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Posted March 17, 2016, by Don Morrison

Also, the Little Osage river is about 4 miles north of the coordinates I mentioned.

Posted March 16, 2016, by Don Morrison

The bridge at these coordinates is a through truss bridge, unless my eyes deceive me....

Perhaps this bridge is at 37.938311, -94.367448 , over Douglas Branch?

Posted March 16, 2016, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

FYI I was responsible for uncovering the fact that this bridge is a product of the Smith Bridge Company, the identity was originally not noted in the Historic Bridge Inventory. Credit is also due to Paul P. Huelskamp, Miami County Engineer, who assisted me further in explaining why a Smith Bridge Company product with ca. 1885 details had a 1913 construction date listed. Documentation of my research is available here: http://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=oh...

Abandonment ofT&NO bridge over Colorado River, on La Grange TAP line.
Posted March 16, 2016, by BILL KARISCH (billkarisch [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Although the La Grange Tap was abandoned from La Grange to Glidden in 1941, the T&NO moved the Glidden Yard Limits about 7 miles north, near the community of Loraine, before the track was taken up. There was a large gravel pit that the railroad moved a lot of gravel out of near there and this new placement of the yard limit would allow the railroad to fulfill it's commitment to abandon the track from La Grange to Glidden, but also allow the railroad to keep the track to the gravel pit. Additionally it allowed the railroad to serve the industry with a switch crew...not call an additional road crew. My "conspiracy theory" is fueled by personal memories of my own and several rail buff friends of a railroad crossing on Hwy. 71 still in place in the mid-1950's just north of Columbus. A retired Texas Highway Department employee that told me the crossing was not taken out until about 1957. The highway department would not have allowed the railroad to keep a crossing in place for 16 years if it wasn't being used and the railroad wouldn't have paid to keep the crossing up, if it wasn't using the line. Unfortunately the UP takeover of the SP has made records hard to find and time is taking it's toll on eyewitnesses! Does anyone have any ideas of when the bridge was abandoned or know anyone that might remember anything about the line operating between Glidden and Loraine from 1941 to the mid-1950's? I'm doing an article about "The other train that came to La Grange" and would appreciate your ideas. Bill Karisch (832)928-6132

Posted March 16, 2016, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Yeah about that one in Amnicon Falls Wisconsin... its not a modern covered bridge there are no timber trusses of any kind there... the IRON BOWSTRING TRUSS is doing ALL the work including carrying the load of the parasitic timbers that do not simulate a covered bridge (note that a covered bridge is a timber truss with covering on it). This one in Tennessee may be one of the most profoundly silly looking things I have ever seen, but you can see the attempt to simulate timber trusses in this design in addition to grafting non-functional steel trusses inside of the package as decorative elements.

The Amnicon Falls one is far more irritating to me because it is a public bridge and the timber obstructs the view of a very rare and unusual bowstring. Moreover, the timber also obstructs the view of the stunning natural scenery around the bridge.

Posted March 16, 2016, by James McCray (jamesinslocomb [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Here is a historic bowstring that has been incorporated into a modern covered bridge: http://bridgehunter.com/wi/douglas/amnicon-falls/

Posted March 16, 2016, by Ben Tate (benji5221 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Here's a wooden pony truss that has been covered in sheet metal. http://bridgehunter.com/tn/lawrence/50017610001/

Posted March 16, 2016, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

We have crossed the English.

Posted March 16, 2016, by Mike Daffron

It looks like pieces of the bridge were used as supports.

re: First official drone inspection
Posted March 16, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Wow,

Bring a generator;

Up-size the drone so it can lift the power cable;

Worry about power cable entanglement;

Have extra personnel to guide the cable;

All so you don't need to carry spare batteries.

I think the inventor's name is Rube Goldberg.

Besides the above, inspection by drone is a great idea! (as long as it is a complement to rather than replacement of physical contact)

Regards,

Art S.

Posted March 16, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The Courtland Canal is crossed by a couple of small bridges a few miles downstream from the Lovewell Reservoir. I am not sure what their purpose is/was. Perhaps they allowed ranchers or livestock to cross the canal. They were probably built in the 1950s.

re: First official drone inspection
Posted March 16, 2016, by Nathan Holth (nathan [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I laughed when I clicked the link, I was expecting maybe a big steel deck arch or something. This setup all seems a bit elaborate for a little through truss! It is an interesting concept though especially the corded solution.

First official drone inspection
Posted March 16, 2016, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)
Posted March 16, 2016, by James McCray (jamesinslocomb [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This bridge seems similar to what was done to this bridge: http://bridgehunter.com/al/monroe/bh56455/

Anyways, I have to give kudos to the guy who did this for several reasons:

1. He saved a historic pony truss. Its not a prefab truss, but a historic one from the 1900's that could have otherwise gone to scrap.

2. He could have just built a modern covered bridge, but instead, went the extra mile and used a historic bridge in its design.

3. He went out of his way to obtain a historic bridge where as he did not have to.

4. He is a private citizen using his own money and not tax payer's money to build the thing.

5. The bridge, which could have gone to scrap, will find many more years of use.

Yes, it may be hidden under the covering, but he has achieved miles above what others would have done with same bridge.

Posted March 15, 2016, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Yeah sorry but I'm not feelin' it!

Go ahead and make a "Romantic Shelter" bridge if ya want to... But don't hide a real gem under it's wraps.

Sure... It does preserve an historic bridge, but the vast majority would drive through and say "Oh, look at the covered bridge!"... While only us few would really know about the Pearl inside the shell.

Posted March 15, 2016, by Ian Martin

This stretch of track is open and occasionally used by the Conway Scenic Railroad. The bridge is also relatively modern, built as part of a track relocation/restoration project ca. 2002.

Posted March 15, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Nah, this is a riveted pony bought on Ebay that has been placed 'in doors' but stands free of the rest of the structure. A not overly significant bridge saved from the scrap heap and well repurposed. Now if it was a bowstring, we might hear a thing or two about it from Nathan... :^)

Regards,

Art S.

Posted March 15, 2016, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Work has begun to cross the English by Wirkin' Bridges and BACH Steel. The friends are very happy there wait is over.

Posted March 15, 2016, by nathan myers (nathanmyers94 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

If I remember correctly it is pretty low. It is on a remote backroad.

Posted March 15, 2016, by Anonymous

Cue comment from Nathan in 3, 2, 1.

Posted March 15, 2016, by J.P. (wildcatjon2000 [at] gmail [dot] com)

believe its a half hip pony

Posted March 15, 2016, by James McCray (jamesinslocomb [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Very cool. A historic pony truss bridge is incorporated into a modern covered bridge.

Posted March 15, 2016, by James McCray (jamesinslocomb [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Just found this: Pony truss. But actually what kind is it? I put warren, but seems to be a little strange. It also has inner lacings.

Posted March 15, 2016, by Sam Yates (sd-yates [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I grew up with this bridge and railroad. My father, Dewitt Yates was the engineer for the B. & S.E. RR. I have walked across this bridge many times, especially during the hunting season. We had a year's permit from Ben Walker, the owner of the land on the Macon County side of the river. Every Sunday for years I would make a run with my dad in a motorized passenger car for a mail pickup from the Central of Georgia at Milstead. I do not ever recall anyone ever using this bridge as a jumping platform as the river at this point was too shallow and the bridge to far above the river. However, there was another bridge below Milstead on a back road that passed over a creek and swimming hole and was used as a jumping platform. The railroad went defunct and the tracks were torn up and sold for scrap. The steam locomotive 200, was sold to an excursion line in Vermont. I happened to see a program about trains on the Rural Network several years ago that featured the 200. The other steam locomotive, the 227 was wrecked when some still unknown person threw a switch sending the engine downhill and up to the cab in a creek bank. This locomotive was cut up for scrap. Luckily none of the crew was injured when the wreck occurred.

Posted March 15, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Good looking bridge. To my eye there really is more artistry in the early ones.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted March 15, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)
Posted March 15, 2016, by Dick (dickwebb11 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Not little Osage. This bridge is over "Douglas Branch" on old US 71 Hwy.

Location is correct.

Posted March 15, 2016, by Katy Merrifield (katydidditt [at] juno [dot] com)

Sunday, March 13, 2016 we were scouting the Buffalo Creek to possibly paddle and checked out the Red Bridge as a possible landing. Much to our dismay both sides of the bridge were littered with carcasses--2 coyote, a deer, an unidentifiable mess of fur, and the gutting of a deer. Disgusting! I will be calling the Lin Co Conservation office next. Why don't the hunters just dump the carcasses in an empty field?

Posted March 15, 2016, by Ralph Demars
Posted March 15, 2016, by Steve Biggs (okla_charger [at] yahoo [dot] com)

The old bridge was still there as of mid October of 2015. I photographed it and plan to return in the late spring to photograph it again.

Interesting bridge! It needs to be preserved.

Steve

Posted March 14, 2016, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Shallow a-frame portal, sway bracing design/connection, vertical v-lacing orientation, hip vertical lower chord connection design, and 1890s construction date suggest this is a Wrought Iron Bridge Co bridge so I added that.

Posted March 14, 2016, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

For travelers info, I note the Google images show the pony truss in storage south of the bridge location just north of Tarters Ferry Road

Posted March 14, 2016, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Ah yes, I know something of the two pony trusses over Beaver Creek. They have long been delisted from the National Bridge Inventory indicating that the road and bridges have been formally abandoned by the county road commission. This was confirmed quite clearly by the angry, armed landowners who confronted us when we visited the bridges. Long story short, road and bridges are now private and will almost certainly never be public again.

Posted March 14, 2016, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

If only we had that much clout Carson!

Posted March 14, 2016, by Ben Tate (benji5221 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Thanks, Nathan. This one had me confused.

Posted March 14, 2016, by Nathan Holth (nathan [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I checked that link, and the included documentatation includes a signed Memorandum of Agreement that states that the historic bridge will be bypassed and preserved. Directly from the MOA:

The historic, concrete open-spandrel arch bridge over the west fork of the Little River will be left in place and a new bridge constructed downstream. To facilitate this, the ALDOT will transfer the existing SR-117 bridge over the West Fork of the Little River to the State Historic Preservation Office. The property transfer will be effective upon property release by ALDOT after completion of all new construction and detour activities. The property transfer will include all responsibility for maintenance and liability.

Posted March 14, 2016, by Brandon Cooper

I have heard rumors that the old haul road may be opened up to driving one day, but this bridge crosses the haul road. That is what it looks like they are getting to do if that is the case. I will be one sad person if they do this as it will destroy the fishing in the area. Though if they would barricade the dip off to traffic where Keffler Kamp (Campsite N) resided, that might stop a lot of destructive fishing if they keep the end where the old complex sat shut down from traffic.

Posted March 14, 2016, by Anonymous

Bridge is scheduled for replacement. Such a shame!

http://rp.dot.state.al.us/SR117/

Posted March 14, 2016, by Carson sobieski (cmsobieski10 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Could you guys please fix that bridge because me and my dad have Fields there and to go to the next one we have to take spencer road insted and it would just be so much eaiser taking our machines across the bridge Thank You please do it soon.

Posted March 14, 2016, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

As per an article printed in the Reading Eagle on 3-14-16 divers stopped searching for the body of a crewman on a sunken tugboat after the tugboat crashed into a barge that was near the new Tappan Zee bridge which is being constructed.2 crewmen have been found so far.Grim news but this just goes to show accidents can happen in bridge building zones.

Posted March 14, 2016, by Nathan Holth (nathan [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I checked with Nels Raynor at Bach Steel he says this is most definitely a former roof truss.

Posted March 14, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

You have painted a rather humorous picture in my mind :^)

Posted March 14, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Nope, not even close. Why do you ask?

Posted March 14, 2016, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

We'll need buckets....

Posted March 14, 2016, by CConkle (msplinter1964 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Isn't this the oldest continuously used bridge in the U.S.?

Posted March 13, 2016, by Wilson White (wwhite678 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Worst flood ever on March 12, 2016 brought the flood waters above the bridge. Not sure if she'll ever be back in service.

Posted March 13, 2016, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I say we...The entire Bridgehunter Nation...Don shovels and dig that sucker out!!! ;-)

Posted March 13, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

No worries. I came across it while doing a category search so I thought I'd ask.

Posted March 13, 2016, by Luke

I might have been half-asleep when I made the edit, because I can't figure out how I'd have thought this was a post truss either...

Posted March 13, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Luke,

I did a category search on Post trusses and this bridge came up. I'm not sure how this is a Post truss. To me, it looks like the South American viaduct built by Phoenix that incorporates the Fink trusses (minus the multi-panel Finks of course). I didn't want to change it in case I'm missing something.

That said, it is absolutely amazing that the entire 1870's structure, Phoenix Columns and all, remains intact under a gigantic mass of fill!

Regards,

Art S.

Posted March 13, 2016, by nathan myers (nathanmyers94 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Yes, this bridge has been completely replace as of 2011.

Posted March 13, 2016, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

It's a shame a bridge as unique as this one is gone.

USGS stream gauge station
Posted March 13, 2016, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Thanks GS about this structure you mentioned.Here where i live in southeastern Pa.i don't recall ever seeing one of these structures around truss bridges.

Posted March 12, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

This truss structure is wild! Is it unique? Does it have a name or is the listed design description it?

Posted March 12, 2016, by Harley Patterson (kc9gld [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Here is a photo of the grave down the road.

Posted March 12, 2016, by Harley Patterson (kc9gld [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Here is a photo of the grave down the road.

Posted March 12, 2016, by Harley Patterson (kc9gld [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This old bridge has a very interesting history I read about last summer. If you look at the Google photo, beyond the deck, in the trees to the left, there used to be a white house that for many years the old woman who lived there, kept a candle burning in the window. She did this because approx. 1 1/2 miles south of that bridge on county road 200 east ( Lost Road ) there is and has been a grave along side the road since 1868. The makeshift headstone says a man and his son were found dead there next to their wagon succum to a disease that swept through Indiana at that time. Lost road refers to the wagon trail through the water ( Sugar Creek ) prior to the origional bridge. It was built in 1901, but was partially swept out, and rebuilt in 1908, this is why the center section looks a little different than the ends. The wagon trail appeared to be lost as you entered the woods approaching the creek. The Boone County highway dept. maintains that grave by applying concrete on top to stop erosion in the ditch as well as road reflectors along the road.

Posted March 12, 2016, by Luke
Posted March 12, 2016, by J.P. (wildcatjon2000 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Thoughts anyone. Its a 2 span through truss getting painted but yet it has no road attached to it on either side

Posted March 12, 2016, by harley patterson (kc9gld [at] yahoo [dot] com)

After just now returning from the Danville library I have found several facts. Danville newspaper quoted June 9, 1904, " Now the concrete abutments are done, they will bring girders in that stand 7' 10" tall." The rails, ties, cinders, were removed in September 1931. The girders remained until May 11, 1961. I highly suspect the above photo is the bridge that was located near the Tuberculosis Sanitarium stop on the line west of Avon IN. The librarian indicated to me she will e-mail me a photo of the Danville bridge once they find it again. I still have some more searching and verifying to do. Harley

Posted March 12, 2016, by Don Morrison

Just guessing, but since they have a tee intersection and a bridge, it would seem logical that they would remove the bridge and bring it's grade down to create one 4 way intersection.

Posted March 12, 2016, by Don Morrison

Photo 5 has a road sign saying 10 foot clearance.

Posted March 12, 2016, by Kristopher Cox (krscx [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I noticed some concrete structures just east of the bridge that look a smaller bridge may have preceded it. Any info on those structures?

USGS stream gauge station
Posted March 12, 2016, by GS

A while back there were some comments about stream gauge stations. Photos #9 and #10 show one on the March 11, 2016 post of the US 66 Meramec River Bridge. It is that small concrete structure with the walk way leading to the metal door in the lower left corner of the photos.

Posted March 12, 2016, by Mike Daffron (daffronmike [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Wow, looks like very tall vehicle wouldn't make it under. Is it as low as it looks?

Posted March 11, 2016, by Kelly McClanahan

There is a movement to keep the bridge:

Historic Route 66 bridge could be renewed connection to state park -- http://openspacestl.org/historic-route-66-bridge-could-be-re...

Posted March 11, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)
Posted March 11, 2016, by Luke

Nice find, J.P.!

Posted March 11, 2016, by J.P. (wildcatjon2000 [at] gmail [dot] com)

1887 railroad bridge rehabbed and used to bypass a 1924 bridge.....

Posted March 11, 2016, by Cherri Mead (cherrimead [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Unfortunately this lovely old bridge is closed in definately which really cuts off access to my neighborhood. It's a beautiful bridge worth saving. Wish more people would appreciate it's historical value for our county and save it before it's gone.

Whittier Bridge (Massachusetts)
Posted March 11, 2016, by Will truax (Bridgewright [at] ymail [dot] com)

Dismantling is currently underway.

Posted March 11, 2016, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

No problem Art being that like i said that my father was from north Philly and that i might have been on that bridge back when i used to drive all over Philly.

re:a little help...
Posted March 11, 2016, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

J.P.,just goes to show any situation can drive people to do that.

Posted March 11, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Yup, that's the one. Thanks George!

Posted March 11, 2016, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Art,you are talking about the falls bridge.I remember seeing it on this site because someone posted something about it.

Posted March 11, 2016, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

That's great to hear that somebody lives near the bridge.Might deter vandals.

Posted March 10, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Luke, there's a bridge in Philly that's still standing that has the same characteristics. I can't remember the name at the moment.

Cobban Bridge (Wisconsin)
Posted March 10, 2016, by Charles Kuehn
Stone Arch Bridge, Butler Co. Kansas
Posted March 10, 2016, by Glen Wise (fairtothewind [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Attached is a picture of a stone arch bridge in Fairview township, Butler County Kansas. It is approximately 5.7 miles North of Towanda Kansas on Hunter Road. It crosses a tributary (of no name) of the Whitewater river. I noticed that the county has flags and stakes at the bridge, indicating that they will do some work. Just in case they intend to replace or just take out the old bridge, I decided to take pictures of it. I searched and have found no pictures or record of the bridge (on the internet). I asked the township superintendent about the age of the bridge and he said he didn't know. Well, it probably doesn't rate very high on the cool bridge factor, but I thought it was a nice little bride. I hope you enjoy.

Posted March 10, 2016, by Kevin Skow (weatherbum [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Sad is truly an understatement. I'll miss this bridge. Aerial photos are posted at: https://www.facebook.com/WagonWheelBridge/

Posted March 10, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Very sad.

Posted March 10, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

:^)

It's amazing what used to be out there!

Posted March 10, 2016, by Mike Daffron (daffronmike [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I have made a game of trying to find where the old bridges were and what their new ugly replacements look like. Sorta fun, and yet it pisses me off at the same time. No personality. Boo!

Posted March 10, 2016, by Luke

One hell of a find, Art!

Posted March 10, 2016, by Luke
Posted March 10, 2016, by scott branine

I don't think we have to worry about anyone vandalizing this bridge. Someone has built a new house about a 100 yards from the bridge.

re: a little help...
Posted March 10, 2016, by J.P. (wildcatjon2000 [at] gmail [dot] com)

James and myself found a little concrete bridge in scott county a couple weeks ago, and a guy came crawling from underneath of it. He said he had an argument with his wife and went there to stay the night.

Posted March 10, 2016, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I didn't know it was a joke.As for what looks like a remote location maybe it will not be removed.

Posted March 10, 2016, by Brandon Cooper

I would like to what going around this bridge as some construction crew, I assuming the Morgan County Highway crew, has been clear-cutting down to this bridge alongside the road. The trees and stuff have been cleared out on 3 of the 4 sides around this bridge and it is a wide path. If anyone knows what is going on around there, I would like to know as the whole countryside is torn up and is rougher than I'll get out in there.

24th Street bridge Erie, PA
Posted March 10, 2016, by Bridget Wickles (blondebridgie [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I can find a photo online of the flood of 1915 in Erie, PA where a flood took out the 24 Street bridge but I cannot find a photo of what the bridge look like before this. It is located between French and state streets on 24th .

Bridges left in Fort Cobb Lake
Posted March 9, 2016, by Karen Kay Knauss (karenkay [at] pldi [dot] net)

Curious to know if the bridges across Cobb Creek were submerged in Fort Cobb Lake, or were they destroyed before the flooding?

Thank you!

Posted March 9, 2016, by Andy Peters (anpete1971 [at] gmail [dot] com)

New bridge scheduled for completion in 2017 and old one to be demolished thereafter.

http://www.oleantimesherald.com/news/little-to-criticize-in-...

Posted March 9, 2016, by Brad Smith (gaberdine [at] hotmail [dot] com)
Posted March 9, 2016, by Sandor Gulyas (sgulya1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

March 21st will be the last day this bridge is open.

https://www.facebook.com/DelawareCoSheriff/posts/11804745186...

Posted March 9, 2016, by Clarence Nelson (nelsond [at] ameritech [dot] net)

I think that this is a marvelous structure for the St Louis Zoo. Weather or not it is indeed a true suspension bridge or not is a valid question for the folks who view this site. But for the patrons of the zoo I'm sure that they would love this bridge instead of a repurposed old bridge that would cost far more than this.

Posted March 9, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

George,

That is the implication of the joke. There are plenty of plaque collectors out there that 'help themselves'.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted March 9, 2016, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I agree that it would be a challenge being that the plaque is concreted in being i hope that there are no plaque thieves out there.

re:a little help...
Posted March 9, 2016, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

As per what was talked about being under and living under bridges i have associated with people who live under bridges.The people i have run across were not rude just trying to survive in some cases.Here in Reading Pa. we have people who live under at least one of the bridges.I have actually been in the space where they sleep at night.As for animals i will have to keep my eyes open for that.

Posted March 8, 2016, by ArtS (asuckeeer [at] knite [dot] com)

They've even provided a challenge - dig the plaque out of the concrete :^)

Posted March 8, 2016, by ArtS

Well,actually the neighboring county.


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