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Posted December 2, 2016, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Could possibly have been a span at one of the bridges at Topeka that got hit hard with flooding?

Posted December 2, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Good catch. I suspect that the bridge was moved here from an unknown location. I doubt that a bridge of this type would have been built ca.1950.

On an unrelated note (well, probably unrelated), 1951 was a significant year for bridges in this area due to the flooding that occurred that year.

Posted December 2, 2016, by Luke

Looking at the spot using historicaerials, it very well could be a railroad bridge, because the bridge isn't at the spot in the earliest aerial view (1948) but appears in the next available set of aerial imagery (1951)

Posted December 2, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This one almost looks like an old railroad bridge from aerial imagery, but of course, I cannot tell for certain. That being said, unless my eyes are playing tricks on me, the panels appear to be roughly 22 feet long, which is impressive for an older bridge.

Overall, the bridge looks like it may be a 7 panel bridge, with a length of at least 150 feet. Naturally, 7 panels at 22 feet each would equal a 154 foot span. This would seem reasonalble given the fact that Mill Creek is practically a small river at this point. That is as much as I can tell without a field visit.

I would like to ask permission to visit, but I probably won't be in the area for a few months at least.

Posted December 2, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Thanks for adding more information. This is a heavy bridge, but I am not sure if the truss was built here, or if it was moved here at some point. I first learned of the bridge in 1999, while visiting the nearby John Mack Bridge.

Posted December 2, 2016, by Dan Bubon

My father was born in Melcher and I am sure this bridge was there before 1940. Re built in 1940 perhaps? It was there before 1940 as he and other boys walked the top of it as youngsters-he was born in 1922.

Posted December 2, 2016, by Dana and Kay Klein

Photo 2is actually Conesus Lake Outlet Bridge BH46251

Posted December 2, 2016, by Dylan VanAntwerp (dylan_vanantwerp [at] live [dot] com)

I've seen several heavy, subdivided Warren trusses that the Rock Island has built, but this bridge takes the cake. It looks like it was meant to hold up a couple of UP Big Boy locomotives in the middle of an earthquake! Wow!

Posted December 2, 2016, by Dylan VanAntwerp (dylan_vanantwerp [at] live [dot] com)

They probably replaced the timber approaches and the main stone or concrete piers with H-piles at that time, but there is no way the timbers underneath the main span were replaced then. Those have been cut down for a very, very long time, whenever the old wooden trestle over the river was replaced by a truss, possibly even the current bridge.

Posted December 2, 2016, by Anonymous

You click the "Add Essay" tab.

Clarion Trestle (Pennsylvania)
Posted December 2, 2016, by Echo Anderson (Echo Anderson [at] Historic bridges [dot] org)

To get here it is a trek through an abandoned tunnel full of water. Then you must find a way to cross the bridge if you wish to...

I wouldn't though. These have been abandoned for years and you don't know when it will cave through...

I made my yearly trip up the turnpike with 2 friends. We went to the bridge but no further, sense we don't know anything about it. I have tons of pictures and even a video, but I do not wish to post them. Bye!

Posted December 2, 2016, by Echo Anderson (Echo Anderson [at] Historic bridges [dot] org)

HOW THE HECK DO I MAKE AN ESSAY!!!???

Posted December 2, 2016, by Echo Anderson (Echo Anderson [at] Historic bridges [dot] org)

I live in town and I have seen this bridge many times. Once a barge hit it, causing one of the pillars to become encased in concrete and preserved. It is a beautiful bridge and is one of the lucky few that survived the flood of 2010. This is one tough bridge. Oh, and you're right, those approaches are insane! They are so freakin long it's weird but true!

Posted December 2, 2016, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Just read in the Reading Eagle that this bridge was removed last year with no replacement planned due to disrepair.Poplar neck rd. is being rerouted under a N/S r.r. overpass on an unnamed road leading to the Titus Island Power Plant which is decommissioned.This unnamed road bypasses the power plant and continues with the original Poplar Neck Road.I was unaware this bridge was removed.

Othmar H. Amnann Awards
Posted December 2, 2016, by Dana and Kay Klein

Still time! December 4th fast approaches..........

Posted December 2, 2016, by Brian Toone (kartoone76 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I crossed the bridge Thursday, November 24th on my bicycle in the rain (very, very slick) on my way up to Northern Indiana for Thanksgiving. It was raining and quite cold so I only took a few pics.

Posted December 2, 2016, by Fmiser (fmiser [at] gmail [dot] com)

I recently drove over the bridge and could see ground work on the west (upstream) side on the north bank. There were a couple cranes etc.

It bugs me that this fully functional bridge is being demolished and a high dollar replacement is being built when way less money could be spend on maintenance and many of the now closed bridges could be in use.

MODOT's motto must be "Replace, don't repair!" Grrrr.

Posted December 2, 2016, by Fmiser (fmiser [at] gmail [dot] com)

Traffic was heavy so I didn't get to the bridge until it was too dark for photos. Bother! But it is still there, with a timber deck overlayed with asphalt, and small trees growing _on_ the deck.

It was dark enough I didn't examine the bridge closely, but it looked complete and intact - ready to be moved to a new home where it could be appreciated and loved. At least it wasn't demolished. Yet.

If you visit, approach from the north. The road on the south has a gate and an extensive collection of No Trespassing signs. From the north, I could have driven onto the bridge except for the guardrail welded across the portal.

Posted December 1, 2016, by Luke

That would've been the Union Pacific bridge, which lasted into the 80s: https://bridgehunter.com/wa/pierce/bh55394/

Posted December 1, 2016, by Michael (graflexmaster [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I believe that your info on this bridge is not correct. I live in Tacoma Wa where this bridge was located. You say that it was no longer used after 1973 (when it was removed).

I did not receive a drivers license until I was 16 years old in Dec. 1975, and I can remember using that bridge as a short cut across the waterway to beat traffic on the 11th street bridge near by I used this bridge all the way through high school (graduated in 1978). So I can personally verify, from personal experience, that it was in use through 1978.

It was a swing bridge that I thought un usual, as it had the railroad track down the center, and the traffic lanes outboard so the lanes were split by the R/R track....

Posted December 1, 2016, by Rhys Martin (rhysfunk [at] gmail [dot] com)

I drove to this bridge today and it is now closed to traffic.

Posted December 1, 2016, by Kevin Skow (weatherbum [at] hotmail [dot] com)

The end of the Wagon Wheel Bridge came today. https://www.facebook.com/139120672925720/videos/654240111413...

Posted December 1, 2016, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Jason... first off rehabilitation isn't a "bad word" its still preservation... but just a very different form of preservation than restoration, so I strongly believe using the right word is critical. People need to understand what the benefit is to "restoration", and what's unique about restoration-focused solutions such as those offered by Workin' Bridges and Bach Steel. They need to understand they are getting a more true-to-form end-product.

As for this bridge, I am not sure of the exact scope of work but I think its a safe bet we aren't looking at restoration of the through truss span, more of a rehabilitation. Use of bolts instead of rivets, etc. What I am 100% certain of however is we have demolition and replacement of the historic riveted pony truss span and replacement with modern pre-fab welded truss. Google Streetview clearly illustrates the original pony truss span.

As for the bedrock, I have no idea where you read that their was a connection between bedrock and the need to replace the pony truss span. I see no mention of that connection in the article. Bedrock and soils are things that typically affect substructure work not superstructure work.

Posted December 1, 2016, by Jason Smith (flensburg [dot] bridgehunter [dot] av [at] googlemail [dot] com)

Actually Nathan, the bridge has been restored. They just replaced the decking and did the repainting, while at the same time, placed the crossing onto newly rebuilt piers. What's different with the bridge is a pony truss approach span, which was needed because of the bed rock they encountered while trying to put the bridge back in its place. In either case, I see this as restoration with a twist. ;-) Link: http://mtstandard.com/news/local/silver-bridge-to-span-big-h...

Posted November 30, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Well, this is a pleasant surprise. I figured that this one would be gone.

Posted November 29, 2016, by Dylan VanAntwerp (dylan_vanantwerp [at] live [dot] com)

Google Earth has imagery from 2013 when the river was really low. You can see the crumbled remnants of the piers in the bottom of the river channel. Using the ruler tool, it looks like the main through truss spans were approximately 155' long.

Posted November 29, 2016, by J Lance (bugo [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I visited this bridge on November 29, 2016 and am pleased to report that it is open to traffic! The furthest west approach spans have been replaced and the deck has settled on some of the approaches but the trusses seem to be in excellent shape. Lets hope it stands another 111 years.

Posted November 28, 2016, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Also a plug for the Ironworkers local at the bottom of the left arch.

Posted November 28, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Thanks for the correction. I will fix the essay when I get on the computer. Welcome to the forum. If you know of any historic bridges in the area that are not listed, please let us know.

Posted November 28, 2016, by Casey Jackson (jacksonpcs [at] gmail [dot] com)

The highway is actually 177, which is often confused with 77 which is main street of El Dorado. I attended grade school at Chelsea from 1st to 6th grade which was the last year of it to be used due to unification of districts.

Bridge comment
Posted November 28, 2016, by Dana and Kay Klein

The Spring Common Bridge -- "Home of Mr. Peanut. Youngstown's Good Luck Charm."

The Spring Common Bridge is a Mahoning Commons' bridge that crosses the Mahoning River from the intersection of Mahoning and Oakhill Avenues on the west to the intersection of West Federal St. and 5th Ave. on the east.

Mr. Peanut - a local curiosity and treasure that refers to a small, metal silhouette sculpture of "Mr. Peanut" (Planter's Peanuts fame) that is welded atop the Spring Common Bridge in Youngstown. Cut from one-quarter inch steel plate, he's about 18 inches tall and welded on the bridge's Mahoning Avenue side. He's viewable by travelers moving toward the downtown area.

Its origin is credited to Dick Tranick and Jim Mansky, who were part of a crew of plumbers and steamfitters that were laying pipeline across the Mahoning River in the summer and fall of 1986. The metalwork was meant to be a comical tribute to John Cashbaugh, a member of the crew, who was known for his "nutty" solutions to worksite problems.

(Source: Jane Tims, "For the Record, Let Me Clear Up a Couple of Things," Vindicator 9-8-92, B1:2)

Mahoning Commons: bit.ly/1bgsGd6

Posted November 28, 2016, by Dana and Kay Klein

Zoom in Mr Peanut welded to right front of bridge. Local story about a crewman being nutty now a local celebrity.

Posted November 28, 2016, by Luke

Same with this one.

Posted November 28, 2016, by Luke

Nice add, Dana.

Posted November 28, 2016, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Actually, the bridge parts have been sent to Little Rock for blasting off of lead paint and lichen. The bridge will be restored by BACH Steel on site. BACH will be fabricating new caissons at Beaverfork Lake and the lattice and riveted railings in Holt, Michigan in the next month. The lift and disassembly went pretty well. There are several castings and the channel missing where something went through the bridge, there is a fix to a broken shoe that had been repaired very early. There is little pack rust or rivet replacement that is required, although every inch will be inspected. The vertical cruciform is in remarkable condition. The differences in 1871 created parts to 1881 parts is the fun part of the archaeology of the craft. The spacers in the lower chord vary as well. Zenas King...wish I had his journals.

Here are a few pictures that I just downloaded, then I'm off to inspect blasting and meet with the survey crew to mark the spots. The coolest part of this whole thing is the working together between the City, the County, BACH Steel, the crane company and trucking. It's been remarkable and the cost savings with everyone doing their own best things is significant. It's an expensive project at $508,370 but that doesn't include what those other jurisdictions included, road in, tree removal, crane pad, people that cared about their work.

Posted November 28, 2016, by Anon

Public meeting on December 14, 2016, 4-6 p.m. to discuss fate of bridge: http://www.modot.org/central/news_and_information/District5R...

Posted November 28, 2016, by Jason Smith (flensburg [dot] bridgehunter [dot] av [at] googlemail [dot] com)

FYI from the Bridgehunter's Chronicles: Deadline for the 2016 Ammann Awards to be extended to 4 December to allow last minute entries of photos, bridges, etc. Voting will commence right after that. Details: http://thebridgehunter.areavoices.com/the-othmar-h-ammann-aw...

Posted November 28, 2016, by Michael Quiet (mquiet [at] gmail [dot] com)

You might be a pontist if family movie night is paused, rewound, and zoomed in because you spotted a builders plate. Thankfully the kids and wife are used to things like this...

The quality of the youtube video isn't enough to read it, but you can at least spot the plate and enjoy the long lost lattice railing.

https://youtu.be/Y0y9zAbX5ts?t=28

It looks like the bridge was replaced this year. Terrible shame, it would have been the only extant Canton Bridge Co. product in VT. But if this shows anything though, there are still notable things to be found!

Posted November 28, 2016, by Roderick Harsh (visit66 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

In late summer of 2016, the City of Joplin decided to allow the original bridge to remain intact while a study is made to locate a new bridge closer to the I-44 bridges. The City expects to save up to $400,000. by using the alternate location.

The Original 1919 bridge will continue to carry traffic during the construction of the new bridge, and afterwards, will likely make the Low Water Bridge a "pedestrian-only" amenity to McIndoe Park. The historic bridge is currently the river crossing for the Wildcat Glades, Audubon Hiking Trail. The www.savethelwb.com website and the 'SaveTheLowWaterBridge' Facebook page will remain active and will post articles and photos of the progress of this project.

Posted November 28, 2016, by Jeremy Beaird (jerebeaird [at] gmail [dot] com)

Bridge is in the process of being disassembled for replacement.

Posted November 28, 2016, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

I don't know the RR history but perhaps that's when it became a road.

Posted November 27, 2016, by J Lance (bugo73 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge is described by AHTD as an "Army truss".

Posted November 27, 2016, by J Lance (bugo73 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The pony trusses were added sometime after 1965. They are described in AHTD's minute orders as "Army trusses".

Posted November 27, 2016, by Judy E (Jeaton2603 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Is this bridge being used at all any more? We used to see a lot of trains come from Illinois into Vincennes, but heard the bridge was no longer being used.

Posted November 27, 2016, by Alexander D. Mitchell IV (LNER4472 [at] verizon [dot] net)

For details of the bridge's removal and replacement, see https://www.facebook.com/FriendsoftheWentworthParksandRecrea...

Posted November 27, 2016, by Kelly McClanahan

I took other locations into account, when I was looking for the location. However, by looking at the Quadrangle maps, Route 32 is in the same spot, where it crosses over the river, which is north of the dam. That is why I determined it to be in this location.

Bridge comment
Posted November 27, 2016, by Dana and Kay Klein

Schnacker!

Posted November 27, 2016, by Randy Higgins

The Springfield Bridge has been removed, disassembled, and sent to Little Rock to be refurbished. It will be reassembled and placed across a small cove on Beaverfork Lake outside of Conway in Faulkner County.

2016 Othmar H. Ammann Awards
Posted November 27, 2016, by Jason Smith (flensburg [dot] bridgehunter [dot] av [at] googlemail [dot] com)

Moin moin over there! :-)

After being absent for a while and reading up on some comments you posted recently about Conde McCollough, let me get the issues straight once and for all:

1. I do know about the gentleman and his work and am planning on nominating him for Lifetime Achievement and some of his bridges in various categories. I first heard of him at the HB Conference in Iowa in 2013 and came to like his work, however....

2. The reason why I chose Ammann instead of Conde has to do with the facts that Ammann built several bridges in his native Switzerland and parts of Europe prior to his emigration to the States. This is why he's famous internationally and is my reason behind having the Awards named in his honor. The Chronicles itself looks at bridges not just in the US but also in other places in the world with the purpose of bringing them to the attention of those wishing to visit them. This is why I didn't use Robert Maillart or Friedrich Voss as names because they were only locally known (I do hope you did your homework there, NH.) I am thinking about expanding the Chronicles to add biographies of bridge builders in the near future. When that happens, then we can contribute to the rightful cause.

3. Thanks to those who have been sending the nominations even if they are in trickles. I'm planning on extending the deadline to December 4th so that you have a full week to submit your last-minute items- photos, bridges and people for the awards. The ballot will be put together starting next week and once the last entries are in, it will be made available on the Chronicles. More information soon.

JS

Posted November 27, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

There is local interest in preserving this bridge.

http://www.fstribune.com/story/2361660.html

Posted November 27, 2016, by Dennis G. Massey

Still standing today.

Posted November 27, 2016, by Michael Quiet (mquiet [at] gmail [dot] com)

This is a nice find, its a shame it isn't extant! With strut bracing in the first panel it puts construction around the the time of the 2nd patent on the design, so I'd guess within a couple of years of 1885 as the birthdate for this one.

Note that the strut bracing on the main span is aligned against the end of the approach deck span, and that there appears to be a brace beneath the approach span from abutment to end of the main span. Its interesting as the otherwise quite similar Livermore Falls Bridge didn't have these details.

Posted November 27, 2016, by David VanderEspt (dvanderespt [at] outlook [dot] com)

This bridge is located on Old Taylorsville Road between Wilderness Trail and Pope Lick Road (the section that leads back to Pope Lick Park). This bridge was closed/shutdown about the same time the (Old) Routt Road bridge (located about 700' away) was closed/shutdown. Local residents were told that both of these bridges were to be replaced by the City of Louisville, but ... the money that was set aside for new bridges somehow just vanished, or got re-appropriated for some other project. In short, it never happened. As Pope Lick Park grew in popularity, the road behind Hatmaker's Gas Station was "re-aligned" and made a gentle curve (instead of the previous zig-zag) back to the Park Area. Watch the power lines and telephone poles and you can figure out the original alignment of Old Taylorsville Road and Pope Lick Road.

Posted November 27, 2016, by David VanderEspt (dvanderespt [at] outlook [dot] com)

This bridge is where Routt Road used to be located, right before you get to Bradbe Road. When you cross the "modern" bridge, look to your right and you will see this bridge about 300' downstream. I was/still am good friends with the family that lives there now (Leroy and Monica) and the previous family (The Schafer's) that used to live there for several decades before. The party shack was added by Leroy after he bought the property from the Schafer's. I can't begin to even count how many hours I/we spent playing on/near/around/under that bridge when I was a pre-teen and teenager. Good times ...

Posted November 27, 2016, by David VanderEspt (dvanderespt [at] outlook [dot] com)

The second picture is where a similar bridge was located. It was at the far end of Fisherville right after Van's Service Station (owned by my father Elmer). If you drove down Old Taylorsville Road through "downtown" Fisherville today, you would pass Pound's Auction on the right, then see the Fisherville Post Office on the left, and then my Dad's building on the left, then about 20 more feet and the road is closed as the bridge is no longer there. My Dad's building is used today as a horse barn. If you go to the edge of the bridge support/embankment, you will see the same houses on the other side of the creek, as depicted in the photo. If you go past Fisherville on (New) Taylorsville Road and cross the "modern" bridge, turn right immediately after crossing to find these pictured houses and the other side of this lost bridge. I'm not sure when it was removed or shutdown exactly, but I do remember it being closed and we used to walk out on it. I also have pictures of my Dad's Service Station when it was open (1960-65? -ish).

Posted November 27, 2016, by David VanderEspt (dvanderespt [at] outlook [dot] com)

I could be wrong ... but ...

The Blue Rock Hotel was located on what is now known as Old Routt Road. Therefore this should be a picture of the Old Routt Road bridge, which collapsed in the 70s/80s when a semi-truck carrying a bulldozer tried to cross it. The bridge collapsed between two support piers and fell onto dry land, along with the semi-truck and the bulldozer, but again not into the water. It was repaired/replaced with a temporary section that looked like an army/military-style bridge, and continued to be used for quite a while after the collapse. Eventually it was closed and sat for a long time before finally being dismantled. I think they also removed the stone support piers later. I grew up about 1/4 mile from this bridge location. I also have several pictures of this bridge.

Posted November 26, 2016, by John Marvig

Where did the 1920 date come from? I see zero evidence that this bridge dates to the 20th century. Books and experts on the railroad list the date as 1889, a much more likely build date

Posted November 26, 2016, by Dylan VanAntwerp (dylan_vanantwerp [at] live [dot] com)

Yeah, but what is really funny is I deleted the auto-fill and re-labeled it, yet it still popped in its own heading.

Posted November 26, 2016, by Luke

It auto-fills with that for anything from the DOT's address. Probably associated with the historic bridge survey they did years ago.

Posted November 26, 2016, by Dylan VanAntwerp (dylan_vanantwerp [at] live [dot] com)

I added a link to an interesting PDF file that contains an application Iowa Northern put together several years ago in attempt to attain TIGER funding for the rebuilding or replacing of bridges along its line. Every bridge that needed major repairs or needed replaced along the entire length of the railroad is listed in this application. Makes for some interesting reading. I have no idea why the website magically subbed "Historic Bridges of Iowa" for the title when I posted it. One of those mysteries of the electronic age we will never understand...

The Beaver Creek bridge is on pages 64-65 if anyone is interested.

Posted November 26, 2016, by Anonymous

Scheduled for demolition 12-16-16. To be replaced by UCEB with pretty fence.

Posted November 26, 2016, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Just read in today's Reading Eagle that the renovation of this bridge will begin in the spring of 2018 at a cost of $1.1 million and lasting for 6 months.To increase the bridge's weight limit of 3 tons the floor will be reinforced with steel support beams covered in wood and bridge abutments will be removed and replaced with reinforced concrete with stone facing.By increasing the bridge's weight limit this will allow emergency vehicles and buses to traverse the structure if necessary.Despite some opposition to using steel reinforcements in historic bridges it is confirmed that these reinforcements do help the bridges remain stable for longer periods according to Fred j. Moll who is a historian of the Theodore Burr Covered Bridge Society.A car breaking through the floor boards 4 years ago resulted in a monthlong closure and ensuing repairs.

Othmar H. Amann Awards
Posted November 26, 2016, by Dana and Kay Klein

I have submitted my nominations for the Coveted Othmar H. Amman Awards to Jason Smith. How come some one new to Pontist Hunting such as myself has done so and many of my hero's on this site ( Some of which may even be nominated)haven't? A True Pontist Mystery..............

Posted November 26, 2016, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I recently visited this Conde McCullough Bridge and tunnel. It was outstanding.

Posted November 25, 2016, by Dana and Kay Klein

A Nod is as good as a wink to a blind man! Not sure view from Hazel street IS this. Cant tell so will leave street view off.Looks like under pass for something else...Pontist Mystery. Thanks for your usual keen Eye

Posted November 25, 2016, by Luke

Dana, the bridge in the picture looks old enough to be added to the site... (nudge nudge)

Posted November 25, 2016, by Dana and Kay Klein

Thanks Luke!

Posted November 25, 2016, by Ronald Skwier (rskwier [at] msn [dot] com)

The original Warren truss was removed, but was replaced by what appears to be a lighter bridge some years(?) ago. Old electrical insulators are evident to one side of the upper portion. The right of way was converted to a trail, but this replacement bridge was there previously.

Posted November 25, 2016, by Dylan VanAntwerp (dylan_vanantwerp [at] live [dot] com)

What is really ironic is that Pella Windows was one of the original backers of Iowa Interstate Railroad when it was formed. Before 1980, this line went all the way to Keokuk, but the section from Keokuk to Pella was quickly abandoned after the Rock Island shutdown.

Pella Windows seems to have been the primary reason the line wasn't abandoned further north in the first place. Whatever traffic originated from Pella seems to have quickly declined after Iowa Interstate was formed.

Even though the taxpayer was on the hook for building this bridge in 1993, by 1998 IAIS filed to abandon the line, citing lack of customers and poor track conditions. Apparently, none of the three online customers at Pella had shipped anything in at least a year, having all switched to big trucks. I read the STB document recently, but I can't find it now or I would post it.

I don't necessarily disagree with the fact that we the people had to pay for the bridge, but it seems sad at the time nobody had the foresight to realize the branch line wasn't going to last much longer. IAIS could have filed to abandon in 1993 and saved us some money.

Posted November 25, 2016, by Anonymous

Ugly modern bridge

Who was Conde McCullough?
Posted November 25, 2016, by Don Morrison

I'm not sure if Jason is joking about being unfamiliar with Conde McCullough, but for anyone who is wondering:

https://oregonencyclopedia.org/articles/conde_balcom_mccullo...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conde_McCullough

Posted November 24, 2016, by Luke

From what I can surmise, this bridge was only built because Iowa Highway 163 was being built in 1993.

The rest of the line from Pella to Prairie City, according to an IAIS railfan site (http://www.iaisrailfans.org/info/Subdivision4), was in "poor condition".

Posted November 24, 2016, by Chris Perry

Abandoned after only five years?

Posted November 24, 2016, by Dana and Kay Klein

Thanks Neil, look forward to those river shots in the Spring!

Posted November 24, 2016, by Cliff Darby (clif30 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Very neat. Been riding this area a lot lately but didn't know this existed. Curious as to the history of this bridge. Was this an old alignment of US71 or LA8?

Posted November 24, 2016, by Cliff Darby (clif30 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Bridge no longer exists. Not sure if the major flooding back in April took it out or what, but the only remains are the supports. The entire deck is gone, but the pilots still are full height. Which makes me think the bridge was a victim of the record floods. I have a photo but my silly motorcycle is in the way ;)

Deadline for Ammann Award Entries nearing
Posted November 24, 2016, by Jason Smith (flensburg [dot] bridgehunter [dot] av [at] googlemail [dot] com)

REMINDER: You have one more week to submit your photos and bridge entries to this year's Ammann Awards. Entries will be received through 12:00am Central Standard Time (7:00am Berlin Time) on 1 December. Please send all entries to flensburg.bridgehunter.av@googlemail.com. More info on the Awards can be found here: http://thebridgehunter.areavoices.com/the-othmar-h-ammann-aw...

And BTW, Please send me an e-mail about Conde McCollough with his contacts. I would like to know what he did so that he is in the running for Lifetime Achievement. Thanks!

JS

Deadline for Ammann Award Entries nearing
Posted November 24, 2016, by Jason Smith (flensburg [dot] bridgehunter [dot] av [at] googlemail [dot] com)

REMINDER: You have one more week to submit your photos and bridge entries to this year's Ammann Awards. Entries will be received through 12:00am Central Standard Time (7:00am Berlin Time) on 1 December. Please send all entries to flensburg.bridgehunter.av@googlemail.com. More info on the Awards can be found here: http://thebridgehunter.areavoices.com/the-othmar-h-ammann-aw...

And BTW, Please send me an e-mail about Conde McCollough with his contacts. I would like to know what he did so that he is in the running for Lifetime Achievement. Thanks!

JS

Posted November 23, 2016, by Kelly McClanahan

Had a little "fun" with this one. I was looking around on the USGS site, at old Quad Maps. I saw this bridge on one of the maps. I looked it up, and it appears that the sight is haunted with "spook lights".

Re: good to have you back
Posted November 22, 2016, by Fmiser (fmiser [at] gmail [dot] com)

Thanks, Robert. *smiles* I didn't really go anywhere, life just keeps me running. And before I knew it, it had been weeks, then months since I checked the forum.

Though I haven't stopped by "here" much, I still stop at bridges. I have photos from dozens of them I need to sort, tag, and pick a few to upload. Maybe tomorrow - er, I mean - next week. Yeah, I'll have time then. I'm sure I will. Maybe

Posted November 22, 2016, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Field visit revealed a 1970 American Bridge plaque. Additionally truss spans show built-up design and use of bolted field connections typical of 1970. Clearly all of the superstructure dates to 1970. What is uncertain is whether the piers are concrete dating to 1970, or are the original piers encased in concrete (possible, given unusually high deterioration of concrete).

An interpretive plaque reads only "original construction 1884" which is technically true, but no mention of the total replacement in 1970 is made, which is likely where the confusion originates. As a bridge historian its a pet peeve of mine when interpretive signage is so misleading.

Posted November 22, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Nathan:

Thanks for the input. I have not had a chance to visit this one yet.

Posted November 22, 2016, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Basically what we have here is a compression-style member used for a tension bottom chord, which in a pin-connected truss is unusual. Fmiser is right, its not remarkable to see a built-up lower chord, but Robert is also right that its unusual in the context of a pin-connected truss. However, I will add a third point that aside from the unusual member choice the detail Robert describes... the built-up beam attached to a plate that in turn attached to the pin is not unusual... most vertical members on pin-connected trusses have the same design. The plate that links pin to built-up beam is called the "pin plate."

Posted November 22, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Also, it is good to have you back as a contributor. I was wondering where you went!

Posted November 22, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

That makes sense. This one just has those strange hybrid connections. The bottom chords are riveted to the gusset plates, but the plates are then pinned to the verticals. Seems a bit unconventional to me.

Posted November 22, 2016, by Fmiser (fmiser [at] gmail [dot] com)

Robert, from what I've seen, a built-up bottom chord is not that rare. And I usually see it on later, riveted bridges. The earlier pin-connected are more likely to have eye-bars.

A few example, from memory and not really looking (much...)

http://bridgehunter.com/mn/goodhue/5750/

mn/goodhue/2624/

http://bridgehunter.com/il/fulton/29310807162/

http://bridgehunter.com/il/sangamon/84316118634/

il/sangamon/84318718661/

Some of those are not pin-connected, and some are not V-laced, but just use a batten. But all use a lower chord built-up from angle, not C-channel.

So I find it odd to see it on a bridge that old.

Nick, do you have any more photos? Maybe some detail views of the joint, etc?

Grrrr. I was just notified I can only put three URLs in a post. So I trimmed the domain off of a few of them. If you want to see the all, copy/paste the line to replace the part after ".com/".

Posted November 22, 2016, by David Backlin (us71 [at] cox [dot] net)

November 2016: Westbound lanes have been replaced, eastbound lanes currently awaiting replacement.

Posted November 22, 2016, by David Backlin (us71 [at] cox [dot] net)

Northbound lanes appear to be the original bridge and southbound lanes appear to be newer.

Posted November 22, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge has some of the most bizarre bottom chord connections I have ever seen in a post 1900 bridge. The bottom chords are angles. They do not appear to connect directly to the verticals. Instead they are riveted to plates that are pinned to the verticals.

Posted November 22, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I have just added three new images. I can't say that these are the best photographs that I have taken, but hopefully they will give the viewers a better idea of the design and the condition of the bridge.

Posted November 22, 2016, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

ADT Count of 25!

A Rehab would have done the trick here... But hey, they just wanted to win this coveted prize!

As always...Thanks for taking this endearing photo Todd B!

Posted November 22, 2016, by K. Allen Ballard (speedeeprint [at] gmail [dot] com)

Confirmed bridge is gone, new UECB just opened, Nov 2016.

Posted November 22, 2016, by Roger Deschner (rogerdeschner [at] gmail [dot] com)

The Ski Train will resume service on January 7, 2017, running from Denver Union Station, through the Moffat Tunnel, to Winter Park Resort. It will run Saturdays, Sundays, and holiday Mondays. It will be operated by Amtrak using Amtrak equipment. https://www.amtrak.com/winterparkexpress

Posted November 21, 2016, by Mike Daffron (daffronmike [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Bob: I hope you don't mind that I have posted your photo.

Posted November 21, 2016, by John (johntherogger [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This bridge is undergoing rehabilitation. Looks like they're putting up a new tower and new signals.

Posted November 21, 2016, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Dana and Kay,this is the bridge that was hit.Just talked to a friend of mine who verified it.Thank you for the information.Don't know if there was any height damage.If and when i get any further information i will pass it on.

Posted November 21, 2016, by Dana and Kay Klein

George, Maybe This one?

Hollow road covered bridge Chester County Pa.
Posted November 21, 2016, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I read an article today in the Reading Eagle concerning this covered bridge.This bridge which is located between French Creek Road and Pughtown Road spanning The French Creek in West And East Vincent Townships was damaged on both sides of its supports as well as its beams and arches.This was due to impact by a large vehicle late Saturday or early Sunday according to PENNDOT.PENNDOT said the steel I-beam will remain closed during examination by engineers who will examine the damage and develop a plan for rehabilitation of the single lane bridge.I looked this bridge up on bridgehunter and couldn't find it.Is it possible it could be listed under another heading?

Posted November 21, 2016, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Mike,

Indiana has a rather remarkable Bridge Management plan. Note this bridge was categorized as "Non-Select" this is a polite way of saying "Death Sentence" supposedly they still do Section 106 but its likely a farce. In contrast if a bridge is lucky enough to be "Select" then preservation is nearly certain. I say "nearly" because in Indianapolis, they were able to bypass this designation to demolish a rare Melan concrete arch. But most of the time "Select" bridges are saved. Its a good system with the exception that some bridges for which preservation was clearly feasible and prudent, were nevertheless classified as "Non-Select." This bridge is a great example... it is noteworthy as a pin-connected truss, and it was feasible to restore. Yet it still got the "Non-Select" death sentence.

Posted November 21, 2016, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

The contractor incorrectly guessed the weight of this truss (it is far heavier in design than most pony trusses). The first attempt to pick it was not successful, and the contractor had to bring in additional counterweights for the crane and extend the crane's "bat wings." It is fortunate these options were available on the crane used, otherwise the costs to mobilize a different crane would have been enormous. A good lesson on why hiring experienced contractors is essential for this type of job.


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