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Posted August 21, 2013, by Zachary S

Visited 8/20/13, documented the bridge in numerous photos; I'll upload these here in the coming weeks once I sort them out, but I did post one photo to serve as a representation of the bridge, as there were no photos of it here yet.

The southern/west end of the road the bridge is on is quite significantly abandoned, and getting to it required quite a bit of hiking. The north/east part of the road past the bridge looks like it's still in use.

With an unusual appearance brought on by a very long approach span on the south side and very little to no approach span on the north end, the abandoned through truss is a great little treasure hidden away on a very scenic creek. Internet references suggest it's a popular stop for people traveling down the creek by canoe or whatnot when it's passable.

The NBI data understates the poor condition of the deck - since being abandoned, the wooden deck has been steadily decaying, and there are indeed several missing boards. Small plants and moss grow fairly thickly on both the approach span and bridge deck itself, with shrubs and poison ivy at the end of the approach. It's not gonna serve traffic anytime soon. The structure itself, though, looks fairly solid, though I suspect before too long sections of the deck will probably rot completely and fall away, making it unsuitable for walking across, a feat that's already a delicate procedure. The guard rails are either not present or have been stolen, as I'm told has happened to closed truss bridges in the area before; people haul the guard rails off for scrap. The lack of this safety feature, seen in photos I'll upload later, combined with the wood deck, makes the bridge seem very light and open.

The bridge has been closed for several years obviously, severing the county road for through traffic, assuming anyone ever would use this particular winding, one-lane narrow nightmare of a road. As the road the bridge is on appears to be the only road on the map for several miles through this area that connects to larger roads to the east and west, I figure it will eventually be lost, unless the county abandons the road. Even if so, the bridge could be knocked off its abutments by flooding or large trees crashing into it during floods.

Posted August 21, 2013, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

This bridge replaced another bridge originally over I-70 at this location. Stadium road was graded lower when it was widened for the stadium project and this bridge was built. The original was a two lane 1960s vintage UCEB on concrete columns that crossed very high over the interstate, carrying what I believe was then called Leeds Road.

re: A question About Takers
Posted August 21, 2013, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

In the context of bridges, which is after all the subject of this forum, I think the much larger issue is HOW tax funds are used... wherever they may have originated from and wherever they may be used. Both the United States and Canada are guilty of unimaginable waste of taxpayer dollars by employing a funding system that rewards bridge owners who choose to defer maintenance with funds to demolish and replace bridges. Furthermore, the interpretation of AASHTO Guidelines as "Standards" or "Rules" has also resulted in the condemnation of countless bridges that are sufficient for the roads they serve. The system should be revised to put primary focus of funding (at all levels of government) on maintaining existing bridges.

Posted August 21, 2013, by Wayne R Keller (maandpakeller at cox dot net)

Had I been able to get to my place I would have had an awesome picture of the water under the bridge. The water was within a few inches of the deck. There was limbs and grass caught in the cross bracing under the deck.

On the east end of the bridge I have a wildlife camera that captures pictures of deer, turkey, bob cat, coyotes and even my cows. The camera has slid around the tree such that all you see is the east bridge abutment and you will notice a shiny medallion on the one post. That is a flood marker from November 17, 1971, which was not the highest flood ever, but one that the record still exists on the post.

Uploaded file: JPEG image data, EXIF standard, 1220670 bytes

Uploaded file: JPEG image data, EXIF standard, 1261091 bytes

A question About Takers
Posted August 21, 2013, by Ed Hollowell (erhollowell [at] aol [dot] com)

If a driver from New York travels across Kansas is it the people of Kansas who benefit or the person from New York? How do you apportion the benefit of having federal highways? It seems that if we want good roads that cross lightly settled places than those roads will need payment by the people who wish to use the roads as much as the people who live in the states where the roads are built.

Also their are many sparely settled states where the federal government holds large amounts of land so that the people can not use the land productively and the state cannot get any tax revenue from the taxes the land would be expected to produce. Shouldn’t the states be able to collect taxes on the land the federal government has refused to sell to the people?

Posted August 21, 2013, by Wayne R Keller (maandpakeller at cox dot net)

Unfortunately on August 8, 2013 I was out and was prevented from returning to my farm by water over the road west of the bridge. I roughly calculated the cross sectional areas for water under the bridge at about 1200 square feet and the same for the water over the road, so the total was about 2400 square feet. The planned seven foot culvert has a cross sectional area of 38 square feet.

Uploaded file: JPEG image data, EXIF standard 2.21, 8175237 bytes

Posted August 21, 2013, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

This bridge has a very unusual detail at the eastern end where the truss is cantilevered out beyond the pier where it holds one end of a deck plate girder span. This is an extremely interesting bridge.

Posted August 21, 2013, by Kelly McClanahan

The bridge used to be painted green, and was often called the Grasshopper Bridge by MoDot. My father worked there for 40 years, and this is what he has always called it.

Posted August 21, 2013, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I did a field visit to this bridge a couple weeks ago and walked the entire through truss section. The paint system is currently in excellent condition and the deck appears to be in good condition. Many who visit this bridge probably think it is preserved and not at risk for demolition, given its appearance. The only problems I noted on the bridge was some isolated areas of section loss around the gusset plates. This section loss occurred prior to the most recent painting project, so the current paint coat on the bridge has arrested the section loss. The only work I would recommend would be to pad weld some of this section loss. The bridge is narrow, but during my visit, it didn't seem to be that busy of a bridge.

Posted August 21, 2013, by James Wireman (jameslovesbridges_86 [at] ymail [dot] com)

I think the Scheduling for Replacement can Be held off at least until Spring of 2025. Hold it off until 2030 if you can but otherwise spring of 2025. This bridge is still in Pretty Doggon good condition. I'm not actually worried about a paint job. It primarily just needs some Repairs. I really doesn't get all that much traffic. Does not get anywhere near as much traffic as the Old Macarther bridge in Burlington, IOWA did. That's my Debate.

Posted August 21, 2013, by Luke Harden (lukemh9 [at] gmail [dot] com)
Posted August 21, 2013, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Mr. Keller:

Have you considered bringing this to the attention of a statewide newspaper such at the Topeka Capitol Journal or the Wichita Eagle? The Hays and Hutchinson newspapers have a fairly wide readership as well.

Posted August 21, 2013, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Sounds like a job for an independent newspaper reporter, if there are any in the area....

Posted August 21, 2013, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Hi Mr. Erickson:

I have seen those "taker" studies, and you have to take them with a grain of salt. Many of them factor in people who are on Medicare and Social Security. Thus people who are receiving now are people who paid in during previous years. Because Kansas has a rather high percentage of seniors, we receive plenty of Medicare and Social Security money, but it does not go to state coffers. The same issue applies to many of the Sunbelt States such as Florida, Texas, and Arizona among others.

Additionally, these surveys often count military spending. Thus, if the Army wants to spend money at Fort Riley or Fort Leavenworth, the survey counts that as money received by Kansas. Like Medicare and Social Security money, it does not go to state coffers. This same issue can be observed in Georgia (Fort Benning), Oklahoma (Fort Sill), Texas (numerous installations), and a few other (primarily southern and western) states.

Of course many Kansas farmers receive money from farm bills. Unfortunately, this just puts the price of equipment up...but that is another discussion for another day...

I have long suspected that somebody is about to prosper from the demolition of this bridge. The enthusiasm to demolish this bridge when logic suggests otherwise is unbelievable.

This creek floods - even though it is in a relatively dry part of the state. It flooded just last week. A low-water crossing is not going to cut the muster.

The bridge needs one pin replaced...one pin...

Posted August 21, 2013, by K. A. Erickson

Outside of those here and a few historical groups, not all historical societies support bridge restoration or preservation sadly, outside I find no one really cares.

I suspect that the commissioners already have a contract drawn up for a buddy buddy of theirs to tear out the bridge. They were just going through all the niceties to make sure their T's were dotted and their i's crossed. The thing about politics is that it is who you know, and the benefits are reaped accordingly.

Look to see if the costs to demolish somehow skyrocket during and Uncle Sam needs to reimburse the county, err contractor. Poke around during election time and see if the contractor gave a generous gift in the amount of possibly the size of the cost overrun to those in office. I've seen an instance like this before.

It should be noted that Kansas is a taker state, they get more than they contribute to the rest of the country. $1 nets them $1.12. My state gets ripped off, every dollar given to the feds gets only 88 cents in return. Those 12 cents go to Kansas to tear out perfectly fine bridges. As such I should be able to dictate what they do with those funds to some extent.

Robert asks, "Why not fix the pin?" "Why can't it be bypassed?" Because in buddy buddy's contract they get the metal from scrapping the bridge and some places pay good money for real metal. If the bridge is left standing that in their minds is a waste of metal and waste of potential profit. They will quickly ask you Robert, "Why do you hate America?" "Why do you hate the Freedoms that make this country so great?"

Remember it's all legal/right until some independent blogger, wayward journalist, or concerned citizen starts asking around and then – TERRORIST!

Posted August 21, 2013, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

If the commissioners want to eradicate all truss bridges in the county, they will be successful with the demolition of this one. It appears to be the last remaining truss bridge in Ford County.

Is the county replacing the bridge without federal funds? This would make a difference given its apparent listing on the NRHP.

Does the Kansas State Historical Society have the ability to stop the demolition? Can the bridge be bypassed and allowed to remain standing? I know that won't help Mr. Keller during floods, but at least it would preserve the bridge for now.

Finally, the big question...again...why not just replace the broken pin?

Charles River Bridge (Massachusetts)
Posted August 21, 2013, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

This bridge has an unusual history. I updated the page so hopefully it reduces the confusion. It was originally a 1910 single leaf bascule, replaced in 1962 with a double leaf bascule (one of the smallest double leaf bascules I have ever seen) and again demolished and replaced in 2010. As such, the bridge today is modern and has no historic significance.

Posted August 21, 2013, by Nathan Holth

Unless I am mistaken (which is possible) I think you made a duplicate page by mistake. Isn't this pre-existing page the same bridge? http://bridgehunter.com/ma/suffolk/B160134EMMDCNBI/

If so, please post your photos on that page, since that page already has additional details and NBI data.

Posted August 21, 2013, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

"...eradicating the bridge?" That's seriously how it was worded in the minutes?! Nice to see a county in Kansas actually use wording that supports my theory that most counties in Kansas view historic metal truss bridges much like a cockroach infestation.

NO Known Cause, And No Known Cure!
Posted August 20, 2013, by Ed Hollowell (erhollowell [at] aol [dot] com)

OCBDS is a tragic affliction and the afflicted need your help. They can't help themselves!! Sometimes victims go on to drawing UCEBs! Please give until it hurts for Douglas' and others like him. Obsessive Compulsive Bridge Drawing Syndrome, take the challenge. It could get worse!

Posted August 20, 2013, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

From what I can determine, the KCS and Frisco joined just north of Grandview and ran north into the Blue River Valley and into Leeds. KCS built a new route around 1929 which headed to the northeast along Blue Ridge eventually joining the old route at Leeds. There are several nice open spandrel concrete arches along this new alignment.

Posted August 20, 2013, by Kelly McClanahan

I am not sure, but I suspect that sometime in the future, KCS will build a new bridge. There are a second set of bridge abutments over I-49/US 71 about a mile away to the north, so they could be in place for siding extension in the future. Also, Blue Ridge is very narrow through here, so if they ever to decide to widen it, they would have to build a new bridge (I deleted this, but I added it again).

After writing the first comment, I discovered that they are indeed, are planning to build a new bridge. The plans are to build it to the east of the old one, and then at another date, build a second one.

Posted August 20, 2013, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

The second set of supports over US 71/I-49 are from a few years back when they replaced the bridges here. The temporary rail passed along them while the current bridge was built. There may be a plan to use them again but I haven't heard of it.

The original alignment of US 71 was the west outer road until the four lane road was built. The old KCS US 71 bridge was of the same design and vintage as this one over Blue Ridge. It carried a Southern Belle sign for years. There was also a similar bridge over Martha Truman Road just to the west of the US 71 crossing, replaced in the same project.

The infamous Ruskin Heights tornado of 1957 passed just to the north and traveled along the KCS track until turning east near 110th and destroying Ruskin High School.

Posted August 20, 2013, by Wayne R Keller (maandpakeller at cox dot net)

From the Ford County Commissioners' Meeting Minutes, Meeting 2013-37, August 5, 2013,

"Bids to Move Bridge

There were no bids received to remove the Valley Road Bridge. Mr. Halbgewachs will talk to the Kansas Historical Society and the Corps of Engineers to see about documenting the history of the bridge before moving forward with eradicating the bridge and constructing something else."

Ink spam
Posted August 20, 2013, by Anonymous

May we have the forum back, please?

Posted August 20, 2013, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I have to admit that you are right. If nothing else, Mr. Spamapiller is very good at pushing spam down the page.

Posted August 20, 2013, by Wayne Kizziar (wayne1701 [at] cableone [dot] net)

I have to admit the Spamapiller is funny!

Posted August 20, 2013, by Anonymous

HOW MANY DRAWINGS OF THIS BRIDGE ARE YOU GOING TO POST? YOU HAVE ALREADY POSTED THE SAME DRAWING ON HERE TWICE!

Posted August 20, 2013, by Anonymous

Spamapiller comin' through

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Posted August 20, 2013, by Douglas Butler

Monticello Road bridge drawing.

Webmaster's note: The photo that was here has been incorporated into the main site.

Posted August 20, 2013, by Douglas Butler

Old Kings Ferry bridge drawing.

Webmaster's note: The photo that was here has been incorporated into the main site.

Posted August 20, 2013, by Douglas Butler

Feather River bridge drawing.

Webmaster's note: The photo that was here has been incorporated into the main site.

Posted August 20, 2013, by Douglas Butler

Atchafalaya River bridge drawing.

Webmaster's note: The photo that was here has been incorporated into the main site.

Posted August 20, 2013, by Douglas Butler

Okoboji Railroad bridge drawing.

Webmaster's note: The photo that was here has been incorporated into the main site.

Posted August 20, 2013, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Pure speculation, but the portal bracing indicates a possible George E. King structure. Of course, portal bracing rarely gives a definitive identification of the builder, but it can provide some clues.

Posted August 20, 2013, by Douglas Butler

Okeechobee Canal bridge drawing.

Webmaster's note: The photo that was here has been incorporated into the main site.

Posted August 20, 2013, by Douglas Butler

Ocmulgee River railroad bridge drawing.

Webmaster's note: The photo that was here has been incorporated into the main site.

Posted August 20, 2013, by Douglas Butler

Ocmulgee River bridge drawing.

Webmaster's note: The photo that was here has been incorporated into the main site.

Posted August 20, 2013, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Thanks for putting a name to the detail. Armed with that information, I found another publication that describes the detail, and notably includes a drawing on the following page.

http://books.google.com/books?id=GcM5AAAAMAAJ&dq=%22Star%20S...

Posted August 20, 2013, by Douglas Butler

Northern Pacific North Red River bridge drawing.

Webmaster's note: The photo that was here has been incorporated into the main site.

Posted August 20, 2013, by Douglas Butler

Newport Railroad bridge drawing.

Webmaster's note: The photos that were here have been incorporated into the main site.

Posted August 20, 2013, by Douglas Butler

Newark Slough Railroad swing bridge drawing.

Webmaster's note: The photo that was here has been incorporated into the main site.

Posted August 20, 2013, by Douglas Butler

Fairhaven Bridge drawing.

Webmaster's note: The photo that was here has been incorporated into the main site.

Posted August 20, 2013, by Douglas Butler

Navy Drive swing bridge in California.

Webmaster's note: The photo that was here has been incorporated into the main site.

Posted August 20, 2013, by Douglas Butler

Escatawpa River railroad swing drawbridge drawing.

Webmaster's note: The photo that was here has been incorporated into the main site.

Posted August 20, 2013, by Douglas Butler

Mossdale Railroad swing bridge drawing.

Webmaster's note: The photo that was here has been incorporated into the main site.

Posted August 20, 2013, by Douglas Butler

Mokelumne River Bridge drawing.

Webmaster's note: The photo that was here has been incorporated into the main site.

Posted August 20, 2013, by Douglas Butler

Miner Slough Bridge drawing.

Webmaster's note: The photo that was here has been incorporated into the main site.

Posted August 20, 2013, by Douglas Butler

Main Street Bridge drawing.

Webmaster's note: The photo that was here has been incorporated into the main site.

Lamb-Fish Bridge (Mississippi)
Posted August 20, 2013, by Douglas Butler

Lamb Fish bridge drawing.

Webmaster's note: The photos that were here have been incorporated into the main site.

Posted August 20, 2013, by Michelle Schall (schallville [at] gmail [dot] com)

The bridge is currently under construction and set to reopen in late August 2013

Posted August 20, 2013, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The recent flood waters in the area have subsided now. It sounds like the flooding was worse in the Little Arkansas and the section of the Arkansas River drainage west of the Flint Hills than in the Whitewater and Walnut River drainage. (The Whitewater River joins the Walnut River, which in turn joins the Arkansas immediately north of the Oklahoma state line).

Hopefully this one held, but flooding on the Whitewater River is a regular occurrence, so it is only a matter of time before this one collapses into the river.

Posted August 20, 2013, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Nathan is correct. The top chord definitely has lattice instead of a cover plate. This one looks rather lightweight for a railroad bridge, which makes me suspect it might be pre-1900 or at least pre-1910.

Posted August 20, 2013, by Fmiser (fmiser [at] gmail [dot] com)

Nice find, Michael!

I was puzzled by the missing span at the east end. There doesn't seem to be the remains of substructure for it. But then I found out the dam was built as a hydroelectric plant. It looks to me like the generators were at the east end - and possibly the bridge was access to the building and not "just" a span over the river.

Posted August 20, 2013, by Nathan Holth

They don't build them like they used to. Already up for replacement:

Contract No. 63598 Kane County District 1 Section 06-00214-18-RP FAP Route 361 (IL 25) Project HPP-1527(37)

Project consists of replacing the structure carrying the UP Railroad over IL 25, the construction of a temporary shoo-fly structure to carry the UP Railroad over IL 25, the construction of a structure to carry IL 25 over the East Branch of Brewster Creek, roadway widening and reconstruction, traffic signal modernization and drainage improvements, located at the north approach to Brewster Creek to Dunham Road and the intersection of IL 25 at Gilbert Road;

Posted August 20, 2013, by Fmiser (fmiser [at] gmail [dot] com)

Waddell calls it a "star strut", and seems to not like ones made from only two angles like the ones on this bridge.

In the glossary in the 1916 edition of _Bridge_Engineering_ he says, "A strut formed of either two or four angles placed back to back. The two-angle form is not a satisfactory type, as it fails to develop as high an ultimate strength as might properly be anticipated."

I haven't seen many star struts - and haven't ever seen any others built with lattice tying the angle stock together.

Posted August 20, 2013, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Maybe I am pushing the limits of images taken from Outer Space, but it looks like the top chord has lattice instead of cover plate. If so, don't forget to point the camera up when you are on the bridge, that's an uncommon detail!

Posted August 19, 2013, by Robert Brock (k0pvw [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I will get up there maybe this weekend and get photos. Very difficult to get to as it is about a 1/3-1/2 mile North of the closest road. I will have to wait until I see a Southbound train come through as it will take over an hour before another train will pass due to no long sidings the whole 30 mile distance of this Sub line.

Lower Gassaway Bridge (South Carolina)
Posted August 19, 2013, by Don Morrison

The HABS documentation in the link suggests that the bridge collapsed in 1982. It was a 6 panel Howe covered bridge.

This bridge page was probably added in 2008 from the HABS Docs, since it has no map location and no photos.

That said, Google maps does show something possibly of interest at 34.774537,-82.773008

Drawings
Posted August 19, 2013, by Dave King (DKinghawkfan [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Even when they are posted here and edited into the pages, the comments still are scattered so far apart it makes for a headache.

OCBDS
Posted August 19, 2013, by Ed Hollowell (erhollowell [at] aol [dot] com)

OCBDS (Obsessive Compulsive Bridge Drawing Syndrome) is not funny! It is a serious illness and those who suffer from it deserve our sympathy and help. Please let's all get together and start a fund to aid these poor unfortunates! It could all start out right here on Bridgehunter. Lets Go!

Posted August 19, 2013, by Thomas Griebel (tgriebel224 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Why did they move the bridge?

Posted August 19, 2013, by Douglas Butler

Three Mile Slough Bridge drawing.

Webmaster's note: The photos that were here have been incorporated into the main site.

Bridgehunter is becoming a free hosting site, it seems
Posted August 19, 2013, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I enjoyed seeing the technical drawing for a while, but now they have become spam. We have tried to convince Mr. Butler to post his drawings as photographs. We could then enjoy them, but not have them clutter the forum.

Unfortunately, I think Mr. Butler just wants his drawings to be hosted online for free.

As a result, it has become impossible to hold any kind of conversation in this forum.

I hate to ask our webmaster to pull someone's posting privileges, but this is getting ridiculous. I have appreciated his contributions, but he needs to play by the rules and not post spam.

Posted August 19, 2013, by Douglas Butler

Merrimack River bridge drawing.

Webmaster's note: The photo that was here has been incorporated into the main site.

Bridge Drawings
Posted August 19, 2013, by Dave King (DKinghawkfan [at] hotmail [dot] com)

This is out of control.

Meridian Bridge (California)
Posted August 19, 2013, by Douglas Butler

Meridan bridge drawing.

Webmaster's note: The photo that was here has been incorporated into the main site.

Posted August 19, 2013, by Douglas Butler

Illinois River rail bridge drawing.

Webmaster's note: The photo that was here has been incorporated into the main site.

Posted August 19, 2013, by Douglas Butler

Memorial bridge drawing.

Webmaster's note: The photo that was here has been incorporated into the main site.

Posted August 19, 2013, by Douglas Butler

Swing bridge drawing.

Webmaster's note: The photo that was here has been incorporated into the main site.

Posted August 19, 2013, by Douglas Butler

Mauricetown Bridge drawing.

Webmaster's note: The photo that was here has been incorporated into the main site.

Posted August 19, 2013, by Douglas Butler

Martin bridge drawing.

Webmaster's note: The photo that was here has been incorporated into the main site.

Posted August 19, 2013, by Douglas Butler

Railroad bridge drawing.

Webmaster's note: The photo that was here has been incorporated into the main site.

Posted August 19, 2013, by Douglas Butler

Magnolia Bridge drawing.

Webmaster's note: The photo that was here has been incorporated into the main site.

Posted August 19, 2013, by Douglas Butler

Madison bridge drawing.

Webmaster's note: The photo that was here has been incorporated into the main site.

Posted August 19, 2013, by Douglas Butler

Madison Avenue bridge drawing.

Webmaster's note: The photo that was here has been incorporated into the main site.

Posted August 19, 2013, by Douglas Butler

Macombs Dam bridge drawing.

Webmaster's note: The photo that was here has been incorporated into the main site.

Posted August 19, 2013, by Douglas Butler

Luraville bridge drawing.

Webmaster's note: The photo that was here has been incorporated into the main site.

Posted August 19, 2013, by Douglas Butler

Louisiana Rail bridge drawing.

Webmaster's note: The photo that was here has been incorporated into the main site.

Posted August 19, 2013, by Douglas Butler

Little Potato Slough bridge drawing.

Webmaster's note: The photo that was here has been incorporated into the main site.

Posted August 19, 2013, by Douglas Butler

Lewis Street bridge drawing.

Webmaster's note: The photo that was here has been incorporated into the main site.

Posted August 19, 2013, by Douglas Butler

Lewes railroad swing bridge drawing in Delaware.

Webmaster's note: The photo that was here has been incorporated into the main site.

Lenox Bridge (Tennessee)
Posted August 19, 2013, by Douglas Butler

Lenox Bridge drawing.

Webmaster's note: The photo that was here has been incorporated into the main site.

Posted August 19, 2013, by Douglas Butler

Leavenworth railroad bridge drawing.

Webmaster's note: The photo that was here has been incorporated into the main site.

Posted August 19, 2013, by Douglas Butler

Lake Monroe bridge drawing.

Webmaster's note: The photos that were here have been incorporated into the main site.

Meanwhile, in Indiana
Posted August 19, 2013, by Anonymous

I don't think I can express my true feelings of the bridge drawings, so I will let Coach Bobby Knight explain:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L5-akqjKzII

***Not safe for work***

Lower Gassaway Bridge (South Carolina)
Posted August 19, 2013, by Michael Miller (michael_a_miller [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Sadly, I believe this bridge has actually been demolished since it was intially posted in 2008. I do not see it on any aerial shots of the area. I will follow-up with field recon & update listing, if needed. If it's still there, I'll get a picture up on the site.

Posted August 19, 2013, by Douglas Butler

Louisville & Nashville railroad bridge drawing.

Webmaster's note: The photo that was here has been incorporated into the main site.

Posted August 19, 2013, by Douglas Butler

Krotz Springs Railroad bridge drawing.

Webmaster's note: The photo that was here has been incorporated into the main site.

Posted August 19, 2013, by Douglas Butler

Keokuk Rail bridge drawing.

Webmaster's note: The photo that was here has been incorporated into the main site.

Posted August 19, 2013, by Douglas Butler

Kennebec River bridge drawing.

Webmaster's note: The photo that was here has been incorporated into the main site.

Posted August 19, 2013, by Douglas Butler

Red River bridge drawing.

Webmaster's note: The photo that was here has been incorporated into the main site.

Posted August 19, 2013, by Douglas Butler

Ouachita River railroad bridge drawing.

Webmaster's note: The photos that were here have been incorporated into the main site.

Posted August 19, 2013, by Douglas Butler

A railroad swing bridge technical drawing.

Webmaster's note: The photo that was here has been incorporated into the main site.

Posted August 19, 2013, by Douglas Butler

Judsonia Railroad Bridge drawing.

Webmaster's note: The photo that was here has been incorporated into the main site.

Posted August 19, 2013, by Douglas Butler

Judsonia bridge drawing.

Webmaster's note: The photo that was here has been incorporated into the main site.

Posted August 19, 2013, by Douglas Butler

Jackson Street bridge drawing.

Webmaster's note: The photos that were here have been incorporated into the main site.

Posted August 19, 2013, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Apparently this bridge has been re-opened to traffic again. If anybody plans to visit this bridge in the next few weeks, just beware that some roads in the region may still be in need of repair due to recent flooding.

http://www.kvoe.com/news.htm

Posted August 19, 2013, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

This historic truss bridge hits the scrapyard as soon as the endangered birds stop nesting in it.

dailyjournalonline.com/democrat-news/news/local/modot-expects-highway-e-bridge-to-open-next-week/article_85873d30-050f-11e3-9c68-0019bb2963f4.html

Bridge drawings
Posted August 19, 2013, by Anonymous

This has gotta stop. These pictures take up too much space here.


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