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Posted June 20, 2016, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

David Steinman was known for taking what had been done before and improving upon it, so it is unsuprising that his method was faster and worked better. That said, I am unsure of the dimensions of this bridge's suspended span, but the Quebec Bridge's 640 foot long x 88 feet wide (c.c. trusses) suspended span was probably larger/heavier, and lifting of that span would be an impressive feet even by today's engineering standards. An unusual system of steel links was used to lift the Quebec Bridge too, which I suspect engineers like David Steinman would have tried to find alternatives too.

Posted June 20, 2016, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Bob, I would estimate this bridge at ca. 1890's.

There are still a fair amount of them out there. Many of this type are abandoned, while ones still in use might be threatened with replacement.

Posted June 20, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The South Fork of the Prairie Dog Creek is crossed by what appears to be an abandoned railroad grade. This bridge may, or may not, be of historical significance. It appears that a farmer is using it.

Posted June 20, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)
Posted June 20, 2016, by Bob (bwinyork [at] gmail [dot] com)

Do you know approximate dates for this pin connected design? Are these bridges common or rare?

Thanks so much, Bob

Posted June 20, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

According to the KHRI database, this bridge is now owned privately.

KSHS page with photo.

http://khri.kansasgis.org/index.cfm?in=137-0000-00046

Posted June 20, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This unusual pony truss (possibly a Bedstead), has been replaced.

Posted June 20, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Bob,

This bridge is pin connected (generally pre-dating riveted connections). The lower cord looks standard for the type.

Hope this helps.

Regards,

Art S.

NS - Codorus Creek Bridge (N) York PA
Posted June 20, 2016, by Bob (bwinyork [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge is listed as a "Pratt through truss" and described as a "simple rail-bridge". I would like some opinions and insights about this bridge, particularly the bottom cord that is constructed of a series of links.

https://bridgehunter.com/pa/york/north-run/

I have never seen this type of bottom cord on a Pratt truss. I am curious as to the reason for its use in this bridge design. One thing that is somewhat unique about the bridge is is has a very slight bend to it. Any comments would be very welcomed. Thanks.

Posted June 19, 2016, by Jonathan Fosburgh (jonathan [at] fosburgh [dot] org)

Confirm, this bridge is closed to traffic. All traffic on business 59 has been diverted to the adjacent structure

Posted June 19, 2016, by Glyn Robinson (contactbluebird [at] hotmail [dot] com)

it's said that the road will remained closed until sometime in October.

Posted June 19, 2016, by Dale Jackson (djstratoart [at] gmail [dot] com)

Been visiting these covered bridges recently, and this was on my to-see list. Great to see these.

Here's my photo of this bridge that I saw yesterday June 18, 2016

Posted June 19, 2016, by Dale Jackson (djstratoart [at] gmail [dot] com)

Visited this bridge yesterday. There are security cameras on poles, but they are distracting to the overall scene, so I removed them via Photoshop. Very pretty scene.

Posted June 18, 2016, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

This was(is) the last of those combination Post truss spans.

Although listed as lost, all of the wrought and cast iron components are in storage. I don't believe any of the wood was retained, but considering the penchant to rip all of the historic wood out of covered bridges these days...I guess that's not a big deal! It remains to be seen if this bridge will ever be rebuilt.

Posted June 18, 2016, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I was only thinking in terms of # of panels crossed Will...

But you are correct in saying that!

Posted June 18, 2016, by Will Truax (Bridgewright [at] gmail [dot] com)

Excepting the Wooden / Iron "Combination" trusses.

Posted June 18, 2016, by Joel Bader (joenonac [at] hotmail [dot] com)

The 1960 edition of the Encyclopaedia Britannica had two photos of the original Carquinez Straits Bridge (?) under construction. One showed the falsework used to support the end spans on one side of the strait; the other showed one of the central spans being raised into place using ropes and counterweights. If I'm not mistaken, David Steinman, one of the articles about bridges for the encyclopedia, noted that the span-raising took less than an hour. (By comparison, the raising of the central span of the Quebec Bridge in Canada took four days and was marred by an accident which took 13 construction workers.)

Posted June 18, 2016, by Sean Blankenship (Sean_blankenship [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Thy will begin construction today to raise the height of the bridge.

http://m.wtoc.com/wtoc/content/gEdL1BL4?t=Bridge

Posted June 17, 2016, by Jason Smith (flensburg [dot] bridgehunter [dot] av [at] googlemail [dot] com)

Looks like the bridge is still standing but has been pushed off its abutments, judging from my bird's eye view....

Posted June 17, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I should note that the KHRI database refers to this bridge simply as the "Soldier Creek Masonry Bridge".

Posted June 17, 2016, by Ed Hollowell (erhollowell [at] aol [dot] com)

Yes the first photo is not fitting with the 1963 date. why hasn't this been fixed yet?

Posted June 17, 2016, by Dave (potiukd [at] gmail [dot] com)

Is this bridge on private property?

Posted June 17, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

New Google imagery still does not indicate status one way or the other. If the bridge ran N-S, it may be hiding in the trees. This is/was a very bizarre and unusual Warren pony bedstead.

Posted June 17, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Source with photograph. I think I have found the location. Bridge status unknown, but it may very possibly be extant.

http://khri.kansasgis.org/?url=khri

Posted June 17, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

These two pages are duplicates. Bridge is lost.

http://bridgehunter.com/ks/jackson/430985003523/

Posted June 17, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

NBI has not been here since 1990. The latest Google imagery appears to show a pony (Bedstead?) truss here. At least, I think I see a pony truss...

Posted June 17, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I think we have a duplicate listing here. Bridge is extant.

http://bridgehunter.com/ks/jefferson/441007103800/

Posted June 17, 2016, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)
Posted June 17, 2016, by Michael Quiet (MQuiet [at] Gmail [dot] com)

Looks like the town is looking to repair or replace this bridge in the near future:

http://www.courant.com/community/ellington-edition/rnw-rr-ma...

The good news is that in any of the 3 scenarios they intend to retain/preserve this bridge. Of course, "preserved" means different things to different people, so we'll have to wait and see whats proposed to determine how well the plans cater to the needs of this historic span. Right now the bridge retains a very good amount of historic integrity, with the truss and floorbeams fully intact. Hopefully any future plans will maintain this.

Posted June 17, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Probably lost.

Posted June 17, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Probably lost.

Posted June 17, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Probably lost.

Posted June 17, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Probably lost.

Posted June 17, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Google maps appears to show a pile of bridge parts in the river.

Posted June 17, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Google Maps shows a bright shiny UCEB here.

Posted June 17, 2016, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Demolition video.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BsBlAc7Z0S4

VIEWER DISCRETION IS ADVISED HISTORIC BRIDGES WERE HARMED IN THE MAKING OF THIS FILM.

Posted June 17, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Nathan:

Thanks for the information. Good eye on the cast iron base. My initial suspicions were recycled materials and/or erroneous date. We may have both here.

Hopefully, the counties are aware of the significance of these bridges. The pony trusses throughout the region have been getting replaced very quickly in the last few years.

5th Street Bridge (Massachusetts)
Posted June 16, 2016, by Nathan Holth (nathan [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Referenced in Railway Engineering and Maintenance of Way March 1914 Page 120.

Posted June 16, 2016, by Nathan Holth (nathan [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Robert,

I did indeed visit this bridge and the unusual details are why it was a priority for me. I also visited this similar bridge that is claimed by MoDOT to be built by Missouri Valley Bridge and Iron Works:

http://www.bridgehunter.com/mo/vernon/25180/

The key shared features are cruciform/star iron outriggers and use of rolled beams for verticals. This one in Kansas on Grasshopper Creek has a unique detail NOT found in the Vernon County bridge which is a cast iron base for the end post. I attached two photos.

There are two additional similar bridges (verticals and outriggers) in Missouri that I didn't visit (and it is not clear if any of these have the cast iron base):

http://www.bridgehunter.com/mo/cass/22942/

http://www.bridgehunter.com/mo/bates/bh57766/

The one in Cass County is claimed on Bridgehunter to be built by Western Bridge Co. of Harrisonville, Missouri in 1918.

Use of cruciform in both 1907 and even moreso in 1918 is a bit suspicious so I question those dates. Moreover, since none other of Western Bridge Company's pony trusses follow the form of this bridge, maybe this company simply reused old/salvaged Missouri Valley trusses?

I propose all the above listed bridges are pre-1900 and built by one company (perhaps Missouri Valley Bridge and Iron).

Posted June 16, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Nathan:

Based on your preview pics, it looks like you visited this one. I have not been back since my initial visit at sunset after work.

I was always intrigued by the cruciform members that serve as outriggers. I did not expect to see them on a bridge from 1907.

I am glad to know this one is still in place despite being closed.

Posted June 16, 2016, by John Berry (jberry3412 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1350&dat=19820824&id=...

Im tracking this bridge down. I have already contacted Zehnders and its confirmed that the bridge went there, but was never used. Waiting to hear back if its stored or scrapped. If its stored going to start trying to get it brought back to Eaton Rapids

Posted June 16, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Based on Google imagery, it appears that this bridge might have been hit by a logjam. It is hard to tell for certain.

Posted June 16, 2016, by EJC (Ethanjcote [at] gmail [dot] com)

Has been replaced with a 10' x 8' segmental precast RC box culvert since last in-depth inspection in 2013 :(

Milford Swing Bridge (New Hampshire)
Posted June 16, 2016, by Michael Quiet (MQuiet [at] Gmail [dot] com)

I'd known about this bridge for a while, and had just assumed it was listed here. So imagine my surprise when I was planning a work trip through the region and couldn't find it! An 1889 Berlin Iron Bridge Co. suspension bridge still in service that had been flying under the BH radar...I'm very happy to get to add this for all to enjoy!

It looks like this bridge is going to need some repairs in the coming years...here's hoping that the community supports this significant treasure:

http://www.cabinet.com/cabinet/cabinetnews/1071264-308/milfo...

Posted June 16, 2016, by J. Charles Binder (jcharlesbinder [at] aol [dot] com)

This bridge crossed over Grand Drive southwest of the intersection of Lindell and Kingshighway. It was demolished when the railroad tracks were depressed in a trench and Grand Drive went over the tracks. The arrows in two of the images point to the bridge. The dual image shows Grand Drive 'before' and 'after' the tracks were depressed.

Posted June 15, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Tony,

You're right, I had a bit of a brain fart and forgot that the tension members crossed two panels on a Post.

Thanks,

Art S.

Posted June 15, 2016, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Art,

To the best of my knowledge there weren't any variants to the Post truss.

Posted June 15, 2016, by Kelly McClanahan

I did some checking in the "old" bridge here. According to the old quad map, 40 Highway was four lane, the "old" road (which most likely was the old road in the first place) was east bound lanes, and the current bridge was the west bound. At some point, most likely after I-70 was built, US was reduced to a two lane highway at that point.

Posted June 15, 2016, by K. Allen Ballard (speedeeprint [at] gmail [dot] com)

I have more photos to load at a future date. Even with a concrete deck this is a cool bridge and great photo shoot with the right light.

Posted June 15, 2016, by Colin J Parker

I managed to get to visit this bridge, on Sunday, June 12, 2016. The road, CR30, from the north is blocked with a large pile of gravel, at its junction with Aylesworth Road. It is possible to park, at the north end, by Aylesworth Road, and walk or cycle the 1/4 mile to the bridge. Also, there are large piles of gravel, to prevent vehicular access, at either end of the bridge. CR 30, because it is blocked off, is starting to get overgrown. The bridge is still intact, but is on poor condition. I took some more recent photo's which are added above.

Posted June 15, 2016, by Anonymous

Daniel Boone was a man he's a biiiiiiiig man lol

Posted June 15, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Nathan,

What is a Post version of a Whipple called?

Regards,

Art S.

Posted June 15, 2016, by Don Morrison

Thanks Nathan - that makes sense.

Posted June 14, 2016, by Anonymous

The bridge here was built in 2000 as part of a new roadway to Gulf Shores. No bridge existed here before then.

Posted June 14, 2016, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Don,

I am pretty sure its painting containment around the bents, they must have been repainting the bridge when James was there.

Posted June 14, 2016, by Michael Quiet (MQuiet [at] Gmail [dot] com)

Like the other bridge on this path, this was bridge was found to be posted "closed to all traffic" as of June 2016, but no barricading to prevent access. Thankfully the trusses are in excellent shape, with no signs of distress. The wooden walkway is spongy / tender though, hence its closing. Still safe to cross though, just watch your step.

Apparently its been like this for a little while:

https://bartonchronicle.com/historic-brick-kingdom-bridges-r...

Posted June 14, 2016, by Michael Quiet (MQuiet [at] Gmail [dot] com)

Found this bridge to be posted "closed to all traffic" as of June 2016, but no barricading to prevent access. Thankfully the trusses are in excellent shape, with no signs of distress. The wooden walkway is spongy / tender though, hence its closing. Still safe to cross though, just watch your step.

Apparently its been like this for a little while:

https://bartonchronicle.com/historic-brick-kingdom-bridges-r...

Posted June 14, 2016, by John Marvig

Very frustrating that there is not an access back to it anymore. There are several reports of a trail back to it, which is clearly gone. Looks like I will be doing some door knocking.

Posted June 14, 2016, by Jason Smith (flensburg [dot] bridgehunter [dot] av [at] googlemail [dot] com)
Posted June 14, 2016, by Jason Smith (flensburg [dot] bridgehunter [dot] av [at] googlemail [dot] com)

I'll post this in my Chronicles page and include your contact details. Glad they decided to keep the bridge intact and give it up for sale.....

JS

Posted June 13, 2016, by Don Morrison

I'm curious as to what is looming in the background of James' photo, since it seems absent in street view.

Bridge Trip Sample Photos
Posted June 13, 2016, by Nathan Holth (nathan [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Anyone who is interested in a preview of my recent Kansas Oklahoma Missouri bridge trip can check out this sample gallery in three parts:

http://historicbridges.org/temp/okmoks/photos1.htm

http://historicbridges.org/temp/okmoks/photos2.htm

http://historicbridges.org/temp/okmoks/photos3.htm

Any particularly noteworthy or unusual observations that I made during my visits I have already added to the Bridgehunter forum.

Thanks to everyone who has worked to provide Bridgehunter coverage to this area, the accurate listings were very helpful in preparing this 3,500 mile trip on somewhat short notice.

Posted June 13, 2016, by Nathan Holth (nathan [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I almost gave up trying to get photos of this bridge... but last minute found that you can get photos (it is fenced off but with gaps big enough for large SLR lenses) at the end of 5th Street where it hits the levee, NE Quadrant around bridge.

Posted June 13, 2016, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Field visited this bridge June 2016. Photos and GoPro Video to eventually/someday end up on HistoricBridges.org. Meanwhile I uploaded the uncut/raw GoPro video to YouTube because this is a very cool bridge that photos do not do justice for... I felt the video helps better convey the length of the bridge. This bridge is AT RISK FOR DEMOLITION! OKDOT even admits its the most historic bridge in the state. Video: https://youtu.be/SHMSSYramGA

Below is a photo I took showing the bridge is so long that the optical distortion caused by the hot Oklahoma sun actually makes the far end of the bridge nearly disappear.

Posted June 13, 2016, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Field visited this bridge June 2016. Photos to eventually/someday end up on HistoricBridges.org. Key finding: Obviously the 1936 construction date is incorrect, but it might indicate when it was altered and likely relocated here too. The bridge has been widened from original roadway width. Evidence: Riveted splices at center of sway bracing and portal bracing. Another interesting observation... this bridge has exceedingly rare "Oliver" brand on the rolled angles. I've only ever seen this on a few bridges in the USA and Canada combined and its always on angles.

Posted June 13, 2016, by Nathan Holth (nathan [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Field visit in 2016 shows that someone crashed into the bent of this bridge and died (flowers/memorial present). It badly bent some of the bracing.

Posted June 13, 2016, by Nathan Holth (nathan [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

This bridge and the plate girder to the south are very irritating to get to. The road this bridge goes over has no legal parking areas. And reaching the road this bridge carries and the road the plate girder carries is more difficult than it looks on the map. Many unmarked one-way roads, many closed roads, plus the fact that the roads are grade separated. I got so irritated at the situation I drove over the shallow curb on Chestnut and parked on the grass. Fortunately no cops came by!

Posted June 13, 2016, by Nathan Holth (nathan [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I cannot provide any instructions on how to access the tunnel as it appears to be on private property (the old cut seems to empty out onto a residential cul-de-sac at one end) but Google Earth's "fake 3D" actually did a good job showing where the portals are... hopefully the attached is of use.

Posted June 13, 2016, by Todd Walker (Twalk4567 [at] aol [dot] com )

This bridge's days are numbered for sure. The replacement structure is online and it will be built just downstream. It looks like a steel or concrete haunched girder design

Posted June 13, 2016, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Anyone have any clue how to get back to this tunnel in 2016? I will be in the area later this week, and would like to invest some time into this structure. Thanks!

Posted June 13, 2016, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Robert... Funny you mention Eggner Ferry because that was another trip I did with similar parameters.

Posted June 13, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Sounds good. I have done the same thing when visiting a new area. Ie - my 11th hour trip to the Eggners Ferry Bridge last year.

Posted June 13, 2016, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Field visited this bridge June 2016. Mike's comment below is correct, this is indeed a truss fashioned from two truss spans. Evidence: Empty rivet holes on the outer truss lines where portal and sway bracing was connected. The plates linking the pairs of truss lines are riveted indicating this alteration was done long ago (ie before 1970 at least).

Posted June 13, 2016, by Nathan Holth (nathan [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Robert:

I didn't make it to the stone arch... this was my first visit to the area so I only focused on very particular bridges... especially given this trip was multi-state and done in conjunction with other activities notably the SIA conference. I will post a "sample gallery" when I get it done.

Posted June 13, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I have driven over this bridge, but did not have a chance to photograph it. The January 2016 Streetview shows the construction of a new bridge immediately to the east. This one will probably disappear soon unless Oklahoma plans to preserve it.

Shadle Bridge (West Virginia)
Posted June 12, 2016, by Allie Pace (allie4god [at] gmail [dot] com)

I lived in Addison, Ohio(1979-81). With traffic lights at both ends, you were guaranteed a stop on this bridge. I remember waiting on this bridge as a coal truck went by, the bridge shook so hard, my head hit the the car ceiling.(This was before seatbelts.) During this time, a police officer also fell thru the grating on the bridge & broke his leg. At 50, I still freak on suspension bridges! When I talk about this bridge, I know people think I've exaggerated, But here is the proof of its existance & POOR rating. I can't believe it took another 20 years to build a new one.

Posted June 12, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Nathan:

I am glad you were able to study these Doniphan County bridges in detail. I look forward to seeing your photos.

If you made it to the Charlie Creek Bridge, (the skewed stone arch) I would be interested to know if it is extant. I have heard conflicting reports and aerial imagery is outdated.

Posted June 12, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This area gets backwater from John Redmond Reservoir IIRC. I seem to remember that this road could get barricaded on occasion. There used to be a MASSIVE log jam just upstream from the bridge which I am sure made the problem worse.

This bridge always seems to have a new layer of paint.

Hope you still got some good pics.

Posted June 12, 2016, by Nathan Holth (nathan [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Field visited this bridge June 2016. If this bridge is open to traffic it is during low water levels only only... the river was more like a lake east of the bridge and deep water was over the road, and the road gated off. The bridge was still "open to traffic" if we expand the definition of "open to traffic" to include fishermen parking their car on the bridge to interfere with my photos. I can also explain the graffiti... one of the locals (sounding quite proud of this) announced to me that graduating high school students paint their name and graduation year on the bridge. Indeed much of the graffiti appeared to be of this variety.

Posted June 12, 2016, by Nathan Holth (nathan [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Field visited this bridge June 2016. No indication of a plaque for this bridge on BridgeHunter. I drove RIGHT BY IT. My GoPro caught it, but my eyes didn't... if you are a safe driver your eyes won't be looking where it is. Such that future bridgehunters might enjoy the knowledge of where the plaque is, please be advised it hides between two trees, mounted on the concrete retaining wall for the north approach, on the east side of the north roundabout that intersects Harlem Avenue. 39.116779, -94.590741

Posted June 12, 2016, by Nathan Holth (nathan [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Field visited this bridge June 2016. Photos to eventually/someday end up on HistoricBridges.org. The coordinates I had guessed in my previous post are essentially correct for the new location: 39.788167, -95.094667. What was remarkable about this bridge is that I haven't seen any mention during the relocation media coverage that this is a "FrankenBridge" pieced together from some other bridge. It certainly is one of the most unique bridges I have ever seen, but its certainly not the work of Mr. Waddell himself! This bridge has so many empty rivet holes on the top chord it looks like swiss cheese. It was at least partly put together from parts of a pin-connected truss, since the base of the end post has a now-unused pin plate present. Even the gusset plates are fashioned from old plates, it is clear they are cut with a cutting torch, and on sections unused rivet holes are visible, even along cut lines. This reuse project obviously occurred long ago during the riveted era, since all the "new" work is riveted.

I should also add the thought that it is probably a mistake to assume that all the parts on this bridge are from the same bridge. I visited several bridges in this region that were reused from other bridge parts. I think it was just a unique thing this region/county did. They may have stockpiled all the trusses they removed for parts. I even found bridge parts at an intersection (190th Road and Randolph) where a truss part was holding up a stop sign. In the background riveted angles being used for something are also visible.

Posted June 12, 2016, by Nathan Holth (nathan [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Field visited this bridge June 2016. Photos to eventually/someday end up on HistoricBridges.org. Key finding: This is a "FrankenBridge" pieced together from some other railroad bridge. Evidence: Heavy member design indicative of a railroad bridge. The hip verticals are ridiculously oversized. Numerous empty rivet holes are evidence of reused bridge parts. Riveted splices on diagonal members indicate the eyebars were shortened. The top chord ends at an angle with an outward facing place having empty rivet holes: strong evidence that this top chord is a reused end post.

Posted June 12, 2016, by Nathan Holth (nathan [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Field visited this bridge June 2016. Photos to eventually/someday end up on HistoricBridges.org. Key finding: This was a originally a standard Pratt through and, based on concrete abutments, likely relocated here. When it was relocated, the center panel was narrowed. Visitors to the bridge should note the most obvious evidence aside from the narrow center panel length is that the bottom chord eyebar was cut to shorten it, and a splice riveted together on it at the center to reuse it as a shorter eyebar. The fact that the bottom chord splice is riveted is evidence that this shortening of the truss happened a long time ago.

Posted June 12, 2016, by Dan Reitmeyer (danr [at] clrincgrp [dot] com)

This bridge is available to purchase if anyone knows of a prospective buyer, let them know, or let me know.

Posted June 12, 2016, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Maybe they had an attack of common sense and realized that with an ADT count of 40 a new bridge wasn't warranted here.

...Well, one can hope!

Posted June 11, 2016, by Anonymous

It's amazing that the truss and stringers are intact! I imagined that the truss would have collapsed due to the heat of that fire. They're perfectly intact!

Posted June 11, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Hi Scott:

Thanks for the update and the photo. Perhaps the bridge got a stay of execution.

Posted June 11, 2016, by Matt C (mgccunning [at] aol [dot] com)

The builder's plaque says this was built in 1911, by the Pennsylvania Steel co. There are much older bridge abutments adjacent to this bridge on both shores. So this isn't the first bridge in this location.

Posted June 11, 2016, by scott branine

The bridge is still standing and open to traffic. I drove over it this past Saturday.

Posted June 11, 2016, by Scott Gray

I was at this bridge on June 10 '16 and it was closed to all but foot and bike traffic. Looking at the pictures on the Johnson Creek Covered Bridge Facebook page it seems to have been closed to traffic since at least Aug '15.

Posted June 11, 2016, by Christopher Finigan

Since California does not have many examples of Queenpost truss bridges, this beauty should be relocated, restored, and preserved on a trail.

Dos Rios Bridge (California)
Posted June 11, 2016, by Christopher Finigan

The historic bridge looks more like a Pennsylvania truss

Posted June 11, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Thanks anonymous. You beat me to it. I just happened to find the tunnel by virtue of Google Maps.

Posted June 11, 2016, by Anonymous
Posted June 11, 2016, by April Waldron (awkitten [at] aol [dot] com)

I'm trying to find a date when this tunnel was built.

Posted June 10, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Based on the 'bubbles' portal bracing, I'm guessing the build date is between 1877 and 1882.

Posted June 10, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Note the portal bracing. Its different than any CBW bracing design I've seen. My guess it that it comes after the 'bubbles' style of 1880 - 1882. That would put the build date in the 1882 - 1884 range.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted June 10, 2016, by Michael McCarty (ruggermike [at] charter [dot] net)

An old postcard depicting the Brewery Creek ( Formerly know as "Red Bluff Creek" ) Bridge looking Northward up Duncan Hill, on the California State Highway.

The proper 66ft bridge was finished and opened for traffic on 11th March, 1921, ( it is easy to think the bridge was built in 1920 because of the plaques that says "1920"; it was in a council meeting on 7th Dec, 1920 that it was voted to have these plaques made ) with only the fills to be completed.

The bridge was built/contracted by Hart Construction Co. out of Gerber,CA for the amount of 13,636.00; the bridge was built in 3 months with both the city and county paying for it.

This 1921 concrete reinforced Brewery creek bridge replaced the 1903 built wooden bridge with brick abutments.

This was the alignment to Red Bluff until the current road was made around 1938 or so. If you look over the railing on the side of the bridge that has the sidewalk you will see a boxed culvert dated 1937.

Baker River Bridge (New Hampshire)
Posted June 10, 2016, by Will Truax (Bridgewright [at] gmail [dot] com)

I agree completely.

Even the hundreds of primary reports filed from that bridge do not make it historic.

Sadly, it is almost as if the remaining Storrs spans have been targeted for removal.

Posted June 10, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Sounds good, Nathan. I am glad you were able to visit the area. It will be awesome to see some of the bridges from my area on your website.


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