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Posted April 24, 2013, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

This bridge was built in 1797 as a replacement for a wooden bridge burned by George Washington's troops during the revolution.

Dinky Bridge (New Jersey)
Posted April 24, 2013, by Art S. (Auckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

This bridge is a rotating two track railroad bridge. The motion was necessary because of the Delaware & Raritan Canal.

Posted April 24, 2013, by Art S. (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

The Mine Road bridge was restored in summer of 2011. It was one of very few bridges over Stony Brook that was not washed out as a result of Hurricane Irene.

Posted April 24, 2013, by Anonymous

Here is a picture of the bridge prior to widening

http://pudl.princeton.edu/sheetreader.php?obj=2v23vt493

Posted April 24, 2013, by Art S. (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Here is a picture showing it's current width:

http://www.flickriver.com/photos/jag9889/4787156748/

Posted April 24, 2013, by Anonymous

Here is a picture of the bridge prior to widening

http://pudl.princeton.edu/sheetreader.php?obj=2v23vt493

Posted April 24, 2013, by Art S. (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Oh yeah, this bridge can be seen in the opening sequence of the 'House' TV series.

Posted April 24, 2013, by Art S. (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

This is the Washington Road (Rt. 571) bridge. It is one of two bridges over Carnegie lake built by Andrew Carnegie when he had Carnegie Lake (Lock Carnegie) created for Princeton University's crew team in 1906. It is reenforced cast concrete four span arch bridge with stone facing It was originally a single lane and was widened in the 1930's.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/jag9889/4841472191/

The other bridge, the Harrison Street Bridge, a spectacular four span iron arch bridge built at the same time as the Washington Road Bridge was torn down 20+ years ago.

http://pudl.princeton.edu/sheetreader.php?obj=1z40ks94n

The replacement is a steel bridge that is a modern interpretation of the original.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/jag9889/4787093866/

Posted April 24, 2013, by Joey Harper (ajharper14 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The pictures you have of the Dumas Bridge is also of the Copeland Creek Bridge at Chamblee Mill Creek.

The pictures that is posted on the Copeland Creek Bridge are from the west side view then the Dumas Bridge photos are of Copeland Creek Bridge from the east side.

I will try to go to the Dumas Bridge soon for some photos of it. I have never heard of Dumas bridge until this site but grew up going to the Chamblee Mill bridge.

Also how would I find more information of a bridge the was on Philpot Rd Hayden going over the Mulberry to County Road 509 Hanceville?

I have always heard about it and would like to know more about it.

Thanks,

Joey

Hunter Road Bridge - Mercer County, New Jersey
Posted April 24, 2013, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

This bridge is about a quarter mile from my property:

http://www.howellfarm.org/valley/life/stories/02bridge.htm

It is located in Hopewell Township (Titusville), Mercer County, NJ.

Note that it is an 1890 Variety Iron Works pony truss. The bridge is in very poor condition and has been closed for years but, to the best of my knowledge, it is not in any danger of washing away or demolition.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted April 24, 2013, by Art Suckewer (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Frank,

Thank you for posting your pictures.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted April 24, 2013, by Bill Graber (foursecretary [at] aol [dot] com)

There is a picture of the east portal of this old bridge in 4/24/13 State Journal-Register, Springfield's newspaper. It is showing the sandbagging being done in 1943 for the "big flood". It is a "file" picture from the SJ-R.

Broad River Bridge (South Carolina)
Posted April 24, 2013, by Joey (ljlucas2894 [at] aol [dot] com)

This bridge is presently being replaced.

Posted April 23, 2013, by Dylan VanAntwerp (dylan_vanantwerp [at] live [dot] com)

Follow the railpictures.net link for some interesting views of this bridge. In 2004, a CSX train was passing over when a pier gave way and nearly brought two spans of the bridge down. Union Pacific had to scramble to stabilize and repair the bridge with the train still stuck on it.

Posted April 23, 2013, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

20k is peanuts in government spending! It can cost that much to get a consultant to write a letter saying the bridge is too far gone to repair.

re: Pan American Bridge Building company of Indiana
Posted April 23, 2013, by Nathan Holth

This is pre-1923, but if you search this text for Pan-American Bridge Company you will turn up a few tidbits. http://books.google.com/books?id=AjEUAAAAYAAJ&dq=Pan-America... I unfortunately don't have a lot of info on this company aside from that it was in operation as early as 1903, maybe earlier.

Pan American Bridge Building company of Indiana
Posted April 23, 2013, by Mark Lindsay (malindsay66 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I am researching a book on a man whose brother, like the entire family, was a bridge builder. This man came to USA in 1923 to work at the Pan American Bridge Building company of Indiana in New Castle. I am trying to find out anything about this company. Who owned it. If it went bust (probably) and especially when.

If anyone knows of a way of researching companies in the USA in the period 1923 to 1927 I would be interested in hearing from them. It seems this period of USA history leading up to the great depression was thrown out with the trash. Nothing seems to be kept over there.

Any help would be appreciated.

Mark Lindsay

Posted April 23, 2013, by frank (fickkats [at] aol [dot] com)

Collapse

Posted April 23, 2013, by frank fick (fickkats [at] aol [dot] com)

Pictures of the bridge

Posted April 22, 2013, by John Paul (john [dot] powers69 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I was at Charlton Mill bridge today and was stupified to see this beautiful bridge had been demolished. So i ask myself..."why was this done? Green county recieved almost $20,000.00 dollars in federal grants to "repair" this historical bridge. This is quite discearning, so what happened to those funds?

Posted April 22, 2013, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

The demolition of this bridge and replacement with a slab of concrete is deeply disappointing. Even though its not physically connected to the Golden Gate Bridge, it is part of the Golden Gate Bridge project. For proof of this you need not look further than the main plaque for the Golden Gate Bridge, which lists the builder for the "Presido Approach Roads and Viaducts" They are basically demolishing part of the Golden Gate Bridge.

Posted April 22, 2013, by Andrew Pearce

Pot metal is any old junk that can melt at relatively low temperatures. Usually it's a cheap combination of zinc and tin, sometimes there is a bit of aluminum or lead in it. It's used for castings of things that don't need great physical strength, and can have a less than uniform appearance.

More Links for the AQ Bridge Bombing Story
Posted April 22, 2013, by Andrew Pearce (apearce2000 [at] yahoo [dot] com)
RCMP Busts Al Qaeda Bridge Bombing Plot
Posted April 22, 2013, by Andrew Pearce (apearce2000 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

AQ in Canada was planning on blowing up the Whirlpool Bridge at Niagara Falls, with a train full of tourists on it. Two Canadian operatives arrested.

http://hotair.com/archives/2013/04/22/breaking-canada-us-bus...

http://www.torontosun.com/2013/04/22/feds-thwarted-major-ter...

The Whirlpool Bridge dates from 1897 and was refurbished a few years ago. It's a 2 hinge arch trestle.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whirlpool_Rapids_Bridge

Posted April 22, 2013, by Jim Hanna (jimsjoynt [at] hotmail [dot] com)

This bridge was built by the Wisconsin & Michigan Railway (The Iron Range) not the C&NW some time around 1910 to the west northwest they had a station & round house were the old pulp mill was. they gave the bridge to the City of Peshtigo when they abandon the line from Peshtigo harbor to Bagley Jct.

Posted April 22, 2013, by Jim Hanna (jimsjoynt [at] hotmail [dot] com)

The railroad is the E&LS ( Escanaba and Lake Superior ) the tracks the old Milwaukee Road.

Posted April 22, 2013, by Jim Hanna (jimsjoynt [at] hotmail [dot] com)

This is an old C&NW bridge, now owned by the Canadian National not the Canadian Pacific.

The old C&NW bridge at Oconto may have been built to swing, I was born in Oconto 64 years ago. That bridge never did turn.

Posted April 22, 2013, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Looks like it was made with Lincoln Logs and an Erector Set.

Very cool though!

Posted April 22, 2013, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Cheap, low temp, zinc alloy, good for casting inexpensive parts. Brittle and weak in tension--breaks when bent. Usually slang for any substandard alloy.

Posted April 22, 2013, by Joe Leets (jpkava10 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

J.R., this bridge carried two bridges by the same railroad. The first being built in the 1800's then the second in 1923 when the railroad double tracked this area. The first bridge was in place with the second from 1923-1953 when the first bridge was demolished because CTC was installed. This can be clarified by seeing an about 200 ft. portion of track there between the spur and the main line.

Posted April 21, 2013, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I am sure pedestrians and bicyclists will appreciate being able to cross an ugly bridge a few feet from the roar of freeway traffic versus having an entire historic cantilever bridge to themselves.

Posted April 21, 2013, by Fmiser (fmiser [at] gmail [dot] com)

I appears the new bridge is not a through truss, based on data on the MODOT page.

http://contribute.modot.mo.gov/stlouis/major_projects/NewDan...

And the new bridge will have a pedestrian/bicycle lane, so there is no use for the historic span.

In the list of excuses for replacing the 1935 span, the page says "... has reached a point where it needs regular preventative maintenance." I guess MODOT figures that any bridge needing maintenance needs to be replaced. Stupid. Maintenance is more cost effective than repair, which is more cost effective than replecement. Maybe it's that politicians like to put in new bridges so they can earn brownie points by naming the bridge for big-named people.

The attached image is an artist rendition extraced from a PDF I found on the MODOT site

Posted April 21, 2013, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I hate it when I am right, but I called it during my site visit a mere week before.

Posted April 21, 2013, by AR

What's "pot metal?"

Posted April 21, 2013, by Craig Philpott (cphilpott [at] puc [dot] edu)

@ Jann, it turns out that Millerick Rd is open and legal, past the Larsen family winery and down to a locked gate in the vineyards with a small parking lot. It is then a mile plus hike across to the bridge. I met one local at the time of my visit who had driven in from the West on the private entrance road. Yes, I have know of this bridge for several years and figured i would never find a way to approach the location. One of my current favorite unusual locations.

Posted April 21, 2013, by Craig Philpott (cphilpott [at] puc [dot] edu)

Visited bridge and took pictures after two years of talking about it!

Posted April 21, 2013, by Craig Philpott (cphilpott [at] puc [dot] edu)

Discovered this bridge and have no historical information on the span. BUT the design and the regional location suggest it may be a John B. Leonard engineered bridge. Any new information would be helpful.

Posted April 21, 2013, by Brian (hayesstation [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Here is a photo of the TTI bridge from 1-11-2009, that crosses the Main Licking River

Posted April 21, 2013, by Aaron Hall (ahall [at] vitaphone [dot] net)

Yeah, I thought those old stone abutments were really interesting when I poked around there. I think they were built for the Leavenworth, Topeka, & Southwestern Railroad, which was for a time jointly operated by the AT&SF and UP, and later publicly owned! The line was probably dismantled around 1933.

The USGS Topographical maps for the Topeka and Oskaloosa regions (30x30, 1894 and subsequent) show the line labeled as the Santa Fe. See also "The People's Railroad" at http://www.kshs.org/publicat/history/2001spring_quastler.pdf

Posted April 21, 2013, by J.R. Manning (thekitchenguy [at] sbcglobal [dot] net)

I was snooping around this bridge yesterday and wondering the same things you are. The continuous top chord design was a hallmark of the Wisconsin Bridge and Iron Company in Milwaukee. I've seen virtual twins to this bridge around Wisconsin, including the cemetery bridges in Oconomowoc.

There was a virtual twin to this bridge in Langlade County, spanning a branch of the Eau Claire River on Rangeline Road. It was built in 1908 and removed in 1991 and I can't help but wonder if this isn't that bridge. It would have been a move of about 50 miles, but this bridge was dismantled, so it isn't a stretch to think it might be the same bridge.

You can see that listing in in the Langlade County listings. There are photos from HAER in the listing, here's one of them. It was taken in 1987 by Martin Stupich.

Posted April 21, 2013, by Fmiser (fmiser [at] gmail [dot] com)

The NBC page that clip points to calls the bridge "historic old cast iron". *sigh* I suppose it's asking too much for the news media to get the facts correct.

Posted April 21, 2013, by Bob Hageman (hageman [at] fairpoint [dot] net)

Bridge might be the old narrow gauge that Western Brick ran across the Salt Fork in order to haul clay from south of the river to the processing plant on the north. The map leads directly north to the U Pull Auto Parts which was the site of Western Brick. That would also explain the brick construction of the piers. As kids Dad would take us for walks across the bridge on Sundays when the plant wasn't open. The nickname for the train was the dinky train because of its smaller size.

Posted April 21, 2013, by Anonymous

The City of Lenora has a 1906 Truss Leg Bedstead Bridge (OS125) to give away. Located in Larrick Park, the steel bridge is 64 ft long and 17 ft wide, is in fair condition but currently has no deck. It is listed in the National Register of Historic Places, and its relocation to Larrick Park had been approved by the National Park Service. Anyone interested in the bridge would be responsible for all work and expense to relocate the bridge, as well as coordination with the Kansas Historical Society. Serious inquiries may be made to the City of Lenora, 125 E Washington, Lenora, KS 67645, or call 785-567-4860, or email lenoraco@ruraltel.net.

Posted April 21, 2013, by Julie (Jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge is being offered by the city of Lenora.

Posted April 21, 2013, by Julie (Jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

A 2 to 1 vote moved the supervisors to sign off on a competitive grant for TAP funds. More will be revealed. The next hurdle is 20 years of maintenance and replacement if the bridge falls again. But with new metal and raising two feet we are confident.

Posted April 21, 2013, by JB (Jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge was built in 1914 as the prototype for warren pony trusses in Iowa. We are looking at moving it to Grinnell to a park on a trail. IaDOT brought to our attention through the Carroll County engineer. There is one more coming out there on Robin Avenue. More info on the IaDoT historic bridge database.

Posted April 21, 2013, by Will Truax (Bridgewright [at] ymail [dot] com)
CR 51 Bridge (Minnesota)
Posted April 20, 2013, by John Marvig (johnmarvig [at] chaska [dot] net)

Based on photos in link and uncertanty surrounding bridge design, and the key stone design, this was almost certainly a former railroad. A C&NW map (which I can no longer find) showed the line had weaved back and forth around here, and was sold to the county upon a new line being constructed in 1899.

If this is the case, there may be similar bridges still in existence on Chatfield Road (county 51) around here. It has been a couple years since I was back here, but there are many creeks and possible sites for more.

Posted April 20, 2013, by Brian (hayesstation [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Here is a recent photo from 4-13-2013.

Posted April 20, 2013, by Joel Wyman (ponchoman49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Whoops I think I mistook this bridge for the one in Rodman that is closed. Glad to see it is still in use.

Posted April 20, 2013, by Joe (ponchoman49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I find it really odd that this bridge was demolished. I remember as a kid 30 years ago fishing in this spot and this bridge was well closed back then. Why 30-40 years later does it all of a sudden need to go? This should have been cleaned up and made into a pedestrian walk bridge. It's really maddening watching our precious history callously being destroyed.

Posted April 20, 2013, by Richard Tekulve (canoeindiana [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I canoed under this bridge last Sunday (April 14th). It is three concrete arches and similar to the railroad bridge just downstream (south) of this one. It has a poured "ledge" or drop off at the south end which kind of adds a falls effect.

Posted April 20, 2013, by Richard Tekulve (canoeindiana [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I canoed under this bridge last Sunday (April 14th) it is three concrete arches and quite wide (aprox. 40 feet). It probably carried multi- lanes of tracks. Very similar to the U.S. 40 bridge just north (upstream) of this one.

Posted April 20, 2013, by Richard Tekulve (canoeindiana [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This bridge just went through a renovation process but not near as bad as the Otter Creek Bridge just east of here. This bridge is located aprox. 1000 ft. East of the 1837 Vernon Underpass. A person could easily walk the distance (less than a half-mile) to both the two railroad trestles and the underpass in one trip.

Posted April 20, 2013, by Richard Tekulve (canoeindiana [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This bridge is aprox. 50 feet above the river below.

Posted April 20, 2013, by Richard Tekulve (canoeindiana [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I canoed under this bridge last Saturday (April 13th) in very high water. The bridge has gone through a complete restoration to a UCEB type bridge. It doesn't even look the same anymore. It appears new, tall concrete columns have been poured to support its weight load. This was planned for awhile but didn't know they (Madison Railroad Co.) were going to change the looks of the bridge. They also renovated the Vernon Railroad Bridge 1/4 mile NW of here over the Vernon Fork Muscatatuck River but not to the same degree. Sorry didn't take any pictures as the creek was flowing extremely fast.

Posted April 20, 2013, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Sadly, I knew with the storms coming through there that this was very likely to occur.

Another unfortunate loss!

Posted April 20, 2013, by Julie Bowers (Jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I wish I had your faith Nathan about reasonable and prudence in regard to Section 106. Mostly I see the opposite, how to get through the process in the least amount of time to get the outcome originally desired by paid staffers.

Posted April 20, 2013, by JT (jct5jet [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Looks like this bridge finally bit the dust judging by this latest video:

http://www.nbcnews.com/id/51599704/#.UXJf2KK87hI

Posted April 20, 2013, by John Marvig (johnmarvig [at] chaska [dot] net)

Bridge was NOT relocated from 474th Street. It is an original RI bridge.

Posted April 19, 2013, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Nice find.

Posted April 19, 2013, by Carl Belken (cbgbrb [at] gmail [dot] com)

I APOLOGIZE SO VERY MUCH!! I WAS WRONG! This is back creek. Those trees were not there when I was a kid. That was what made me think it was Wolf Creek. Please delete my first comment. Things have changed very much since i was there last.

Again I sincerely apologize.

Posted April 19, 2013, by Carl Belken (cbgbrb [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge was located less than half a mile from my boyhood home. Years ago we owned property on both sides of this road on the opposite side of the bridge. Sometime back in the early 1940's my dad sold the property on the right to a fellow by the name of Anderson who built a filling station and store. It was sort of a motel too. They had several cabins they rented overnight. The place was named "The Beacon" It closed sometime in the early 60's.

Back in the 40"s the creek flooded so bad that it got up into the Beacon filling station. To appreciate the amount of water this would have taken you'd have to see the area in person. The beacon actually sits on sort of a bluff of the little St.Francois. I was told the water was going over the top of the bridge. It was the only time that has ever happened even with the huge rain storms we had when I was a kid.

Posted April 19, 2013, by Dylan VanAntwerp (dylan_vanantwerp [at] live [dot] com)

The Rock Island referred to in this bridge's name can't have anything to do with the former railroad, and is probably related to the local geography. The Rock Island RR never got near this area; the farthest it ever penetrated into Tennessee being Memphis.

Posted April 19, 2013, by Carl Belken (cbgbrb [at] gmail [dot] com)

I'm originally from this area and traveled this road many times. I once joked that I could drive it with my eyes closed. I no longer live in the area and it's been 10 years since I have been back but this photo looks like it's the WOLF CREEK BRIDGE. If it were Back Creek you'd be able to see the Kollmeyer Dairy farm in the background if it still exists.

Back in May of 1970 I was coming home from high school with a friend when we came upon an accident at the Wolf Creek bridge. I was concerned because my mom drove a brown 65 Plymouth and she would have been going to work at the time. On that bridge sat a car that was too mangled to tell what make and model it was AND it was the same color as moms car. What had happened was this car had collided head on with a concrete truck. The impact was so hard that the truck was off in the creek. I wanted to go check and see if it was MOM but stopped when I saw the Highway patrolman look in the car and his face turned very pale. It WAS NOT my mom but the poor woman in the car had been decapitated and killed instantly.

I know the Wolf Creek Bridge very well.

Posted April 19, 2013, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I checked and Section 106 does apply to this project. So it cannot be demolished without first considering feasible and prudent alternatives to demolition.

Posted April 19, 2013, by Jann Mayer (jannmayer [at] gmail [dot] com)

Great photos, Craig! How did you get to the bridge - I wasn't sure if any of those roads were open to the public?

Posted April 19, 2013, by Paul Ronczy (paul [dot] ronczy [at] ssa [dot] gov)

The current bridges are replacement bridges built sometime in the 1980's. The original bridges as built had a grated steel deck which made a distinctive sound when driving over it, hence the name.

Posted April 19, 2013, by Matt Lohry

Another easy way to identify the bottom chord is to look where the diagonal members meet the verticals--they always meet at the top and bottom chords and never anywhere else, except in cases of subdivided panels (Pennsylvania, Baltimore, or subdivided Warren).

Posted April 18, 2013, by Kay Stum (btmchickenlady [at] aol [dot] com)

photo take on Jan 29th 2013

Posted April 18, 2013, by Mike Goff (michael [dot] goff [at] hotmail [dot] com)

This certainly is an interesting find Craig, Good Work!

Posted April 18, 2013, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Thanks, Nathan. I see the original bottom chord now.

Posted April 17, 2013, by Craig Philpott (cphilpott [at] puc [dot] edu)

A fully manual operate lift bridge on active railroad.

Posted April 17, 2013, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Robert,

Let me clarify the design of this bridge for you, which may not be apparent in the photo. What looks like a polygonal bottom chord is not the original bottom chord. The original bottom chord is horizontal and is above the added metal which likely was added during a floorbeam alteration. Additionally, the verticals on this bridge are back-to-back channels with v-lacing on each side. This was characteristic of Massillon ponies, but your bridge appears to have angles with lattice, uncommon among Massillon ponies.

Posted April 17, 2013, by Stuart Johnson (stu_jo [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Recently restored as part of the Mission Reach hike & bike trail.

Posted April 17, 2013, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Nathan: Thank you for updating this bridge, and therefore calling my attention to it. There is a nearly identical bridge in Riley County, Kansas. Perhaps that bridge was built by the same firm. I had always wondered who the fabricator might have been, and this might give me a clue.

Link for the Kansas example:

http://bridgehunter.com/ks/riley/deep-creek/

Posted April 17, 2013, by Justin Minor (justinminor [at] hotmail [dot] com)

As of 4/17/2013 the new bridge is built and in place some 150+ yards east of this bridge. This bridge is still standing and somebody (likely a local farmer) has torched the barricades off and it is being used to move farm equipment between pastures.

i don't know if it helps you to approximately date it or make-it, but the name "Jones and Laughlin" appears on the heavier bracing, and the stylized "illinois" stamp on the lighter-duty bracing. Thought it possible Some of you guys with a lot of bridge hunting/researching experience might be able to discern something from that.

Couldn't get any decent pictures, was a cold, rainy,dark day when I was out there.

Posted April 17, 2013, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Pitiful.

The modern standard for railings (to prevent children falling through) requires that it not allow a four inch diameter ball to pass.

Obviously this new railing will end the problem of children falling from this bridge. /sarcasm

There are ways this standard could have been met while still keeping the visual style. Really sad to lose another concrete "fence".

Posted April 16, 2013, by Nathan Holth

Did a field visit to this bridge last Sunday and was very angered. The attractive, original concrete railings were pointlessly removed from this historic bridge and ugly modern steel railings were put in their place. The bridge now looks very stupid. Not really worth a visit anymore. Very shameful what they did since it was completely uncalled for. See below photo.

Below photo Copyright 2013 Nathan Holth, HistoricBridges.org All Rights Reserved.

Posted April 16, 2013, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Made a field visit to this bridge last Saturday and it was still standing. Its leaning about as far over as the Maple Rapids Road Bridge in Michigan was the last time I ever saw it standing. At this angle, the bridge will become top heavy and is at risk for tipping over like Maple Rapids did. Significant branches are piled up on what's left of the wooden piles. A massive rain of as much as four inches is predicted for this region in the coming days. If this occurs it would be the heaviest rain seen in a couple years in this area. So it might not be standing for long. It will be an unspeakable loss to see a Hammond truss collapsed.

Posted April 16, 2013, by Jack Keller (jkeller41 [at] cinci [dot] rr [dot] com)

Sirs;

This bridge was likely replaced in 1904 as that is a date prominent on the bridge molded into the concrete.

Jack

Posted April 16, 2013, by Patrisha (patrisha_henson [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Planning a Carole Lombard trip in June 2013, came across this while researching places in regard to Carole. Very helpful. Thanks for posting.

Posted April 16, 2013, by Dylan VanAntwerp (dylan_vanantwerp [at] live [dot] com)

The Milwaukee Road did a mass-abandonment in 1980, shedding off its entire Pacific Extension and also numerous lines in the Midwest. It was a desperate measure to shed off weaker lines and retreat to a financially solvent core system. Among the lines that were axed was the former E/W main across IA that went through Cedar Rapids. So the bridge was probably torn out within a short time following its 1980 abandonment date.

Posted April 16, 2013, by Ron Mele (rmeg12 [at] charter [dot] net)

The bridge is owned by East Manufacturing, leased to Kasgro Rail, and operated by NCIR. It's mostly used by Kasgro for car storage but NCIR has operated over it on occasion.

Posted April 16, 2013, by Keel Clemmens (keel [dot] clemmens [at] gmail [dot] com)

It was built in 1905 and widened in 1912-13. The first bridge (1881-1905) across Cedar River was about a mile further south and the right-of-way sloped down the east side of the river. The grade and the piers can still can be seen today.

Posted April 15, 2013, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Already listed here:

http://bridgehunter.com/mt/park/P0001100001651/

Move the photo and delete....

Posted April 15, 2013, by John (johnsjunk11 [at] comcast [dot] net)

Some pics from Summer 2011 (not mine). I hate to think what it's like it's now.

http://advrider.com/forums/showpost.php?p=16319754&postcount...

Shame, as this was one of my favorite spots that time forgot. Now it really will be forgotten.

Posted April 15, 2013, by Deb (deb [dot] heiss [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This bridge was damaged in a flood in 2012 and I believe it is now closed.

Posted April 14, 2013, by Barton Jennings (b [dot] jennings [at] mchsi [dot] com)

It is original White River Railway, then Missouri Pacific, then Union Pacific, and now Missouri & Northern Arkansas. Don't get this line confused with the abandoned line of the nearby Missouri & North Arkansas.

Posted April 14, 2013, by Janis Ford (jford3 [at] columbus [dot] rr [dot] com)

4/14/13 - Gloomy day, so photos aren't the best. If you're ever in Port Clinton, eat at Jolly Roger's.

Posted April 14, 2013, by John Marvig (johnmarvig [at] chaska [dot] net)

The bridge pictured here is on the UP line, not the DM&E. The DM&E Bridge is a pony truss. This one might be north of Algona.

Posted April 14, 2013, by jody (smallj12 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

i remember that bridge, i dropped rocks off that bridge 20 years ago as a child. during hunting trips i would ride my 4wheeler out to the middle and look over. it was pretty scary because the wood planks across the bottom where rotten or missing in some places. looks great now, might have to go check it out when im out there for dove season

Posted April 14, 2013, by K. A. Erickson

Last week Budget Travel named the KATY trail one of ten "Hidden Gems" in the US.

The write up states that: "The largest rails-to-trails conversion in America, the 240-mile Katy Trail spans Missouri's midsection, from Clinton in the west to Machens in the east, along the former track of the Missouri-Kansas-Texas (MKT) Railroad (a.k.a. the Katy). The mostly flat path is open to hikers and cyclists—and in some sections, horseback riders—and traverses historic railroad bridges, tunnels, forests, valleys, and open fields. In spots, it skirts the edge of the Missouri River."

Pyatt Tunnel (Arkansas)
Posted April 13, 2013, by Hensley ( thehensleyfamily870 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Thanks for the pictures. This is a special place to my family as ALL the property surrounding this tunnel has been owned by my family since before the construction of the railway and tunnel themselves.

My bad
Posted April 13, 2013, by Julie bowers (Jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

But never anonymous.

Just need my filters in place for those that I have no use for.

But what about the coasts, then?

RE: Omitting Ghost Bridges
Posted April 13, 2013, by Anonymous

From the "About" page:

"The purpose of this site, then, is to assemble a database of the historic bridges in the Central United States. This includes everything from minor stone culverts to sweeping suspension bridges to massive steel truss spans. This also covers past, present, and future -- bridges that are long gone, those that are still standing, and those that might be built in the future using historic designs."

Omitting Ghost Bridges
Posted April 13, 2013, by Julie bowers (Jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

History is fine but it is hard to find a ghost bridge that has been gone for decades.

I spent real time and money trying to find one in Illinois a few years ago.

James spends real money on this site too and adding bridges that can't be hunted seems wasteful. But that is just my humble opinion.

And those bolts for the new bay bridge were made in Ohio!!!!!

Still would like to see iron scrap separated from regular scrap metal.

Posted April 13, 2013, by chuck cleveland (chuckc39 [at] live [dot] com)

Ive taken the pics of the superstructure but my new cameras 16mp ccd makes the file sizes too large to upload so far. Unconfirmed but pretty reliable reports say demo is now happening may 10th.

Posted April 13, 2013, by Kirk Kirkland

Let's discuss where our scrapped bridges end up. Hint: It isn't on these shores. You'd think that perhaps we could reuse the metal for projects here. But the truth is most winds up in the same place that brings us cheap pot metal products we find on Wal-mart shelves. And the USA loses again.

Posted April 13, 2013, by Anonymous

You see right there. The only reason you want their name is to threaten violence. You can't win on the merits of your argument so you threaten violence. The minute you do that you've admitted defeat. Why couldn't you simply chime in and support patriotic leanings instead of somehow justifying the use of Chinese steel in our nation's infrastructure? Let's leave this topic alone and get back to admiring bridges.


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