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Posted February 5, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

Second the good Job. Thanks Daniel!

Posted February 5, 2017, by Luke

Glad to see that the site got pictures of this before it was replaced.

Also, since I don't think I've complimented you on the work yet: You're doing a damn good job Daniel. Keep up the good work.

Posted February 5, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

or maybe 9th?

Posted February 5, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

Luke and Doug cant tell which is 16th and which is 9th?

Posted February 5, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

George per Xmas conversation this may be 1958 Stringer to be replaced. Kind of on EDGE of historic but soon to be history.............

Posted February 5, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

Thanks for sharing, looks like a cold day on the Clarion!

Posted February 5, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

It is good to see photos of this one on here. It has obviously been abandoned for decades, yet thus far has survived everything that the Whitewater has thrown at it.

Rte. 663 bridge over Green Lane Reservoir in Montgomery County
Posted February 5, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I was talking to my fiancees nieces significant other over the Christmas holiday and he said that this bridge is closed for replacement with detours.I haven't read nothing or heard nothing on the radio or t.v. about this bridge.If anybody knows anything about this bridge let me know because i am from the area.

Posted February 5, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

William thanks so much for taking care of the bridge, More photos always welcome. I'm sure some one would add photos to main page if permission was available from you. Thanks again

Posted February 5, 2017, by Paul Levesque (Plevesque207 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Until the 1950's there was only one physical rover crossing in Augusta. The Carleton bridge is located in Bath, down river, and is out of use to vehicular traffic but remained open to rail traffic. There were /are not moving bridges in Augusta.

Posted February 5, 2017, by William Allcorn (Pokemon241392 [at] aol [dot] com)

Hello! Out of curiosity I searched the creek name and found this page - I live within walking distance from here! Infact, I'm the one who cleared the detritus off of it after the flood. That's why the picture from last year shows the top completely clear. I couldn't get much of the junk out from the beams underneath it though. It's just a special place to me and I knew no one else was going to do it, and I didn't want the boards to molder. I guess I don't really have much to add, though for trivia's sake I'll add it was closed BEFORE the floods. That's why the guard rails put up to stop traffic are washed out.

Anyway, have a good day!

P.S. - Here's two of the pictures I took of the flood damage, I have more but I didn't wanna spam the page with all of them!

Posted February 5, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Looks like a 4 panel Pratt through truss to me. I can't help but wonder if it has been shortened, or otherwise modified.

Posted February 4, 2017, by chuck pickern (pickern [at] sbcglobal [dot] net)

Photo by Carol Jackson

Posted February 4, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Very old and very unusual. I would want to see some detail shots before I deeming it a simple Warren. Could be something more unusual.

Posted February 4, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Oh wow this one....super jungle environment, looooong stringer over creek, super cool. Lots of wood rot up top, but a timber-packed awesome old bridge nonetheless.

Posted February 4, 2017, by Mike Daffron (daffronmike [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Visited this bridge today and it looks like the repair is moving along at a brisk pace. Good for Paoli and Indiana!

Posted February 4, 2017, by Mike Daffron (daffronmike [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Great to see this bridge! I'm sure we traveled this a lot when I was a kid, but I don't remember it.

Posted February 4, 2017, by Mike Daffron (daffronmike [at] yahoo [dot] com)

As of February 2017, still going strong!

Posted February 4, 2017, by Mike Daffron (daffronmike [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Now, unfortunately, this baby has been replaced anyway. Boo!

Posted February 4, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This is a great find. Nevada has very few historic bridges, but this would be an important bridge even in a truss rich state. This one may even be wrought iron.

Posted February 4, 2017, by chuck pickern (pickern [at] sbcglobal [dot] net)

Photo by carol jackson 2016

Posted February 4, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Admittedly, I was not expecting a bedstead to surface in Chase County. From what I have observed, Chase County did not seem to build a lot of bedstead trusses. On the other hand, perhaps they did build several only to lose them in floods. Regardless, this is the only known bedstead truss in the entire county. Thus, it has very high local significance. In addition, bedstead trusses are not exactly a dime a dozen on the national scale either.

The laced endposts on this bridge are an interesting feature. Without further inspection, I would estimate that this bridge could have been built anywhere between about 1885 and 1915. It could easily be pre 1900 given be very lightweight construction and the laced endposts.

Posted February 4, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I have found it rather difficult to estimate the age of stone arch bridges as compared to truss bridges. I would say that this bridge could have been built anytime between about 1885 and 1920. Most likely however, a date range of 1895 to 1910 is a relatively safe bet.

In Kansas, the oldest stone arch bridges that I am aware of, were built in the 1880s, although there might be an older bridge or two lurking out there. Generally speaking, construction of stone arch bridges stopped about 1918. Then, during the Great Depression, the WPA and perhaps a few other Roosevelt programs built stone arch bridges in Kansas, especially in the north central part of the state. Construction of Stone Arch Bridges ended for good in the early 1940s.

To me, this bridge looks like it might be a product of the Walter Sharp Bridge Company which was based in El Dorado. It does not look like a WPA bridge to me.

Posted February 4, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

This one is very much NOT open. A short walk though off 196 to the north on Indianola Road will take you down the hill right to it, very pretty and secluded spot, Bridge is falling apart sadly, curious about 1903 build date possibly older?

Posted February 4, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Walked down very overgrown 70 road west till I came to the creek. Very long bedstead I believe, rather interesting. Gorgeous little spot, all but forgotten.

Posted February 4, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Got some more information on this bridge.As per an article printed in the Reading Eagle on 2-4-17 this bridge will remain closed for at least 8 more weeks through early April.The Pa Turnpike Commission and the N.J. Transportation Authority who are joint owners of the bridge said an April reopening represents a best-case scenario,provided a more complex partial reconstruction or even replacement of the entire structure is not necessary.I have seen the pictures of this fracture and it did not look good.When i find out through the media what is going to happen with the repair or possible replacement i will let everyone know.

Posted February 4, 2017, by Jacob Lennington (simpspin [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Some photos of the Rehabilitation.

Posted February 4, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Nathan,thanks for the information about whether this bridge was constructed out of steel or iron.I worked in a refinery but i melted copper,not steel or iron so i don't know which would corrode first being steel or iron.Weird that this bridge is located next to a scrap yard,huh?

re: Landowners
Posted February 4, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Also, one thing to keep in mind, is that many landowners with historic bridges visit this website. Likewise, many DOTs, Historical Societies, County Engineers and other locals visit as well.

This forum can be a great place to explain who we are and what we do. First impressions count. Likewise, I want landowners to be able to feel comfortable coming on here and discussing their bridges. If they want their bridge repaired, we have the resources and the contacts to make that happen. If they want it to be NRHP listed (ie to apply for funding), we have people on here who can help. If they want to get rid of their bridge, we know people who can relocate and restore it on a local trail or local museum grounds. If the county feels that a bridge (public or private) is an "attractive nuisance", we know companies that can make it safe. If an owner knows that his or her bridge is on the verge of collapse, we know companies who can fix it. Their bridge does not have to be doomed to collapse. We can turn their liabilities into assets.

Yes, we are advocates for bridges. At the same time, we can also be advocates for private owners of bridges. We are here to work with landowners and with County Engineers who need to replace, repair, or restore their historic bridges.

Posted February 4, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Having a sapling growing out of the pylon is never a good sign. One of Nick's recent photographs shows this problem well.

An abandoned bridge will not stand forever. At some point, this bridge, like all others, will need maintenance/restoration.

Tunnel Mill Road Bridge
Posted February 4, 2017, by Bruce M (Erwin10452 [at] aol [dot] com)

I lived in Charlestown Indiana from 1967 to 1987 and used to drive the back-roads a lot. One of my favorite drives was out Tunnel Mill Road. On the way out to the scout camp there was a hill that was a twisty affair to navigate and at the bottom was an old steel bridge, probably circa 1925. The last time I was there, 2008, the old bridge was gone and a new one was in its place. I am wondering if anyone knows when the old bridge was torn down and if there are any photos of it.

Landowners
Posted February 3, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Reply to Ray:

I deleted my comment when I realized that a sentence or two might get misconstrued. I was planning to rephrase it.

Yes, I have never had a problem with hostile neighbors when photographing public bridges. Typically, the locals are proud of their bridge and don't want anybody trashing it. If they know that I am just taking pictures, they usually asked me about the bridge, or in some cases tell me stories about it.

Regardless, one should always take basic precautions when photographing a bridge. I would rather miss out on a good photo than get into a shouting match (or worse) with a hostile neighbor. Likewise, there are some bridges that I will not visit at night due to illicit activities that go on at some of them.

Posted February 3, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

Q.E.D.

Posted February 3, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

Looks like Doug took picture in 2010 so after "Rehab". Know it sounds crazy but from the one photo looks like deck pulled. Steel set over existing bridge and then redecked. Its better than scrapping it. If I get up that way Ill take a look underneath to see if truss carries any load or just railing.

Robert Elder comment "Shootout at the OK Bowstring"
Posted February 3, 2017, by Ray from KOL

It's no longer there.

To summarize in all the years he has been Bridgehunting he never had an encounter like mine. Usually when he is photographing a span the neighbours are more curious than hostile. When they find out he is just there to take pictures and not dump trash or cook meth or fire his gun after drinking he explains they may offer some history of the structure. It's best to leave locations with ill tempered individuals.

I posted my thoughts as the conversation here of late concerns spans on former roads. Jurisdictions closed the roads leaving behind an intact or frame of across the void. Roadways became part of the adjacent landowners and some as Robert mentioned are quite protective of their properties. Its working with them ... documentation. Not there to put the road back in or such.

Posted February 3, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Plate girders are usually not overly attractive, so I don't spend as much time looking at them as I do trusses, March arches, stone arches, etc.

That being said, any pre - WWII plate girder/deck plate girder has at least a little bit of historic significance. This, if a plate girder was here when the trail was being developed, I would rather see it in place than a fake covered bridge. Likewise, I would rather see a historic bridge relocated to the trail for use than see a fake covered bridge.

Covered bridges do provide shelter in a surprise rain squall though...

Posted February 3, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

NBI still shows build date as 1897 with a 2005 "Rehab"...

However, it is listed as a "Steel Stringer" so I am thinking that if the trusses still exist they are decorative guardrails now.

Posted February 3, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

That "Thing" is hideous!

Posted February 3, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

Nice winter shots John, thanks for braving the elements!

Eagle Creek
Posted February 3, 2017, by Agent KOL

.......Imagine a giant cockroach, with unlimited strength,a massive inferiority complex, a REAL short temper, is tear-assing around Eagle Creek in a brand new Edgar suit........

Posted February 3, 2017, by Dana

I believe Nathan was sorting out confusion from dialogue started by Myself and George. Nathan has more bridge knowledge than most and ALWAYS welcome his comments. Thanks for all the fish!

Posted February 3, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

That is so very sad to lose this one. Friends and I visited during the 45th annual Walnut Valley Festival (bluegrass) in September 2016. Of all the single-arch bridges in Cowley County, this one seemed a little bit more special than the others. Again, very sad.

Posted February 3, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Yep, still driving Chelsea, who ironically was named after a place in Butler County. I had to have a new engine put in while vacationing in West Virginia in 2013 but other than that she's been doing well. However, after that experience, I usually rent a car for vacation.

Posted February 3, 2017, by Ray from KOL

You should go there. Holiday! Take the car. Chelsea was the name? Or did you get a newer ride for Crimbo?

Posted February 3, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I somehow managed to miss this one. Like many Kansas bridges, it merits a winter visit. At least it remains in place.

Whoever thinks that there are no trees in Kansas never went bridgehunting there...

Trump supporter threatens Bridgehunter Film at 11!
Posted February 3, 2017, by Ray from KOL

or The Reckoning at Eagle Creek

Speaking of don't risk your life for a bridge. A while back I drove up the shore a ways. I pulled over to the shoulder of the highway, used the right of way alongside the bridge into a creek and took a picture. A drunken individual parked nearby went ballistic that I was "50 yards FROM his property!" and he was "calling the police". Insults were traded but not escalating up to the level of vulgarities. This sloven creature attempted to block the way back to the road but I went around him further infuriating him. "You're one of those people who voted for Hillary I can tell." He had voted for Trump. If he had more alcohol in him, the tavern is across the highway, or a firearm or heaven forbid I was ... I dunno ACTUALLY ON his property as opposed to "50 yards FROM" who knows what the results would be.

In this heated political environment where lawmakers mull rules saying it's OK to run over people as long as you didn't really mean to, what next? Does Nathan's April Fools post of Michigan outlawing bridge photos for national security reasons become reality?

I am just passing this along so others can be aware. I don't want a myopic gun nut shooting Robert Elder as they mistakenly read his Black Sabbath t-shirt for "Black Lives Matter" and claim they had to do something, they "felt threatened."

Posted February 3, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I will let Nathan speak for himself, but I believe that he was quoting the PennDot assessment.

Posted February 3, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Regret not knocking on neighboring property house door - did not look like a trespassing situation but still barrier to keep at least traffic off was enough....next time. Can see bridge from the distance and decking through trees via satellite.

Posted February 3, 2017, by Ray from KOL

So what Nathan is saying in his disdainful comment "Boring, blase, COMMONPLACE!" george oakley is not to pull an Arthur Dent and put yourself in front of the bulldozer for this bridge. Don't risk your life man! But Nathan can be a bit gruff at times in his replies - the Grumpy Cat of Bridgehunters.

Posted February 3, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I had to look up the spelling the first few times as well.

Posted February 3, 2017, by Sherman Cahal (shermancahal [at] gmail [dot] com)

It was a very simple plate girder bridge, hardly unique or historic.

Posted February 3, 2017, by Gary Fuqua (Gary [at] fuquaconstruction [dot] com)

Fuqua Construction Co., Inc. Removed this structure in 2006

The Main Span is a 100.1 foot Pony Truss Span Built in 1936.

This Bridge was packaged and shipped to Navasota Texas.

Replicate Plans are now in the process and duplicate structures will be fabricated for shipment.

For Replicate Information Contact;

Gary W. Fuqua

Executive Manager

#Colorado River Draw Bridge

gary@fuquaconstruction.com

Posted February 3, 2017, by Gary Fuqua (Gary [at] fuquaconstruction [dot] com)

Fuqua Construction Co., Inc. Removed this structure in 1994

The Main Span is a 100.1 foot Pony Truss Span.

Other approach spans total 214 foot of short H-Beam on timber piles and wood deck.

This Bridge was packaged and shipped to Navasota Texas.

Replicate Plans are now in the process and duplicate structures will be fabricated for shipment.

For Replicate Information Contact;

Gary W. Fuqua

Executive Manager

#San Antonio River Bridge

gary@fuquaconstruction.com

Posted February 3, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

Doug is this bridge still here? Thanks

Posted February 3, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Yeah, I botched the spelling late last night!

Posted February 3, 2017, by Nathan Holth (nathan [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Who even thought this bridge was steel? Its a cast and wrought iron truss and one of the oldest and most unique truss bridges in the state. In case you missed it in the links list, full coverage of this bridge is at HistoricBridges.org http://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=pe...

The bridge is right next to a scrap metal facility. What could possibly go wrong?

Posted February 3, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

With a construction date of 1877, this one is likely wrought iron as opposed to steel. Wrought iron generally does not rust out as much as steel does, so complete section loss might not be a problem. Better yet, this one has not received road salt in years, if ever.

From my experience, falling trees, flooding streams, crumbling pylons, and scrapping thieves are bigger threats to wrought iron bridges than rust.

Posted February 3, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Thanks Robert for responding.By looking at google satellite it looks like it's still there.Hopefully if it's not too rusted or worn out it can be saved by preserving it.

Posted February 3, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

When i get information Dana i will post it to the corresponding site.Reading the paper and listening to the news helps also.Is it possible there was aa truss bridge here?

Posted February 2, 2017, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Interestingly there is a Bellefontaine bridge plaque on ebay right now: http://www.ebay.com/itm/Antique-1895-Bellefontaine-Bridge-Ir...

The $500 starting price is well beyond my budget for any plaque (and my personal opinion of its worth when its not attached to a bridge) but this price is lower than most sellers try to (and usually fail) to sell plaques for at this size and ornamentation. I noticed this plaque also has a lot of "watchers" so maybe you bridgehunters are all getting ready to pounce on it?

Posted February 2, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Yes, I can't believe how rare Bellefontaine products are becoming. I have read through the Ohio surveys of Bellefontaine bridges there. Sadly, most of those were not considered NRHP eligible. Neither was this on in the 1980s. I would imagine that it would / should be eligible now.

Posted February 2, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I am sure that one of us will make it here in good time if we can get landowner permission. If Nick or Sheldon beat me to it, more power to them.

I did update the KHRI listing for the Bellefontaine Bridge a few miles downstream from this one. I mentioned that it is the only known Bellefontaine product West of the Mississippi River.

Posted February 2, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

...Also this Bellefountaine!

Posted February 2, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I haven't noticed anything from the lad in same time now.

I do wish our roving Kansas Bridgehunter would make it out to this one soon... Dying to know what we have here! Like yourself Robert, I suspect we have a thru and pony here.

Posted February 2, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Yeah, 1880 and Stringer don't generally go together in the same sentence.

Likely there was an 1880 truss at this location that was replaced by the current structure in 1932.

Posted February 2, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

By the way, has anybody heard from Sheldon lately? I have not seen him on here for a while. I hope that he is still chasing bridges. We would have not known about this one if he had not added it.

Posted February 2, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Reply to George:

I know that this is an old thread, but according to Google Earth, this one was still standing as of May 2016. This is an extremely significant bridge. I would suggest that it be considered of prime importance for preservation.

Posted February 2, 2017, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I have no idea what article you are talking about but this bridge was most certainly not built in 1880. Featuring a standard balustrade railing, the 1932 date given in the National Bridge Inventory is accurate. What is inaccurate in the NBI is the bridge type (its a steel stringer encased in concrete) This is a common problem one must be on the lookout for in Pennsylvania mostly in this period. Here is the bridge description from the Historic Bridge Inventory:

The 3 span, 125'-long encased steel stringer bridge, built in 1932, is supported on a horizontally scored concrete substructure. It has standard concrete balustrades on each side of the concrete deck. The bottom flanges are exposed, and concrete diaphragms are the full depth of the stringer encasement. Concrete encasement was favored in the state because it provided protection for the steel and eliminated the need to periodically paint the beams. A representative example of one of the most common, mid-20th century bridge types and designs in the state, it has no innovative or distinguishing details. It is one of over 639.

Posted February 2, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

Thanks You're the man!

Posted February 2, 2017, by Luke

Dana, after looking at historic maps available on the internet, I'm pretty confident in saying it's the crossing of Walnut Creek on the same road, as there are buildings close to the bridge in both the picture and on the map:

http://www.historicmapworks.com/Map/US/470912/Olin/Jones+Cou...

Posted February 2, 2017, by Dana

1880 Stringer? Royce pretty early nice find!

Posted February 2, 2017, by Dana

Maybe crossiing due South? Luke might not be correct local, save image then Ill delete. Rather have accurate. If info on south crossing becomes available or you are sure its this one add back in. Thanks for all you do for bridgehunter!

Posted February 2, 2017, by Mike Robinson (mrobinson [at] ltadd [dot] org)

This bridge has been moved and saved. Grayson County has reinstalled the bridge at a new park they are building in Leitchfield, KY. It is going to be used for pedestrian access from downtown to other park facilities.

Approximate location:

86 17 27.42W

37 28 39.48N

Posted February 2, 2017, by J.P. (wildcatjon2000 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Bridge still stands but deck is removed.

Posted February 2, 2017, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I have no idea what Howlet, MI is, and Howell, MI has nothing to do with either this bridge or the Huron River, but I think the bridge you are looking for is this one (see my historical photo within my narrative). http://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=co...

Posted February 2, 2017, by Douglas Butler

I need help with this one I just deleted the page this bridge says Jefferson Avenue, when I mapped it Ann Harbor between Monroe and Wayne County this Photo picture says Howlet MI when I tried to find the county of Howlet instead it says Howell Michigan.

Rita Bridge (Louisiana)
Posted February 2, 2017, by Adam (741996 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This was the bridge used in the final scene of the 2013 movie Homefront. The fence on the east side was added by the film crew.

Posted February 2, 2017, by Luke

Dana, the bowstring in the picture you added is a single-span, which would make it an un-added span over Walnut Creek.

Great find!

Posted February 2, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Reply to Topher:

I have not researched the ownership of this one. Consulting with landowners is always a good idea, and Nick has been doing a great job of this.

I always check with landowners if a bridge appears to be private. Most of the time, the landowners are happy to let me on if I ask permission. A couple have not replied, but only one landowner has actually flat-out denied me access.

Sometimes, determining ownership can be difficult. For example, many Kansas bridges are on roads that are impassible to vehicles, but are still public. In these cases, you can legally park and walk to the bridge. Other bridges are on roads that are officially closed, but the bridge touches two or more properties. These ones can be tricky. In some cases, the bridge is still public, the road is still public, but a landowner posts it as private. I encountered this at the Independence Bowstring Bridge, but a local homeowner said something like, "it is still public, but we are just trying to discourage teenagers from having parties here".

County GIS maps can be a good resource if you cannot find the owner.

Posted February 2, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Nathan:

Thanks for the reply. I will update this page to reflect the information that you have discovered concerning this bridge. I will also edit the KHRI page to reflect the fact that this is a state-standard plan. If I recall correctly, this bridge was not considered NRHP eligible in the 1980s, but I would think that it would qualify now, given the fact that many state-standard plan bridges have been demolished in recent years.

Considering Kansas specifically, I would agree that there were far fewer state-standard trusses built in Kansas compared with Missouri and other states. One reason of course was the aforementioned Marsh arches, and also the fact that unlike Missouri and Pennsylvania, Kansas did not (typically at least) continue to build truss bridges into the 1950s.

That being said, in the 1980s, there were a few other state-standard trusses still in existence. Most of these bridges were located on major highways and were demolished likely due to the high volume of traffic that they had to carry.

There are a few remaining trusses in Kansas which might be state-standard. I need to research them further. Here is a small sample:

http://bridgehunter.com/ks/jefferson/440001/

http://bridgehunter.com/ks/jefferson/perry/

http://bridgehunter.com/ks/butler/80853006006/

Note that the Whitewater River span has fence guardrails, which seem to have been a state-standard railing.

Posted February 2, 2017, by Dana

Keep us in the know George, thanks for all you do.

Posted February 2, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

That's it.Thanks Dana and Kay.Now that i know that this bridge is listed here i can post more information as i get it.

Posted February 2, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Most definitely on those outriggers. Different shape, color, and rust patina - first thing that stands out when staring at it from a good side view. Home construction on opposite side is brilliant - huge deck overlooking creek valley.

Posted February 1, 2017, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Robert: I agree with that assessment, aside from convenience of location, that was one good reason for me to visit this bridge. I like to get at least one example of a highway department designed truss from each state I visit. Unlike 19th Century trusses where builder determined style, bridges from this area have styles and designs determined by state.

My photos and findings are now online. Feel free to integrate my builder info on Bridgehunter. http://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=ka...

Note that this bridge also has rare Scullin Steel brands on it.

Posted February 1, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge looks like it might be developing a bit of a foundation problem on the south arch. Now would be the time to fix it before the Cottonwood River undermines it further.

I have not visited this bridge for several years, so I am glad to see some current photos of it.

Posted February 1, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

This one fairly deep on private property but visible behind fences close to highway, as seen in street view. Neat one but falling apart.

Posted February 1, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Thanks for creating the PDF. Hopefully that will answer John's question.

Posted February 1, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Like the nearby Hartford Bridge, this one seems to be getting backwater from John Redmond Reservoir.

http://bridgehunter.com/ks/coffey/160969205326/

Looks like a heavy 1930s bridge to me...

Posted February 1, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Pretty cool little spot. Neat old abandoned RR bridge off 5th. Needs to be cleaned up some - lots of local trash dumped in the area.

Posted February 1, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Interesting little bridge. Without a closer inspection, I suspect that the outriggers might be a later addition.

Posted February 1, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Yes, I have spent some time looking at your photos. Good stuff as always.

I honestly don't think that many individuals realize that bridges are sometimes "Frankenbridges". I had to spend quite a bit of time looking at bridges before I realized this.

Posted February 1, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Open road, open bridge. Very solid, thick beams, super-hearty construction.

Posted February 1, 2017, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Links posted for KHRI sometimes work and sometimes don't its easier to upload a PDF of the report, which I have done here for the Bendena Vicinity Rock Creek Truss Bridge. See also my listings for this Randolph Road Bridge (former railroad) and two other bridges, one is a shortened/relocated highway thru truss, the other is an a-frame highway truss totally made from salvaged truss parts (likely highway truss).

http://historicbridges.org/b_a_county.php?county=Doniphan%20...

Long story short, this county loved to reuse bridges and bridge parts.

Attachment #1 (application/pdf; 429,435 bytes)

Posted February 1, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Walk down old abandoned road from hiway to this one. Amazing location, very high off creek bank. Spoke with local property owner. Neat experience.

Posted February 1, 2017, by Topher (ksufan88 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Is this one on private property?

Posted February 1, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Abutments left, and that's about it on this one.

Posted February 1, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

This one looks lost for some time. Like the toppled-over pillar. That makes all 3 Eagle Creek bridges in this vicinity officially lost.

Posted February 1, 2017, by jake (jwatchin1 [at] gmail com)

we had a cabin in the area as a youngster should have pictures of the wreck somewhere....

Posted February 1, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge has an odd feature (okay, it has a lot of odd features) - the portal bracing does not touch the endposts. Instead, the portal bracing rests on the oversized hip verticals. Apparently, the hip verticals are massive enough to provide stability for the portal bracing.

Posted February 1, 2017, by Anonymous

This is an old picture of the bridge as it was before before it was removed and bypassed.


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