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Posted July 22, 2016, by Luke

IMO, the current rail line should be the one listed if the bridge has no official or common nickname.

After looking at the article the imagery came from again, the bridge is referred to in the article as the "Glenmoore Bridge", so perhaps we should call it a day and just name it "Glenmoore Railroad Bridge"...

Posted July 22, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] cfom)

Luke,

Not so much for this bridge but most people that I know locally, refer to the rail line as the old Reading line.

This may be more of an issue back east than it is in the mid-west. We had all sorts of railroads. Then, everything went Amtrak/Conrail now we see all sorts of stuff, including UP on the old Reading line. While the Northeast Corridor was originally Camden and Amboy then PRR it now has Amtrak, Conrail (yes, it still seems to exist) NJ Transit, Septa and possibly NS and CSX running on the same rails. To me, considering the history of the NE Corridor, in my mind the connection is to the PRR, not Amtrak, who technically owns the line. Also having the RR name first complicates the search.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted July 22, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Luke,

Most people around here that I know still refer to this rail line as the Reading line. I guess if this is the way the site wishes to handle it, I'll go along with it but it seems to go against the whole 'historic' thing.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted July 22, 2016, by Luke ( )

Yes, but given the fact there hasn't been a successful railroad merger in some time* that won't be too much of an issue.

(*Not to mention the fact that the most recent attempt at a merger was admonished by multiple politicians, including the justice department.)

Posted July 22, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Luke,

I understand keeping the two sections as one bridge. However, the CSX thing confuses me. Does this mean the bridge's name changes with each railroad merger?

Regards,

Art S.

Posted July 22, 2016, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Feel free to print this on card stock, send them to your friends. I've found that trading cards, post cards, bookmarks are kind of fun to do when we are going somewhere. A quick snap shot of the Workin' Bridges of today taking on a project that we are not sure where it will go. Will we be the interim owner? Will we be able to develop the heritage park idea that is emerging with preservation via ownership? Those are the questions swirling at hq these days as we finish up and prepare to lift Martin Road, waiting patiently for the engineering for the bowstring move.

Finishing up the details for Dy & Anna's (the advance team) trip to Oregon next week to meet with interested folks in Springfield and Eugene for a couple of days. I'll be posting the press release with more info on where and when they will be around tomorrow but plan on the Chamber of Commerce in Springfield, Oregon at 2:00 next Wednesday for the public and any interested folks to get their ideas on the idea board. Dy will also be presenting at the Springfield Historic Commission on Tuesday at 5:30.

Posted July 22, 2016, by Luke

The abutment for the DPG is built into the arch segment, so I'd consider the DPG to be a part of the same structure.

Also, railroad names are as relevant/pertinent as highway names are in the title.

Posted July 22, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Do we define the deck plate girder bridge over the roadway as a separate bridge or part of the same bridge?

Posted July 22, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

As far as I am concerned, this one should easily qualify. Some bridges in this area have not been surveyed in years, so that may be the issue.

Posted July 22, 2016, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

For what? Where in the middle of nowhere are those reported 10 cars a day actually going???

Posted July 22, 2016, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Where do they get that this one shouldn't be NR eligible?

Posted July 22, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Susan,

Post the cards or links to them and someone here will likely be able to provide you with an answer.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted July 22, 2016, by S, Smith (susansmith1948 [at] hughes [dot] net)

Do you know if this was originally a covered bridge? I have several postcards and some old notes that may indicate that at one time, there was a covered bridge in this area.

Posted July 22, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

To give others a sense of what's going on, think about taking a little county bridge with poor sight lines that should be OK for 100 cars a day then ty to force thousands of cars a day across it!

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/07/20/nyregion/new-jersey-roads-...

New Jersey Drivers Fume as Road and Bridge Work Stops

By PATRICK McGEEHAN and EMMA G. FITZSIMMONS JULY 19, 2016

Photo

Stalled bridge construction near Princeton, N.J., on Route 518. Construction began in early July but Gov. Chris Christie, at impasse with lawmakers on a gasoline-tax increase, stopped road work around the state.

Credit Fred R. Conrad for The New York Times

Several miles from Princeton, drivers are playing chicken as they detour across a single-lane bridge. In Summit, the prolonged shutdown of a century-old crossing has forced nearby businesses to lay off workers. And in Hoboken, the delay of the long-awaited rehabilitation of a critical connection to the Lincoln Tunnel threatens to disrupt back-to-school traffic.

Across New Jersey, residents accustomed to complaining about all of the road work undertaken during the summer months now have something different to moan about: Hundreds of those improvement projects have ground to a halt, victims of a political stalemate among state lawmakers. In many places, the orange cones and mesh netting are still in place, but the backhoes and road graders sit idle, as do more than 1,000 construction workers across the state.

The long days and abundant sunshine of the season make it prime time for fixing the roads and bridges that keep things moving in New Jersey, which, like many states, is saddled with aging infrastructure. But for more than a week, those ideal conditions have been squandered as the state’s political leaders argue about whether and how to raise the state’s gasoline tax.

With no agreement and the state’s Transportation Trust Fund — which is financed by the tax — nearly drained, Gov. Chris Christie ordered that all work stop on a long list of projects throughout the state. That left the completion of construction scheduled for this year in jeopardy, said Anthony Attanasio, executive director of the Utility and Transportation Contractors Association of New Jersey.

“One thing everyone agrees on is that government is responsible for providing safe and reliable infrastructure for taxpayers,” Mr. Attanasio said. But, he added, since Mr. Christie’s executive order took effect on July 8, “we’re in this weird limbo where no work’s getting done.”

With Mr. Christie and other Republican leaders at their party’s national convention in Cleveland this week, a deal to end the stalemate is unlikely in the coming days. The chances of reaching one before the Democrats wrap up their convention in Philadelphia late next week seem nearly as slim.

Photo

Gov. Chris Christie, left, at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland.

Credit Eric Thayer for The New York Times

The 50-page list of stalled transportation work represents more than $3 billion in projects to upgrade roads, bridges and mass transit. New Jersey Transit, the agency that runs the state’s commuter rail and bus network, has had to suspend its order for dozens of new buses until the financing issue is sorted out.

Continue reading the main story

James Kennelly, a spokesman for Hudson County, said officials there had been advised to expect the suspension of work on the Park Avenue Bridge, which connects Hoboken and Weehawken, to extend to the end of July.

What is clear is that shutting down and restarting projects will add to their cost, driving up the total price significantly in some cases. Hudson County, Mr. Kennelly said, estimates the stoppage will add as much as $120,000 to the cost of rehabilitating the bridge.

In several towns on the northern border of Princeton, the closing of the Route 518 bridge this month — and the subsequent shutdown of work two days later — has sent cars onto other traffic-clogged routes over the Millstone River, leading to angry exchanges among drivers. The work was scheduled to be finished this fall. Now the bridge could be closed much longer.

Donato Nieman, the administrator in Montgomery Township, said he had seen drivers getting into arguments when they were rerouted to a one-lane bridge to the north. Some drivers have even played chicken on the bridge, facing each other until someone backs down, he said.

“You get the rolling down of windows and the hurling of less-than-charming language,” Mr. Nieman said, noting that officers were sent to park in driveways nearby in an effort to encourage drivers to behave.

The police in nearby Franklin Township, in Somerset County, have received complaints about road rage shouting matches at another crossing to the south. Sgt. Philip Rizzo, a spokesman for the Police Department, said the community had seen major traffic backups, especially during the evening commute.

Document: New Jersey Town Asks State to Deem Bridge Project Essential

Local leaders have asked the state to deem the Route 518 bridge an essential project and to restart the work since it is a critical route for emergency responders trying to reach a hospital. Theodore Chase, the deputy mayor in Franklin Township, questioned why work began on the bridge on July 6, even as uncertainty lingered over state funding.

His wife, Victory Chase, was stuck in traffic at an alternate crossing as she returned home on a recent evening after volunteering at a library.

“It took me an hour to do something that takes less than 10 minutes normally,” Ms. Chase said.

Stephen Schapiro, a spokesman for the state’s Transportation Department, said officials had developed the detour with local communities before the project began and that the Route 518 bridge would have been closed this week even if a shutdown had not been ordered. Since work on the bridge had already started, it was no longer safe for traffic, Mr. Schapiro said.

Down the block from the Route 518 crossing, Barry M. Gerlack, the owner of a travel business, said he was furious with Mr. Christie over the impasse. Not only is his commuting longer, but a pizza deliveryman recently called him frantically asking for detour directions in the hopes of keeping a pie hot.

“We have our own Bridgegate here — it’s unbelievable,” he said.

A deal over transportation financing appeared near last month, but Mr. Christie and Democratic leaders in the State Senate could not agree over which tax cuts to pair with a 23-cent increase in the gas tax. On Monday, Mr. Christie told reporters in Cleveland that he had rejected a new financing proposal from Stephen M. Sweeney, a Democrat and president of the State Senate, and would meet with Mr. Sweeney after the convention. Mr. Sweeney’s office said that Mr. Christie had not offered his own counterproposal.

Since Mr. Christie ordered the shutdown, he has been preoccupied with a series of political setbacks. Last week, David Samson, his longtime friend, pleaded guilty to using his position as chairman of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey for his personal benefit. A day later, Mr. Christie was passed over to serve as Donald J. Trump’s running mate.

At the Morris Avenue bridge in Summit, residents complained of rerouted traffic filling quiet neighborhoods with the sounds of revving engines and honking horns. On Monday afternoon, a group of teenagers walked down the sidewalk as they sought a way around the closed bridge.

Photo

An idle bridge repair site. Officials are complaining that time is running out to finish many jobs before schools open. Credit Fred R. Conrad for The New York Times

Jim Jorgensen, 50, a financial analyst who lives in Summit, walked past the idle construction site.

“How long does it take to build a bridge?” he asked.

The project in Hoboken had been underway for just two days when Mr. Christie ordered the shutdown, Mr. Kennelly, the Hoboken spokesman, said. Workers had begun chipping away at the old concrete on the bridge, one of two that connect Hoboken and Weehawken just south of the Lincoln Tunnel.

“Our main concern was that we found ourselves in a tricky position because it is very difficult to get in and out of Hoboken,” Mr. Kennelly said. “We wanted to try to manage things so that we didn’t increase any period of time of aggravation.”

County officials asked the contractors to cover up the work its crew had done and reopen the lane of traffic that had been closed off, Mr. Kennelly said. Before the suspension of the work, the plan had been to have crews work for 12 hours a day six days a week through mid-September.

Under that schedule, the project could have been completed without much nighttime labor and before school buses start rolling again in the fall, Mr. Kennelly said. But now that plan will have to be reworked with the understanding that it will extend well past the end of summer.

Construction industry officials, Mr. Attanasio said, still hope that elected officials can work out a solution before the end of the month. If not, he said, the stalemate could grow into a more dire condition.

“If you get into August, you’d be going from hundreds of projects to thousands of projects” shut down, he said. “That’s going to affect every single person in New Jersey and anyone who travels through our state and anyone who ships goods and services to and from our state.”

Nate Schweber contributed reporting.

A version of this article appears in print on July 20, 2016, on page A1 of the New York edition with the headline: Anger as Work Stops on Roads in New Jersey. Order Reprints| Today's Paper|Subscribe

Posted July 22, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/07/20/nyregion/new-jersey-roads-...

New Jersey Drivers Fume as Road and Bridge Work Stops

By PATRICK McGEEHAN and EMMA G. FITZSIMMONS JULY 19, 2016

Photo

Stalled bridge construction near Princeton, N.J., on Route 518. Construction began in early July but Gov. Chris Christie, at impasse with lawmakers on a gasoline-tax increase, stopped road work around the state.

Credit Fred R. Conrad for The New York Times

Several miles from Princeton, drivers are playing chicken as they detour across a single-lane bridge. In Summit, the prolonged shutdown of a century-old crossing has forced nearby businesses to lay off workers. And in Hoboken, the delay of the long-awaited rehabilitation of a critical connection to the Lincoln Tunnel threatens to disrupt back-to-school traffic.

Across New Jersey, residents accustomed to complaining about all of the road work undertaken during the summer months now have something different to moan about: Hundreds of those improvement projects have ground to a halt, victims of a political stalemate among state lawmakers. In many places, the orange cones and mesh netting are still in place, but the backhoes and road graders sit idle, as do more than 1,000 construction workers across the state.

The long days and abundant sunshine of the season make it prime time for fixing the roads and bridges that keep things moving in New Jersey, which, like many states, is saddled with aging infrastructure. But for more than a week, those ideal conditions have been squandered as the state’s political leaders argue about whether and how to raise the state’s gasoline tax.

With no agreement and the state’s Transportation Trust Fund — which is financed by the tax — nearly drained, Gov. Chris Christie ordered that all work stop on a long list of projects throughout the state. That left the completion of construction scheduled for this year in jeopardy, said Anthony Attanasio, executive director of the Utility and Transportation Contractors Association of New Jersey.

“One thing everyone agrees on is that government is responsible for providing safe and reliable infrastructure for taxpayers,” Mr. Attanasio said. But, he added, since Mr. Christie’s executive order took effect on July 8, “we’re in this weird limbo where no work’s getting done.”

With Mr. Christie and other Republican leaders at their party’s national convention in Cleveland this week, a deal to end the stalemate is unlikely in the coming days. The chances of reaching one before the Democrats wrap up their convention in Philadelphia late next week seem nearly as slim.

Photo

Gov. Chris Christie, left, at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland.

Credit Eric Thayer for The New York Times

The 50-page list of stalled transportation work represents more than $3 billion in projects to upgrade roads, bridges and mass transit. New Jersey Transit, the agency that runs the state’s commuter rail and bus network, has had to suspend its order for dozens of new buses until the financing issue is sorted out.

Continue reading the main story

James Kennelly, a spokesman for Hudson County, said officials there had been advised to expect the suspension of work on the Park Avenue Bridge, which connects Hoboken and Weehawken, to extend to the end of July.

What is clear is that shutting down and restarting projects will add to their cost, driving up the total price significantly in some cases. Hudson County, Mr. Kennelly said, estimates the stoppage will add as much as $120,000 to the cost of rehabilitating the bridge.

In several towns on the northern border of Princeton, the closing of the Route 518 bridge this month — and the subsequent shutdown of work two days later — has sent cars onto other traffic-clogged routes over the Millstone River, leading to angry exchanges among drivers. The work was scheduled to be finished this fall. Now the bridge could be closed much longer.

Donato Nieman, the administrator in Montgomery Township, said he had seen drivers getting into arguments when they were rerouted to a one-lane bridge to the north. Some drivers have even played chicken on the bridge, facing each other until someone backs down, he said.

“You get the rolling down of windows and the hurling of less-than-charming language,” Mr. Nieman said, noting that officers were sent to park in driveways nearby in an effort to encourage drivers to behave.

The police in nearby Franklin Township, in Somerset County, have received complaints about road rage shouting matches at another crossing to the south. Sgt. Philip Rizzo, a spokesman for the Police Department, said the community had seen major traffic backups, especially during the evening commute.

Document: New Jersey Town Asks State to Deem Bridge Project Essential

Local leaders have asked the state to deem the Route 518 bridge an essential project and to restart the work since it is a critical route for emergency responders trying to reach a hospital. Theodore Chase, the deputy mayor in Franklin Township, questioned why work began on the bridge on July 6, even as uncertainty lingered over state funding.

His wife, Victory Chase, was stuck in traffic at an alternate crossing as she returned home on a recent evening after volunteering at a library.

“It took me an hour to do something that takes less than 10 minutes normally,” Ms. Chase said.

Stephen Schapiro, a spokesman for the state’s Transportation Department, said officials had developed the detour with local communities before the project began and that the Route 518 bridge would have been closed this week even if a shutdown had not been ordered. Since work on the bridge had already started, it was no longer safe for traffic, Mr. Schapiro said.

Down the block from the Route 518 crossing, Barry M. Gerlack, the owner of a travel business, said he was furious with Mr. Christie over the impasse. Not only is his commuting longer, but a pizza deliveryman recently called him frantically asking for detour directions in the hopes of keeping a pie hot.

“We have our own Bridgegate here — it’s unbelievable,” he said.

A deal over transportation financing appeared near last month, but Mr. Christie and Democratic leaders in the State Senate could not agree over which tax cuts to pair with a 23-cent increase in the gas tax. On Monday, Mr. Christie told reporters in Cleveland that he had rejected a new financing proposal from Stephen M. Sweeney, a Democrat and president of the State Senate, and would meet with Mr. Sweeney after the convention. Mr. Sweeney’s office said that Mr. Christie had not offered his own counterproposal.

Since Mr. Christie ordered the shutdown, he has been preoccupied with a series of political setbacks. Last week, David Samson, his longtime friend, pleaded guilty to using his position as chairman of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey for his personal benefit. A day later, Mr. Christie was passed over to serve as Donald J. Trump’s running mate.

At the Morris Avenue bridge in Summit, residents complained of rerouted traffic filling quiet neighborhoods with the sounds of revving engines and honking horns. On Monday afternoon, a group of teenagers walked down the sidewalk as they sought a way around the closed bridge.

Photo

An idle bridge repair site. Officials are complaining that time is running out to finish many jobs before schools open. Credit Fred R. Conrad for The New York Times

Jim Jorgensen, 50, a financial analyst who lives in Summit, walked past the idle construction site.

“How long does it take to build a bridge?” he asked.

The project in Hoboken had been underway for just two days when Mr. Christie ordered the shutdown, Mr. Kennelly, the Hoboken spokesman, said. Workers had begun chipping away at the old concrete on the bridge, one of two that connect Hoboken and Weehawken just south of the Lincoln Tunnel.

“Our main concern was that we found ourselves in a tricky position because it is very difficult to get in and out of Hoboken,” Mr. Kennelly said. “We wanted to try to manage things so that we didn’t increase any period of time of aggravation.”

County officials asked the contractors to cover up the work its crew had done and reopen the lane of traffic that had been closed off, Mr. Kennelly said. Before the suspension of the work, the plan had been to have crews work for 12 hours a day six days a week through mid-September.

Under that schedule, the project could have been completed without much nighttime labor and before school buses start rolling again in the fall, Mr. Kennelly said. But now that plan will have to be reworked with the understanding that it will extend well past the end of summer.

Construction industry officials, Mr. Attanasio said, still hope that elected officials can work out a solution before the end of the month. If not, he said, the stalemate could grow into a more dire condition.

“If you get into August, you’d be going from hundreds of projects to thousands of projects” shut down, he said. “That’s going to affect every single person in New Jersey and anyone who travels through our state and anyone who ships goods and services to and from our state.”

Nate Schweber contributed reporting.

A version of this article appears in print on July 20, 2016, on page A1 of the New York edition with the headline: Anger as Work Stops on Roads in New Jersey. Order Reprints| Today's Paper|Subscribe

Posted July 22, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This one still exists - for now. It is a rare example of a Bedstead built by George King.

KHRI link:

http://khri.kansasgis.org/index.cfm?in=131-0000-00202

Posted July 22, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

If you look at the July 2013 Google Streetview, you will see a crane next to the old bridge...

Posted July 22, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge still exists. Nemaha County once had a massive collection of truss bridges (mostly ponies), but nearly all have been demolished in the last few years.

KHRI link with photo:

http://khri.kansasgis.org/index.cfm?in=131-0000-00021

Posted July 22, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Well, it survived for a while, but now this dirt road is sporting a bright shiny UCEB.

Posted July 22, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

KSHS has updated their KHRI link with additional photos (taken 1994). This bridge does have cruciform outriggers. This could easily be an 1880s bridge.

http://khri.kansasgis.org/index.cfm?in=197-0000-00222

Posted July 22, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

http://www.franklintwpnj.org/Home/Components/News/News/3184/...

Update on Rt. 518

Post Date:07/20/2016 4:00 PM

The NJDOT has completed adjustment of traffic signal timing on Route 27 in the Kingston area. These changes were made to help traffic flow due to the increased volume resulting from the closure of the Route 518 Bridge over the D&R Canal. There are still delays during the AM & PM rush hours, but we have seen some improvement with the signal timing changes. The Griggstown Causeway continues to be a location with significant delays during the rush hours and motorists are advised to avoid that area if at all possible. We are aware of the inconvenience and frustration caused by the bridge closure and will continue to work with NJDOT and County officials to mitigate the impacts as much as possible.

Posted July 22, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Matt,

You are probably correct. However, its a multi-span pony that literally ends at a T intersection with relatively heavy traffic and poor sightlines. To me, this is the worst kind of compromise, an 'in-kind' replacement that really provides no benefit over the prior structure while eliminating the actual historic artifact.

Its shortcomings have really come to a head as the next crossing (Rt. 518) a relatively major route was closed for repair of the canal bridge (adjacent to the river) and, due to NJ politics, is now closed indefinitely as all state DOT work has stopped due to a political pissing contest.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted July 22, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This is a very old and very lightweight Queenpost pony truss. It appears to have cruciform outriggers, but a field check would confirm this.

Larry Hornbaker photo:

http://ke2013.smugmug.com/keyword/bridge/i-HnjDDqh/A

Posted July 22, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This one is way too heavy to have been built in 1859. There might have been an older bridge at this location that got replaced. The 1916 date listed here seems reasonable for this one.

Posted July 22, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Pure speculation, but ca. 1900-1910 would seem reasonable based on overall appearance.

Posted July 22, 2016, by daniel medlin (runtmed [at] hotmail [dot] com)

WHAT YEAR WAS THIS ONE BUILT

Posted July 22, 2016, by daniel medlin (runtmed [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Rock island swing bridge built 1859

Posted July 22, 2016, by Nathan Holth (nathan [at] historicbridges [dot] org)
Posted July 21, 2016, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Historical article with photos.

Attachment #1 (application/pdf; 544,204 bytes)

Posted July 21, 2016, by Matt Lohry

I found it rather odd as well that they chose to build a one-lane bridge here...I would guess that the reason is to limit the traffic flow, and to make it inconvenient enough to force the majority of people to take alternate routes to somewhat protect this area, as it appears that it might have some environmental importance to it. Hardly seems worth it, though, with all of the problems that it seems to be causing...

Posted July 21, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

I crossed that bridge yesterday. I don't know why they kept it as a one lane bridge when they replaced it. Seems kind of pointless of killing a historic bridge only to install a duplicate replacement. That said, even with a four lane bridge, the intersection would still suck.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted July 21, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Pint - sized inriggers! I like it!

Posted July 21, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I would not be shocked if this one was built by the Wrought Iron Bridge Co. I was looking at the telltale connections at the base and top of the endposts.

Hopefully, Republic County does not get in a hurry to remove this Kingpost. It is historically significant.

Posted July 21, 2016, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Yup, I think you are correct Mr. Elder! But it's the pint-sized ones like we have here in the Hoosier State... Not them big crazy looking ones like they have North of here! ;-)

I-895 Patapsco Flats Bridge (Baltimore County, Maryland)
Posted July 21, 2016, by C. P. Zilliacus (cpz [at] os2bbs [dot] com)

The Maryland Transportation Authority (MDTA) has awarded a contract to perform major repair work to this bridge starting in late July, 2016. The work will include the long-term closure of one and sometimes two lanes (the bridge is four lanes wide, so the traffic impacts could be significant).

Details on the WTOP Radio Web site here:

http://wtop.com/sprawl-crawl/2016/07/major-895-bridge-projec...

Posted July 21, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Based on the KHRI image, I think that this one has inriggers as well.

It is an interesting little bridge overall.

Posted July 21, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The four main spans are scheduled to be imploded on Monday, July 25th.

http://www.wpsdlocal6.com/story/32472322/demolition-schedule...

Posted July 21, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Anthony, you just might be right about those beams preventing this one from collapsing. Somehow, it has stood with a washed out abutment for several years now.

Posted July 21, 2016, by DSue

This bridge is not safe for today's traffic. There is no need in 2016 for a one lane pony truss. It is not even the original bridge so therefore, it's not historic.

I have witnessed so many scary things happen. Two people trying to cross at once, cars backing up onto River road and almost getting hit by other cars passing when there is clearly a sign that says no passing. I have witnessed multiple fights, verbal AND physical. I have sat in line for over 10 minutes once because two cars stuck on it head one couldn't back off because all the cars behind them went too.

This is a heavy traffic area. It needs a two lane bridge!

Posted July 21, 2016, by DSue (donnarich734 [at] msn [dot] com)

This bridge is not safe for today's traffic. There is no need in 2016 for a one lane pony truss. It is not even the original bridge so therefore, it's not historic.

I have witnessed so many scary things happen. Two people trying to cross at once, cars backing up onto River road and almost getting hit by other cars passing when there is clearly a sign that says no passing. I have witnessed multiple fights, verbal AND physical. I have sat in line for over 10 minutes once because two cars stuck on it head one couldn't back off because all the cars behind them went too.

This is a heavy traffic area. It needs a two lane bridge!

Posted July 21, 2016, by J.P. (wildcatjon2000 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This may be the only surviving Queenpost surviving in the state of Michigan.

I was able to find a picture of it from the state website

http://www.michigan.gov/mdot/0,4616,7-151-9623_11154_11188-2...

Posted July 21, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Nathan,

Two points:

1. Its not a metal truss bridge. Wood and stone have a better standing as 'historic' amongst the general public.

2. Based on my previous post, the anti-preservationists are getting fired up...

Regards,

Art S.

Posted July 21, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

http://www.pressherald.com/2016/07/21/letter-to-the-editor-s...

Letter to the editor: Stackpole Bridge project raises questions about oversight, more in Saco

A bond was approved in November 2014 for $990,000 to repair Saco’s Stackpole Bridge. The lowest bidder was Chesterfield Associates ($839,500); CPM was the fourth highest bidder ($1.19 million). The City Council awarded the contract to the latter, the preferred contractor of Friends of Stackpole Bridge.

Central to the project was restoration to the bridge’s historic significance. Subsequent to the award and several design modifications, it was determined that an additional $370,000 was required to fix the bridge. These funds were approved by the council last Dec. 21.

Since last fall, changes have been made to the design. Progress reports were not offered until a Saco resident publicly requested an update in May. In June, the request for information was pursued.

Mayor Roland Michaud acknowledged the city received a letter from the Maine Historic Preservation Commission stating that the bridge wouldn’t be recognized for its historic significance. The process leading up to this disclosure has not been made transparent by the city.

Despite the design changes, not to mention the costs associated, the selected contractor cannot deliver on the principal objective: to reconstruct the historic structure.

Where is the oversight? Was the historic goal realistic in light of the funds approved at referendum? Should the low bidder have been passed over or given an opportunity to submit alternatives with the additional funds afforded the current bidder?

Was allocating additional sums in keeping with the referendum’s intent? Has the city been placed in a position of losing state funding? Who authorized the various project changes?

What role has Friends of Stackpole Bridge played in the process? What legal advice has been sought or given? Where is the Saco City Council leadership?

Again, where is the oversight?

As concerned citizens, we believe that our local government needs to be more transparent and attentive to the management of the public coffers.

John Harkins

chairperson, Saco Citizens for Sensible Government

Saco

Pond Eddy Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted July 21, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

It has begun...

http://www.pikecountycourier.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/...

Construction of new Pond Eddy bridge begins

Published Jul 20, 2016 at 4:39 pm (Updated Jul 20, 2016)

Photos

BY ANYA TIKKA

POND EDDY — Construction of the new Pond Eddy Bridge off Pennsylvania’s Shohola side’s Rosas Switch Road and Flagstone Roads, and New York State Route 97 has started. Construction equipment has been moved to the site daily for days, and construction crews are starting the work. Route 97 on New York side, the only access road to Shohola residents via the existing bridge, is blocked on alternate sides at times for 2-lane traffic on a short stretch near the construction.

The bridge plans have seen several transformations, from local grassroots and environmental opposition in early stages, to rumors about a large-scale interstate bridge, to the current design of a one-lane, two-truss design, similar to the existing, old bridge.

SAI Consulting Engineers of Lemoyne, PA gave an extensive exhibition and information meeting earlier in the year in Shohola Town Hall, with a model of the new bridge, timeline, and other info to residents. The existing, historic bridge will be taken down, and has not found any buyers although it was listed for sale, and the new bridge will be built about 65 feet from it.

The construction will be in stages, starting from New York side when a rock causeway will be built half way across the river, and then the same will be repeated from Pennsylvania side. The existing bridge will stay open for residents during this whole time.

Once the two sides of the new bridge under construction meet in the middle of the Delaware River, the rest of bridge construction will be finished, and finally, the old bridge taken down. The last estimate was the bridge wouldn’t be open until end of year 2018.

The two-stage construction is necessary to keep the water flowing for environmental, and fishing purposes, as well as recreational use for visitors to the area, in heavy use during the summer months.

Freshwater mussels were found in the early stages of the project, and they had to be moved, although they were not an endangered species. Historic D & H canal remains run next to the river, and an archeologist will be at hand during the construction.

The cost estimate has been about $13.3 million, to be shared between Pennsylvania and New York.

The new bridge will closely resemble the old one, with taupe color and material made to look like the historic bluestone once mined in the area.

Posted July 21, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Anthony:

I have not been able to find this one on the KHRI database yet. Some Kansas bridge were abandoned and largely forgotten before the surveys were done in the 1980s.

I have done some rough math and have estimated that Miami County has approximately 1 truss bridge for every 26 square miles. No matter where you are in the county, you don't have to drive too far to see one. But, as you alluded to, that could change if nothing is done to save the abandoned ones.

I should also mention that numerous trusses were lost in the 1980s with the creation of the Hillsdale Reservoir. They may have been cut up for scrap, or they may have just been submerged.

Overall, Miami County has take great pride in their bridges. The Creamery Bridge in particular, is known for being a point of interest.

Posted July 21, 2016, by K. Allen Ballard (speedeeprint [at] gmail [dot] com)

The truss bridge on 5th Street / connects S. Rodier Rd and heads back up to the site of the former bowstring. The 5th Street bridge is actually Price & Colburn pony over McKee Creek. I visited P&C Oct 24th, 2016 and took extensive pics. I was not aware of the bowstring location north of twon or I would have investigated while I was visiting my in-laws in Belton, MO. It is on list now.

http://bridgehunter.com/mo/cass/21297/

Posted July 21, 2016, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

http://www.mainestory.info/maine-stories/explosive-times-at-...

Just one of many stories on the internet about this bridge and the "Bomber" Werner Horn. You have to read down a ways to get to the bridge.

Posted July 21, 2016, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Is there a KSHS page for this one Robert? At first glace it appears to be shorter like a pony truss...but the foliage plays tricks on the eyes and so it is hard to tell. Bing imagery offers nothing but lots of Green leaves. I don't know why these satellite people can't be sensitive to us Bridgehunters and only record these views during times of "Leaflessness"!!!

On a serious note... Miami County, Kansas has an incredible collection of historic bridges which is probably the best in the state! (Robert can confirm or refute this). Although they have replaced some ponies (The Baltimore was a major blow!), they have left a bunch of through trusses standing. With all of these, the amazing Asylum Bridge, and the two triple Marsh arches it is quite the catalog of historic spans! They need a group in this county to spearhead trying to do what is needed to further preserve these structures before Mother Nature reclaims them...

http://bridgehunter.com/ks/miami/611091104965/

This span will be doomed to extinction if action isn't soon taken. I know this is often easier said than done, but actions start with words and if nothing is ever said...then nothing is ever done.

Sprague Bridge (Wisconsin)
Posted July 21, 2016, by J.P. (wildcatjon2000 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Bridge still exists north of the new bridge. Added new location and updated bridge status. Also updated the NRHP info.

Posted July 21, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I can't seem to find this one in the NBI. It is visible on aerial imagery from 1947 when it was in use, and it reappears on aerial imagery taken in March 2015 and March 2016. I don't want to speculate too much, but I would not be surprised if this is a Pratt through truss built by the Kansas City Bridge Co.

Posted July 20, 2016, by Anonymous

Picture of workers at cow creek viaduct

Posted July 20, 2016, by Rebecca (rebeccainphoenix [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Thank you so much for posting these pictures! We used to cross it all the time when visiting family in the area. Can you imagine 9 people in an old Ford Mustang crossing that bridge in the 1970s and 1980s? I've been trying to find a way to see it again for years, but with limited time in the area, I never seem to have time to pull off and find it again.

Posted July 20, 2016, by Peter Schierloh (forthbrdge [at] aol [dot] com)

The stone pier that used to rest under the old north approach trestle used to support a fourth TPG span. A derailment in the 1970's on the CRIP destroyed the TPG span and severely damaged the pier. The CRIP replaced the TPG span with a open deck pile trestle that they tied into an existing approach trestle that also received some damage in the derailment. I have a copy of the newspaper article on the derailment somewhere, if I find it I will try to post it.

The damage from the derailment and the hasty construction of the replacement trestle resulted in significant settlement problems with the timber trestle, so the IANR replaced the north approach trestle with a BNSF/UP joint standard precast concrete trestle. To satisfy the DNR hydraulic requirements, the stone pier was removed when the trestle was reconstructed.

Posted July 20, 2016, by Nathan Holth (nathan [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Robert railroad companies tend to make unreasonable demands upon anyone seeking to acquire one of their bridges. For example, if a railroad is replacing a through truss. If nobody wants to reuse the bridge, the railroad might still pick the entire span intact with a crane and set it on the ground, so as to minimize the time where the railroad is closed to trains. Then the railroad would have to pay workers to cut up the bridge for scrap. FYI scrap steel value is at an all-time low so its not a profitable endeavor. Given these parameters, one might think that the railroad would be happy to transfer ownership of the truss after its set on the ground for another person to non-destructively disassemble. However, this is not what I have seen happen. First, the railroad will require the third party to remove the bridge from the tracks at the expense of the third party. This includes labor, crane rental, engineering for the pick, as well as flaggers on the railroad tracks, even though the railroad was going to do these things on their own. Second, the railroad will charge a fee for the bridge span as if its a new product being sold at profit. One span was being offered for over $30,000.

If you think there is a way to overcome this attitude on the part of railroads then go for it, it would be nice to see these railroad bridges being reused.

Posted July 20, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The question is, how can we better communicate with railroad companies. Saving a bridge requires time, energy, and money. If we someone is willing to purchase a doomed bridge, perhaps some companies might be willing to market them. There is a free market solution to everything...

Posted July 20, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I figured it was probably lost. This was the only one of its kind in the state that I am aware of.

Posted July 20, 2016, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Assuming KHRI is correct in listing this in section 25, the bridge is gone. The 1936 county road map shows only two crossings in sec. 25, the road on the west section line and the road on the north section line. Both have modern bridges.

Posted July 20, 2016, by Dallas E. Montgomery PE (dallas [dot] montgomery [at] burgessniple [dot] com)

The design of the second bridge was produced by a company called Hazelet and Erdal, Inc. out of Louisville KY. This was before my employment with them. Its first intial in-depth inspection was performed by a team of inspectors (which included me) in 1988 or 1989 employed by Hazelet and Erdal, Inc.. After numerous buyouts, H&E has become part of AECOM.

Sincerely

Dallas E. Montgomery PE,RLS

Burgess and Niple, Inc.

Louisville, KY

502-552-1634

Posted July 19, 2016, by Nathan Holth (nathan [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

This article appears to contradict my earlier finding (and that of the historic bridge inventory) that the bridge remains historic, and instead suggests all truss materials are new, bolted, and galvanized. http://www.galvanizeit.org/project-gallery/gallery/washingto...

Posted July 19, 2016, by Nathan Holth (nathan [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Tony, it wasn't the design of a bridge company it was one of the early state-designed standard plan type bridges in Michigan (which was in fact a leader in developing state standard plans for bridges). C. V. Dewart who wrote that article I linked to was the first engineer for the highway department and is likely responsible for the unusual design. He certainly was an engineer with some unusual ideas as he also designed Michigan's unique Concrete Camelback Bridges. As early as 1905 (the year the department was formed) the department was tasked with providing the townships and counties with design recommendations for bridges For example, pin-connected truss bridges were recommended only for spans greater than 100 feet. The highway department was created in part to combat quality issues with bridge company designed bridges not being up to par.

Anyway because it was the design of a state highway department engineer and not a bridge company this is why you don't see the specific knee brace design I am showing in other states. Most knee braces are smaller like this example here in Kansas.

Bridge across Cobb Creek taken out by construction of Fort Cob Dam
Posted July 19, 2016, by Karen Kay Knauss (karenkay [at] pldi [dot] net)

I am interested in the description of a bridge built over Cobb Creek, located in Section 15, TWSP 8N Rge12

The bridge was removed in 1957-58 when the Fort Cobb Dam was constructed.

Thank you

Karen Kay Knauss

Posted July 19, 2016, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I've never seen any supports like these... Might have been a builder specific to Michigan.

Could almost call these "Inriggers"! ;-)

Posted July 19, 2016, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

It would be wrong to fault the engineers and builders of the replacement spans... As they are just doing the jobs they are paid to do.

That being said, We who visit, contribute to, and help keep this site going are preservationists. When an injustice like this is executed against any historic bridge, we will not (and should never)restrain from saying our peace against the irrational and illogical actions of the agencies who are short-sighted in their process.

...My two cents worth

Posted July 19, 2016, by Nathan Holth (nathan [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I would like to add support for the thought that nobody on this page (or my own page for this bridge on HistoricBridges.org) intended to call into question the competency of the contractors working the job. And I have no doubts that the engineers who designed the new bridge did a great job doing that. Although certainly if we (as is typically the nature of discussion on a website like this) are considering the heritage and aesthetic values of the two bridges, obviously only the old bridge had heritage and aesthetics and the new one has none.

Here are my concerns with the project. Michigan State Historic Preservation Office failed to evaluate the bridge as eligible for the National Register of Historic Places. This eliminated Section 106 from the process and prevented me from having input into the discussion. I disagree that the altered spans were not historic, indeed I submit that the alterations (having occurred so long ago) were themselves historic.

Second, I question the need for a new bridge at this location, when it appears that another railroad bridge that goes to exactly the same two east and west locations is located a bit north of here. This is not the Chicago-Toronto or Chicago-New York City corridor. Its not that busy. I find it odd that today so many railroad bridges are needed here. Had Section 106 taken place, a civilized discussion about this could have taken place.

I will say this 99% of the time, railroads do not care for preservation or history. The problem with railroad companies is that they are for-profit companies, not Non-Profit Foundations. Does preserving a historic bridge get the product delivered faster? Cheaper? More efficiently? If the answer to these is no, than the railroad has no reason to preserve the bridge. The only reason many railroad bridges seem to be preserved by railroads is simply because maintenance makes sense from a financial standpoint. Its usually cheaper and less disruptive to rail traffic to keep what they have in good shape. This is why I get so frustrated with highway DOTs because they waste money by letting bridges deteriorate and then spending a lot of money to replace them.

But when a railroad decides an old bridge isn't getting the job done, watch out...

Posted July 19, 2016, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I think my message was misinterpreted. For starters, I am not an engineer. From a functional perspective, I am quite sure that the new bridge is solid, and will serve traffic well for the coming years. Secondly, I did not mean to offend those who worked on the structure. I understand it was your job, and you can be proud of your work. I understand the need to replace aging structures, however I question if alternatives were ever considered (such as using the north line through Wells, preservation of the trusses, etc). My frustration stems from driving several hundred miles from Minnesota to see a historic through truss structure, which is visually quite appealing to nearly everyone and being met with a modern, and quite plain girder structure. This is a website with contributors who have an interest in documenting and preserving historic bridges, and replacement of a structure like this is not taken well by the group on here.

Lastly, I did not intend to disparage anyone, and I am sorry if you took it like I did. However, I am a historic bridge enthusiast and after driving several hundred miles to document the historic structure, there will be a bad taste in my mouth for seeing the modern girder. Like it or not, the new bridge has little to no character. I understand it was your project and you are proud of it, however it consists of spans pre constructed in a shop, and shipped to the location. The very unique truss bridge that once stood here is only a memory, replaced by a bridge that is significantly less appealing. So when I call the bridge ugly, I am stating my mind, and likely several other contributors to this site. The bridge was built strictly for functionalism and features no visually appealing characteristics.

Posted July 19, 2016, by Dave King (DKinghawkfan [at] hotmail [dot] com)

NBI has this listed as a steel stringer built 1939.

Posted July 19, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Naturally, railroad companies are not primarily in the preservation business. Likewise preservationists are not primarily in the transportation business. We would do well to work with each other and learn from each other.

There are historic railroad bridges that continue to serve the companies that maintain them. Preservationists are always happy to see such bridges maintained.

Of course, sometimes replacement is necessary. We don't expect an 1884 wrought iron Pratt truss to carry an Interstate. It is understandable that railroad companies face similar issues related to weight limits, width, height clearance, etc.

If we are serious about preserving historic railroad bridges, we need to be willing to work with the companies. Likewise, if railroad companies were willing to sell, or offer doomed bridges to preservationists, these bridges could be moved for pedestrian or light vehicular use by a new owner. There are options out there if we are willing to find them.

Posted July 18, 2016, by Casey

"Disparage"

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LDwFCoj-0js

Your employer built an ugly-as-hell replacement bridge whilst passing off the historic structure as "non-historic", and you expect people to be kind about it?

Posted July 18, 2016, by MKM (mkmcclure63 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Currently only the north end is accessible and only for a short portion. The north end of the Seven Mile Bridge is in the midst of a re-hab.

Posted July 18, 2016, by Peter Schierloh (forthbrdge [at] aol [dot] com)

I am sorry to see that John feels the need to disparage the efforts of those that were involved in the replacement of the spans in this bridge. Please understand those that designed and built the new spans are dedicated individuals that take their profession seriously. To many, the demolition of a structure such as this is not taken lightly. The history of this crossing and our place in it is understood, but in the end the realities of the structure's age, design, and materials made replacement the best viable option.

John has taken some excellent photos of the bridge, and these photos are appreciated by those of us that have spent the last five years working on bringing this project to fruition. It is understandable that John may be frustrated by the ultimate outcome, but publicly ridiculing the structure and then essentially writing it off as no longer being a suitable bridge is inappropriate and unprofessional.

Posted July 18, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Thanks for those links. I can't remember if I have encountered these features on a highway bridge before.

Posted July 18, 2016, by Nathan Holth (nathan [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Tony, perhaps you recall the term from the usage by the Michigan State Highway Department to describe its standard ponies with inward-facing "outriggers" which MSHD called knee braces? See second article: http://historicbridges.org/michigan/grout/article.pdf from this page http://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=mi...

Posted July 18, 2016, by Tom Hoffman

The wooden deck has been replaced by metal grate. Before the 1997 rehab, the deck was chewed up with boards missing and splinters sticking up probably from speeding and heavy vehicles. Same thing was happening to the new deck.

Posted July 18, 2016, by Mike Daffron (daffronmike [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Just visited this fella Saturday and it looks like they have forgot to restore it. Come on, people! Let's get our poop in a group!! (Still, quite a breathtaking sight!)

Posted July 18, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Thanks for the reply. Have you found them to be associated with a particular builder?

Posted July 18, 2016, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I've seen them on a few pinned Pratt ponies around Indiana Robert, not overly common though. The term "knee brace" comes to mind...although I can't quote just where I heard it at. I would say it's definitely supposed to help keep the verticals at 90 degrees to the floor beams, but I doubt it would do much good upon impact with a vehicle.

Posted July 18, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This is a rather unusual Pratt pony truss. In lieu of outriggers, it has angled braces that connect the vertical members with the floor beams. These members are inside the truss, but I don't know their technical name. They are commonly found on railroad bridges, not on highway bridges.

Photo: http://ke2013.smugmug.com/keyword/bridge/i-hHRL2rN/A

This bridge appears to be owned privately, but is easily visible from the county road. A supplemental ford is located a short distance upstream.

Rome Ferry (Tennessee)
Posted July 18, 2016, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Does anybody have any information on what might be done with the ferry?

Posted July 17, 2016, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Well, I hope they are just leaving it in place and not sawing the trusses off and setting them on the bridge. And that 280 traffic count... Is that per month? I have a hard time believing that is a daily count!

Posted July 17, 2016, by David Jones (david2jpix [at] yahoo [dot] com)

As of July 16, 2016 this bridge is in the process of being bypassed and then possibly removed or incorporated into the new bridge design.

Rome Ferry (Tennessee)
Posted July 17, 2016, by Lewis Napier (damsurdid [at] aol [dot] com)

This is aa disgrace for the old Ferry. Mitchell Family had Ferry built in honor of their son that got killed in the service. At the time the ferry was donated to Smith County Tennessee there was an agreement in writing Between Mitchell Family and Smith County if Ferry was ever closed there would be a bridge built across Cumberland River. Wonder what happen

Posted July 17, 2016, by David Backlin (us71 [at] cox [dot] net)

Replacement begins July 18.

Posted July 17, 2016, by David Backlin (us71 [at] cox [dot] net)

MoDOT has announced they will replace this bridge starting in September.

Posted July 16, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I understand that railroad companies maintain archives. That might be a place to start. If you find a public domain image, please share it.

Posted July 16, 2016, by Eric Fleck (efleck999 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Part of this bridge was destroyed by flooding in 1997, and replaced that same year. It's scheduled to be replaced in summer 2017.

http://www.countyofplumas.com/index.aspx?NID=2023

Posted July 16, 2016, by Craig M Whittington (whittspits [at] gmail [dot] com)

My father owns the land the bridge crosses.I would love to get him a pic of the bridge while it was still standing.any help would be awesome.

Posted July 16, 2016, by Anthony Wallace (Toughant_89 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Updated photos: 07/16/2016

Posted July 16, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Nice find!

re: Kansas Visit
Posted July 16, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Will do. Good luck with this trip. I hope to visit the area in November.

I have found several bridges through KHRI and Aerial Imagery since leaving the area. I wish I was closer so I could help the Bridgehunter community with the mysteries.

Posted July 16, 2016, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

This is true CV...spruced it up a bit!

Kansas Visit
Posted July 16, 2016, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

I start having meetings the second week of August. Until then I hope to get out into Kansas for some back road travel.

I have several bridges I'd like to field check but I probably won't remember all of them.

If you have some suggestions for places to visit, email me.

No promises but I hope I can get pics of a significant number of undocumented ones.

Posted July 16, 2016, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

The glass is half full. Clearly someone recognizes that the pony trusses are more attractive than the UCEBs.

Posted July 16, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

About 12 - 14 hours for me, depending on traffic...

Posted July 15, 2016, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

An imposter!

Posted July 15, 2016, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I could hop on I70 and be there in say 10 hours or so!

Posted July 15, 2016, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I nominate this beauty as the initial entry for the new category "Camelback Pony truss"

Posted July 15, 2016, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

The 1940 Darlington MO 62500 map shows the road crossing the stream immediately to the SE of the CB&Q then crossing the track on the north side of the stream. Now the road crosses over on the south bank to join the RR grade. Pretty clear that this is the RR bridge and the road bridge was removed.

Posted July 15, 2016, by Anthony (ant_1_1999 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Wow! I saw this bridge last year in October, while headed to DC on Amtrak. I was wondering about its origin. Great looking!!!!

Posted July 15, 2016, by Rick Beers (nsi632 [at] charter [dot] net)

As a kid in 1955 I used to walk across the bridge and across the old highway to the school bus stop.

Posted July 15, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Thanks to Clark for the map reference. Abandoned by 1967 makes sense given the construction of I-70. I can see how this one escaped detection despite being so close to the Interstate.

An old bridge at this location also makes sense given the fact that the Clarks Creek and Humboldt Creek valleys provide an easy North - South route through the Flint Hills.

I will try to refrain from speculating about the truss type. Generally, the first bridges in the area were wooden structures, followed by Bowstrings, followed by Pratt trusses and Bedsteads.

Whatever it turns out to be, it is definitely quite old. I am thinking pre-1900 is very possible. I doubt that it is a 1920s or 1930s structure due to lightweight construction, but I welcome any and all speculation. Online searches have not turned up anything so far.

It may be private, but I would like to get permission for a field visit. That will tell us for certain what we have here.


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