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Posted July 10, 2013, by Luke Harden (lukemh9 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Douglas drew the image he posted on this page, as well as all of the others:

94273918@N06/page1/">http://www.flickr.com/photos/94273918@N06/page1/

Posted July 10, 2013, by Anonymous

I think a lot of this has to do with the moronic "navigation hazard" rules by the Coast Guard. Even though the Daniel Boone Bridge has the exact same pier locations as the new truss not ten feet away, it becomes a "navigation hazard" if abandoned in place while someone comes up with the money or an idea for what to do with it.

Posted July 10, 2013, by Zachary S

There's a pretty impressive and very large through truss at this location even today. Might add that one eventually.

Posted July 10, 2013, by Zachary S

Nice finds, all these recent historic Alabama bridges and tunnels from AER. This one is extremely close to home, I'll hop out there and investigate this in the coming weeks.

Posted July 10, 2013, by Zachary S

Damn, sooooomeone found a treasure trove of classic old structural drawings. Nice.

Posted July 10, 2013, by Douglas Butler (drawbridges [at] lycos [dot] com)

A view of a rail lift bridge was built before it was demolished.

Webmaster's note: The photo that was here has been incorporated into the main site.

Posted July 10, 2013, by Douglas Butler (drawbridges [at] lycos [dot] com)

The last shows a Skagit River Railroad Bridge drawing.

Webmaster's note: The photo that was here has been incorporated into the main site.

Posted July 10, 2013, by Anonymous

Now a tecnical drawing that shows the railroad bridge.

Posted July 10, 2013, by Anonymous

A Spottsville Railroad Bridge is also a technical drawing shown.

Posted July 10, 2013, by Douglas Butler (drawbridges [at] lycos [dot] com)

A Washington techical drawing of a railroad swing bridge.

Webmaster's note: The photo that was here has been incorporated into the main site.

Posted July 10, 2013, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I realize that I forgot to mention the older Liberty Bend Bridge which appears to be in no danger of demolition.

Posted July 10, 2013, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

This bridge may date to 1919. The 1992 NBI data lists a 1919 construction date for the replacement bridge, which dates to 1989.

Posted July 10, 2013, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

The project materials for the Fairfax Bridge indicated that the NR Eligibility of the Platte Purchase Bridge would be reviewed. However it does not indicate the outcome of that. I agree that it should be NR eligible, given the dramatic loss of older bridges of this type in the state.

Regarding the list of Missouri River Bridges below, I would comment that the Washington Bridge is absolutely doomed, there is no probably about it at this stage, and I believe the same is true for the older Daniel Boone Bridge.

Posted July 10, 2013, by Douglas Butler (drawbridges [at] lycos [dot] com)

Most Strauss Overhead Counterweight bascule bridges have the links connected on top of the counterweight, however the Morehead City railroad bridge I believe is the only bridge with the links connected on the bottom of the counterweight.

Webmaster's note: The photos that were here have been incorporated into the main site.

Posted July 10, 2013, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Ironically, the preservation conference that James will be attending features a bridge theme.

As far as the Missouri section of the Missouri River, here are some thoughts of mine.

Brownville Bridge (1936 Cantilever): No threat of demolition at this time.

Rulo Bridge - Demolition imminent

Amelia Earhart Bridge - Demolition imminent

Centennial Bridge - Probably doomed, but replacement is years away

Fairfax/Platte Purchase Bridges - replacement could begin by 2015.

Broadway Bridge - No threat of demolition.

Rocheport Bridge - No threat of demolition at this time.

Jefferson City Bridges - No threat of demolition.

Washington Bridge - potentially doomed.

Daniel Boone Bridge - the old one is probably doomed.

Posted July 9, 2013, by Don Morrison

The people of Hazleton might be open to some more preservation.

From http://hazletonia.com/History.htm

"The population of Hazleton is 950, has a mayor/council form of government, two full time employees, and two part time employees. The council has chosen as our town motto "Bridging Two Cultures"...referring to the unique bridge in Fontana Park and the Amish population west of our town."

Posted July 9, 2013, by Zachary S

Awesome.

Walker Bridge (California)
Posted July 9, 2013, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

This bridge got a brief appearance in a television commercial: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zFO9Xb2ArrI

Posted July 9, 2013, by James Baughn (webmaster [at] bridgehunter [dot] com)

The Fairfax Bridge is NRHP eligible according to MoDOT's Historic Bridge List at http://epg.modot.org/files/e/ed/127.2_Missouri_Historic_Brid...

That list is based on a survey of Missouri bridges completed in 1992. The Platte Purchase Bridge was not old enough to be considered for that survey at the time, but I would argue that it is NRHP eligible today.

In related news, another 1950s-era bridge over the Missouri River, the Centennial Bridge at Leavenworth, is also apparently doomed. This Associated Press story mentions the bridge in passing: http://hdnews.net/news/k3446-BC-KS-TollRoads-Kansas-1stLd-Wr...

It won't be too long before the Missouri portion of the Missouri River is completely devoid of pre-1950 highway bridges, and perhaps even pre-1960 or 1970 bridges will be extinct at some point. Only two bridges can be considered "saved": The ASB Bridge in Kansas City and the Boonville Railroad Bridge, and both of those are railroad spans.

I'm giving a presentation in September at the Missouri Preservation Conference in Boonville on this very subject.

http://preservemo.wordpress.com/conference/

Posted July 9, 2013, by Luke Harden (lukemh9 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Hazleton lists the replacement of this bridge as part of their long-range plans.

http://hazletonia.com/about.htm

Posted July 9, 2013, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Thanks, Nathan. I wondered if Section 106 would be triggered in this instance. The NBI says that the historical significance can not be determined, but this page lists the bridge as being NRHP eligible. The newer Platte Purchase Bridge (1957) is listed in the NBI as not being eligible.

In my humble opinion, both bridges have historic value. The Platte Purchase bridge is a great example of a 1950s cantilever. I suspect that this newer generation of cantilevers will be the next ones to go, once we are through demolishing the pre-WWII variety.

The link I posted below actually lists the older bridge as historic and includes some great photographs of it. Of course, the authors then proceed to say that both bridges are at the end of their useful life.

Posted July 9, 2013, by John Marvig (johnmarvig [at] chaska [dot] net)

Waste of tax payer money to take it down without any logical reason. That same money could go towards preserving the bridge.

Posted July 9, 2013, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Section 106 applies to this project. I am contacting them to request more information on what stage the project is in and why alternatives that avoid adverse effect are not shown.

Posted July 9, 2013, by Anonymous the Spartan (Anonymous [at] stopwastingtaxmoney [dot] greece [dot] net)

Good grief, they want to build a bike path on the new bridge? In Sparta, we would save money by leaving the old bridge for bikes and pedestrians. I swear to Poseidon that Western Civilization is going downhill fast!

Posted July 9, 2013, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

We can now add two more large cantilever truss bridges to the (potentially) doomed list:

http://www.modot.org/kansascity/major_projects/US69_EIS_Info...

NONE of the options (other than no-build) call for the preservation of both bridges. At a minimum, the 1935 Fairfax bridge would be doomed.

Posted July 9, 2013, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

There was talk of tearing down the Cotter Bridge at one time? Guess, I should not be too surprised. The John Mack Bridge (2nd longest extant Marsh arch in the USA) was also saved at the last minute...

Posted July 9, 2013, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Whipple trusses never disappoint, but this one is a really nice example!

Posted July 9, 2013, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

How typical. Here we have an exceedingly rare pin-connected wrought iron Whipple truss. The county plans to demolish it for absolutely no reason (no replacement planned). The bridge could easily be left standing for pedestrians. The bridge design is more rare than any of the several wooden covered bridges in the county. Yet, once again, every single covered bridge in the county is preserved and has a fresh coat of paint on it, while this metal truss bridge (whose design is more rare in Pennsylvania than the designs of the covered bridges) is sentenced to the dumpster.

Posted July 9, 2013, by Anonymous

I say leave it, only because it shows what would have happened if the Cotter bridge had been torn down as planned, before it became a National Civil Engineering Landmark.

Posted July 9, 2013, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I think that the two-toned paint job looks great!

Posted July 9, 2013, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Yes, James has final say. Personally, I would vote this one off the island.

Posted July 9, 2013, by Spiney the Elder

Final decision rests with James the Webmaster....

Posted July 8, 2013, by Jason Smith (JDSmith77 [at] gmx [dot] net)

That's the primary reason why we're choosing the Sutliff Bridge as our venue for the HB Weekend for Saturday night (in August)! I was there twice when the easternmost span was amputated and am looking forward to seeing the bridge fully restored and in use again. I think a lot of people really enjoy having Sutliff back in service again... :-)

Posted July 8, 2013, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

This bridge is being bypassed and preserved. articles.philly.com/2013-07-06/news/40393842_1_new-bridge-north-camden-state-street-bridge

Posted July 8, 2013, by John Marvig (johnmarvig [at] chaska [dot] net)

I did classify it as a warren. Silly mistake. Not sure if I was going too fast and didn't take a decent look at the pictures. Sorry for the confusion.

Posted July 8, 2013, by Diane Martin

It had been years since I had been in this area. The renovation is wonderful. It was a beautiful day and there were many enjoying the beautiful new/old bridge.

Posted July 8, 2013, by Fmiser (fmiser [at] gmail [dot] com)

It is a regular problem when the truss web is so short. There aren't enough panels for a pattern to be seen.

But I agree with Clark. This is a 5 panel pratt truss. If it _had_ to be a warren, I would call it something like "center panel overlapping warren with verticals". But really it's clear to me it's a pratt.

John - did you classify this as a a warren, or did you find somewhere else that called it a warren? I don't want to just arbitrarily change what you just edited...

Posted July 8, 2013, by Mike Olszewski

Now considered a part of the Superior Hiking Trail, this bridge was long ago abandoned with a re-alignment of Getchell Road (Highland Avenue) and was long just a place for kids to party. It needs stabilization, especially of the original concrete railings, but appears otherwise sound.

Posted July 8, 2013, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I see we have a "steel deck grate" category, so a jack-arch deck category is appropriate. I created one here: http://bridgehunter.com/category/tag/jack-arch-deck/

I listed a few bridges, mostly ones I am familiar with but will rely on others to populate the category. A good overview of this deck type is here: http://www.nh.gov/dot/org/projectdevelopment/environment/doc...

Posted July 8, 2013, by Anonymous

Well, Nathan and Clark, I learn something new every day! I had assumed it was a county highway department re-decking a bridge the "cheap and smart" way. I hadn't realized this technique had a name!

Posted July 8, 2013, by Dave King (DKinghawkfan [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I also agree. When I added Illinois Steel to the categories it must have auto added it to the builder because I didn't add anything to the builder section.

Posted July 8, 2013, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Thanks for posting the picture below. This bridge looks better than ever - at least since I started driving over it on a regular basis.

Posted July 8, 2013, by Matthew Landes (mlandes [at] miamicountyks [dot] org)

Creamery Bridge is scheduled for reopening after our rehabilitation project on Tuesday, July 16th, 2013. Ribbon cutting will be at 9:00am. I've included a photo taken when we were about 95% complete with the rehab.

Posted July 8, 2013, by William Henry (IJH [dot] WRH [at] Gmail [dot] com)

Destroy by aronist over the 4th of July weekend

Posted July 8, 2013, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Not trying to troll here, but other then length, does this bridge have any particular significance?

Keller Ferry (Washington)
Posted July 8, 2013, by K. A. Erickson

I was hoping to make it out this way before they retired it. I see in the paper that the last run was yesterday. No ferry service until a little before Labour Day, when the new ferry is dedicated after ramp widening projects complete. Link added.

Posted July 8, 2013, by K. A. Erickson

I agree. It's just the steel the county, builders used in erecting the bridge. One bridge I photographed had steel stamped from different companies.

Posted July 8, 2013, by Anonymous the Athenian

Thank you, good sir. We Athenians appreciate real beauty in our architecture. Fake history just seems so cheap to us. Don't get me started on fake Doric and Ionic columns on post WWII buildings.

Posted July 8, 2013, by Anonymous the Spartan (anonymous [at] sparta [dot] greece [dot] net)

Those Athenians sure have an appreciation for beauty. Therefore, I can understand how this bridge would fail to impress them.

Posted July 8, 2013, by Anonymous the Athenian (Anonymous [at] athens [dot] net)

In foundries of old, o'er the fires so hot

Components of old truss bridges we wrought

Eyebars, beams, struts and lacing

All the designs of ornate portal bracing

The skills of the blacksmith were ne'er for nought

Then came the UCEB to carry many a car

A view of the river, Jersey barriers to mar

We needed the UCEB to support all our freight

It's design universal, no matter which state

But from Bridgehunter, precast 'crete we must bar

Update on HB Weekend in Iowa
Posted July 8, 2013, by Jason Smith (JDSmith77 [at] gmx [dot] net)

Reminder to those who HAVE NOT registered for the dinner and tour portion of the Historic Bridge Weekend: You have until 15 July to register for that. You can register here by clicking onto Events in the Bridgehunter's Chronicles' facebook page and choosing which HB Weekend Days you want to participate in, or contact me for a registration form at either flensburg.bridgehunter.av@googlemail.com or JDSmith77@gmx.net. If you wish to just join the bridgehunting tour or have any questions, etc., please let me know before 31st July. Please note, we'll start our bridgehunting adventure on August 9th at 10:00am at the Old Barn Resort outside Preston, located up the hill from the Old Barn Bridge. Looking forward to seeing you all at the HB Weekend August 9-12

Posted July 8, 2013, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I suspect that the Illinois Steel Company was the fabricator, but probably not the builder.

Posted July 7, 2013, by Andrew (rosecitywanderer [at] gmail [dot] com)

A part of me wonders if it would still swing...

Posted July 7, 2013, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Surprised it stood as long as it did.

Posted July 7, 2013, by R&F

Paddled by there today, actually most of it is torn down now, including the two main pillars in the creek. Looks eerie really! Saw a caterpillar standing there and some welding equipment so it looks like they're taking it down completely.

Posted July 7, 2013, by Janis Ford (jford3 [at] columbus [dot] rr [dot] com)

This photo is from 3/25/07.

Posted July 7, 2013, by Bailey (X [at] y [dot] com)

We went out to see this bridge today, and found it to be open. Some locals said that it was closed last year, and reopened earlier this year. Appears to have been repainted.

Posted July 7, 2013, by Chad Smith (ca531 [at] bellsouth [dot] net)

Here are a couple more

Posted July 7, 2013, by Anonymous

Fascinating bridge. It would be nice if somebody could take some more photos of it and post them here.

Posted July 6, 2013, by Vickie Cunningham (vickiemarie623 [at] earthlink [dot] net)

My 86-year-old father discovered this bridge while he was out hiking around! He couldn't wait to show it to me...and I have to say, it is very cool!

Posted July 6, 2013, by Mike

This is now known as the Cassidy Point Bridge, and MDOT is going to remove it and replace it with an at-grade railroad crossing. The reason for removal is so that double-stacked intermodal shipping containers can be transported by rail out of the International Marine Terminal, and raising the height of the bridge (or building a new bridge with adequate clearance) would not be cost effective.

Posted July 6, 2013, by Mike

Get photos while you can, folks. Maine and New Hampshire have begun the planning and design process to replace this bridge. The new bridge may or may not have a railroad deck, depending on the funding situation. TIGER grants have been applied for but ME and NH will be competing against many other projects. The states asked the Navy to help pay for the rail portion, since they're the only one who benefits from it, but the Navy declined (even though they acknowledged that rail is their preferred way to transport spent fuel rods out of the yard).

Posted July 6, 2013, by Claudette Killingsworth Harris (ClAudetteharris [at] centurylink [dot] net)

I grew up in Okolona. As a child we would be playing at a house in town and hear the train whistle! We would take off running down the road and get to the peak of the bridge just as the train came underneath!

It was a scary feeling at first, you wanted to run because that train was coming straight at you! After the engine past under the bridge, it was not so scary! I remember the engineers waving for us to back away from the train, but we didn't! We also played underneath the bridge a lot! Now that I am an adult, I can see how dangerous it was for us to play so close to the track as the train came through! One of my favorite places in childhood memories!!

Posted July 6, 2013, by Jack Raitt (jraitt [at] live [dot] com)

Photos taken 07/06/2013

Posted July 6, 2013, by Karen Le Grand (karenleg [at] med [dot] umich [dot] edu)

The Bridge is beautiful after a good blanket of snow and the pieces of ice floating down the Wabash River.

At Christmas time going to my Parents home, my daughter, Cynthia, my husband and I would sing the song; Over The River and Through the Woods to Grand Mother's house we go.... Lots of memories.

Posted July 6, 2013, by Stephen Kokoska (xtevencom [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Two photographs, May 2013

Posted July 6, 2013, by Mike

I can't disagree with your assessment, and I'm sad that this decision was made; however, MaineDOT has been severely underfunded for decades, and that situation has gotten dramatically worse during the past two years because of the current governor. DOT is being put in the position of having to choose only those projects with the highest priority and affecting the highest number of people, so it's no surprise that this bridge didn't make the cut (I believe it was only carrying 5 or 6 cars a day when it was still in service). As a bridge fan and as a Mainer, I'm still very sad about it... although this sadness can't even begin to compare to my continued sadness over losing the Waldo-Hancock Bridge... something that could've been prevented if MaineDOT had an aggressive and fully-funded preventative maintenance program...

Posted July 5, 2013, by Roger Deschner (rogerdeschner [at] gmail [dot] com)

I just crossed these bridges in June 2013. Both original bridges are very much intact, with no evidence of construction activity to replace them, despite CDOT's schedule to replace them starting in 2011. Perhaps they figured they had higher priorities than a couple of bridges with 47.9 sufficiency ratings, very light traffic, and an alternate route for high-clearance vehicles via mainline US 50.

Posted July 5, 2013, by Randy Rasa (randy [at] cleversoul [dot] com)

New bridge with the old one still standing next to it. Was pleased to see that the new bridge has wide bike-friendly shoulders. I'd never ridden over the old one, but understand that it was a rather terrifying experience.

Posted July 5, 2013, by Randy Rasa (randy [at] cleversoul [dot] com)

As seen June 29, 2013 on a bicycle tour.

Posted July 5, 2013, by Randy Rasa (randy [at] cleversoul [dot] com)

Just a confirmation: There are currently "Bridge Closed" signs at each end of the structure, though it's still passable by foot.

Posted July 5, 2013, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

What else would you expect from a DOT that treats historic bridges like they are a cockroach infestation? This suspended deck is one of the most unique features I have ever seen on a historic bridge. The entire deck was suspended from the truss by rods held together by a pin-connected system.

Posted July 5, 2013, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Well shucks. This is one of a very small number of historic bridges in Kansas that is visible from I-70 - which along with I-35 is probably among the only roads in Kansas that many travelers use.

Posted July 5, 2013, by Mike

MaineDOT announced today that they are going to permanently remove the lower vehicle deck, as it would be cost prohibitive to repair or replace it.

http://bangordailynews.com/2013/07/05/news/mdot-plans-to-rem...

Fitch's Bridge (Massachusetts)
Posted July 5, 2013, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Massachusetts: Enjoy your MOB. Suggested Pairing:

Posted July 5, 2013, by Dave King (DKinghawkfan [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Road is now closed and bridge may be close to being removed. There is a new Delta Avenue that the abandoned Delta Avenue runs in to. Bridge will probably not be replaced.

Fitch's Bridge (Massachusetts)
Posted July 5, 2013, by micah (micah [dot] abbott [at] gmail [dot] com)

As of June 28, a new bridge has been installed and is open for use.

https://www.facebook.com/FitchsBridge

Posted July 5, 2013, by Anonymous

The land must be very stable around there if this bridge has stood for over a hundred years without cracking.

Posted July 4, 2013, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I can end all speculation after poking through the county website. Leavenworth County is currently wasting an estimate of $150,000 of taxpayer dollars to reduce this beautiful historic bridge to a pile a scrap metal. NO REPLACEMENT BRIDGE IS PLANNED. Nothing disgusts me more than this insensitive destruction of history and wasting of money. If they want to close the bridge to traffic, fine, go ahead. But unless the bridge is in danger of collapse, don't destroy history and waste money for no reason. A 2012 bridge inspection report was posted on the county website. This bridge was not in imminent danger of collapse. Demolition was not needed.

Also, I am attaching a map that shows the unusual county designations for all the bridges in the county... essential if anyone wishes to research other bridges in this county in the future.

Attachment #1 (application/pdf; 2,768,844 bytes)

Posted July 4, 2013, by Luke Harden (lukemh9 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The 1912 bascule was replaced in 1989:

Source: Page 11 http://www.uscg.mil/hq/cg5/cg551/Galveston_Causeway_Final_EA...

Posted July 4, 2013, by Jason Smith (JDSmith77 [at] gmx [dot] net)

Judging from the crane being in position and the recent newspaper article, I'm afraid to say that the bridge's days are numbered. The county had closed the bridge to all traffic in April. Link: http://www.leavenworthtimes.com/article/20130412/NEWS/130419...

Posted July 4, 2013, by Nathan Holth

I think the bascule bridge that was replaced here to be moved to California was not the original 1912 bascule, or it was severely altered with very little original material left. News articles described the span being moved to California in 2012 as "26 years old" which would put its date at 1986. Moreover, it is unlikely a railroad would buy a 1912 bridge to replace a 1903 bridge.

Posted July 4, 2013, by Zachary S

According to

35547288@N00/6116159472/">http://www.flickr.com/photos/35547288@N00/6116159472/

and

http://www.tannehill.org/activities.html

and cross-checking as being the only major truss bridge I could find in Tannehill according to Google Earth the build date appears to be 1902, and it was relocated from Turkey Creek near Pinson on Blountsville Rd in 1975 - IF this is the same bridge as listed in the links above! It looks virtually identical in the photos, and of course both have the modern wooden railings all along the deck.

Posted July 4, 2013, by John Marvig (johnmarvig [at] chaska [dot] net)

This bridge looks like a modern concrete precast girder bridge, and it probably replaced the original bridge at this location.

Posted July 4, 2013, by Don Morrison

The crane in the background doesn't bode well for this bridge.

Seems like a little more than necessary for floor plank removal.

Posted July 4, 2013, by Don Morrison

Apparently James Oliver had a foundry and did some structural iron and steel work before and during the time he developed the chill-hardening process for plows. His factories were in Indiana. His company later merged with 3 other ag related businesses to become Oliver Tractor in Charles City, Iowa.

Posted July 4, 2013, by Randy Rasa (randy [at] cleversoul [dot] com)

I attempted to cross this bridge on Jun 30, 2013, and found it impassable. Road crews have removed one section of the deck. Not sure if they're replacing the deck, or taking the bridge out of service. Side railings had been removed as well.

Posted July 4, 2013, by John Marvig (johnmarvig [at] chaska [dot] net)

Photos #70 and #71 are incorrectly placed. Note the difference in portal bracing. These belong on this page.

http://bridgehunter.com/ia/polk/bh54303/

Posted July 4, 2013, by Don Morrison

I might have to do a little bridgehunting this weekend.

Posted July 4, 2013, by Don Morrison

I guess I think of a kingpost bridge as being a very short span pony. The height required for a through truss would result in a wider span. I've never seen one before, and wasn't sure if the "through" was in error.

Posted July 4, 2013, by Jodi Christman (masterofchaos [at] outlook [dot] com)

The 3rd & 4th photos are actually the RR bridge called Great Allegheny Passage.

Posted July 4, 2013, by Nathan Holth

David, George, and Henry were all involved with the Oliver Iron and Steel Company. Here is a historical article: http://books.google.com/books?id=NmZMAAAAYAAJ&dq=Oliver%20ir...

It states that Oliver Iron and Steel Company was formed in 1888... which is after the construction date given for this bridge. So either the construction date is wrong, or these brands may refer to the previous company they ran called Oliver Brothers & Phillips.

Oliver brands are very rare, but I have found them in both the US and Canada. I assume they all refer to the Pittsburgh company.

Happy Fourth of July
Posted July 4, 2013, by Jason Smith (JDSmith77 [at] gmx [dot] net)

Here's something to think and talk about! Have a happy and safe Fourth of July! http://thebridgehunter.areavoices.com/2013/07/04/happy-fouth...

Posted July 4, 2013, by Don Morrison

Oliver Iron & steel?

Perhaps Henry

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_W._Oliver

Or, maybe less likely, James

http://centerforhistory.org/learn-history/oliver-history

Yellow Bridge (California)
Posted July 4, 2013, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I was doing research in preparation for creating a page for this bridge on HistoricBridges.org, and I found there is one way to access this private bridge... become a member of the country club. With this knowledge, I calculated that to gain access to this bridge it would cost $1075! Its also worth noting that with a decent zoom on your camera, you can get pretty much every angle except portal views of this bridge from the right-of-way of the adjacent highway. I managed to get a fairly complete set of detail photos for this bridge, considering the situation.

Posted July 3, 2013, by John Marvig (johnmarvig [at] chaska [dot] net)

I would certainly encourage you to check it out Don! Admittedly it is on my hit list as well, although I am 120 miles away from it!

Posted July 3, 2013, by Don Morrison

Hmmmm....

An 1875 plat map shows roads approaching the river from both sides and "Durham's Ferry" at the crossing.

http://www.historicmapworks.com/Map/US/471090/Township+76+No...

In 1901, this bridge is there, but roads still approach the bridge.

http://www.beforetime.net/iowagenealogy/marion/platmap1901/P...

This bridge was built in 1880; perhaps the old wood pilings were for a Durham's Ferry Bridge that carried the road before this bridge was built.

If so, it's amazing that they are still visible.

Pine Creek Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted July 3, 2013, by AR

Nice!

Posted July 3, 2013, by Skipp Barto (littlekned [at] aim [dot] com)

Rebuilt in 2012... 1st picture is taking down old bridge...

Posted July 3, 2013, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Not the first jack arch I've seen here. Should there be a category for them?


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