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Posted January 23, 2015, by Mollie (mollie [dot] gingras98 [at] gmail,com)

I need the History i need some more information im trying to do an essay but i cant find any information anywhere

Posted January 23, 2015, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com )

Things are changing. More is being revealed. IOWA Conservation Boards are a dead end. They use tax payer funding on pet projects and don't seem to be very transparent.

More news soon.

Posted January 23, 2015, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Art I have been busting my butt for years trying to get involved with trail projects during the design phase to let them know that reuse of historic bridges is feasible. I sent an email to EVERY single Conservation District in Iowa... and got little to no response whatsoever. I have had zero luck with repeated dead ends. So if you think I am a failure, that may be warranted, but it would be more productive if you could present a solution.

Posted January 23, 2015, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Nathan,

I'd look at it another way. The entity that put up that bridge was interested in having a historic looking bridge and went through the extra expense of doing so.

I consider this our (the preservation community's) failure because if the individual had been aware that a restored, historic bridge was a safe, cost effective and practical solution, there is a strong possibility that a historic bridge would have found a home.

While a number of individuals, me and you included, are working hard to save old bridges; the message that these bridges are a good solution for new applications is not getting across to the average planner/ designer/ administrator that is jobbing out the work. Somehow, that needs to change in order to increase our success rate.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted January 23, 2015, by Matt Lohry

If you really want to know the truss type for this bridge, I believe it to actually be a Howe truss because of the inclines of the upper chord...look up roof truss types, and you'll find that this exact configuration is a Howe. The diagonals actually are pretty much perpendicular to the upper chords, and the verticals are angled outward with respect to the upper chord, jus as a Howe with a horizontal upper chord is configured.

Posted January 23, 2015, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

When you reuse a historic pony truss you can make it whatever width you want, or simply put a narrow deck on it. Its not a big deal either way.

Posted January 23, 2015, by Don Morrison

Click on the "view uglybridges.com report" button and read the 2012 inspection notes.

Posted January 22, 2015, by Roger Nott (rogernott [at] att [dot] net)

The CSX RR bridge a mile downstream is impressive

Posted January 22, 2015, by Roger Nott (rogernott [at] att [dot] net)

Thanks for posting. Here's the bridge 1/17/2015

Posted January 22, 2015, by Roger Nott (rogernott [at] att [dot] net)

Thanks for posting. Here's the bridge 1/17/2015

Posted January 22, 2015, by Jason Smith (flensburg [dot] bridgehunter [dot] av [at] googlemail [dot] com)

No Nathan, this bridge is definitely no joke. If you fly to Iowa next time and happen to visit the Colonies, you can find this bridge off Hwy. 220 going west, leaving Lily Pond and entering Middle Amana. I sympathize with you because of your argument and totally agree with you, yet the logic behind this was to accommodate a bike trail, which is rather narrow. And unless you shorten the width of the truss bridge, having this bridge there does make sense. You have to give them credit for mimicking a Kingpost design. I had a hard time trying to figure out what truss type it was until visiting it in person during a morning walk around Lily Pond. My two cents on this topic. ;-)

JS

Posted January 22, 2015, by Anonymous

"The webmaster of this website has provided users with special classifications for modern truss bridges like this."

Yeah it's ...

*

d

r

u

m

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l

l

*

POOP QUAKE!

Posted January 22, 2015, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Was this bridge posted as a joke? It is one of the dumbest bridges I have ever seen. Not only are Continental Bridge Co. MOBs the Walmart of bridges, someone superimposed fake diagonals on top of a standard MOB apparently to make it look like a Kingpost. The attempt did not improve the appearance of the bridge and only made it look dumber. Next time, get a company like Bach Steel to relocate and restore a historic bridge... or even rivet together a replica historic Kingpost from scratch.

Also, as a reminder, the webmaster of this website has provided users with special classifications for modern truss bridges like this. For those who feel compelled to add MOBs like this, please classify the truss type using the "Modern" group of trusses. These can be found at the end of truss configuration choices given when you are adding a bridge. I have made the change for this bridge.

Posted January 22, 2015, by Margaret (Lowe) Mathena (mmathena [at] frontiernet [dot] net)

I grew up and in the area of Millport and my mother's side of the family came from Bridge Creek, the Kintner's, McCoy's, McMillen's, Lingenfelter's and also the Cunningham's.

Posted January 22, 2015, by David Backlin (us71 [at] cox [dot] net)

Today, January 22, 2015 saw the arrival of a construction barge that will be removing the bridge.

Posted January 22, 2015, by Amber Flowers (amber [at] soulgazephotography [dot] com)

Sadly, this bridge is no longer with us...it was demolished January 2015. RIP. I'd liked to have seen it preserved. I'm always saddened by the demise of unique landmarks.

"Nothing left but the memory. Scott & Murphy made short work of the old Glasgow St. Bridge Thursday morning. Cleaning up the debris and removing the concrete supports are all that's left." Source: Edmonton Herald-News (Facebook)

https://www.facebook.com/137741393010848/photos/a.4266306407...

Posted January 22, 2015, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This stone culvert is not considered eligible for the NRHP. It will be demolished soon. I have driven over it many times, and I have often suspected that it might be a stone arch.

K-4 is a winding and scenic route across Kansas, but this stretch is being updated.

Link with photographs:

http://khri.kansasgis.org/index.cfm?in=197-298

Posted January 22, 2015, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)
Posted January 22, 2015, by Anonymous the Athenian (anonymous [at] athens [dot] org)

All classics must have a sequel. Homer followed the Iliad with the Odyssey.

Soon, there will be enough historic bridge demolition footage to make a sequel to this old classic...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H0p0dfx5Y10

Posted January 22, 2015, by Anonymous (preblecounty [at] hotmail [dot] com)

After completion.

Posted January 22, 2015, by Anonymous (preblecounty [at] hotmail [dot] com)

This structure has been rehabilitated and open to traffic. I encourage you to visit it!

Posted January 22, 2015, by Sherman Cahal (shermancahal [at] gmail [dot] com)

Replaced in 2014; the old bridge stands in the weeds next to it.

Re: New e-mail
Posted January 22, 2015, by Anonymous

If this is really you, Jason Smith, then you are probably not alone. Tony Dillon's account got waxed once and some have since received random emails with bizarre links that are miscellaneous letters. Unless Tony is the Spam King of Indiana.

This post needs more bridge. Will a railing do?

Posted January 22, 2015, by John Marvig

The location is pretty easy to get to. It seemed to be mostly park space when I was there. It is located near where Lawe Street crosses the Fox River in Appleton, just south of Lawerence University.

Posted January 22, 2015, by Matt Lohry,

Sorry, I'm the anonymous poster below.

New e-mail
Posted January 22, 2015, by Jason Smith (flensburg [dot] bridgehunter [dot] av [at] googlemail [dot] com)

Hi all,

In light of an incident last week, where my gmx account was hacked and the contact list was used to send inappropriate e-mail without my notice/consent, my account is being deleted in favor of a new e-mail account. Please send all bridge-related correspndance to flensburg.bridgehunter.av@googlemail.com and other non-bridge correspndance to jadasmi77@gmail.com. Please update this info in your address book. Your help is much appreciated in this matter. Thank you for your help.

JS

Posted January 21, 2015, by John Marvig

The location is pretty easy to get to. It seemed to be mostly park space when I was there. It is located near where Lawe Street crosses the Fox River in Appleton, just south of Lawerence University.

Posted January 21, 2015, by Anonymous

Although this type of cantilevered arm situation with pier spacings longer than available beams was remedied with pin and hanger systems on some bridges, this one had overlapped side-mounted brackets that used bolts to connect them together...this, coupled with the curved nature of the bridge, likely caused some eccentric forces due to the demolition process that sheared these bolts off and caused the collapse. Had there been gusset plates with multiple bolts instead, which is the most common form of connecting these beams that I've seen, this probably would not have been an issue. The photo below shows the street view of the failure point and the bracket and bolt system used.

Pond Eddy Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted January 21, 2015, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)
Posted January 21, 2015, by Brian Moyers (bsmoyers [at] gmail [dot] com)

Some photos of the bridge after the rehab

Posted January 21, 2015, by Jim Ross (pathfinder66 [at] earthlink [dot] net)

This is the wrong description for this bridge. The bridge at this location is a multi-span steel stringer with steel piers over a canyon.

Posted January 21, 2015, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)
Posted January 21, 2015, by Charisse (cmmeier11 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Can you please tell me how to get to this beautiful location for some wedding pictures?

Thanks!

Posted January 21, 2015, by Randy Bingham (rbingham81 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Dino, I came across this while searching for a planned railroad from tville to Nokomis that never materialized. I think the bridge may be just a few years older maybe 1908? The newsclipping of 1909 mentions the ditch from "The steel bridge" over the southfork. I always wondered why that part of the river was so straight and assumed done when the new bridge went up...never knew it was done that long ago.

Posted January 21, 2015, by Steve Burchfield (coosabassman [at] gmail [dot] com)

Thanks Ben!

I'm new to this site. I haven't seen any underwater bridge photgraphs.

My main hobby is bass fishing. I love to find sunken structure like this to fish around.

I hope that someone has more info on this old bridge that I found up in Town Creek. It is located 6 miles up into the creek from where it empties into the Tennessee River. The old bridge would have been across the first set of rapids (pre-impoundment) that a boater would have encountered coming from the river. I have looked for old maps that show the bridge without luck. It may have been a covered bridge as there were several in the area.

Posted January 21, 2015, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Interesting. I wondered if Walter Sharp might have been involved, but I was not sure how much the company experimented with concrete.

Posted January 21, 2015, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Glad you found the information useful. This bridge must have impressed a lot of travelers after its completion.

Posted January 21, 2015, by Phyllis Smith (phylacs [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I know major work was done on the railroad bridge between Mt.Carmel, IL and IN in the 50's could you give more information on this? We have an online conversation going about it.

Thank you,

Phyllis Smith

Posted January 21, 2015, by Margie Chambers Irbe (Margieirbe [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Thanks for this site! My father (born in 1910) worked on this bridge and I believe that he was supervising a crew for the AR highway department. When he finished the 8th grade near Edgemont, AR he went to work. A few years ago, I found an arithmetic book that had notes made by Mother, that were dated/marked where to start. He was studying the section on calculation of angles.

It has been on my "bucket list" for quite some time to visit all the bridges that he worked on. Your site will be quite helpful in my efforts to document this for my family for future generations. Other bridges include the towns of: Davenport, IA; Hannibal, MO; Paducha, KY and the last one between Port Arthur and Beaumont, TX where he fell in 1938 and likely broke his back.

Thanks again for this site and for all those who took the time to comment.

Posted January 20, 2015, by Mark Shannon

As of 2014 this bridge, and the others along Old U.S. 50 are still standing.

Posted January 20, 2015, by Mark Shannon

As of 2014 this bridge, and the others along Old U.S. 50 are still standing.

Posted January 20, 2015, by Mark Shannon

As of 2014 this bridge, and the others along Old U.S. 50 are still standing.

Posted January 20, 2015, by Mark Shannon

As of 2014 this bridge, and the others along Old U.S. 50 are still standing.

NBI 2014
Posted January 20, 2015, by James Baughn (webmaster [at] bridgehunter [dot] com)

I've uploaded the latest version of the National Bridge Inventory data to the "Import from NBI" tool. I'm still working on updating uglybridges.com.

Posted January 20, 2015, by James Baughn (webmaster [at] bridgehunter [dot] com)

Hmmm... I think I may have posted the wrong NBI link. There's three Hopple overpasses in the NBI, and the newspaper photos suggest it was actually this one:

http://uglybridges.com/1405159

Posted January 20, 2015, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I was looking at the news and I thought it might be a pin and hanger system. But I pulled up Street View and it isn't, it appears to be a cantilever stringer span, and the suspended span is what dropped. Thats why part of the beam is hanging over the pier in this photo, thats the cantilever arm that remains. http://goo.gl/maps/sXfOf

Posted January 20, 2015, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

I'm a bit puzzled by this one. I don't see a truss or a pony. It looks like beams under a slab.

Posted January 20, 2015, by Ben Tate (benji5221 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Awesome photos and video. Thanks for sharing!!

Posted January 20, 2015, by James Baughn (webmaster [at] bridgehunter [dot] com)

Here's the NBI report on the bridge:

http://uglybridges.com/1404914

Posted January 20, 2015, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)
Bridge comment
Posted January 20, 2015, by Anonymous

oh ok.

Posted January 20, 2015, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

This would appear to be an accident that is a result of the bridge being demolished... in other words the problem probably is not so much of the bridge, but the method of demolition.

Posted January 20, 2015, by Anonymous

My heart is with the family who lost a member last night. I know we like bridges, but we can't let them be unsafe.

Posted January 20, 2015, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

This is a converted RR bridge that dates well before 1930.

Posted January 20, 2015, by Dan Gier (mcbigd [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Sorry gang but you have this Bridge in the wrong county should be Miller not Morgan....

Posted January 19, 2015, by James Holzmeier (wabashry [at] gmail [dot] com)

It should be noted that there are two Moulton Junctions: the Wabash Railroad referred to the Wabash/CB&Q crossing, in Moulton proper, as Moulton Junction. The second Moulton Jct. was named by the APNC, as is reflected in Dylan's history.

Posted January 19, 2015, by Bob Poortinga (bh [dot] 10 [dot] bobp [at] xoxy [dot] net)

Monroe County has acquired the RoW of the IC Indiana Southern and this former branch line is going to be converted to a trail. This bridge will either be refurbished or replaced, along with the wooden trestle along Victor Pike south of this bridge.

US82 Viaduct (Arkansas)
Posted January 19, 2015, by Debbie Joyner (debjoyner5 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Just thought you might like to know that the powers that be in El Dorado, AR have decided, in their 'infinite wisdom' (ha) to tear down this stately, historic bridge. This was documented in the El Dorado New Times on December 25, 2014. Merry Christmas, residents! Yet another piece of El Dorado's incredible history is set to be destroyed!

Posted January 19, 2015, by Rick McOmber (rickvic8 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Thanks for sharing, and glad its still standing. Any pictures of the Cole road pony truss next to it?

Posted January 18, 2015, by Bob Hageman (rvhjr1945 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Short's Bridge probably named for John Short who opened and owned the Moss Bank Coal Mines in what would become Vermilion Heights. It was the bridge that preceded the Woolen Mill Bridge.

Posted January 18, 2015, by Jim Grey (mobilene [at] gmail [dot] com)

Does anybody know why this bridge is slated for demo? My Google-fu is turning up nothing.

Posted January 17, 2015, by Rick Skinner (pennsy22 [at] verizon [dot] net)

The construction company was the FrankFORT Construction Company, as in Frankfort, Indiana. Not FrankFURT, as in Germany! It's painted on the bridge and it's on the Historic marker that is in the picture albumn. This has been miscited on numerous other web pages too.

Posted January 17, 2015, by Gene McCluney (gmacfilm [at] live [dot] com)

Boy, it sure seems odd that an UNCOVERED wood truss bridge would last from 1870 thru the 1930's.

Posted January 17, 2015, by Brandon Cooper

That helped a lot and added some valuable information to this here bridge.

Posted January 17, 2015, by J.P. (wildcatjon2000 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Big Four is getting a computerized light system soon. Can't wait to check it out and get some pictures of the bridge lit up.

http://www.courier-journal.com/story/news/local/2014/07/11/c...

Posted January 17, 2015, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)
Posted January 17, 2015, by Vicci Nolan (viccimn [at] earthlink [dot] net)

Depending on who you ask, Bucks Bar Bridge is scheduled to be torn down for different reasons. Our beautiful, 75-year-old bridge, deserves a reason for destruction. Or will it be a quiet victim of the El Dorado county's quest for more federal grant money?

https://www.facebook.com/savebucksbarbridge?ref=aymt_homepag...

Posted January 17, 2015, by Luke

That's one hell of a misnomer.

Posted January 17, 2015, by Ian Martin

According to this link, (http://www.nyow.org/owremains_part1.pdf) this is actually a former NYC/RW&O connecting track to the NYO&W station, so I guess the trail's name isn't totally correct.

McGregor Bridge (New Hampshire)
Posted January 17, 2015, by Will Truax (Bridgewright [at] gmail [dot] com)

I came across a bit of information which had me editing an older blog entry. It also led to the collection of enough information to recently add The McGregor here.

The Blog piece, while more about the history of the crossing than that of The McGregor, it does hold additional information, not seen here on the data page.

For those interested in the history of BIBCO, it also pictures a company advertisement which seems to be the only image of this bridge where its structure can be seen in its entirety.

https://bridgewright.wordpress.com/2013/03/31/a-riddles-answ...

Posted January 17, 2015, by Matt Lohry

Zach,

No reason to feel stupid; its a perfectly valid question! This is indeed a Pratt through truss; Warren trusses always have diagonals alternating direction with each panel over the full length of the truss, where Pratts typically have only verticals and only diagonals that slope inward toward the center of the truss. In many cases (such as this), the center panel(s) may have opposite diagonals to form an "X" for added strength, but they do not continue through the entire truss.

I'm not sure that this entry is the same as the other one you mention; that says its a pony truss, and this one is a through truss, but that could be a mistake too.

Posted January 17, 2015, by Zachary S

I feel stupid for asking, since I spend so much time looking at historic truss bridges and reading as much as I can since getting into bridge hunting a year and a half ago, and therefore should know, but... this would be considered a Pratt, right? I was initially a little stumped because I have not encountered a Pratt with similar ties and counters in this area. I thought at first it might be a Warren but I gravitated more towards Pratt after further looking into it...

Also this might possibly be the same as the Bull Mountain Creek bridge entry. I am not certain. But I have yet to find a truss at the location mentioned in that entry, which is based on NBI data and is only a couple miles from this bridge.

Bear Creek Bridge (Mississippi)
Posted January 17, 2015, by Zachary S

Yeah, it is pin connected. My guess is that 1951 is probably a rehab date or the date that it was moved here... the NBI is not always as helpful as it is in other situations. I'd guess late 1920s as an overall build date maybe?

Bear Creek Bridge (Mississippi)
Posted January 16, 2015, by Barry (bllauver [at] toad [dot] net)

This does not seem to be an especially old bridge, but it does seem to be very old-fashioned, including what looks like pin connections. Could it have been moved from elsewhere?

Posted January 16, 2015, by Dave King (DKinghawkfan [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I believe this bridge and the Stephenville Crossing Bridge (http://bridgehunter.com/tx/hamilton/bh49327/) are duplicate pages. This page has the NBI data. The pages should be merged if I am correct.

Posted January 16, 2015, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)
Posted January 16, 2015, by Anonymous

A builder has not been named for this bridge and, although not documented, the concrete footings may have been added by Walter Sharp Bridge Co.

Posted January 16, 2015, by Anonymous

This bridge could have been built by Walter Sharp since it is an example of the type of construction he was experimenting with during this time of its construction.

Posted January 16, 2015, by Kerry Wano (kerrywano [at] gmail [dot] com)
Posted January 16, 2015, by Fred (godfreycolt [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Ad

Posted January 16, 2015, by Fred (godfreycolt [at] yahoo [dot] com)

1930s Dog river bridge

Posted January 16, 2015, by Fred (godfreycolt [at] yahoo [dot] com)

1930 dog river bridge 29 model a ford Eltha Rene Daniell

Posted January 16, 2015, by Luke

From what I've read at NASA's site, the canal system has no name.

Posted January 16, 2015, by Richard A Johnson (revrjohnson [at] juno [dot] com)

Many fond memories crossing the bridge whether in a car or the old street car.

Posted January 16, 2015, by Douglas Butler

I wonder which name of the Canal it crosses?

Posted January 16, 2015, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)
Posted January 16, 2015, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Matt,

I hope you are right, but when I read it, it seemed like much less of a sure thing, just a possible option. My concern is that the county just spent $650K three years ago and the fix was supposed to last 50 years. Now, just three years later, they are being told that the bridge has $1.8M worth of problems. That may cause a very strong negative reaction! Hopefully someone like Nels can go down and fix the bridge for a fraction of the quote.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted January 16, 2015, by Anonymous (mechanicman86 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I have a recent picture in 2014 of this bridge

Posted January 15, 2015, by Matt Lohry

Art,

All is not lost though... It is being replaced, but preserved for pedestrian use, according to the first paragraph of the article! :)

Posted January 15, 2015, by Matt Lohry

Of course, since it's a covered bridge, the word "renovations" is appropriate...if it were a metal truss bridge, the word "replacement" would be used instead.

Posted January 15, 2015, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)
Posted January 15, 2015, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Here we go again!:

Benton County to replace historic bridge

http://www.arkansasonline.com/news/2015/jan/15/benton-county...

Posted January 15, 2015, by Jim Grey (mobilene [at] gmail [dot] com)

Per INDOT, this bridge has been closed since 2013.

Posted January 15, 2015, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Here is the latest news. The new bridge is scheduled to open sometime next month, February 2015.

http://djournal.com/news/tallahatchie-river-bridge-work-near...

Posted January 15, 2015, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

By next month, this cantilever will be gone. Demolition may start this week. If you want to see the bridge, you had better catch the next plane to Kansas City.

http://cjonline.com/news/2015-01-15/crews-demolish-parts-fai...

Posted January 15, 2015, by Johnny Burnham (johnnyburnham [at] ymail [dot] com)

Was the arson in 1989 ever solved? I read it burned down. Are there any more photos of the covered bridge and new bridge?

Thank You!

Johnny Burnham

Posted January 14, 2015, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

A new bridge has been built and the historic bridge left standing next to the replacement.

Posted January 14, 2015, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

This bascule bridge is behind a security checkpoint in a NASA rocket testing facility. Just tell them you are with BridgeHunter and are here to photo the bridge and I am sure they will just wave you on through...

I actually don't even know if this bridge is historic or not. But it has the look of a Chicago style bascule. Maybe someone who works at the space center will find this page and tell us about the bridge... or even better supply photos!

Posted January 14, 2015, by James Baughn (webmaster [at] bridgehunter [dot] com)

It looks like some vestiges of this bridge are still visible on the satellite view.

Posted January 14, 2015, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

The 1925 date is questionable too.


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