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Posted May 26, 2015, by Judy Props (inrobroy [at] aol [dot] com)

This bridge is closed indefinitely.

Posted May 26, 2015, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

It was open to traffic as of October 2013 when I drove by.

Posted May 26, 2015, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

as per an article printed 5-26-15 in the reading eagle the maidencreek township supervisors are delaying making a decision on this bridge.the options are removal,rehabilitation or full rehabilitation of the bridge.also maidencreek township is arguing about ownership of the bridge once work is done with pendot.any future articles printed in the paper I will print here.

Posted May 26, 2015, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I don't think this bridge was demolished. From Historic Bridge Inventory:

The 3 span, 267'-long bridge is a continuous, Warren deck truss. It was rehabilitated in 1999 with replacement of the original deck and railings.

Posted May 26, 2015, by Marsha (Stevens) Umphry (sgtump1 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I agree with Walker Burns! It IS the old bridge that was replaced with the "rainbow" cement bridge just west

of the old county home. This was known as "the old New Hampton road". I own the property just around the corner, from this bridge.

Posted May 25, 2015, by acptulsa (acptulsa [at] gmail [dot] com)

This is the original Midland Valley Railway bridge. Yes, it's pretty light for a railroad bridge. But this is their standard truss on the route; there is or was another one just east of Bixby near US64.

This was not a major railroad, never had much of a budget or a lot of traffic, and was originally intended to be an electric interurban. So, there was nothing heavy duty about it. Not even the Arkansas River bridge was significantly more stout than this span (look up Tulsa River Park Pedestrian Bridge).

Posted May 25, 2015, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I don't know. Low Water Crossings and their seasonal usage seem to be a way of life in this region. This website is dedicated to keeping people updated on the status of 892 low water crossings in the greater Austin area alone: http://www.atxfloods.com/

Posted May 25, 2015, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

I was listening to the news and they were describing how 'shallow water crossings' are impassable. I wonder if these floods will cause any local lawmakers to rethink removing little used bridges and replacing them with 'shallow water crossings' to save on maintenance costs.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted May 25, 2015, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Another Twitter photo.

Posted May 25, 2015, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

From Twitter: 5th and 6th streets are flooded at West

Posted May 25, 2015, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I think this is actually a girder/floorbeam system type bridge. Note how the outer beams rise above the roadway level, and further note the rivets in the side of the girder, which one would assume, are where the transverse floor beams are riveted.

Posted May 25, 2015, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

My understanding is that Acrow modular bridges are essentially Bailey truss bridges, updated and simplified. They call them the "Third Generation" which I assume means an improvement over the original Bailey M2 Model. Basically Bailey 3.0. From BridgeWeb.com:

The 700XS Acrow Panel Bridging system is the third generation of improvements beyond the original, world-renowned Bailey Bridge. Briefly, the design of the new 700XS System has produced a lighter bridge comprised of fewer components with a truss that is 50% taller than alternate panel bridges and, as a result, 50% stronger in bending and 20% stronger in shear.

Posted May 25, 2015, by Walker/Susan Burns

Walker says its the one west of old county farm. It had the 1909 and 1993 floods marked on it...no longer there replaced by ugly cement one. West fork of big creek

Posted May 25, 2015, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Flood graph for the next crossing south of this bridge. Hopefully this bridge (and other abandoned bridges in this county) survive the heavy flooding in this region!

Posted May 25, 2015, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

The article is probably confusing the date with one of the several other US-6/19 truss bridges in the area which are from the 30s. The one in Venango has a 1934 date.

The Cambridge Springs Bridge was evaluated as NOT ELIGIBLE many years ago, and PennDOT appears to still be upholding this finding. This is not acceptable given the recent demo of the Berne Station Bridge, the ongoing demo of Denora Webster Bridge, and planned demo of Hulton Bridge and Wolf Bridge.

I contacted the PHMC last week and am advised they will be reviewing this project next week.

All surviving Pennsylvania truss bridges in Pennsylvania should be re-evaluated as eligible given their extreme rarity in the state today as a direct result of widespread unchecked demolition.

Posted May 25, 2015, by 2Trainz

U cannot steer a train dumbass

bridge funding
Posted May 25, 2015, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

this article concerning bridge funding covering repair of bridges owned by counties and municipalities was printed in the reading eagle dated 5-25-15.this does only pertain to bridges in Pennsylvania.u.s. senator bob casey jr. is backing a bill to increase the percentage of federal bridge dollars used on locally owned spans.if passed this bill would help possibly preserve county and local bridges in pa.if and when this legislation passes or fails I will print it here.

Posted May 25, 2015, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Luana,

You should be proud. Building a bridge of that size is quite an accomplishment.

Many people on this site tend to have a negative impression of new bridges that replace old ones they like, I would suggest reading the prior comments from that perspective.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted May 25, 2015, by ArtS (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Clark,

If you look at Nathan's site in the links, he has compelling evidence For 1901. I just wanted to quote the article verbatim.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted May 24, 2015, by luana morales (luanademorales [at] gmail [dot] com)

The new carquinez bridge is BEAUTIFUL,I am proud to have been one of the bridge builder,that worked on footings and tower (Crockett side),can't wait to show my grandchildren,what their grandma helped build, :)

Posted May 24, 2015, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Does anyone else thing this looks like an Acrow bridge rather than Bailey?

Posted May 24, 2015, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

So, is this really from 1901 or is the newspaper date correct?

Posted May 24, 2015, by Bob Waterhouse (bobwaterh [at] aol [dot] com)

Thanks for the response, Nathan. Yes, those are the truss end posts I was referring to. This pair differs from the other 13, which are the more elaborate, and graceful, Phoenix columns. However, the upper and mid-height bracings that connect them transversely are identical to those joining the other end post pairs, as are the decorative finials above them. There must be a story behind this, some irregularity that made it necessary either when the bridge was built 1882, or when it was repaired around 1950 (I believe)or even during the 2010 rehabilitation. Are there engineering records that would provide an explanation?

Posted May 24, 2015, by Lee A. Gautreaux (railgoat [at] bellsouth [dot] net)

For further clarification, the westernmost through span which had previously served as the swing span prior to the installation of the center vertical lift span no longer functions as a draw span. The rails have been permanently welded together and the swing mechanism has been permanently disabled. All marine traffic that cannot travel under the bridge must use the center lift span.

Posted May 24, 2015, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Doomed:

http://www.goerie.com/news-from-across-erie-and-crawford-cou...

CAMBRIDGE SPRINGS

PennDOT to outline plansfor Route 6 truss bridge

The Pennsylvania Department of Transportation will share plans to replace the truss bridge on Route 6 over French Creek in Cambridge Springs during a public meeting at Cambridge Springs High School in June.

The 203-foot bridge is structurally deficient. PennDOT plans to replace it beginning in 2017.

The bridge carries about 8,500 vehicles a day, PennDOT spokesman Jim Carroll said.

The bridge was built in 1934.

PennDOT will present plans for the bridge replacement on June 17 at 5:30 p.m. The program will include an outline of the project, including traffic impacts and proposed detours.

-- Valerie Myers

Posted May 23, 2015, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

A video of the proceedings:

http://wlfi.com/2014/09/09/after-slight-rain-delay-freedom-b...

Regards,

Art S.

Posted May 23, 2015, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

The right of way is now owned by:

Climbing Arrow Ranch

2525 FAIRWAY DR

BOZEMAN, MT 59715-5862

I think one would honor their wishes and contact them before entering their land.

If you are going to be trapped on a railroad bridge, please at least have some clothes on.
Posted May 22, 2015, by James McCray (jamesinslocomb [at] yahoo [dot] com)
Posted May 22, 2015, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)
Posted May 22, 2015, by Roger Deschner (rogerdeschner [at] gmail [dot] com)

A photo of this great-looking, historic bridge is featured as the background picture for Bike The Drive, when Lake Shore Drive is closed to cars and opened to bicycles for a Sunday morning. It is regarded as an iconic bridge by Chicagoans, making the prospect of losing it controversial. http://www.bikethedrive.org/

Posted May 22, 2015, by Matt Lohry

I drove past here in May 2015, and there is no indication that the old truss bridges ever even existed. Two nasty new UCEB's now carry I-94 across the red Cedar River. Shameful.

Posted May 22, 2015, by Douglas Butler

You can move them thanks.

RE: Trying to identify a bridge in Washington state from a photograph
Posted May 22, 2015, by Mike Goff (michael [dot] goff [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Andy,

I beleive this is the fish ladder access bridge on the Wind River near Carson, WA.

The company that build it has a website devoted to their work. http://www.sahale.com/wind.htm

They also have it mapped on their webpage.

Happy hiking,

Mike

Re: Bridge Identification
Posted May 22, 2015, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Just a couple more random comments. One of the benefits of Baltimores and Pennsylvania trusses, or any subdivided truss is it shortens the panel length. This in turn means that deck stringers can be shorter in length and thus lighter weight... which means less dead load.

If the bridge is pin connected its often easy for a non-engineer to learn what members are in tension or compression, because eyebars are always tension members, and not designed to handle compression.

Posted May 22, 2015, by Douglas Butler

This swing bridge was converted into a lift bridge.

Posted May 22, 2015, by Mary Jo Williams (calhounem2 [at] sat-co [dot] net)

Two Bayou Creek

33.629805, -92.708981

Bridge at Two Bayou Creek is located at above lat/long. Located east of SAU Tech.

MJ Williams

Co-Administrator

Calhoun County Physical Addressing

Posted May 21, 2015, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Of course you will have to wait three days for the nearest police officer to complete the drive to this bridge...

Posted May 21, 2015, by James Baughn (webmaster [at] bridgehunter [dot] com)

I received this message:

"Your website has incorrect information. The Eagle's Nest Trestle is located on PRIVATE PROPERTY, it is not open to public traffic. Please correct this as we do prosecute."

Re: Bridge Identification
Posted May 21, 2015, by Matt Lohry

I think that the main difference between the top and bottom is compression vs. tension...I believe that the short diagonals that run up to the top chord are being "squeezed" in between the long diagonal (which is in tension, or being " stretched") and the upper chord (which is in compression, or being "squashed"), while the diagonals that go to the bottom chord are in tension, since the lower chord is also in tension. These extra members all help to add capacity, which is why they were used for railroad bridges in many instances. They're different in design from each other, but they're both substantially stronger than their root Pratt variants. These sub-members also help to alleviate the possibility of buckling in compression members (such as the end posts) by reducing their "unbraced length"--that is, the distance between two points of connection. Longer members tend to buckle much more easily than short members, and adding these extra members and connecting them at the midpoints essentially divides each long member into two short members by cutting their unbraced length in half and reducing the possibility of buckling greatly.

Posted May 21, 2015, by Ian Martin

Unless someone is oppsoed, I'm going to change the RR bridges between Plymouth & Lincoln to PLRR titles instead of NEGS (New England Southern). NEGS has rights to Lincoln but hasn't operated north of the Laconia/Tilton area in many years; the only trains to regularly use these bridges are PLRR tourist trains.

Posted May 21, 2015, by Ralph Demars

According to a street view file Aug.2014, this bridge is gone.

Trying to identify a bridge in Washington state from a photograph
Posted May 21, 2015, by Andy Pierson (andy [dot] pierson [at] gmail [dot] com)

Hi all- new to this site... just discovered today while trying to search Google for suspension bridge hikes in Washington. I saw this photograph online and I have very little information other than it is in Washington. If you can help I would greatly appreciate it..

Cheers,

Andy

Posted May 21, 2015, by Danielle (Backyardiganmom [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This was yesterday 5-19-15

re: Bridge Indentidication
Posted May 21, 2015, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Not convinced its an early example... looks like its rivet-connected to me. Among Baltimore trusses I have visited, I usually do in fact find both a hip vertical from the end of the top chord to the bottom chord, and also a subdivided panel at the end post, where you have a vertical running from bottom chord to halfway up the end post, with an associated diagonal member at that point. Its the shorter diagonal members from the full-length diagonals that run up to the top chord, that you might not always see. This drawing shows a Baltimore WITHOUT those diagonals: http://pghbridges.com/assets/images/bridgetypes/truss_balt.G...

Bridge Indentidication
Posted May 21, 2015, by John Marvig

Royce,

The bridge is a type of early Baltimore truss. The end panels containing the verticals is rather rare (not something I've seen often), so it is a modified Baltimore through truss, and a rather early one.

Posted May 20, 2015, by Ben Tate (benji5221 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I'm pretty sure it's a typo. I can't find any reference to that definition of contentious.

Posted May 20, 2015, by Mark Hilton (hotel264 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Stopped by here last week looking for the bridge's historical marker. Added 3 more photo's, one of the bridge marker, one of the small model a few blocks away, and one of the former entrance to the bridge.

re: hill to hill
Posted May 20, 2015, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Royce,

Thank you for your kind words. Its always been my hope that people use HistoricBridges.org just the way you do... as a compliment and supplement to BridgeHunter... I often worry that people think of these two websites as competing, thats not really my intent. I think both websites are valuable resources for historic bridge info. As you can tell, I use Bridgehunter myself constantly!

Posted May 20, 2015, by Douglas Butler

At one time It was a 3rd street swing bridge in Bay City Michigan.

Posted May 19, 2015, by John Cross (jcross [at] cross-photography [dot] com)

I'm sure it was rehabbed in the early 1970s possibly elevated for what would be the newly completed (at the time) McClellan-Kerr Arkansas River Navigation System.

re: Hill to Hill Bridge
Posted May 19, 2015, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Royce - The Hill To Hill Bridge is one of the most unusual and unique bridges in America... hard to classify... as a result, I would not fault anyone for classifying it either way... (ie arch or truss). On my website, I usually classify bridges based on longest span, and as such on my page http://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=pe... I listed it as a truss in terms of main span, with arch approach spans. However, someone listing it as a concrete arch isn't too surprising, since the actual river spans are concrete arches, and the vast majority of spans are concrete arches.

As for the Bridge Road Bridge situation, a lot of times the name of the road does refer to the historical name of the bridge. Just be sure there aren't any more prominent bridges on the road.

Posted May 19, 2015, by derek kennedy (dkennedy44 [at] bellsouth [dot] net)

I thought it was a spelling error, also. Contentious in this case means only one way traffic, only one car can cross at a time.

Posted May 19, 2015, by Ben Dover (kjwhekhweguer12 [at] gmail [dot] com)

woooooooo

Posted May 18, 2015, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

NRHP Nomination Form Attached.

Attachment #1 (application/pdf; 1,147,645 bytes)

Posted May 18, 2015, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)
Mystery Truss
Posted May 18, 2015, by Kevin Skow (weatherbum [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Found this truss today sitting next to a Madison County, IA road maintenance shed near East Peru, IA. Any guesses where it came from? I have a hunch it is probably one of these two bridges: http://bridgehunter.com/ia/madison/233810/ or http://bridgehunter.com/ia/madison/233620/

Posted May 18, 2015, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Bob,

Are you referring to this detail:

https://goo.gl/maps/PO5Jk

It appears to be either a (perhaps old) alteration of original end posts, or replacement of original end posts. I (embarrassed to say) have not field visited this bridge, and so am just going off of Google Street View.

Posted May 18, 2015, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

The 185 feet may be the clear span. It is not some random length (as often appears in the NBI); it is reported as the span length in literature I have from the centering fabricator for the bridge... but the centering fabricator would likely be interested in the arch length from the spring line, rather than c. c. of pier.

Posted May 18, 2015, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I am somewhat familiar with Michigan bridge history, and there definitely was a 6th Street Bridge in Saginaw. The likely builder was Smith Bridge Company of Toledo. Similar styled bridge. http://bridgehunter.com/ky/meade/bh43007/

Posted May 18, 2015, by Chris Litherland (christopherlitherland [at] gmail [dot] com)

Photo I took of the now most likely abandoned bridge from May 17 2015.

Posted May 18, 2015, by Chris Litherland (christopherlitherland [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge is abandoned now at least most likely is. Some of the tracks are ripped up just a couple hundred feet passed this bridge and the tunnel located about a quarter mile is abandoned and has pieces of it collapsed on top of the tracks and then about a mile past the bridge the tracks are completely ripped up. I was just there a couple of days ago. So the status of this bridge should be changed.

Heres a photo I just took of it yesterday, the tracks clearly havent been used in a long time.

Posted May 18, 2015, by Don Morrison
Posted May 18, 2015, by Richard Zitrick (richard [dot] zitrick [at] comcast [dot] net)

The GPS coordinants for this bridge are wrong. The coordinants listed are for Cabin Run Covered Bridge. As near as I can figure, the proper coordinants for Loux Covered Bridge should be:

N40 25.36 W75 07.67 (may be off by a few feet)

+40.422989 -75.127688 (on the money)

Posted May 18, 2015, by Elliott Johnson (elliottsgon15 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I can find no proof of this bridges existence, the satellite shows an empty lot and the NRHP has no listing for it. The NBI shows it, but that was the only proof i could find.

Posted May 18, 2015, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

The arch is a patented design by Jai Kim where the arch provides load-bearing for live loads... although I recently learned from him that his patented design was sometimes used by companies who didn't use it properly and altered the truss, which he says his original design didn't do.

Posted May 17, 2015, by Robert Stephenson (seinfeld99 [at] yahoo [dot] com)
Posted May 17, 2015, by Robert Stephenson (seinfeld99 [at] yahoo [dot] com)
Posted May 17, 2015, by Anonymous

the swinging bridge was built by wylie william price and john lee price some time around 1950.

Posted May 17, 2015, by Roger Deschner (rogerdeschner [at] gmail [dot] com)

If this is a truss bridge, what is that arch doing threaded in the middle of the truss webs? The arch and the truss members do not appear to be connected. Was the arch added later to provide added strength? A very unusual structure, that I hope can be saved.

Posted May 17, 2015, by Krista Lee (stbrigidofoz [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Still standing - taken 04/26/2015

Posted May 17, 2015, by Krista Lee (stbrigidofoz [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This photo was take December 2012 looking West.

No Shorcuts.......
Posted May 17, 2015, by GS

Here's the photo without the advertising

Sulphite Railroad Covered Bridge 29-07-09-BM - Upside-Down Covered Bridge
Posted May 17, 2015, by Royce and Bobette Haley (roycehaley111 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Just noticed that these 2 bridges are the same bridge. I'm not sure how to combine the two pages. Looks like James Baughn page was up first. Might want to change the name though to "Sulphite Bridge" which is the local name of the bridge.

Royce

RE: On The Road To Success There Are No Shortcuts
Posted May 16, 2015, by Luke

Art, according to a comment on a Reddit thread, Mamaroneck, New York is the location.

I did a bit of looking at it looks like it's the Metro-North bridge over Mamaroneck Avenue.

On The Road To Success There Are No Shortcuts
Posted May 16, 2015, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Not sure where this bridge is or how to post a picture on its own, but thought I should post.

http://starecat.com/truck-fail-hit-the-bridge-on-the-road-to...

Posted May 16, 2015, by Bob Waterhouse (bobwaterh [at] aol [dot] com)

This is an amazingly graceful truss bridge, lightweight girders and ornate details. Does anyone know why the southern end posts on the third or fourth truss seem to be of a heavier material?. This feature was preserved even after the rehabilitation about five years ago was it a quirky part of the original design, or was it made necessary by some unusual occurrence?

Posted May 16, 2015, by Mike Daffron (daffronmike [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I would imagine that this creek got it's name from the unfortunate smell that accompanies it.

Bath Bridge 29-05-03 (New Hampshire)
Posted May 16, 2015, by Will Truax (Bridgewright [at] gmail [dot] com)

I am in complete agreement with Micheal as to categorizing truss type -

The Bath features an unpatented truss type which was once found in greater numbers in this immediate area.

Though often misidentified as Burr or Haupt variants, the truss is not a variant of either, nor does it share any similarities with a Paddleford other than the curious irony that both share the same home range and both are unpatented.

Posted May 15, 2015, by Scott Gavin (trainnut1956 [at] gmail [dot] com)

By the way, the Oregon Southern and Eastern Railroad, and its trestles, featured prominently in another film - Emperor of the North - starring Lee Marvin and Ernest Borgnine. It's a pretty dreadful and violent film, the only saving grace is that it also contains some of the best steam railroad action scenes to ever grace the silver screen.

Point Bridge (1st) (Pennsylvania)
Posted May 15, 2015, by Luke

Thanks Clark.

There are a bunch of sites I've found with load of imagery, including a site with a sheet that claims that the American Bridge Company "engineered/built the bridge":

http://point-bridge.com/about-us/pittsburgh-the-point/

http://www.brooklineconnection.com/history/Facts/PointBridge...

Posted May 15, 2015, by Scott Gavin (trainnut1956 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge was built for the film and was not a bridge used by the Oregon Southern and Eastern Railroad itself. It was designed to collapse at the climatic moment of the film, so bridge affectionados can relax - no real bridge was harmed during the making of this movie!

Of more interest is the over-under trestle shown part way through the movie in the scene where the raiders, on the top level of the trestle, throw ties down onto the train passing below in hopes of derailing it. There were only three or four known Over and Under Trestles in Oregon, and most of them don't match the setting in the movie - and none of them were anywhere near Cottage Grove, where the film was made. For years railroad fans and film nuts have wondered where that particular scene had been shot.

Lloyd Palmer, Terry Gookin, Len Wall and a group of several other rail historians and fans, myself included, finally located photos of an over-under trestle at Black Rock, Oregon, west of Dallas that match the trestle in the movie exactly, and given that the logging railroad at Black Rock was owned by George Gerlinger, and that Buster Keaton had sent the locomotives to be used in the movie to Gerlinger Locomotive Works to be refurbished and back-dated for the film, we knew that the movie engines had been in the vicinity, and personal examination of the trestle site and comparing it with both historic photos of the trestle and stills of the movie proved beyond a shadow of a doubt that the over-under trestle scene was filmed at Black Rock.

Point Bridge (1st) (Pennsylvania)
Posted May 15, 2015, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

This was a really attractive bridge. I hope there are more pictures. Nice find, Luke.

Posted May 15, 2015, by Ralph Demars

I think they're just removing the rails. Don't panic about the bridge...yet!

Posted May 14, 2015, by Eric Berger (eric [dot] berger [at] chron [dot] com)

So the answer to this is pretty interesting and I only stumbled across it after speaking with Humboldt Mandell, who worked on the original Mars planning group at NASA in the early 1960s. When this bridge was being built they needed to transport rockets from Stennis to Michoud, and the rocket they envisioned using for Mars was called the "Nova" rocket. This was envisioned to be a good deal wider than the Saturn V and thus the high clearance needed for this particular bridge.

Posted May 14, 2015, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Finding truss bridges in aerial images is not always that easy. If the bridge is casting a shadow, consider yourself lucky. Most abandoned truss bridges are surrounded by dense foliage, unless you are in the deserts of the Mountain West. I have found plenty of "lost" bridges that were really just hiding in the trees.

Very lightweight trusses, including bowstrings can practically disappear against brown water.

Posted May 14, 2015, by Bill Graber (foursecretary [at] aol [dot] com)

Wrong picture. The picture is the replacement NS between 9th and 11th Streets. The IM or IC RR Cook Street Overpass is east of 18th Street.

Posted May 14, 2015, by Colin J Parker

I was looking at the postcard, pictured above. It does indeed look like the rail road bridge. You can see, what looks like the road bridge BEHIND the rail road bridge?

Posted May 14, 2015, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

A recent Google Maps aerial image shows construction work taking place near this bridge...

Posted May 14, 2015, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Hi Julie:

I will see what I can do. Central Kansas has fewer historic bridges than it did when I was a teenager, but there are still some nice ones left.

Posted May 14, 2015, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Some nice historical photos in this article

https://books.google.com/books?id=czs5AQAAMAAJ&dq=rainbow%20...

Posted May 13, 2015, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I would love to pursue a Robert Elder bridgehunting itinerary for that area. They want us to look at the Chapman Creek Bridge.what else is there over there?

RE: Know where this is?
Posted May 13, 2015, by Luke

A "Reverse Google Image Search" brought up this: http://www.hoax-slayer.com/house-removal-bridge-accident.sht...

Posted May 13, 2015, by Kevin Skow (weatherbum [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Found the answer to my old question. This bridge was moved here in 1952, which would account for the mystery pier below the structure, which would have been from the previous bridge.

Posted May 13, 2015, by Ryan (notmyemail [at] email [dot] com)

I can't believe someone actually thought those were real pistols!

Posted May 13, 2015, by Anonymous

From a historical perspective, the last thing we need is historic bridges disappearing illegally. From a public safety perspective, the last thing we need is bridges in use being weakened - a practice which this guy does not seem to be guilt of. Regardless, he needs to be prosecuted and punished severely before he starts removing other bridges. I am afraid that if he just gets a mild slap on the wrist, or if all charges are dismissed then he will be right back at it. We are not dealing with silly teenagers committing silly pranks here. We are dealing with professionals who are putting the public at risk.

Posted May 13, 2015, by Elliott Johnson (elliottsgon15 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

even in blurry photos, truss bridges are really easy to spot because of the shadows they cast. well, that and the bright white color of the uceb's that replace them. its still hard to tell sometimes.

Rail Bridges
Posted May 13, 2015, by Don Morrison

I added 3 rail bridges in Iowa. One in Mitchell County near Orchard, one in Floyd county over the Little Cedar River, and one in Chickasaw county near Bassett. Have known of the one in Orchard for a long time, the other two I spotted driving between Charles City and New Hampton.

I checked the site and saw that they had not been added.

Feel free to edit these entries and add info. There are more bridges along these two ROWs as well. ;-)

Drew Bridge (Florida)
Posted May 12, 2015, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Blake,

As a followup to my evaluation of this bridge's significance, I have submitted request to Florida State Historic Preservation Office to list the bridge on the National Register of Historic Places. The process moves REALLY slow, but supposedly Florida SHPO is doing its own research on the bridge as well. My hope is that a listing would increase awareness of the bridge.

Drew Bridge (Florida)
Posted May 12, 2015, by Blake K. Reaves (blakekarleen2012 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I am absolutely amazed at what I read about the Drew Bridge. I can honestly say that I know very little about bridges. I just knew that I had been fascinated by this old swing bridge since I was a small child and thought that it deserved some recognition, as few people in our town knew it existed. I never thought it could be one of the oldest railroad bridges in the country. The two counties really don't know what they've got sitting there in the river and I wish more could be done to preserve it.

Posted May 12, 2015, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Better hope he doesn't get to the Sohl Avenue Bridge....


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