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Duboistown Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted January 11, 2013, by Jodi Christman (masterofchaos [at] comcast [dot] net)

42 year old temper tantrum commence @#!&^*%$#@ !!!

Posted January 11, 2013, by Fmiser (fmiser [at] gmail [dot] com)

Here's an odd one!

A through truss railroad bridge build before 1913 has one of it's three spans washed away in a tsunami in 1946. The two remaining spans are moved, and become deck trusses for a highway that uses the railroad alignment.

I found out about this when talking with the nephew of the county highway engineer responsible for the clever reused.

There are probably other bridges along this Hawaii Belt Rd that are actually older than the 1950's date when the highway department took over.

Duboistown Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted January 10, 2013, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)
Posted January 10, 2013, by Anonymous

Should this mongrel bridge also be categorized as a concrete arch?

RE new find?
Posted January 10, 2013, by Luke Harden (lmharden [at] iastate [dot] edu)

Link so people can actually look at it: http://joshmeierphoto.wordpress.com/2012/03/24/rock-island-rail/

It has not been added to the site, so I'll create a page for it and try and find its location is satview.

On another note, this two-span stone arch on the ex CNW (now UP) is still in use: http://bridgehunter.com/ia/cedar/up-rock-creek/

new find?
Posted January 10, 2013, by AR (mistressdelain [at] yahoo [dot] com)

While Google-Imaging for stone bridges, I came across a nice one on private property in Iowa. Josh Meier blogged it under the title "Rock Island" in March 2012. I commented to let him know this site existed. Does anyone recognize this bridge as one already listed here?

Arch Street Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted January 10, 2013, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

WAS a nice bridge before the PennDOT Reaper passed through...

Arch Street Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted January 10, 2013, by Anonymous (Yo [at] yo [dot] com)

Replaced in 2012.

Posted January 9, 2013, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

This one looks like a mongrel that was made from some spare parts that were laying around the county highway department yard.

Posted January 9, 2013, by Danny (pringlle [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This is very interesting. I'm new to the area and travel 11 up to Ohio for work often. I have seen the remnants of the bridge (kind of looks like a small shop) now I know exactly what it is. Thanks for puting the pictures up and sharing the info.

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Posted January 9, 2013, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

This one is odd and the other one next drive over (http://bridgehunter.com/ky/bullitt/bh55161/) is equally odd. I suppose there's a story behind these two spans and how they got here.

Posted January 9, 2013, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Looks like it has rivets, so I wouldn't call it a MOB. MOBs would be welded. An interesting bridge of lightweight design.

Posted January 9, 2013, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Very unusual bridge I have never seen anything quite like this before (which is saying something). Its a pony truss, but the configuration is sporadic. I wonder if this was originally even a bridge, or if it was once longer than what we see. I think there is more to this story than just a relocated bridge.

Posted January 9, 2013, by Steve Conro (sconro [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Waited too long to field visit.

Posted January 9, 2013, by Ben Tate (benji5221 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Back off, Tony!! We got our own way of spellin' down here in Alabama. Ha ha!!

Posted January 9, 2013, by Santa Claus

Anonymous got a lump of coal in his stocking by the way...

Posted January 9, 2013, by Anonymous

This sucks ass

Posted January 9, 2013, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Hard to tell when this bridge was constructed. It might be a possible WWII era structure. Obviously, it is not anything pre-1900, but I don't necessarily think it is a MOB either.

My suspicion is that the connections are either riveted or welded. These types of connections are seen on mid-20th century trusses. MOBs tend to not have much in the way of connections at all. They also tend to have a more pre-fabricated look (okay, all trusses are pre-fabricated to some degree, but you see what I mean).

Posted January 9, 2013, by Jason Smith (JDSmith77 [at] gmx [dot] net)

The bridge you posted is the wrong bridge. That is the Philipps Mill Bridge, located west of Rockford on the Winnebago River. According to the Floyd County Historical Society, the current bridge is the third one at the Main Avenue site (the concrete arch span). The previous spans featured a single span bowstring arch bridge built in 1870, followed by a pin-connected Pratt through truss bridge built in 1884. The latter was built by the King Bridge Company. I will create a new post here and would like to ask you to move your photo to that site under the name Philipps Mill and Crossing. More information will be added once the move is finished. Thank you.

JS

Posted January 8, 2013, by James McCray (jamesinslocomb [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This bridge is confusing. First of all Google Earth say this is King's Church Rd., but this looks like just a private driveway and King's Church Rd. is just to the south of this driveway. I am wondering if this driveway could be an old alignment or if Google Earth is wrong.

Next, is this bridge a real historic pony truss or is it an MOB? I personally think its a historic pony truss, but J.P., the other bridgehunter that was with me thinks its an MOB. I think its historic by looking at the rods on the bottom in the closeup pics. We could not get on the bridge itself because it is on private property and was fenced off. At the time the owner of the property was not available for permission so we had to take pics from the adjacent property.

Anyway, is this bridge real or not? Any help will be gladly accepted.

Posted January 8, 2013, by James McCray (jamesinslocomb [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Here is an interesting bridge: Its certainly old and has been relocated. One can see in the pictures, especially photo 5, that the bridge's original supports have been cut off. Anyway, wanting to know what kind of bridge this is, can it be considered a pony truss? And if so, what kind?

Posted January 8, 2013, by Drew (gordon7519 [at] aol [dot] com)

Does anyone have anymore pictures of this bridge or any of the two lane highway 61? I am interested in seeing what this area looked like before high way 61 was a divided highway.

Posted January 8, 2013, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I continue to be amazed at how many people feel the need to flaunt their stupidity. Apparently, the reason this bridge is being replaced is because its like the I-35W bridge. Which it isn't. http://www.baxterbulletin.com/article/20130107/NEWS01/301070003/Historic-bridge-replaced

Posted January 8, 2013, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)
Posted January 8, 2013, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Scratch my previous comment. God forbid any truss bridge be preserved. Now they are changing their mind and want to demolish the bridge http://www.concordmonitor.com/home/3632597-95/bridge-roberge-commission-council

Posted January 8, 2013, by Craig Williams (craig [dot] willi1970 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Listed Clarke, Reeves, and Co and Phoenix Bridge Co are the same company. The Clarke Reeves Co turned into the Phoenix Bridge Co in 1884. This bridge was built during the Clarke, Reeves Co era.

Posted January 8, 2013, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I am in agreement with both Anthony and Nathan. I deliberately used a wide date range, knowing that the occasional post-1900 bridge featured decorative portals - ie the 1902 Long Shoals Bridge in Bourbon, Co. Kansas.

But yes, I think pre-1900 is a reasonably safe bet.

Posted January 8, 2013, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

You gotta love that sign in pic #11!!!

"Alabama's oldest in contentious use"

Contentious | Define Contentious at Dictionary.com

dictionary.reference.com/browse/contentiousSharetending to argument or strife; quarrelsome: a contentious crew. 2. causing, involving, or characterized by argument or controversy: contentious issues. 3.

Does this mean they have been arguing over the bridge since the day it was built? lol

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Posted January 8, 2013, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

The portal bracing with circles in them are definitely more akin to around 1890 than anything post 1900.

Posted January 8, 2013, by Nathan Holth

Agreed. My guess, closer to ca. 1890 based on the lightweight decorative bracing.

Posted January 8, 2013, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge looks much older than 1930. I am guessing 1890-1910.

Posted January 7, 2013, by Ben Tate (benji5221 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Coldwater Bridge is AL 8. The article says Al 1-7 are gone.

Here's AL #2. Built the same year.

http://bridgehunter.com/al/walker/country-club/

Posted January 7, 2013, by James McCray (jamesinslocomb [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Apparently this bridge is the "Oldest traffic bridge in AL." Now, I wonder what they mean by "traffic bridge." Anyway, it seems that there are some older bridges......well, some comments are appreciated.

Posted January 7, 2013, by John Marvig (johnmarvig [at] chaska [dot] net)

Still there as of late August 2012. (google earth proves this)

http://www.siouxfalls.org/parks/park-planning/Projects/greenway/Photo-Gallery/river-wall-construction.aspx

Still planned to be removed though

Posted January 7, 2013, by Brian J. Patterson

This bridge actually crossed the former Rock Island main line, NOT the Illinois Central! The track pictured is still in place. It is owned by International Mining, and leased to the CSX Railroad. CSX, in turn, has given trackage rights to the Iowa Interstate, who own the line west of Wyanet, Illinois.

Posted January 6, 2013, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Swing bridge truss configurations can be difficult to neatly classify due to the unusual way that forces work in them. However, this bridge is mostly a Warren rather than a Pratt.

Posted January 6, 2013, by Don Morrison (bacchus [at] mchsi [dot] com)

The imagery isn't great, but it seems to exist in Google Earth from 1995 until March 11, 2004. The March 13, 2005 imagery appears to show both approaches washed away. I'm guessing a spring flood breached the road on both sides in early 2005.

That assumption led me to this:

http://www.followscamp.com/Page4.html

"Some reports had this bridge as having been washed out.

Actually, it wasn't. Only the bridge's road approach ramps were

washed away exactly as they were engineered to do to relieve the

flood pressure against the bridge. What is shown in the above

photograph was carefully preplanned."

and

"(Camp's fire Chief Jim Lewis) said it'll take about $1.5 million to restore the campgrounds.

San Gabriel Valley Tribune 1/28/05"

So, it was the main entrance to the defunct Follows Camp campground, the grounds of which were pretty much sent downriver that January.

Don

Posted January 6, 2013, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

When this was built the RR was the CM&StPaul. The Pacific was added to the name in the late '20s. It looks like when I added the CM&StPaul as builder we got a new category, probably not needed.

Posted January 6, 2013, by Joe Wyse (jw123 [at] charter [dot] net)

The builders plate on the bridge is somewhat misleading. The bridge was built in 1901 when the rail line was extended from Princeton to Marshfield. Early photos show the approach span on the south side supported on wooden legs or piles. That apparently did not work too well and it was replaced by a new approach built on concrete piers. The builders plate is on the new approach and if I recall correctly the date on it is 1909. I do not know of a builders plate on the swing span.

I have not found a name of the actual bridge design, only that it seems to be a combination of Pratt and Warren designs.

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Posted January 6, 2013, by Kurt Pedersen (kurt [dot] pedersen [at] yahoo [dot] com)

The bridge does not show up until the 2003 photo on Historicaerials.com. It appears to be related to the mining operations in Fish Canyon.

Posted January 6, 2013, by Charles L Pickett (pickettfarms [at] windstream [dot] net)

I ran up on this site by accident

just for your info this bridge was built in 1928 and not 1938..I now own the farm it was built on..

Posted January 6, 2013, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Based on the portal and the build dates it might also be Stringer's Ridge.

http://bridgehunter.com/tn/hamilton/33SR0080009/

Posted January 6, 2013, by Mark Kelly Hall (mark [at] markkellyhall [dot] com)

I have pics of my grandparents taken in/about the 1920's, standing with friends in front of what I believe is the original, one-tube McCallie Tunnel, viewed from the west side looking east. They lived down Dodds Avenue at the time (where the funeral home is now) with her mother, Ida Kelly. Note the street is still gravel! The right side of the concrete form looks the same, though the top looks different (could have been altered in the addition of the new tube). It looks like the Cherokee Blvd. tunnel, also, but the pic shows much more earth above the tunnel than the Cherokee Blvd. one has, so my guess is they were built around the same time and/or by the same people. I'd appreciate any research on this that anyone would care to do.

BTW, while we're on the subject of bridges, my great-grandfather Joe P. Kelly worked for the Converse Bridge Company in Chattanooga at the time of his death in 1912. They specialized in metal truss bridges.

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Posted January 5, 2013, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Hint of a wreck in 1968. Perhaps some of the N&W railfans could provide details.

Info on Gretz:

http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1N1-10612917E3368CFF.html

Posted January 5, 2013, by Jon Stead (jandlstead [at] sbcglobal [dot] net)

Railroad tracks run right next to the tower and coal hoppers were loaded here for years. Not sure when operations ceased.I used to live in Wheeling and went past here all the time in the 70's and early 80's.

Posted January 5, 2013, by Roy Buck (roybuck [at] msn [dot] com)

The Pacific Crest Trail is routed across this bridge.

Posted January 5, 2013, by J Lindsey (weblindsey [at] gmail [dot] com)

Looking for photos of Zumwalt bridge prior to concrete replacement. Thank you, John 573-491-9919

Posted January 5, 2013, by Andy Peters (anpete [at] yahoo [dot] com)

oops, I see that Meeks Road is a county road. Sorry about that. So I guess the bridge is either maintained by the county or by a private party?

Posted January 5, 2013, by Andy Peters (anpete [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Is this bridge privately owned and maintained? Is Meeks Road a private road, a county road or a state road?

Mount Hope Bridge (Rhode Island)
Posted January 5, 2013, by t. grenier (rimouse0204 [at] aol [dot] com)

....My daughter-in-law snapped this beautiful picture of the Mt.Hope Bridge (with me under it) yesterday in the Sun....

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Posted January 5, 2013, by Terrie/Phoenix AZ

As a young person back in the 50's, I use to walk across this bridge. On the Tempe side of the bridge was the old rollerskating rink and next door was the local swimming pool. ASU at that time was a college, not a university. The town of Tempe was like the tv show Happy Days. Great times; Great memories!

Posted January 4, 2013, by Art (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Still open to hikers and bikers. Great bridge in a very beautiful setting.

Posted January 4, 2013, by Art (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Bridge was taken down after Hurricane Irene

http://www.nj.com/mercer/index.ssf/2011/09/mercer_to_begin_dismantling_of.html

It is in storage and may be installed near by sometime in the future.

Eye Candy: Bastei Bridge Over the Elbe River, Schweiz National Park
Posted January 4, 2013, by James McCray (jamesinslocomb [at] yahoo [dot] com)
Posted January 4, 2013, by Michael Kiesling (mk [at] arch21 [dot] org)

That bridge is one of two "Summer" bridges in the Guerneville area. In the winter, it is removed and the spans placed across the roadway to the north, near the intersection with River Road.

Great site!

Posted January 4, 2013, by Luke Harden (lmharden [at] iastate [dot] edu)

The source on Flickr is a former IDOT worker, so I'm assuming there was a notation on the back stating it's in Ankeny. I've asked if he knows exactly where in Ankeny it was.

Posted January 4, 2013, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

It's like the trick pictures on ebay--look in the reflection on the water, you can see everything!

Inquiring minds want to know--where is the source for this bridge? I'd like to hope it's still around and just misplaced....

Posted January 4, 2013, by Luke Harden (lmharden [at] iastate [dot] edu)

The queenpost had already been removed at the time of the arson.

Either it was removed when The covered bridge was taken off the county road system in the 50s and relocated elsewhere for other usage, or a flood took it out.

Posted January 4, 2013, by Justin Minor (justinminor [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Haven't been able to go and field-check it, but satelite view on google earth seems to indicate she's long gone. Appears to be a long, white UCEB where it once stood.

Posted January 4, 2013, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Exactly - but if the Queenpost did not have a shed over top, it might not have been seen as historic by some folks.

Robert has nothing against covered bridges, he just wishes that metal truss bridges (especially the pre-1900 variety would receive a similar interest).

Posted January 4, 2013, by James McCray (jamesinslocomb [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This bridge used to be the original alignment of US 31 into Louisville from New Albany, Indiana. US 31 was realigned onto the 2nd Street Bridge when it opened, however the K and I bridge remained opened until a truck caused some minor damage to the decking in the 70's.

Posted January 4, 2013, by Matt Lohry

It could have been if Robert were there to cover it with his tool shed...

Mount Hope Bridge (Rhode Island)
Posted January 4, 2013, by t. grenier (rimouse0204 [at] aol [dot] com)

Wayne, thank you very much for that pretty, pretty picture of the Mt.Hope Bridge. I paint (not professionally), and I'm painting it from your angle but at night though. So I'm using your photograph as a focal point. Thank you, I will post a picture of the painting afterward. I remember playing under that bridge while my sisters gathered mussels, over 45 years ago......

Posted January 4, 2013, by Jim Grey (mobilene [at] gmail [dot] com)

It'd be nice to see under this bridge, how it's constructed. I live in Indy (waaaaay on the other side of town from this bridge, so I'm not familiar with it) -- the railing on this bridge is typical of those around town I've seen with plates showing 1950s-60s build dates.

Posted January 4, 2013, by Jim Grey (mobilene [at] gmail [dot] com)

This is a hidden gem. If you've only ever driven 38th St., you might not ever know this bridge is here. The iron fence on both sides of the street obscure the bridge's railing.

Posted January 4, 2013, by Scott Gavin (fatpiecat2 [at] charter [dot] net)

It's nice to see this trestle is still standing. When I was a kid, in the early 70s, we visited some friends of the family who lived in Bellvue, within sight of this trestle. Kids being kids (i.e., stupid), we tried to walk across the thing, never knowing if a train was due. That was the time I discovered that I was afraid of heights!

Posted January 4, 2013, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

When I clicked on the link to view in Flickr I got a message reading "This photo falls outside your current SafeSearch filter. You can click through to see it if you want." The photo is marked as "restricted." Its a false alarm apparently, since this bridge clearly has all its private parts covered in concrete. No naked bridges here.

Posted January 3, 2013, by Luke Harden (lmharden [at] iastate [dot] edu)

I clicked the wrong autofill option when entering data.

Also I have no idea what road this bridge existed on either.

Posted January 3, 2013, by John Marvig (johnmarvig [at] chaska [dot] net)

Reconstructing the eastern most span. Currently, after reviewing photos, it appears that the three western spans and the eastern span will have been reconstructed, with the swing span and the span directly west of the swing span being spared for now.

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Posted January 3, 2013, by Nathan Holth

Surely the beautiful metal queenpost truss span COULD have been salvaged after the fire?

Posted January 3, 2013, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

There's a possibility that the build date on this one is earlier. Indianapolis has a number of concrete bridges built roughly a century ago of which they are proud. They seem to have an appreciation for them as a part of their park system.

Posted January 3, 2013, by April J. Navarro (charleshallj06 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Yeah, its really confusing. What are their basis in considering a bridge to be historic? It obvious that time and life span of the bridge is one of the basis for a bridge to be called historic. Which bridge builder are they getting business with? Is it available up to now?

Tar River Bridge (North Carolina)
Posted January 3, 2013, by steven (steven72977 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

this bridge has been dismantled and replaced with concrete high rise beside it

Posted January 3, 2013, by GaryD (gWillikers [at] gmail [dot] com)

This one lane bridge is the main income of the Quechan Indian Police. As the bridge changes traffic direction by traffic light and casino a block away, who would have guessed the source of repair funds in 2002...

The east side is designed for 4 autos to park, one "speeder" and 3 QIP vehicles. That's the typical take down procedure.

THIS IS A SPEED TRAP!

Posted January 3, 2013, by Nathan Currier (ncurrier [at] gmail [dot] com)

Here is one of the articles featuring the rehabilitation and widening of the Checkered House Bridge in Modern Steel Construction (AISC).

http://www.modernsteel.com/SteelInTheNews/?p=1870

Posted January 3, 2013, by Don Morrison

Fascinating.

Spent a lot of time in the area and on the river and never knew that this bridge ever existed. Looks like a pair of lally columns at 41.998616,-93.904142. Must've crossed from Moingona road to Camp Hantesa. Bird's Eye view turned to south gives a good view of the bridge remains and the road near the camp.

Cool find.

Posted January 2, 2013, by John Marvig (johnmarvig [at] chaska [dot] net)

Well UP is talking about tearing down the Clinton bridge (even the side channel bridges) and a bridge in St. Paul, CP wants the bridge at La Crosse, WI gone, and the Sabula Rail Bridge. BNSF already took out the old Burlington Bridge.

Point is, class 1 railroads have a really bad history of destroying history, especially up in the midwest. Amazing UP would even have considered bulldozing that historic bridge in Eau Claire, WI.

I'm actually gonna go out on thin ice here and give CN credit for not completely removing the bridge. Keeping the frames and deck, as well as the connections is one of the more interesting things. It just makes you ask "why?"

But I will continue to watch the situation. I'll hope the best for this bridge

Posted January 2, 2013, by John Marvig (johnmarvig [at] chaska [dot] net)

Love the website, but a couple things I would like to see added is at least one more build date slot, and at least one rehabilitated date slot. One thing I have found with railroad bridges is that often times, they were built at different times. And often times both road and railroad were rehabilitated. I think creating multiple build date categories and a rehabilitated catagory could really help with people attempting to find bridges.

Posted January 2, 2013, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Canadian National would bulldoze the Pyramids of Egypt if they were in their way.

Posted January 2, 2013, by John Marvig (johnmarvig [at] chaska [dot] net)

Look at the pictures of the westernmost span. Now look at these pictures.

The one thing that stands out to me on this bridge is the chords. The parker spans are cool, but some have much heavier bracing.

While looking further into it, I found that this is because Canadian National is cutting out the diagonal bracing of the old spans and replacing it with new bracing of the same pattern, only with plates connecting it in the middle.

So see the remaining original spans while you can. This could be part of a larger project, similar to the bridge at Burlington. There have been talks of replacing the swing span with a lift span....

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Platform Bridge (California)
Posted January 2, 2013, by Strykers (Pstryhers [at] comcast [dot] net)

What year was it constructed?

Posted January 2, 2013, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Unfortunately true and apparently an in-house job to keep out the red tape of this bridge being a "Select" span.

http://www.wbiw.com/local/archives/2012/10/work_continues_on_twin_bridges.php

Hammond Bridge (California)
Posted January 2, 2013, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

This county seems so completely covered, I was surprised I did not find this bridge listed. Hope I didn't miss something. Anyway, this is a railroad bridge in use for pedestrians. It is claimed to be "beyond repair" and is to be demolished and replaced. http://www.arcataeye.com/2012/12/hammond-bridge-is-close-to-falling-down-december-30-2012/

Posted January 2, 2013, by T.M. (apmarino1966 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This bridge and the one next to it are gone.

Posted January 1, 2013, by Jared Mixson

Bruce is correct. Bing Maps still shows Gremillion St. crossing on this bridge although the road deck has long since been removed. You can still see some of the pilings.

Posted January 1, 2013, by Jim Peterson

As already mentioned, this is the bridge that is jumped near the beginning of "The Blues Brothers". Detailed shots of the gearing and other workings of the bridge are shown as well as a very clear shot of the bridge plate.

Posted January 1, 2013, by Luke Harden (lmharden [at] iastate [dot] edu)

The Bing link worked fine for me.

Posted January 1, 2013, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Looking at the view on Bing, there appears to be another pony truss similar to the Lassig span tucked in right next to the building. The Lassig bridge(s) is very significant and it would be nice to see the city relocate it to a park before this complex is someday likely demolished.

Not sure if this Bing link will work or not:

http://binged.it/TEVBiy

Posted December 31, 2012, by David P. Jordan (dpj1974 [at] mediacombb [dot] net)

Another possibility is that the bridge is the P&PU's Pekin Bridge. So while the railroad could be correct, the location is not. Also, P&PU permanently abandoned its Pekin Bridge before 1897.

Posted December 31, 2012, by David P. Jordan (dpj1974 [at] mediacombb [dot] net)

That is not the Peoria & Pekin Union Railway (now Tazewell & Peoria Railroad) bridge. It may be the Peoria Terminal Co. bridge that closed in early 1973 and was dismantled in the summer of 1974.

Posted December 31, 2012, by WMD

Since all the photos here are recent, I thought I would post some taken before blue fences and tourist goop.

These are from a few rolls of Kodachrome 64, shot mostly on March 31, 1991. It turns out that it was just four days before the Kerry sisters were murdered. What a horrific crime. When I look back on the photos now it's a little unsettling to recall the graffiti, open man-hole covers and the remoteness of the bridge at that time. I think I was wise to slip a .357 into my jacket before I left the house.

I was born and raised in the area and traveled across the bridge many times. Traffic was always fairly heavy and that made the bend all the more exciting, if that's the right word. The narrowness, altitude, and bend all caused my mother to have a pretty good grip on the arm rest and front seat whenever we crossed it.

Those were the days.

@ webmaster: According to MoDot and an Alton newspaper, the bridge closed to traffic in February 1970.

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Posted December 31, 2012, by Gary Sprandel (jaidite [at] aol [dot] com)

There was an entire complex along the river that bridges 1&2 were the main access to.

Aside from the Nabisco plant there was a Johns Manville plant on the north bank on both sides of the main street.

If you go to historicaerials.com and put Marseilles IL in the search box and check out the topo maps(sorry the site has no photos outside the Chicago metro area) from 1972 through 1984 you can see how the tracks were laid out.

Posted December 31, 2012, by Brad Smith (gaberdine [at] hotmail [dot] com)
Posted December 31, 2012, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Picture 3 looks like Melan type reinforcing.

Posted December 31, 2012, by dylan ulin (dylanulin76 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The bridge in photo 14 is the market street bridge iun ottumwa,iowa

Posted December 30, 2012, by Steve Conro (sconro [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I agree there's no way a car has crossed this for MANY years. There is also two other bridges on the south side of the building I photoed and listed here. Unless any one has further history I figured as well to leave them all together.

Posted December 30, 2012, by J.P. (wildcatjon2000 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge is abandoned and is blocked off with a pile of dead trees on the school side and the community on the other side is gated. This bridge has a pony arch in the middle. along with an open spandrel underneath.

Posted December 29, 2012, by Don Morrison
Posted December 29, 2012, by Ken (Fiveo [dot] 17 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The original dam is pretty much gone. On the south side o the bridge there is a parking area by the powder mill I surrounded by a fence. Follow the trail through the woods and the dam was back there. It is soon to be a walking trail.

Re: train turntables: considered bridges or not?
Posted December 29, 2012, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I would agree with Fmiser that this would be a good addition to Landmarkhunter.


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