Forum

< Previous Page 49 of 378 Next >

Post a comment Contact webmaster

Posted September 19, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Good catch - I will change the name.

Posted September 19, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I would definitely have added this one. I generally consider a few questions when adding a bridge like this:

1. Is it pre 1970ish?

2. Did it require a significant amount of engineering?

3. Is it a MOB? (okay, every truss bridge is technically a MOB)

Essentially if I can say yes to either the first or second question, I will generally add it. On the other hand, question 3 applies to those modern prefabricated bridges that all pretty much look the same. MOBs tend to generate lots of anger because in the eyes of many of us Bridgehunters, they represent a lost opportunity to reuse an otherwise doomed historic truss.

This bridge appears to meet both 1 and 2, while escaping the condemnation of 3.

RE: Harvey Mountain Bridge
Posted September 19, 2016, by Luke

George, Chester hasn't added it to Bridgehunter.

Posted September 19, 2016, by Luke

According to a 60s topo from historicaerials, it was a MoPac line.

Posted September 19, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I will let the railfans fill in the railroad information if they are interested.

This appears to be a long-abandoned timber stringer. The Whitewater just might take it out someday.

Posted September 19, 2016, by Luke

Dana, no need to apologize, as there are already a lot of footbridges on the site.

The only footbridges people really get annoyed by are the modern boxxy ones and the modern pseudo-bowstring ones.

This bridge is is old (http://hornellhome.com/Around%20Hornell%20in%20Photos%20-%20...), and looks quite nice, IMHO.

FOOT Bridge BH 73746
Posted September 19, 2016, by Dana and Kay Klein (danakchert [at] verizon [dot] net)

Apologies for posting a foot bridge! As a Modern Metal foot bridge this is as good as it gets in our area.

Posted September 19, 2016, by KAE (kimelli [at] verizon [dot] net)

What is the street now was the Big Four Railroad (Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St. Louis) line from Louisville KY to Benton Harbor MI.

Harvey Mountain Bridge
Posted September 19, 2016, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Is this bridge on Bridgehunters?

Harvey Mountain Bridge
Posted September 19, 2016, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Is this bridge on Bridgehunters?

Posted September 19, 2016, by Christopher Della Rocco (cfdellarocco [at] gmail [dot] com)

Went to the bridge yesterday, Sept. 18, 2016 and it's still closed and the deck boards are really sagging. There are piles of rocks at both approaches and rails welded across. Not looking good...

Bridge piers in Youghiogheny river near Dawson, PA
Posted September 19, 2016, by Mike Piontka (Spginc [at] comcast [dot] net)

Much thanks Don.

I never gave light rail a thought. It appears that a branch line did run off of the Connellsville / Uniontown loop from Leisenring #1 to Dawson. And, the piers would make perfect sense. However, the piers are massive, and seem like a huge overbuild for a light rail crossing. Additionally, the lines time table seems to end in Dickerson Run, across the river from Dawson. Also, I can find no mention of trolley service to Dawson in any historical info I have been able to gather. Perhaps, the next time I'm up this way, I'll visit Dawson and ask the locals.

Posted September 19, 2016, by David Eike (eikes [at] sbcglobal [dot] net)

The attribution in the historic photo is incorrect. This is the Illinois & Michigan Canal.

Bridge piers near Dawson, PA
Posted September 18, 2016, by Don Morrison

There was a proposed electric rail line from Dawson to a small town called Juniata, southwest of Connellsville.

Maps of the West Penn System Railways show a line that ended at Dawson and had to cross the river about where the piers are.

http://patheoldminer.rootsweb.ancestry.com/westpenn.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/West_Penn_Railways

Posted September 18, 2016, by Don Morrison

The bridge that was at 36.389667, -93.659259 looks in Google Earth 2001 imagery to be a multi span through truss. Gone in 2006 imagery.

So no, it's not the swinging bridge, but it may have replaced the swinging bridge.

BH 72993
Posted September 18, 2016, by Dana and Kay Klein (danakchert [at] verizon [dot] net)

Many Thanks to Bridgehunter hero Dave King for posting BH 72993 Canacadea Creek Bridge, Visited today. Its closed to one lane and in sad state. VERY busy bridge, believe the 1047 a day. Think its so cool someone from several states away found a bridge in what should be my back yard!

Posted September 18, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This is an interesting little Pratt pony truss. Every full panel is double - countered. (Is double - countered an appropriate term)?

Bridge Piers in the Youghiogheny River East of Dunbar, PA
Posted September 18, 2016, by Mike Piontka (Spginc [at] comcast [dot] net)

I was biking the Great Allegheny Passage between Connellsville, PA and Dickerson Run, PA, yesterday. Approximently 1 mile east, or up river, from Dickerson Run, I discovered a trail leading off to the river. I found a rather large stone bridge abutment and piers crossing the Yough. I can see the piers from Sat. Imagery, but when crossing over to old topo's, the bridge doesn't show. There is no existing superstructure, just piers. It's almost within view of the Dawson bridge. I have scanned the P&LE and B&O records and even went back to the Pittsburgh,McKeesport and Youghiogheny Railroad, and have found nothing. I seems that it is definitely railroad related since there are no towns or roads that could have contributed to its existence. Any info greatly appreciated.

Grid Coordinates:

LAT: 40 degrees, 2 minutes, 16.3 seconds North

LON: 79 degrees, 38 minutes, 38.2 seconds West

Posted September 18, 2016, by David Backlin (us71 [at] cox [dot] net)

I found what appears to an abandoned bridge remnant just west of Berryville on old CR 306. Could this be the old swinging bridge?

https://goo.gl/maps/4LiKqaW8sCE2

Posted September 17, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Hi Julie:

I will drink to that. In all seriousness, a conference call may be a great idea.

Robert

Posted September 17, 2016, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Permitting might not be too bad, with a plan to mitigate disaster. Permission is next. How about a conference call with the owner next? We will be in Arkansas in October, fingers crossed, and maybe we can achieve something with our fundraising efforts here in Michigan. If a beer can save this bridge for the next step, well it should. W'B American Brown Ale.

Posted September 17, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Yes, and it is the permits that concern me the most. I am under no delusions about the legal complexity of propping up a bridge. Permissions and permits are the next stage...

Posted September 17, 2016, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

KSHS has desire and no funds. We shored Martin with a steel post and concrete Robert, you can show her that potential fix from photos.

No one will step up if we dont. Hopeful that we can try. I'll send you those photos to send to her. It's not an expensive fix but you can't just go out there yourself, and it requires permission and funding and a contractor.

Posted September 17, 2016, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

The aerial view clearly shows the curved track on the west end.

Posted September 16, 2016, by Seth Gaines (sethgaines [at] gmail [dot] com)

This has been gone since 2012-13. Drove over it in May '12, and the replacement bridge was well under way.

Posted September 16, 2016, by Lora (loratuttle1961 [at] gmail [dot] com)

yes the name is on the bridge and the year it was built

History of Belle Chasse Train tressle bridge
Posted September 16, 2016, by Stacy McFarland (smcfarland11 [at] cox [dot] net)

I am looking for information about the Belle Chasse Train Tressle where trains cross over. I am looking for when it was built and the parts used in the updating of it.

Posted September 16, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I would say keep posting. This helps us all to generate some ideas. I figure that we all want to save the bridge.

Posted September 16, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Robert,

My only point regarding SHPO and other governmental organizations is that people within those organizations may help in guiding you in your communications with KDHE in order to avoid possible missteps and put you in touch with someone within KDHE that has experience and a reasonable perspective on this type of work.

Actually, come to think of it, someone at the county's bridge dept. may be helpful in guiding you through the KDHE paperwork.

Regards,

Art S.

PS. If you are concerned with my posts on this topic being posted in a public forum, just let me know and I'll stop.

Posted September 16, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Art:

Good thoughts all around. The SHPO is aware of the bridge, as are county officials.

Robert

Posted September 16, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Glad you're on it Robert.

You are working on the right things. I hope you have the time and patience to pull it off!

Landowner permission is key (unfortunately). I don't see a way around it. Will she allow you to act toward the bridge's preservation if you don't challenge her ownership? Would you be willing to work on it if it remains private?

KDHE may be tricky. It is possible to get these folks to move quickly but it may require some navigation. See if someone in the state historic preservation office has dealt with any previous historic preservation efforts on the Whitewater River (it can be anything - for example a mill). They may be able to tell you who to reach out to at KDHE. Then, if you can find a loophole in the rules - like the form will not extend below the lowest course of stone (assuming the lowest course is intact, hard to tell in the photos) and the form will not impact the water quality or flow pattern they may be willing to sign off quickly. Additionally, push on the fact that if the bridge collapses, it will have a much greater negative impact than the proposed repair and necessitate removal which will also be more invasive to the water course.

I doubt you can get funding in time. You will likely need to do this with 'sweat equity' alone. Talk to local supply houses and concrete contractors, you may be able to build the form with stuff the supply house is willing to write off. A concrete contractor may occasionally have an extra couple of yards from a job on a truck - if you can be flexible with your timing and work around the contractor's schedule, and if there is access, have him dump the excess in your form.

None of these suggestions will generate a 'nice job' nor meet any engineering standards. However, they just may give you the time you need to do it right.

Based on my experience with Maple Rapids Road and the rigging of Carlton (via Nels), the three legged bridge isn't really an option, the 'or worse' is.

Good luck!

Art S.

$5 vehicle registration fee to finance bridge repairs in Montgomery and Berks Counties in Pa.
Posted September 16, 2016, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I read this morning in the Reading Eagle that first off Berks County is considering a $5 annual registration fee to finance repairs to county owned bridges.As of today Berks County's plans are to repair 59 county-owned bridges. Whether this is passed remains to be seen.As for Montgomery County $5 will be applied in 2017 to vehicle registrations for structurally deficient bridges.This will raise an additional $3.25 million for road improvements which i think also includes bridges.The county deemed 62 bridges deficient in 2012.Of those,7 have had repairs completed,and an additional 26 are in a design phase or construction.By adding the $5 fee,the county would be able to triple the amount of bridge projects slated for 2017 from 4 to 12.It was also quoted in this article that in 2017 73% of the bridges declared structurally deficient in 2012 will be in design,construction or actually completed.As of today,Montgomery County became the 13th county to impose the $5 fee.

Penn Street Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted September 16, 2016, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Read in the Reading Eagle this morning that the estimated cost for repairing this bridge is now $42.6 million which is $6.3 million more than originally estimated.The budget for this project has already been increased by about 50% over the original estimate.If this keeps up according to what i'm reading the final cost will be way higher.As mentioned previously work on this bridge will not begin until the Buttonwood Street Bridge reopens.

Posted September 16, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Hi Art:

Thanks as always for your feedback. I have spoken to a few individuals who want to save the bridge. I strongly believe that building a form and pouring concrete is a great idea. I am looking at this as a potential short term solution. At this point, we need three things to happen.

1. Landowner permission.

2. Any KDHE (Kansas Department of Health and Environment) permits that would be needed.

3. Funding or donations of material.

I have talked with the landowner about 1 and 3. She and I discussed the implications of a NRHP listing in regards to funding. I have also explained that nobody wins if the bridge collapses.

With another flood, we could be dealing with a three - legged bridge...or worse...

Robert

Posted September 16, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Robert,

If you are willing to be directly involved, try to convince the landowner to allow a stabilization effort to be done. Build and strap on a form around the base of the pier and pour concrete around it. It will look terrible, be a pain to remove and may not be a good long term solution but it should buy the bridge time.

Considering no one besides you seems to be stepping up to restore the bridge while its standing, if it falls in, its a death sentence, even if there is only minor damage.

With stabilization, I believe time is the bridge's friend as the preservation movement seems to be gaining steam.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted September 16, 2016, by Zander Donat (zanderdonat [at] gmail [dot] com)

I'm going to take a few more pictures to see if that helps. The Carnegie stamp is very faded but it should show up in a photo. Thanks for all of the input from everyone!

Posted September 16, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Robert,

Unless someone shores it up very soon it will be gone. As they say, a stitch in time saves nine. This reminds me of the Maple Rapids Road Bridge. We were a few weeks too late...

Regards,

Art S.

Posted September 16, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I just added new photos showing the aftermath of yet another flood on the Whitewater River. The pylon continues to crumble.

Posted September 16, 2016, by John Marvig

Nathan,

I'll look more into the date for this bridge. It's likely in an annual report somewhere. The bridge in wisconsin is possibly an accurate date, although I will ask the owner where that date came from.

Posted September 15, 2016, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

John... while certainly there is the potential for a bridge of this design to date to 1883 from a technological standpoint (in my earlier comments I overlooked the 1880 Redstone Bridge as an earlier all-riveted truss), my point is that's still a pretty significantly early date, and quite an outlier... even as you state this bridge design was built over a period of years... of which I would suspect 1883 is at the early end of the spectrum. Also, I am not clear what the source cited for the 1883 date of the Lammscapes bridge is. I wouldn't trust the signs that private owner put out unless there is further evidence than I am unaware of... which by the way would be fairly noteworthy.

In any case, I would caution against adding a speculative date to BridgeHunter (without adding underlying detail in the description) since as is clear here some visitors may interpret as "confirmed construction date" what should be at best a "circa" date and at worst an "estimate."

Posted September 15, 2016, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Nathan,

This identical structure:

http://bridgehunter.com/wi/washington/lammscapes-railroad/

was built by the same railroad in 1883. This design was very common along this railroad between the early 1880s and 1900. The difference is, this is one of the few structures that did not end up getting retrofitted with new floor beams and ending up in road use. While the date may be an error, I do not believe that this type of structure was exclusively built later in the 19th century.

Posted September 15, 2016, by James (Jwwoodham [at] aol [dot] com)

I was looking through the condition reports of the several arch bridges on SW Fwy. that are only 10 -12 years old and seem perfect yet their conditions are not rated highly. I'm no experts but I wonder why they wouldn't achieve higher scores. They have light traffic.

Posted September 15, 2016, by Royce and Bobette Haley (roycehaley111 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This bridge also looks like it was replaced.

Royce

Ellis River Bridge (New Hampshire)
Posted September 15, 2016, by Royce and Bobette Haley (roycehaley111 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This bridge looks pretty new. Maybe a replacement bridge?

Royce

Posted September 15, 2016, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

If this bridge were built in 1883 it would be tied with the Rocks Village Bridge for oldest known surviving bridge using riveted connections. I think this date highly unlikely on that fact alone. Pony truss railroad bridges are rare, and many lack a confirmed build date. However, based on bridges I have dates for, (and my own experience in general) the bridge likely dates from ca. 1888 to ca. 1896. I cite these bridges as representative technology (note the Milford Bridge was originally on a railroad)

http://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=oh...

http://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=ne...

http://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=mi...

Photos of the Carnegie brand on the bridge and information on which member(s) the name has been found would be immensely helpful (Carnegie varied their font over the years, and can help to some extent with dating). Do any other mill names appear on the bridge?

Posted September 15, 2016, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Zander, It's possible that there was an earlier bridge on site here as the stone abuts do suggest a pre-1900 span. I do think the bridge is at least 1890's but am not up to speed on steel mill history to comment further. Nathan Holth could probably tell you with more certainty. Either way it is definitely a very cool span!

Oh, and "God Bless Mooseheart"!

Posted September 15, 2016, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Zander,

The date was assumed based on the type of bridge, as well as the original date of construction at this location. I am curious. Is it a single member, or several that are stamped with this? What are the members? To me, the bridge certainly looks like an early to mid 1880s railroad structure.

Perhaps you could shed some light on the bridge? Do you have any information on it?

Posted September 15, 2016, by Zander Donat (zanderdonat&gmail [dot] com)

This site claims erection of this bridge in the year 1883. The bridge is stamped with "Carnegie Steel" which was founded in 1892. I work for the municipality that owns this structure and I am curious of the facts surrounding it. Clearly there's some different information here. I'm contacting the Batavia Historical Society to see if they have any other info. Either way it's a great piece of history in my home town!

Posted September 15, 2016, by Zander Donat (zanderdonat&gmail [dot] com)

This site claims erection of this bridge in the year 1883. The bridge is stamped with "Carnegie Steel" which was founded in 1892. I work for the municipality that owns this structure and I am curious of the facts surrounding it. Clearly there's some different information here. I'm contacting the Batavia Historical Society to see if they have any other info. Either way it's a great piece of history in my home town!

Posted September 15, 2016, by Cyndi Riley (cyndiriley13 [at] gmail [dot] com)

taken 20160912

Posted September 15, 2016, by Matt Lohry

Being the bridge is fairly new, it was likely designed and built to exceed new Colorado standards, which I believe are 40 tons for single-axle vehicles and 42.5 tons for multi-axle.

Posted September 14, 2016, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Its just pathetic and sad that this bridge is not being left standing next to its replacement. What on earth is it in the way of?! To say its in the middle of nowhere is an understatement. The United Kingdom routinely leaves historic bridges standing next to their replacements... and its a lot more crowded over there than rural Arizona!

Posted September 14, 2016, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Looks like it was an early example of a bridge built by Smith Bridge Company of Toledo, Ohio. I say it looks like an early example because it has a lightweight design, and the portal bracing lattice arrangement is slightly different from the typical form... although it is positioned below the top chord as in their later examples. The finials and plaque are shaped typically for the company.

Harvey Mountain Bridge
Posted September 14, 2016, by Chet Gehman (gehmanc2000 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

A lengthy drought in Connecticut has exposed a bridge that has been underwater for about 60 years. The small village of Colebrook River was lost when the Goodwin Dam was built on the West Branch of the Farmington River. The bridge crossed the river in the village and was never removed. While the bridge has been partially exposed in the past at times of low water, this is the first time it is accessible from the shore. I will be posting more photos on Landmark Hunter soon.

Posted September 14, 2016, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

It looks as if the rehab copied the previous topside appearance. See the second picture:

http://www.examiner.net/article/20131010/NEWS/131019982

Posted September 14, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

A couple of videos of the bridge:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5cZCy9tiYgM

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hLHOt5KCFS4

The new bridge is projected to open in December of 2017.

Posted September 14, 2016, by James Baughn (webmaster [at] bridgehunter [dot] com)

According to Clayton Fraser's Missouri Historic Bridge Inventory, the main span on this bridge was financed and designed by the Frisco railroad. So it seems logical that they reused a truss from elsewhere.

I believe this is the only remaining pin-connected truss remaining on the Missouri state highway system.

Posted September 14, 2016, by Aaron (rnstphns [at] yahoo [dot] com)

What is the weight restriction on this bridge

Posted September 14, 2016, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

The M.S. Cartter Company was built railroad bridges in the 1880s. There is a possibility that the trusses were reused from an older railroad bridge and relocated here.

Posted September 14, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I have good news and bad news concerning this bridge.

Good news: A neighbor just informed me that the bridge is still standing.

Bad news: It is listing badly and in danger of collapse.

Posted September 14, 2016, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Found good views of the bridge, but they involve standing where the Toll Booth on the Broadway Bridge once was. Not the safest or most comfortable situation, but got some awesome photos

Posted September 14, 2016, by Luke

John and I had the exact same thought a couple of days ago.

An article on the construction of the new bridge confirms that they were relocated:

(Clipping source: https://books.google.com/books?id=zhY4AQAAMAAJ&q=rolling+a+n... )

Posted September 14, 2016, by Mike Boehne (mikebon088 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

The second Omaha bridge had four 250-foot, eleven-panel Whipple trusses, and two tracks. The first Plattsmouth bridge's two Whipple spans were moved to a Des Moines River bridge, UP moved Pegram trusses to Idaho, and C&NW moved spans from the first Blair bridge to Wyoming. Some chance that these two spans are from Omaha?

Posted September 14, 2016, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

That bridge at the treatment plant has a fresh coat of White paint on it and looks to be in really good condition. Hopefully it is adequate for the limited traffic needs and will serve there indefinitely.

I just hope the county will save the Armstrong Bridge as the last surviving span on a county road.

Posted September 14, 2016, by Meinart (Meinart5962 [at] sbcglobal [dot] net)

Grayson is right. I lived at the end of chester. I always called it the Penn central tracks or the " low' tracks. 72 I started walking these both directions. Just walked em this year some. 2016

Posted September 14, 2016, by Meinart (Meinart5962 [at] sbcglobal [dot] net)

Finally figured out where the old road was. Wish they would quit tearing all these down. Johnson hill etc.. old bridges and roads are addicting. Im always lookin. That one near the old powerplant is next. Fished there In the mid 60s.

Posted September 13, 2016, by Don Morrison

It's the new alignment of MO 5 bridge over Bryant Creek in the photos.

Posted September 13, 2016, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Through truss span shows evidence of being widened and the portal bracing totally replaced. And I assume the 1930 date is when this happened. The pin-connected trusses of course being older.

Posted September 13, 2016, by Roger Deschner (rogerdeschner [at] gmail [dot] com)

Visited in July 2016 and took some pictures. Track appears somewhat maintained, with evidence a hi-rail vehicle has been through here recently. So UPRR has not completely abandoned this line (yet). However all signal systems have been dismantled. The south portal is easily reached on a public county road, from US 24 just south of the pass.

Posted September 13, 2016, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I quickly visited this bridge and took photos from below only. In reviewing the Street View I see there is a second plaque on the railing topside in addition to the "keystone" plaque visible from below.

Posted September 13, 2016, by Roger Deschner (rogerdeschner [at] gmail [dot] com)

The bridge is open again after rehab. See the Daily Southtown article about the reopening in the links section for a description of the design flaw that hastened corrosion on this bridge. This design flaw was apparently corrected in the rehab. Nice to see the nearby Chatham Street bridge also being repaired.

Posted September 13, 2016, by Roger Deschner (rogerdeschner [at] gmail [dot] com)
Posted September 13, 2016, by E. Jordan (cire141 [at] att [dot] net)

I drove under this bridge a few days ago and noticed the wooden beams on the north end of the bridge have been pulled out and replaced with steel girders. The supports on the south side are still wooden, but with a concrete top support for the bridge deck.

Posted September 13, 2016, by David Backlin (us71 [at] cox [dot] net)

Bridge has been permanently closed and will be replaced 2017

http://www.nwaonline.com/news/2016/sep/12/benton-county-to-c...

Posted September 13, 2016, by JP (pierre [at] robotfood [dot] com)

Watch the end of the video.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_bkX5VkZg8U

Posted September 13, 2016, by greg quaglio (gquaglio54 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge was destroyed in the 2006 flood and has been replaced with a concrete structure. The local news paper listed the bridge as "missing".

Posted September 13, 2016, by Jason Smith (flensburg [dot] bridgehunter [dot] av [at] googlemail [dot] com)

On a minor but important note: The Bridgehunter's Chronicles is wearing a special avatar in honor and memory of Jacob Wetterling, whose remains were found two weeks ago after being missing for 27 years. Together with the victims of 9/11 and the Spring Revolution, the Chronicles is showing solidarity to the families and friends affected by this and will keep this special avatar online until the winners of the 2016 Ammann Awards are announced on 11 January, 2017. More details here:

http://thebridgehunter.areavoices.com/2016/09/12/odds-and-en...

A poem in Jacob's honor is also found in the article....

JS

Posted September 12, 2016, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

What was originally Sandusky Street nearby also had an overpass with the same unique colored tiles. Additionally, the colored tile design is identical to the Ogden Avenue Bridge in Chicago http://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=il...

Posted September 12, 2016, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Fink Deck trusses are amazing sights!

Posted September 12, 2016, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Thats an important question that needs additional research!

Posted September 12, 2016, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

The three truss bridges along this railroad line likely were built soon after the 1913 flood, since it appears all the bridges over this river on this line (Pennsylvania Railroad) were washed out.

Posted September 12, 2016, by Dave King (DKinghawkfan [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Was it completely destroyed during that derailment?

Posted September 12, 2016, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Waddell's text suggests it only lasted 11 years until a derailment wrecked it? Bottom of page 1541. https://books.google.com/books?id=bxAkAAAAMAAJ&dq=St.%20Char...

Posted September 12, 2016, by Nathan Holth (nathan [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

All bridges should look like this one... the pinnacle of awesome. Bridges like this are why I laugh when people think cable-stayed bridges are nice-looking "signature" bridges.

Posted September 12, 2016, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Monetary value is probably small.

If they are clean and visually interesting, individual pages could be scanned, resized, and reproduced as art prints.

It's likely that an historical society, harbor museum, or library would want to preserve the originals for future study.

Posted September 12, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)
Posted September 12, 2016, by Douglas Butler

I recognize the double section of a planned design.

Posted September 12, 2016, by Douglas Butler

I see another swing span further left of a double swing

Posted September 12, 2016, by Craig O'Donnell (craig [dot] odonnell [at] doverpost [dot] com)

Known as Pigeon Point.

Posted September 12, 2016, by Craig O'Donnell (craig [dot] odonnell [at] doverpost [dot] com)

Bridge was replaced with a replica. How historically accurate, I don't know.

Posted September 12, 2016, by craig.odonnell@doverpost.com (craig [dot] odonnell [at] doverpost [dot] com)

This drawing of the shear pole swing bridge is actually the 5th Street Bridge in Delaware City. (The Corps of Engrs considers Reedy Point Bridge over the C&D Canal and this bridge as one "system" but they are different.)

The existing 5th Street bridge was installed about 1930, is a bascule welded shut now, and was closed Sep. 12 (today) 2016 for replacement with a concrete span.

Two pix taken about 7 AM 9-12-16, looking south down the roadway and looking southeast along the (old) canal.

Mary Street Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted September 12, 2016, by Anonymous

Fun lessons. We're coming thru to go to Oregon. Would love to make your bridge a stop. Exchange notes. Look at your next project.

Posted September 12, 2016, by Mariea (mariea [dot] clements [at] yahoo [dot] con)

I have the original blue prints for this bridge, is there any value to them?

Posted September 11, 2016, by Barry (bllauver [at] toad [dot] net)

I think this is the Spring Garden Swing bridge on the Western Maryland RR. It is already posted.

Posted September 11, 2016, by David Backlin (us71 [at] cox [dot] net)

Looks like two rail cars placed side by side

Posted September 11, 2016, by David Backlin (us71 [at] cox [dot] net)

There were originally two bridges at this location, but one would later be removed. The vehicular clearance under this bridge is 7 feet.

Posted September 11, 2016, by Dollarhide Descendant

These are my people. One branch of the family moved to the Yakima Valley. Further descendants were Canadian pioneers.

Posted September 11, 2016, by K (kaykat9676 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge is no longer here. I visited the location on 9-10-16.

Posted September 11, 2016, by Ivan Tabler (vtabler [at] hotmail [dot] com)

The present Porcupine Crossing bridge is being replaced. Completion: Summer 2017.

Posted September 11, 2016, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

!992 NIB shows a 1924 steel truss over the RR on MO 39. Gone now, probably removed after the one in the photos was build in 1995. Probably should create another entry to distinguish between the new bridge in the photos and the historic bridge at the pin location.


< Previous Page 49 of 378 Next >