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Posted December 28, 2013, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

The demolition of this bridge is ridiculous. Glad I visited this bridge during a brief visit to this region this past fall. My site visit indicated that there was absolutely nothing seriously wrong with the superstructure. They could have put a new deck on and celebrated a piece of Route 66 history.

Posted December 28, 2013, by Kelly McClanahan

MoDot Press Release states the new bridge will be opened Feb 9, 2014.

http://www.newriverbridge.org/documents/2013-12-12MissouriIl...

Bridge comment
Posted December 28, 2013, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Luke, I like the first one, tiny and cute. I'd give it a home if they got rid of it!

RE: Bridges in IL
Posted December 28, 2013, by Luke Harden (lukemh9 [at] gmail [dot] com)

As far as the trusses go...

I think this is the Tompkins Township one: http://bridgehunter.com/il/warren/94520208313/

I think this is the Hale Township one:

http://bridgehunter.com/il/warren/94530220683/

I think this is the Monmouth Township one:

http://bridgehunter.com/il/warren/94481020726/

Posted December 28, 2013, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)
Posted December 28, 2013, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

The bridge will undergo further repairs and receive a paved wooden deck to replace the metal deck:

http://www.waynepost.com/article/20131228/NEWS/131229928/199...

Posted December 28, 2013, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)
Bridges in IL
Posted December 28, 2013, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Bridges in Warren County, IL. Here is an article discussing deficient bridges including three truss bridges from around 1900. Are these in the database?

http://www.reviewatlas.com/article/20131228/NEWS/131229944/1...

Posted December 28, 2013, by Andrew Laverdiere (laverdiereaf [at] yahoo [dot] com)

The bronze plaque states that this bridge was built by the New Deal Works Progress Administration in 1938.

Posted December 28, 2013, by Tom Parker (tscottparker [at] gmail [dot] com)

Here are some pictures I took a number of years ago. I do not believe the bridge is abandoned. It is a double track bridge but on track was removed many years ago. One track is still in use unless the bridge has been recently replaced.

Posted December 28, 2013, by James Wireman (jameslovesbridges_86 [at] ymail [dot] com)

Please at least use this bridge as a FRONTAGE RD. Bridge for like a back Road. I know it looks good enough for that.

Posted December 28, 2013, by James Wireman (jameslovesbridges_86 [at] ymail [dot] com)

Please don't replace this Bridge until at Least 2025. This Bridge still looks in pretty good condition. This bridge does not need to be replaced anytime soon. I'm Begging you the owner of this bridge to not replace it in 2015 wait for another 10 years or so after that like 2025, 2030, of anywhere in between any of those years. I am so against having this bridge Replaced anytime soon. Please do not replace this bridge at least until 2025. I want the owner to keep this bridge up at least until 2025. This is my Debate. I'm Debating on the people to keep maintaining this bridge at least until 2025. This is one of my Faverate Bridges. It Makes a really great sound going across it. the way I see it this bridge Is still good enough to stay open to traffic for another 10 to 15 years. This is my Debate.

Posted December 28, 2013, by Anonymous

I was Thinking More for this Bridge To be Reused as a FRONTAGE RD. Bridge. This bridge still looks Pretty doggone good Condition. I was also trying to say Please reschedule the replacement to either 2025, 2030, or Anywhere In Between those 2 Years. Because this Bridge still looks OKAY. This Bridge might just need some Repairs on the steel OPEN GRATE DECK. It just had some repairs on the IOWA Approaches like only 2 years ago. So this bridge does not need to be replaced anytime soon.

Posted December 27, 2013, by Jason Smith (JDSmith77 [at] gmx [dot] net)

REMINDER: ONE WEEK LEFT BEFORE THE DEADLINE!

You still have until January 3rd to submit your ballot or list of bridges nominated for this year's Ammann Awards! Click and download your ballot, fill it out or list your favorites, and send it back to me via e-mail or facebook messenger. Your vote matters, esp. as everything is up for grabs right now!

http://thebridgehunter.areavoices.com/2013/12/05/2013-ammann...

Winners will be announced on January 7th. Good luck! :-)

Posted December 27, 2013, by James Baughn (webmaster [at] bridgehunter [dot] com)

Looking through various sources, I've found that the creek has been spelled Bullinger, Bullingers, Ballingers, Bollingers, Bollinger's, and Bollinger.

It appears that the officially recognized spelling is Bullinger, based on a decision in 1961 by the U.S. Board on Geographic Names.

I'm in the process of adding the names of creeks and rivers to the "What's Here" feature for editing bridges. Although not posted yet, this tool gives the name Bollingers, based on the U.S. Census Bureau's TIGER dataset.

The National Bridge Inventory spells the name Bullingers.

The Stephen F. Austin Historical Park uses the spelling Bollinger on their signs:

http://www.texashiking.com/Pictures/ShowImage.aspx?PictureID...

The Bollinger family was a pioneer family, always moving further west to avoid the crowds. George Frederick Bollinger brought 20 families to Southeast Missouri in 1799-1800. He's the namesake of Bollinger County, Missouri, typically pronounced Bull-in-ger.

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~lhsetzer/m...

From what I can gather, John Bollinger (George's nephew?) then moved to Texas with Austin.

http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/h/a/r/Randall-C-H...

If that's the case, then the creek *should* be spelled Bollinger. On the other hand, it's hard to ignore a ruling from the Board on Geographic Names (federal government) giving the name Bullinger.

Posted December 27, 2013, by Patrick S. O'Donnell (1 [dot] 991km [at] comcast [dot] net)

The thing that bothered me most about the bridge is the negative camber (dip / depression) at mid-span where the two halves meet, thus taking away the one graceful aspect this bridge should have had. The Walmart at the base of the bridge on the eastern end (Mason, WV) doesn't help either. Note the Walmart as well as the dip in the deck, most noticeable by way of the railing and the formation of a puddle in the pedestrian pathway. Additional photos posted in the photo portion of the listing.

Posted December 27, 2013, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Images from the construction site for the restoration of the bridge can be found at www.bunkermillbridge.org.

We will start to have video up on You Tube soon. It is our job to educate. W'B believes in the apprentice training. In order to become master at anything one has to do it. Many times I watch Nels let "crew" do the work, even when he would rather do it themselves, in order to give them that feeling and the experience they need to move these projects forward.

Leet Street Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted December 27, 2013, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I sent an email to the reporter suggesting that they look into restoration a little further and that it is certainly eligible for historic status, whether they pursue that or not.

It is not easy to find the kind of money that these bridges deserve. For too long demo was lowballed to hinder restoration...much easier to torch it and pull it out of the river.

The engineering education needs to come forward and we need to make strides next year in revising some of those AASHTO standards or guidelines that have been proven to have other solutions.

I can tell you that we were able to beef up Bunker Mill Bridge when Nels suggested that we use 40' stringers. By adding that structural stability over three floor beams, and beefing up the three center beams we are able to meet the necessary loading requirements without having to resort to limiting the width. Kalona people are stepping forward with cash to get their project done and we are meeting all of the requirements for restoration without having to go through SHPO/DOT delays. It would be one thing if they didn't spend most of their time getting up to speed in order to comment.

So we continue the education, hoping that people see the value that NSRGA/W"B can bring to the table; working with the best craftsmen and engineers under the umbrella of a non-profit with a construction/consulting arm. Who would have thought.

Rose Point Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted December 27, 2013, by Cliff D (clif30 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Anybody have an update on this bridge?

Posted December 27, 2013, by Patricia Bagwell (icezena [at] mac [dot] com)

The correct spelling is "Bollinger Creek Bridge". It is on Peters-San Felipe Road in the Corporation of San Felipe de Austin. This creek runs through our property, and my old Deeds show the spelling as: Bollinger, and this family once lived on this property. This area is the area which Stephen F. Austin's Old 300 Colonists were brought to.

I'm looking for the exact date of the bridge, one lane, wooden deck that was probably built in the 1930's, and was replaced by the 1996 concrete bridge.

Leet Street Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted December 27, 2013, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Tony, historic status has little to do with reality when dealing with corporations and governments. If anything, it is perceived as a headache. Historians and enthusiasts are irritants. The key is to convince these entities that repairing/maintaining these bridges is a better solution than replacement.

Looking at what Julie and Nels are doing with the Bunker Mill bridge makes me think that the solution is to put together a system/process and a crew that could outcompete the current way of thinking. For example, if this bridge could be restored, including lead abatement, for a similar cost to having it removed and replaced with a pedestrian bridge, one could argue that it would be a functionally superior result at a competitive cost. This would make sense to the bean counters and mitigate the historic status issue.

If there were examples of success that we could point to (or once there are several successful outcomes), it would make it easier to convince others of this approach.

Also, I suspect that most civil engineers that are tasked with providing a load rating for an old bridge have little confidence in the older materials or little experience in determining how to do the calculations for old truss types. This results in the engineers putting in way too conservative of a fudge factor in order to protect themselves when they sign off on the load rating, thus making the bridge obsolete due to the restricted load rating.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted December 27, 2013, by Luke Harden (lukemh9 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Yeah, that's why I added the rail-and-road category, I just forgot to removed the rail-to-road one.

Leet Street Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted December 26, 2013, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Not eligible for historic status?... HOGWASH!

Posted December 26, 2013, by Nicotti (prisoneratwar [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Drove past yesterday (12/25/13). The road deck has has been removed from half the bridge. Only the MO side remains.

Posted December 26, 2013, by Zachary S

Haha you found a street view of the girders?? Awesome. I guess we can't consider the bridge technically lost, as both the girders and piers are still clearly extant and intact to this day.

Posted December 25, 2013, by ArtS (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

More info on the bridge as well as pictures:

http://lincolnhighwaynews.wordpress.com/tag/trenton-nj/

Leet Street Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted December 25, 2013, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

NS is willing to pay $77K to remove this bridge. I bet it can be lifted and properly disassembled for that. Depending on what it needs, Julie and Nels might be able to get NS to spend a little more (the $77K removal cost combined with the cost of the replacement pedestrian bridge might be enough) and have it restored!

Anybody thoughts on this idea?

Regards and Merry Christmas to all!

Art S.

Leet Street Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted December 25, 2013, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)
Posted December 25, 2013, by Luke Harden (lukemh9 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I think Stephen Fry put it best: " 'Because it's ugly,' whinge the pedants. It's only ugly because it's new and you don't like it. Ugly in the way Picasso, Stravinsky and Eliot were once thought ugly and before them Monet, Mahler and Baudelaire."

Posted December 25, 2013, by Shawn Denman (shawn [dot] denman [at] hotmail [dot] com)

My father was in charge of the building of this bridge. I remember going to the job site as a kid. There was a worker who was severely injured by pygmy rattle snakes when he fell into the snakes nest.

Posted December 25, 2013, by Sherman Cahal (shermancahal [at] gmail [dot] com)

It seems that cheap pot-shots are taken at the new bridge because someone has a strong dislike for all bridges new and/or concrete that may cause the replacement of an existing old truss. Get over it already. The new bridge has a lower rating mostly because of the type of construction method used, partially detailed at http://www.dot.state.oh.us/engineering/OTEC/2008%20Presentat...

Someone at another forum mentioned cracking, which is is superficial hairline concrete cracking that is completely normal on newly poured concrete surfaces and supports. There are no indications of cracks over 1/16", moisture intrusion or rust stains on the bridge, which would otherwise indicate delamination.

Winfield Toll Bridge (West Virginia)
Posted December 25, 2013, by Sherman Cahal (shermancahal [at] gmail [dot] com)

A FYI, the bridge has been rehabilitated. It has a new silver paint job, refurbished railings that are a deep black, a new sidewalk and a new bridge deck. The overpass over former US 35 has also been restored. It looks great now.

Posted December 25, 2013, by ArtS (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

The previous bridge at this location was an 1866 J.Hutchinson, Troy, NY builder, cast iron Whipple Purchased and assembled second hand in 1895 from the Berlin Bridge Co.

http://www.friendsofmerrymeetingbay.org/mmb/History/cathbr.h...

Posted December 25, 2013, by ArtS (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)
Posted December 23, 2013, by Jason Smith (JDSmith77 [at] gmx [dot] net)

Congratulations to the Friends of the Green Bridge for a resounding victory! A 7-0 City Council Approval for a joint project to raise funds and restore the 1898 Raccoon River crossing that has been closed since March! Now the next step is fund-raising and determining the bridge's needs (exactly)! More details here in this link: http://thebridgehunter.areavoices.com/2013/12/24/newsflyer-c...

Many cheers for the efforts!

Posted December 23, 2013, by Patrick S. O'Donnell (1 [dot] 991km [at] comcast [dot] net)

First four images posted to this listing do not belong here. They belong with the Downingtown Pike Bridge here: http://bridgehunter.com/pa/chester/bh46338/

Likewise the first four images there, belong here. This entry is the bridge with the unmistakable Brandywine Valley Viaduct high above.

Posted December 23, 2013, by Patrick S. O'Donnell (1 [dot] 991km [at] comcast [dot] net)

First four images do not belong with this entry. This is the Downingtown Pike Bridge connecting East Bradford and West Bradford Townships. The first four images here within belong with the Brandywine Avenue Bridge and the first four images within that entry belong here.

Posted December 23, 2013, by Matt Lohry

The attack against massive railroad bridges continues--this bridge may be in danger. I noticed today while driving by that test piles for new foundations on either side of this bridge were being driven. I heard through the grapevine (verification required) the bridge is being replaced as part of the Zoo Interchange project! IS NOTHING SACRED??

Posted December 23, 2013, by Ed Hollowell (erhollowell [at] aol [dot] com)

I understand that the bridge was closed with flood damage on December 22, 2013, Don't know the details.

Posted December 22, 2013, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)
Posted December 22, 2013, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)
Posted December 22, 2013, by Patrick S. O'Donnell (1 [dot] 991km [at] comcast [dot] net)

54 images added from my archives. A fair portion of them being overall shots with most of the views from the bicycle / pedestrian pathway with details that can only be gained from such a vantage point. I highly recommend spending some time up on the bicycle / pedestrian path if you get to this bridge.

Posted December 22, 2013, by doug (douglasrhine [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I love the 2010 ugly bridge report/inspection,

since the bridge wasn't even there then..

Posted December 22, 2013, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Yes he is Tony. He asked about you the other day. We are on holiday now but the eye-bar extra's were installed and the rollers were exposed....full of clay and mud. I'm sure I have a photo somewhere. We put them back with a teflon bearing plate attached to the original plate under the rollers. She straightened out and it was really a great day with a great connection between the operator/owner Jim Townsend of Townsend Crane (they do the odd stuff) and Nels with stories going both ways. The crane didn't budge, the portal lifted with a crack, they said it was a growl on the other side, and by the end of the day the load out was over.

It was cool. An interview during ice delay here..... http://www.cbs2iowa.com/news/features/top-stories/stories/ka...

Posted December 22, 2013, by Dan Turner (turnerda6 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The singing bridge has a special spot in my memory banks. My grandparents, Sant and Stella Day, lived close on the south banks of the river and slightly east. I returned to see the "old home place" last year and it is gone. I was even more disappointed to see the one-lane concrete road has been replaced along with the singing bridge.

Posted December 22, 2013, by Will Truax (Bridgewright [at] gmail [dot] com)

Though it might seem odd to some, I stand with Nathan on this issue - And share his opinion that a a false sense of history is inappropriate and flouts the Secretary's Standards.

More than that, I despise faux covered spans - The "House' is supposed be akin to the paint on a steel truss, there to protect a Through Truss from the elements. I like to put it this way - If it (the added dead load) ain't there to help hold things up, it can only be pulling things down.

Beyond that, when it comes time to maintain a needless maintenance item, it can only add to the mythology accepted by some that covered spans are silly and expensive to maintain.

Posted December 22, 2013, by Mike Broderick (Broderi53 [at] aol [dot] com)

This bridge is currently closed to all traffic, and no one myself included knows the reason why, its been closed for months and no work has been done to it, Its a real inconvience for the community and town highway department!

Posted December 21, 2013, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Nels is a Bridge-restoring Beast!

Re: Is this Morrison Frisco Bridge at Memphis?
Posted December 21, 2013, by Fmiser (fmiser [at] gmail [dot] com)

The piers match, the center tall web span matches, the sway braces look the same, the cantilever at the Arkansas shore is the same, the truss webs look similar.

http://bridgehunter.com/tn/shelby/frisco/

Yup. I think so. Taken from the Arkansas side of the river, facing approx southwest.

The Frisco was the first bridge over the river in Memphis, so in this photo, because there isn't even evidence of construction of the Harahan, (completed in 1916) this photo has to be earlier than about 1915.

Delaware Aqueduct (Pennsylvania)
Posted December 20, 2013, by Patrick S. O'Donnell (1 [dot] 991km [at] comcast [dot] net)

The only photos I could add that are different to those already great shots posted above are these few showing the splaying of the main cable into the strands with one of them including myself to show scale. These were shot 11 years ago back in the days of film. This was and still is a suspension bridge.

Webmaster's note: The photos that were here have been incorporated into the main site.

Is this Morrison Frisco Bridge at Memphis?
Posted December 20, 2013, by Kim Morris (kemorris [at] ipa [dot] net)

I have some old family photos that include this one, I think it must be the Frisco Bridge at Memphis, can anyone confirm that?

Posted December 20, 2013, by Anonymous

Bend Bridge has 90 tons of asphalt on the deck , I imagine you could saddle the trusses with large steel plates to strengthen the trusses and remove the asphalt to lighten the load that the bridge has to hold so that the road can stay open until the new bridge is finished , currently it's a 20 min drive to go around, and several business are located right across the bridge. It is a headache to have to drive the long way around multiple times a day!!! I think city and county need to get there heads out of there asses to get the bridge operational !!! I typically use the bridge 10 or more times a day and I have had enough !!! I have heard the county and city are fighting over money and lawsuits An that is part of the problem !!! I also was told they closed this bridge to force the hand of the state to give them emergency funding to build a new bridge because they go to the top of the list on getting grant money to build a new one by closing the existing bridge

Craighead Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted December 20, 2013, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)
Posted December 20, 2013, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Thanks for updating this page. Although this is a newer truss bridge (ca. 1930), it is a rather interesting structure because it consists of through and pony spans. I would not be surprised if this one gets demolished in a few years as it does carry a surprising amount of traffic for a bypassed bridge.

Posted December 20, 2013, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Bing Bird's Eye now has a nice view of the deck truss. I imagine this bridge will probably be demolished soon given the fact that it has a rating in the 20s and is a deck truss.

Delaware Aqueduct (Pennsylvania)
Posted December 20, 2013, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

The bridge was indeed originally a Roebling built bridge/aqueduct. For years in more recent history the aqueduct part was removed. More recently, the wooden aqueduct structure was replicated on the bridge. However, it remains open to pedestrians. If you look at the elevation views you can see a main cable with suspenders leading down to floor beams. The concrete you see appears to be a deck.

Delaware Aqueduct (Pennsylvania)
Posted December 20, 2013, by Luke Harden (lukemh9 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Sure looks like a suspension to me in this pre-restoration photograph...

Posted December 20, 2013, by Don Sayenga (Dsayenga [at] gmail [dot] com)

The various Ohio River comments perhaps ought to be clarified. Kentucky DOT has maintained the bridge because the Ohio River west of the north extension of the Mason Dixon Line had been claimed by Virginia. When Congress created new states such as Ohio, Indiana, and Kentucky the border claims of Virginia were retained by Kentucky. When the Corps of Engineers converted the Ohio River into a slackwater canal, they raised the water level in the pool stage, thereby submerging the boundary. The north side span of this bridge crosses over that boundary, but the rest of the bridge, including both towers, is in Kentucky.

Delaware Aqueduct (Pennsylvania)
Posted December 20, 2013, by Don Sayenga (Dsayenga [at] gmail [dot] com)

Perhaps a new category is needed for this one, but I wouldn't know what to call it. It wasn't a suspension bridge when it was built and it isn't a suspension bridge now. The latest photo is excellent. It clearly shows the prestressed concrete deck inside the aqueduct replica.

Posted December 20, 2013, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Yeah, it's a King Iron Bridge Co. pratt truss rehabbed .... now being restored. Here's Nels Raynor....in his own words.

http://www.press-citizen.com/article/20131220/NEWS01/3122000...

Posted December 19, 2013, by Luke Harden (lukemh9 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Article about the woman getting stuck on the bridge: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2456893/Woman-55-lef...

Posted December 19, 2013, by James Wireman (jameslovesbridges_86 [at] ymail [dot] com)

When Said to save it, I was thinking more of a FRONTAGE ROAD Bridge for like a Back road If you cannot do that, Pedestrians would be OK too. But Prefer it to be reused as a Frontage Rd bridge, that is just my Preference

Posted December 19, 2013, by Steven W Lindsey (SteveLindsey60 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Governor LaPage's Maine is not much into culture, historic preservation or the environment.

See: http://www.onlinesentinel.com/news/Historic_New_Sharon_bridg...

November 15

Historic New Sharon bridge will be torn down by the state

Multiple efforts to restore the bridge failed from a lack of funding.

By Kaitlin Schroeder kschroeder@centralmaine.com

Staff Writer

NEW SHARON — A nearly 100-year old iron bridge downtown will be demolished after the three-person select board unanimously approved the state’s offer to demolish the structure.

click image to enlarge

OLD BRIDGE: New Sharon selectmen unanimously voted Wednesday night to tear down this 94-year-old bridge in the downtown. Maine Department of Transportation offered to tear it down with no cost to the town, but said if New Sharon continued trying to restore it and it collapsed then the town would have to pay for the clean up.

Staff photo by Michael G. Seamans

click image to enlarge

OLD BRIDGE: New Sharon selectmen unanimously voted Wednesday night to tear down this 94-year-old bridge in the downtown.

Staff photo by Michael G. Seamans

Select images available for purchase in the

Maine Today Photo Store

The Maine Department of Transportation department told the town that the Sandy River bridge is in imminent danger of falling into the river, and said the state will pay to have it removed.

If the town had rejected the offer and the bridge collapsed, residents would have been responsible for clean up costs and any damage downstream from the collapse, according to the department.

There is no timeline yet for the state to remove the bridge and state transportation officials are working to obtain the necessary permits, said Maynard Webster, chairman of the select board, which voted on the bridge demolition Wednesday.

Selectman Forrest Bonney said while a couple residents suggested waiting until the annual Town Meeting to let the voters weigh in on the state’s offer, he said selectmen couldn’t take the chance.

“It’s a great liability for the town,” he said.

The bridge, located parallel to the newer U.S. Route 2 bridge, was built in 1916 and is on the National Register of Historic Places. The bridge is one of the last remaining bridges of its type of construction and the only one of its construction type in the state on the registry.

There have been multiple efforts to repair the bridge, but the efforts failed from a lack of funding.

Selectmen said a recent inspection by the transportation department revealed significant vertical cracking in the south abutment, leaving the bridge vulnerable to collapse into the river.

Bonney said most people who led a serious effort to restore the bridge have died.

Resident Kirk Butterfield, 55, said he thought the selectmen should not have made the decision to let the state tear it down, and should have instead had the voters decide at the annual Town Meeting.

Butterfield said he disagreed that the decision needed to be made immediately to prevent a collapse.

“I’m willing to bet it’s not a crisis situation,” he said.

Resident Anisa Welch, 48, said she supports the selectmen’s decision to pass the liability from the bridge on to the state, but said she understands why some residents have a hard time with it.

“It’s an emotional attachment,” she said. “That bridge, it is New Sharon.”

Selectmen estimated it would cost at least $2 million to repair the bridge.

Road Commissioner John Pond said the town hardly has the money to pay for necessary infrastructure work such as rebuilding roads, much less for restoring a defunct bridge.

“We can’t raise money for the roads, why spend it on this bridge?” he said.

Webster, longtime chairman of the select board, said he worked on several efforts to save the bridge, but said the time for saving it has passed.

“No one wanted it saved more than me, but it’s just not in the cards,” he said.

Posted December 19, 2013, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

12 Angry Men: My comment was not made due to my dislike of covered bridges, I would say the same if some fake modern metal truss was added on top too. The Secretary of Interior's Standards For Rehabilitation makes the following statement:

"Each property will be recognized as a physical record of its time, place, and use. Changes that create a false sense of historical development, such as adding conjectural features or elements from other historic properties, will not be undertaken."

Adding the structure that makes it look like a covered bridge creates this false sense of history. In the interest of offering some positive commentary, I will add an example of a bridge's sense of history being maintained. The following railroad bridge was redecked for pedestrian bridge, but special red colored concrete strips were incorporated into the deck. They trace the lines of the removed railroad rails, to remind people that it was originally a railroad bridge, but also not creating a tripping hazard that leaving the actual rails in place might have done: http://www.historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowse...

Posted December 19, 2013, by Art S. (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

The picture in the link looks like an early Columbia Bridge Works bridge!

Posted December 19, 2013, by Art S. (Asuckewet [at] knite [dot] com)

Personally, I think the 'makeup' isn't a big deal as long as the original bridge remains. It can always be reversed when tastes change. It would be nice if there was an interpretive plaque explaining the history of the bridge and what has been done to it.

Oh, and in response to 12 Angry Men: only a coward throws insults anonymously.

Regards to all,

Art S.

Posted December 19, 2013, by J.P. (wildcatjon2000 [at] gmail [dot] com)

So would this be considered a cover bridge with a round about in the middle?

Posted December 19, 2013, by J.P. (wildcatjon2000 [at] gmail [dot] com)

So I would have to agree that adding a cover takes away from the original bridge. I'm personally happy that they have preserved the bridge but could have been done just by adding a deck with some railing. It also takes away from the natural view the bridge would provide with out the cover. Just a thought.

Posted December 19, 2013, by Jason Smith (JDSmith77 [at] gmx [dot] net)

Note to all participating in the voting for the 2013 Ammann Awards: Don't forget to submit your votes before January 3rd. You can submit your ballot or (if you have any problems voting with the ballot) send your candidates via e-mail without the ballot. In any way, they will be received and counted. REMEMBER: YOUR VOTE MATTERS!

http://thebridgehunter.areavoices.com/2013/12/05/2013-ammann...

Posted December 19, 2013, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I suspect that this bridge was removed as part of the Heartland Corridor clearance project.

http://www.arema.org/files/library/2010_Conference_Proceedin...

Posted December 19, 2013, by Fmiser (fmiser [at] gmail [dot] com)

I agree with Robert. If you want a shelter, build a shelter. If you want a covered bridge, that's fine - but please don't make a "fake" covered bridge by putting a roof over an existing bridge.

But that's my opinion. Yours is probably different. *smiles*

Posted December 19, 2013, by 12 Angry Men

We dream of when your pointless comments are removed.

Everyone knows you hate covered bridges. You don't have to say it every time somebody puts up a picture. Put those comments where they belong--on your own website.

Posted December 19, 2013, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I can understand the need for a shelter. My main concerns with adding wooden covers to non-covered bridges are two-fold.

1. Modern wood coverings can conceal historic elements. Granted this is a much bigger concern with truss bridges that plate girder bridges as trusses are much more interesting and complex.

2. These coverings re-enforce the idea that non-covered bridges are uninteresting and non-historic. It is not unusual for a early 1900s covered bridge (with multiple modern components) to be preserved while an 1870s-1900 wrought-iron truss bridge nearby is demolished without any regard to its history. All too often the metal trusses are just regarded as eyesores. Usually, because they are unpainted.

Don't get me wrong, I can appreciate a historic covered bridge, but they are not the only structure type worth preserving.

As far as the need for a shelter is concerned, I would prefer a shelter separate from a bridge.

Posted December 18, 2013, by Bill Eichelberger

As it stands right now, it is useful as not only a bike trail bridge, but also a shelter in the event that the weather takes a bad turn while biking or hiking. It's also something of a tourist draw. Take the roof off and it's just a nameless old rail bridge that the bikers and hikers care about, but no one else.

Overweight bridge?
Posted December 18, 2013, by Fmiser (fmiser [at] gmail [dot] com)

A friend sent me this link to a video of a roadgrader on a bridge.

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=372967746087504

I think there is a possibility of the bridge being overloaded. I'm pretty sure this was not in the USA.

Posted December 18, 2013, by Fmiser (fmiser [at] gmail [dot] com)

Patrick,

Thanks for the photos! I especially appreciate the images of details. That is a sweet looking little bridge.

You do know that as an editor you can add images separate from posting a comment. Then you can give them a title and a caption - and the site will keep all your photos organize by bridge for easier management.

Craighead Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted December 18, 2013, by Art S. (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)
Posted December 18, 2013, by Art S. (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)
Posted December 18, 2013, by Art S. (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] co )

Congrats to you and Nels! In light of the $60K budget gap, what is your best guess at a timetable to completion

Regards,

Art S.

Posted December 18, 2013, by Art S. (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Patrick, thank you for sharing! Would you mind transferring some of your other pictures across to this site? It would beat the links to Flickr.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted December 18, 2013, by Patrick S. O'Donnell (1 [dot] 991km [at] comcast [dot] net)

Last set of photos with junctions of the structural members featured as well as my favorite mode of transport when visiting bridges. Eliminates the stress of finding parking away from the bridge so that the car is not in the photos and or on private property / stuck in a ditch in an attempt to get as far off the road as possible.

Webmaster's note: The photos that were here have been incorporated into the main site.

Posted December 18, 2013, by Patrick S. O'Donnell (1 [dot] 991km [at] comcast [dot] net)

Additional photos of the Ross Fording Road Bridge. The "Phoenix" branding in the last photo is barely discernable due to the many layers / thickness of paint.

Webmaster's note: The photos that were here have been incorporated into the main site.

Posted December 18, 2013, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)
Posted December 18, 2013, by Patrick S. O'Donnell (1 [dot] 991km [at] comcast [dot] net)

With the Devereux Road Bridge in mind and whether it is safe from demolition... I had recently visited this the Ross Fording Road Bridge this past November and expecting it to be in bad shape, was pleasantly surprised at the renovation that had taken place. I'll be liberal with photos as there are none posted yet.

Webmaster's note: The photos that were here have been incorporated into the main site.

Posted December 18, 2013, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

The appropriate corrective measure to the damage caused to this historic bridge was to replace the vertical member and bottom chord connection that was destroyed. Maybe a new floor beam too. Looked like the rest of the bridge was repairable.

I looked at the video which shows what the new "bridge" looks like (a slab of concrete) and I found I needed a...

Posted December 18, 2013, by Kent Higgins (jkhiggins [at] transystems [dot] com)

Wooden bridge removed on December 16, 2013.

Posted December 18, 2013, by Fred Sanford (Frederick_Sanford [at] aol [dot] com)

Bridge removed, new bridge completed, dedicated September 2013... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bxkwxLSupf8

Posted December 18, 2013, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

They have been reaching out to Workin' Bridges for several bridges. The problem is no one was giving the kind of consulting needed for tgese jobs so hard to attract reuse. Workin' on it.

Posted December 18, 2013, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Maybe one of these days, the public will realize that a bridge does not have to have a wooden cover to be significant...

Posted December 18, 2013, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Unfortunately, that is probably true.

Posted December 18, 2013, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Safe from demolition? This is a metal truss bridge in Pennsylvania. I think not. That said, structurally, the bridge is in good condition and is feasible to preserve long-term.

Posted December 18, 2013, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This is a very interesting pony truss. I would hope it is safe from demolition...

Posted December 17, 2013, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Patrick,

The person who photodocuments Chester County bridges for HistoricBridges.org said she had trouble finding this bridge. She is going to try to seek it out again when the weather gets better, so it should end up online eventually (along with a bunch more Chester County bridges she photographed that I have yet to add).

Wondering about an employee from 1930's
Posted December 17, 2013, by Ben kivett (Bfkfour [at] gmail [dot] com)

My great uncle worked there for twenty yrs. up until the 1930's he died in 1933 i know nothing about him and was hoping someone here might be able to point me in the right direction. His name was Jack H. Wison Thank you in advance. Ben f kivett IV

Posted December 17, 2013, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I dream of when the pointless covering is removed.

Posted December 17, 2013, by Dustin Adams (weetbixmarmite [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Closed? Demolition? This bridge is too beautiful to demolish! And didn't they just do a rehab on it a few years ago?

I did get to visit it once and take a whole roll of pictures back in 2010 on my way from New Orleans.

Posted December 17, 2013, by Patrick S. O'Donnell (1 [dot] 991km [at] comcast [dot] net)

Perhaps they're just keeping uniformity with the other bridges along this trail and how they have 8' high fences. There are at least three of these type truss bridges put in on this trail. One is complete, two were under construction at the time of my visit. Note the high fences going in. Certainly I can see having something like this when there is traffic underneath, although it still very much detracts from the truss they went with. They could have gone with any ol' mailorder bridge. The Valley Creek Bridge only spans a waterway. A fence half that height (4' as compared to 8') would be sufficient to prevent accidental falls. BTW Nathan, I didn't see this bridge (the stone arch Valley Creek Bridge) within your website.

Webmaster's note: The photos that were here have been incorporated into the main site.

Posted December 17, 2013, by Charles Blevins (cblev3 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This Bridge is historical, beautiful, and functional. I THINK IT IS A SHAME THAT THE COUNTY AUTHORITY(NELSON)RESPONSIBLE FOR MAINTAINING THIS BRIDGE HAS BEEN DERELICT IN ITS DUTY! If the bridge had been maintained on an annual basis there would be no need for an exorbitant amount of money to be spent now. So much money they are using it as the reason to close the bridge.

The Nelson County and the Washington County Judges both have stated that it is their desire to see the bridge closed, regardless of what their constituents want.

For my wife and me, it is our escape route when the river goes over the road between us and Fredericktown. Though we have discussed this with both Dean Watts and John Settles, our concerns bear little weight with either Judge.

Our hope is that reason and a remembering of civic responsibility will change minds about closing the landmark.

Posted December 17, 2013, by Luke Harden (lukemh9 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Here is the page from the book Mr.Gordon-Gilmore mentioned:

http://murphylibrary.uwlax.edu/digital/lacrosse/OnalaskaSawm...

Posted December 17, 2013, by Randy Gordon-Gilmore (randy [at] prototrains [dot] com)

In 1917 this bridge replaced an earlier bridge composed of two 132-foot Pratt through trusses (I assume, with approach spans). There is a photo of the earlier bridge (apparently in the process of being replaced) in the book "From Sawmills to Sunfish" on page 175. The far truss seems to be in the process of being dismantled, and a recognizable pier for the current bridge is in the river on the near side of the former center pier.

Does anyone know of any other photos of the earlier bridge? Thank you.


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