 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Can somebody remove the NBI data/

Posted February 28, 2013, by Barry Lauver (bllauver [at] toad [dot] net)

I first saw this bridge in about 1970, definitely before Hurricane Agnes in 1972. At that time I was exploring using a fairly detailed county map. I approached from the Anne Arundel County (east) side. Even then, the road bed from the intersection to the bridge was completely overgrown, the paving gone, and a mound of earth blocking the path. At that time, the bridge was lying collapsed in the Patuxent River. Sometime in the middle or early 1960’s it collapsed under the weight of a truck, probably a gravel or sand truck. Sometime, after 1980 I think, the bridge was restored and used for fishing. The deck at the time of the collapse was probably wood planks with macadam cover.

Posted February 28, 2013, by Don Morrison

Fair enough, if you prefer that entries exist for both names of the bridge, the broken link (under Sources for the Eureka bridge) should be fixed so that someone searching for either name doesn't miss the information posted under the alternate name.

Thanks,

Don

Posted February 28, 2013, by Luke Harden (lukemh9 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Done.

Posted February 28, 2013, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This entry was made before the original location of the bridge was known by us bridgehunters.


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