Forum

< Previous Page 49 of 256 Next >

Post a comment Contact webmaster

Posted May 8, 2013, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

are they any pictures of those iron pickets?

Posted May 8, 2013, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Jayhawk:

Thanks for the tip. That is some interesting imagery. It does look like the bridge is partially buried in mud.

I guess that is one way to preserve a bridge. Too bad we don't have Anonymous the Pompeiian. He could provide good information about buried structures (although this is in mud, not a pyroclastic flow).

Posted May 8, 2013, by Captain Caps (captaincaps [at] capspolice [dot] org)

Mr. Stewart, please check your caps lock key.

Posted May 8, 2013, by Don Morrison

No problem, John;

It's sometimes hard to tell what's what from way up here in the satellite.

I don't see that the Indian Creek or Judith River trestles have been added yet, by the way.

Posted May 7, 2013, by JIM STEWART (JAMES [dot] STEWART [at] TYLIN [dot] COM)

THE ORIGINAL SQUIRE WHIPPLE BOWSTRINGS HAD RAILINGS IF THEY HAD SIDEWALKS. THESE WERE IRON PICKET RAILINGS. BRIDGES IN THE MORE URBAN AREAS HAD CANTILEVERED SIDEWALKS.

Posted May 7, 2013, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Railing on bowstrings

Intriques me

I also have to do something

Wire cable was not good

Perhaps Wooden railing is Best

It was good enough in the 40s

Tough question but one coming up for me because I know that a bridge that has had nothing for 130 years will certainly be forced to have some kind of railing system.

Any ideas?

Posted May 7, 2013, by Dylan VanAntwerp (dylan_vanantwerp [at] live [dot] com)

I stand corrected. Serves me right for assuming that there was only one large trestle near a town I've never seen in a state I've never visited.

Posted May 7, 2013, by Joe Fishbein (jmf [at] visi [dot] com)

Bridge 1850 is open to traffic. We did a fracture-critical inspection on it today. A section of approach road south of the bridge that had been washed out has been repaired with concrete pavement and a lot of rip-rap.

Uploaded file: JPEG image data, EXIF standard 2.3, 2496009 bytes

Posted May 7, 2013, by Brian J. Patterson (pattersonbj [at] earthlink [dot] net)

This picture was taken 7 May 2013 from a similar position to the Steve Conto picture from 2012. View is facing south by southeast in both pictures. Note that the span itself APPEARS to be intact; it's the failure of the east pier of the aqueduct that brought it down. Also note the water flowing into Nettle Creek from the I&M Canal. This water flow has already eroded the clay lining of the canal for a distance starting about 30 yards east of the aqueduct site. The longer the delay in doing SOMETHING to contain this flow of water, the more difficult it will be to actually place the aqueduct back in service and rewater the canal. Prior to the aqueduct colapse, the water level at this section of the I&M was at the historic in-service level. You could canoe from about 4 miles WEST of the aqueduct all the way to Chanahon and beyond.

Uploaded file: JPEG image data, EXIF standard, 5458699 bytes

Posted May 7, 2013, by Anonymous the Athenian

This replica bridge was done right

It surely belongs on this site

No known criteria would this bridge fail

'cept of course for that modern rail

Posted May 7, 2013, by Anonymous the Athenian

But this one is made of wood

I would have added it if I could

My previous comment was wrong

This bridge does truly belong

Posted May 7, 2013, by Anonymous the Athenian

A MOB of such great size

Will make you shield your eyes

Our bodies have such great reflexes

Not everything's bigger in Texas

Posted May 7, 2013, by Anonymous the Athenia (spartansaretoodarnedserious [at] athens [dot] net)

In this valley, a stench has permeated.

'Tis a MOB the Governator should have terminated!

Posted May 7, 2013, by Anonymous the Spartan (anonymous [at] peloponnese [dot] net)

MODERNE/NON HISTORIQUE!

Posted May 7, 2013, by Don Morrison

Fascinating. Since this is called Curtis Bridge road, I assume the Curtis Bridge was located where the road ends at 41.807944,-91.646577.

Posted May 6, 2013, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

One person can make a difference, and in this case, that person retired from TxDOT last year. It's too bad because while TxDOT did specify rivets in the last three projects, the next "REHABILITATION" is just that. A rehab of a very historic bridge that is next to a park and a restaurant and would get a lot of visitors. The TxDOT bridge division trio that I spoke to says that they haven't given up on the in-kind restorations, but weren't comfortable with that on this bridge. And, they have to come up with the procedures for field rivets and inspection procedures for field rivets, in order be "comfortable". That was their word.

I kept trying to get them to change the bid by an addendum or put the bridge letting back, but no. Rather than create an addendum to the bid which lets tomorrow allowing field rivets to be used if we create those procedures, like a Site Specific Erection Plan, they have chosen to make it clear that all of the riveted lattice, 70% of it, should be replaced with high tension bolts, and four years ago they didn't even make the fake rivet headed bolts. My engineer professor friend said that the high tension bolts were "stronger", but the rivets ARE STRONG ENOUGH. Not to mention that the bolts won't work on the inclined end posts repairs. The division engineer said they were going to look into that. I suggested putting the job letting back but, no. I guess it is a press release and letters to those powers that be that Workin' Bridges, for one, thinks they have made a mistake that should and could be corrected.

Now we have been doing rivets a long time, and bridge and building rivets for 150 plus years. Rivets weren't replaced because they weren't good enough, according to Nels, but because the bottom line said one guy can turn a bolt where it took a gang to do the high quality work.

Sounding rivets, an ASHTO Standard to inspect for problems has been part of the specifications for inspections according to the 2000 edition. Other procedures for process and procedure for the hot rivet process must be available somewhere, and should not need to be created again.

My question, if they are sure the previous three bridges are fine, but want to now limit the risk of a "black eye" (again, their words) then why not use the Worley Bridge in Milam County as the text book case for finalizing those standards and procedures? It is the perfect bridge for that.

Two steps forward, 10 back. Why does that happen with engineers, and states, and opinions rather than facts? Case by case, person by person, we will prevail at this battle of design engineers not interested in the knowledge that is available from other sources, including fabricators, metal smiths, professors, engineers and other passionate people about our history.

I won't love going to see this bridge with bolted lacing on the verticals. And I am glad that I have the power to speak about these issues and am not tied to a desk, not too much risk sitting there.

Posted May 6, 2013, by Roger Deschner (rogerdeschner [at] gmail [dot] com)

Replacement of the outer section of the north leaf was completed on time this morning, and CTA trains resumed using its upper deck for this morning's rush hour. The Brown and Purple Line 'L' trains carry an estimated 77,000 passengers daily over this bridge. The lower deck remains under construction, and will be closed to cars and pedestrians until November.

Chicago Tribune article: http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/breaking/chi-well-street-bridge-cta,0,4653495.story

Chicago Tribune photo gallery. Last photo is especially interesting, from 1921: http://galleries.apps.chicagotribune.com/chi-130228-wells-street-bridge-pictures/

Posted May 6, 2013, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Kudos to the local folks who balked at the idea of their historic bridge being replaced by a concrete ugly... AND more kudos to the Boone County Commissioners who actually listened!

The only thing that distracts from the beauty of this location is the constant traffic noise from I-65 that is just to the West of here. But it may just be the Interstate that saved the bridge from already being removed.

Uploaded file: JPEG image data, JFIF standard 1.01, 2169181 bytes

Posted May 6, 2013, by Roger Deschner (rogerdeschner [at] gmail [dot] com)

From the photos and from Google Satellite view, the bridge appears to be open and in active use by "4-legged pedestrians" (cattle) to cross the creek.

Posted May 6, 2013, by John Marvig (johnmarvig [at] chaska [dot] net)

I am currently leading a charge to save the last span of the bridge. I have heavy support from Des Moines historians, who either want it rehabbed as an overlook, or relocated. I have made a save the bridge page too. I think we can preserve the remaining history here.

https://www.facebook.com/SaveTheDSMRRBridge

Posted May 6, 2013, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This is a prime example of a MOB being used where a historic bridge could have been installed.

Posted May 6, 2013, by Luke Firestoker (kjolen [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I knew this bridge during the last 30 years of its existence. It never was much to look at, little more than a continuation of Grand Ave that was raised above the railroad tracks. At that tme the bridge was already failing with rusted expansion joints and railings, although SLU painted the railings SLU blue. There were several places where rain or snow melt ponded on the roadway. When buses went through the puddles, they sent soaking sheets of dirty water onto the pedestrian walkways and any pedestrian who happened to be there. In winter time the sprayed areas became coated with ice and dangerous. After the metrolink stations were added, busses and cars stopping for passangers would block the outer lanes of traffic on the bridge creating congestion.

I was glad to see the bridge replaced. The new bridge is nicer, but I wish I could have seen the 1891 bridge. I read that there had been an earlier bridge located down in Mill Creek Valley. It was not very large and just extended across Mill Creek. From the description, Grand Ave descended from Forest Park Ave into the valley, crossed railroad tracks and the creek before it became part of the sewer system. Grand then ascended to Chouteau Ave. It is understandable why the raised bridge was built.

Posted May 6, 2013, by AR

Hey, that shot of the south entrance is worth the crawl! Thanks, Cody.

Posted May 6, 2013, by jayhawk

New Google imagery confirms that this thing was out of the water and and dry last summer. It looks like it's partially sunken in mud.

We've had a lot of rain in central Kansas this month so it could be submerged again.

Posted May 6, 2013, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Does this bridge have any particular significance?

Posted May 6, 2013, by Brian J. Patterson (pattersonbj [at] earthlink [dot] net)

The I&M/Nettle Creek Aqueduct collapsed early 19 April 2013 due to heavy rains and record-setting flooding in the area. According to published reports, Nettle Creek's level rose to a point where it was roughly equal to the level of the I&M Canal. Between this rise in the level of Nettle Creek and the additional water flowing into the I&M Canal from the unusually heavy rain in the area, the east support wing was undercut and failed. As of 06 May 2013, there are no published reports on plans to reconstruct the aqueduct. However, this aqueduct will have to be reconstructed to preserve this section of the historic Illinois and Michigan Canal.

Posted May 6, 2013, by Patrick Feller (nakrnsm [at] aol [dot] com)

I visited the overpass yesterday. At first it appeared that that 1971 rehabilitation had involved replacing the steel stringers with concrete, but the concrete sheathing is damaged in places, showing the steel beams. There's a fair amount of old spalling on columns and beams, especially the older ones, but none appears substantial enough to cause concern.

There'd been a small brush fire down the tracks from the overpass and, at first, I associated that with the blackening of the beams and deck, but it is probably just a few decades of diesel smoke.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/nakrnsm/8711911735/in/photostream

http://www.flickr.com/photos/nakrnsm/8711911959/in/photostream/

Posted May 6, 2013, by C J Johnson (108stitchesiowa [at] netzoola [dot] com)

Union Pacific trains roar many times daily under this bridge at well over 50+ mph before crossing the new concrete Kate Shelley High Bridge completed East of this bridge. I believe that this bridge is sometimes referred to as the "Humpback Bridge".

Photo taken Winter 2013.

Uploaded file: JPEG image data, JFIF standard 1.01, 1597458 bytes

Posted May 6, 2013, by C J Johnson (108stitchesiowa [at] netzoola [dot] com)

The Iowa Interstate Railroad bridge also over Walnut Creek is located just North of the Grand Avenue Bridge. Photo taken April 2013.

Uploaded file: JPEG image data, JFIF standard 1.01, 4384648 bytes

Posted May 6, 2013, by C J Johnson (108stitchesiowa [at] netzoola [dot] com)

Demo continues...

Uploaded file: JPEG image data, JFIF standard 1.01, 5925322 bytes

Uploaded file: JPEG image data, JFIF standard 1.01, 5671076 bytes

Uploaded file: JPEG image data, JFIF standard 1.01, 3439924 bytes

Posted May 6, 2013, by C J Johnson (108stitchesiowa [at] netzoola [dot] com)

Demo continues....

Uploaded file: JPEG image data, JFIF standard 1.01, 5125507 bytes

Uploaded file: JPEG image data, JFIF standard 1.01, 5161670 bytes

Uploaded file: JPEG image data, JFIF standard 1.01, 5244081 bytes

Uploaded file: JPEG image data, JFIF standard 1.01, 5654902 bytes

Uploaded file: JPEG image data, JFIF standard 1.01, 5737852 bytes

Uploaded file: JPEG image data, JFIF standard 1.01, 5332923 bytes

Posted May 6, 2013, by Don Morrison

It seems the only factual error is the date of 1910; about 32 years before Donald Bailey designed his namesake truss. The rehab date of 1973 apparently is the date the Bailey truss replaced the 1910 bridge.

The bridge is 40 years old, and you've photo documented it. Perhaps it is best to not remove this entry.

....Or did you nominate the bridge itself for removal? They could put in a nice UCEB here. 8^)

Posted May 5, 2013, by Don Morrison

It appears that this bridge is long gone. I set the street view to focus on two crosses at the side of the road near the present bridge. It seems appropriate. RIP.

Posted May 5, 2013, by Don Morrison

Hmm......

..... the Sage Creek trestle appears to be about 4 miles in a generally northerly direction up the tracks from the Indian Creek trestle, at 47.255524,-109.756765.

Posted May 5, 2013, by C J Johnson (108stitchesiowa [at] netzoola [dot] com)

Demo has started on the Grand Avenue Bridge over Walnut Creek

and Grand Avenue will be closed for the Summer of 2013.

This bridge is located just West of the Des Moines, Iowa/West Des Moines, Iowa dividing line of 63rd Street which is also regarded as 1st Street West Des Moines, Iowa. Photos taken Spring 2013.

Uploaded file: JPEG image data, JFIF standard 1.01, 5034235 bytes

Uploaded file: JPEG image data, JFIF standard 1.01, 4263601 bytes

Uploaded file: JPEG image data, JFIF standard 1.01, 6385711 bytes

Uploaded file: JPEG image data, JFIF standard 1.01, 5125507 bytes

Uploaded file: JPEG image data, JFIF standard 1.01, 4467127 bytes

Uploaded file: JPEG image data, JFIF standard 1.01, 4387252 bytes

Posted May 5, 2013, by C J johnson (108stitchesiowa [at] netzoola [dot] com)

March 2013

Uploaded file: JPEG image data, JFIF standard 1.01, 3889172 bytes

Uploaded file: JPEG image data, JFIF standard 1.01, 3665451 bytes

Uploaded file: JPEG image data, EXIF standard, comment:

Uploaded file: JPEG image data, JFIF standard 1.01, 4409906 bytes

Uploaded file: JPEG image data, JFIF standard 1.01, 91805 bytes

Uploaded file: JPEG image data, JFIF standard 1.01, 4956209 bytes

Posted May 5, 2013, by Ian J (icjohnstone [at] ymail [dot] com)

Where is it today? Kinda hard to spot it or see signs/evidence or clues to where it was.

Posted May 5, 2013, by Ross Brown (bluehavanaross [at] gmail [dot] com)

Google Maps appears to show that the bridge has been demolished.

Posted May 5, 2013, by C J Johnson (108stitchesiowa [at] netzoola [dot] com)

Old Rock Island logo barely visible on both the North and South sides of the bridge. March 2013.

Uploaded file: JPEG image data, JFIF standard 1.01, 6615748 bytes

Posted May 5, 2013, by james mccray (jamesinslocomb [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Unfortunately I called the local historical department in 2011 or 2012 and inquired about this bridge and they told me that it collapsed in a flood and the remains are in the creek. If that is so, it is sad, but if scrappers have not got to it, maybe someone can salvage the remains--hint, hint......

This I wonder though, for the Northport Bowstring Bridge. That bridge was originally a four span bowstring bridge. Only one is said to still remain, i.e., the preserved one in Northport, AL. I wonder if this bridge (Half Chance) is one of those "missing" spans. Then I will go further.....what happened to the other 2 spans if this is one of them?

Posted May 5, 2013, by Alexander D. Mitchell IV (LNER4472 [at] verizon [dot] net)

As should be plainly obvious from the photo, there is no way the current structure dates to 1910. The locals I talked to believe this bridge replaced a bridge washed out in Tropical Storm Agnes in 1972, and the National Bridge Index never noted the new construction of what was supposed to be a temporary structure. I nominate this for removal.

Posted May 5, 2013, by Anonymous

florida. This bridge is currently closed and being replaced. The anticipated completion date of construction is November 2013.

Posted May 5, 2013, by Dylan VanAntwerp (dylan_vanantwerp [at] live [dot] com)

According to topographical maps and also Google maps, the creek crossed is actually called Indian Creek; however, two different sources on railpictures.net list the bridge as the Sage Creek Trestle. Perhaps Sage Creek is another name used locally, or maybe the maps are wrong.

Posted May 5, 2013, by Jimmy Roland (mrciviljim [at] hotmail [dot] com)

The original bridge is the arch section. The rigid frame arch of the original was retained with cast in place frame added to the south end. This wasl also done with the structure down stream on Lincoln Creek but a Conspan arch was used to mimic the original structure.

Posted May 4, 2013, by John Marvig (johnmarvig [at] chaska [dot] net)

This bridge was built after 1918. A valuation chart says in 1918 it was a Through Truss. Another chart says rails here are from 1941. Maybe the date is 1941?

Posted May 4, 2013, by Carolyn Susor (susorcar [at] yahoo [dot] comn)

This is such a beautiful area. The bridge just adds to it, without looking out of place.

Posted May 4, 2013, by Miles W. Rich (mileswrich [at] gmail [dot] com)

There were two swing bridges across the Canal at Milan. The railroad bridge was replaced in the late 60's or early 70's by the culvert and fill across the canal and is still used by the Iowa Interstate to reach the industries in Milan on the old Milan sub of the Rock Island Lines. The Rock River bridges were originally built by the Rock Island & Peoria Railway which as owned by the Cable family that also managed the Chicago Rock Island, and Pacific, the Rock Island Lines. When the Hennepin Canal was built, the swing bridge was built so boats could pass. The remains of the turntable in the canal are from the US 67 Highway Bridge that was replaced in the late 40's after the span closest to Rock Island that was right next to the Sears Power Dam collapsed. The tracks that exist were the street car tracks. The Rock Island and Peoria went through Milan and behind the Quad City Airport and then along US 150 through Coal Valley to Orion. The line was abandoned between Milan and Orion in 1941, and the Rock Island secured trackage rights over the Burlington from Colona to Orion to reach the remaining trackage through Cambridge to Peoria. Branching off at the Milan depot was the Rock Island and Mercer County Railroad, also owned by the Cables, to reach their coal mines in Preemption, Sherrard and the town of Cable. The Rock Island Southern leased trackage rights on the line from Southern Junction near Matherville through Milan to reach Rock Island. The lines south of Milan were abandoned in 1952 when the RIS shut down.

Posted May 4, 2013, by Luke Harden (lukemh9 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Nice Find!

Posted May 3, 2013, by Zachary S

Have always wondered about this trestle, as for two decades it's never ceased to surprise me as we round the bend passing through the area (a fairly frequent travel) and suddenly this massive hulk of metal appears, towering over the road. Awesome structure.

Builders Plate Database
Posted May 3, 2013, by John Marvig (johnmarvig [at] chaska [dot] net)

My thoughts after hearing that Clark would be it is a major project, and many people might have to contribute efforts. I do have a website dedicated to bridge photography, but I'm so packed with reconstructing my site, and other preservation projects I wouldn't have time at the moment.

Does James have anything to weigh in on this? I agree with Clark, useful and handy.

Posted May 3, 2013, by Patrick Sullivan (paddy3070 [at] yahoo [dot] com)
Posted May 3, 2013, by Zachary S

Hey, it's the Palo Alto redwood. One of the most iconic trees in that part of the state; lovely photos of the bridge here as well.

Posted May 3, 2013, by Zachary S

Should information be added about the old wooden trestle that burnt here be added? There are some interesting statistics here - http://discuss.amtraktrains.com/index.php?/topic/10901-fire-collapses-portion-of-railroad-trestle-in-sacramento/

Posted May 3, 2013, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Here are some pictures of Mine Road Bridge I shot this morning:

Uploaded file: JPEG image data, EXIF standard, 2966631 bytes

Uploaded file: JPEG image data, EXIF standard, 3068063 bytes

Uploaded file: JPEG image data, EXIF standard, 2786118 bytes

Posted May 3, 2013, by Luke Harden (lukemh9 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Picture of the replica spans from the organization's website: http://motormill.org/

Uploaded file: JPEG image data, JFIF standard 1.01, 304038 bytes

Posted May 3, 2013, by Joel Wyman (ponchoman49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Wow does PENNDOT have something against preserving historical bridges or something? You would think that a state like PA would try and preserve some of it's historical beauty.

Posted May 2, 2013, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

A little reading on a nearby bridge gives the date, 1886, and explains the names.

http://bridgehunter.com/ks/chautauqua/bh43712/

Posted May 2, 2013, by Luke Harden (lukemh9 [at] gmail [dot] com)

My guess would be that it was built in the late 1800s. All I know is that CKW built the route, and that the CKW was bought by the ATSF around 1901.

Posted May 2, 2013, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Any idea how long ago the RR was built? The 1903 KS RR map also shows AT&SF but I don't know anything about when this line was built or by whom. I don't have much access to RR history, so your info source would be interesting to look at. I'm always curious what else might be out there undiscovered.

New feature
Posted May 2, 2013, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

I've thought about trying to assemble photos of plaques posted here, perhaps sorted by builder and date. This would be very useful IMO. Plus generally fun to look at. If James doesn't have time to program it, perhaps someone here will step up and offer to build and host it--proper permissions first having been obtained.

New Site Feature Idea
Posted May 2, 2013, by John Marvig (johnmarvig [at] chaska [dot] net)

Upon attempting to do research about a specific type of plaque on a couple bridges in Iowa, an idea occurred to me. Would it be an idea to create a database of builders plates, separated by road and railroad, with a breif description of the company? I think from a research standpoint, especially with people like me, it would make life a lot easier. Especially when searching for a specific plaque shape.

Posted May 2, 2013, by Jim Grey (mobilene [at] gmail [dot] com)

A couple of INDOT photos of the demo. :-(

Uploaded file: JPEG image data, JFIF standard 1.02, comment:

Uploaded file: JPEG image data, JFIF standard 1.02, comment:

Fitch's Bridge (Massachusetts)
Posted May 1, 2013, by Jason Smith (JDSmith77 [at] gmx [dot] net)

I've been in contact with the people there and I guess the vote for the replacement was overwhelming, given the fact that the bridge had been abandoned for over 40 years with no rehabilitation work. It's unclear what will be built in its place, but it appears there may be a replica in the works, but don't hold your breath.

Check out this article: http://thebridgehunter.areavoices.com/2013/04/18/fitchs-bridge-coming-down/

Posted May 1, 2013, by Luke Harden (lukemh9 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The bridge would have been built by the Chicago, Kansas and Western Railroad. http://bridgehunter.com/ks/chautauqua/ckw-cedar-creek/

Posted May 1, 2013, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

The RR was shown as the AT&SF on the 1936 county highway map.

Bridge of Southeast Kansas
Posted May 1, 2013, by Tedd (tl9ok [at] aol [dot] com)

thank you Robert Elder & Clark Vance for the most excellent leads & search. After looking at 3 possible and distinct Marsh Arch Bridges in Southeast Kansas I've come to my conclusion that this bridge is the Hickory Creek Bridge, northwest of Oak Valley Kansas on Hwy 160.

And after looking at the best (& my favorite aerial internet map service) Flash Earth, I've based my conclusion based on the shade provided by the trees surrounding the Hickory Creek Bridge (and, studying the original B&W photographs on the Kansas Historical Resources Inventory web site ...

http://khri.kansasgis.org/index.cfm?in=049-0000-00041

http://khri.kansasgis.org/index.cfm?in=049-0000-00042

However, I could be mistaken. Perhaps the Hickory Creek Bridge AND the Painterhood Creek Bridge were built during the same period of 1928 since they were close to each other and both spanning Hwy 160.

One clue for positive documentation would be the 'concrete wound' on the 6th pillar of my attached photograph. Prost!

Uploaded file: JPEG image data, EXIF standard, comment:

Fitch's Bridge (Massachusetts)
Posted May 1, 2013, by Robert Elder

Nathan I appreciate your humor but this is May 1st not April 1st. Oh wait, you're not kidding. This may be the most puzzling and stunning demolition I have heard about yet.

Posted May 1, 2013, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

This magnificent historic bridge with its unique approach spans is slated for demolition! http://www.kentucky.com/2013/04/27/2617901/historic-mercer-county-bridge.html

Fitch's Bridge (Massachusetts)
Posted May 1, 2013, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

One of the oldest rivet-connected truss bridges in the country has been demolished to make way for a Mail Order Bridge (MOB) for pedestrian use. This is one of the most wasteful, shortsighted, and downright stupid things I have ever seen. This community should be ashamed of itself. This bridge could have so easily and inexpensively been restored for pedestrian use. If anyone told this community otherwise, than they lacked proper experience working with historic truss bridges. This bridge could have been an iconic attraction for this trail system. Instead, they have destroyed an extremely significant historic bridge. And for what? An ugly, nondescript modern MOB bridge that from a functional standpoint does the same thing the historic bridge could have easily been made to do? This is an Epic Fail.

http://www.lowellsun.com/local/ci_23137071/plans-under-way-groton-bridge-celebration

Posted May 1, 2013, by marty Puckett (marty_65626 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

While recently driving from West plains Missouri to Nashville Tennesee, pouring rain all the way, I came upon the MS River Bridge quite suddenly & unexpectedly! There was nothing I could do----couldn`t turn around or back up! I was so incredibly terrified my legs were like jelly and I was shaking all over! Three 18-wheelers passed me going the opposite direction, as I white-knuckled the steering wheel, feeling, literally, nauseous from fear! I finally made it to the other side, so relieved I was about to burst into tears, when, around the next bend, suddenly appeared the Ohio River Bridge! I couldn`t believe my eyes!! The rivers were both flooded way over their banks. Somehow, I made it over both bridges, but it took me a long while to calm down! Needless to say, I found a different route back home to West Plains! I have talked about it so much since I got home that my husband said, "you`re makin` me wanna go there!" ( may 1, 2013)

Posted May 1, 2013, by Zachary S

I've GOT to get out there and see this thing sometime soon. I'm absolutely in love with big old deck girder railroad bridges.

Posted May 1, 2013, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Appears to show up in current Bing imagery but sure looks to be gone when viewed in GE.

Let's just hope it shows up in a park somewhere.

Posted May 1, 2013, by Christine McCombs (Massey) (delanymom87 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Just got off the phone yesterday with my 1st cousin and she said my great grandfather was worthless and only held one job in his life. That job was with the WPA building Longford Bridge. I had to look up the bridge to verify her story. She is telling the truth.the bridge did exist and was built during the time period of which she was alive and he was alive. Neat story.

Posted May 1, 2013, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Well, that is two of us in agreement, so I have edited the page accordingly.

Posted May 1, 2013, by Luke Harden (lukemh9 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Looks like a rigid frame bridge to me.

Posted May 1, 2013, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

My fellow bridgehunters: I have just added this bridge, which the NBI considers to be a slab. To me, it looks more like a rigid frame concrete bridge.

What do you folks think. All we have is Streetview so far.

Posted May 1, 2013, by Luke Harden (lukemh9 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Landmarkhunter and Bridgehunter are two different sites, so leave your entry up, and copy info from the entry over on LH to your entry on here.

Posted May 1, 2013, by Zachary S

Always tragic to see a classic old steel railroad trestle - my favourite type of bridge - meet its end, but it's wonderful to see how they have restored it and put it back in use. It's like a miniature Kinzua, with more restoration. Give it a bit of rust and it will look almost as good as the original trestle, though the surrounding landscape is going to look like a war zone for decades until the forest grows back. I remember seeing the aerials the day after the tornadoes and seeing the trestle torn apart - such amazing intensity. Then again, 190mph winds will do a number on just about anything.

Bridge of Southeast Kansas
Posted May 1, 2013, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)
Posted May 1, 2013, by Zachary S

Hm... very interesting! I just checked over several local news articles, as it does appear via Register notes and G.E. imagery as though the 1880 bridge might've been moved, but it's looking as though the restored bridge in Northport was found in the woods probably in the same county (thus being from Tuscaloosa county, I would wager) crossing the Black Warrior River; this is a couple of counties north of Marengo, where the 1880 bridge - crossing a smaller creek - is/was. The two do look strikingly similar, though, and I would hope that the 1880 bridge met a happier fate than many others of its ilk.

On a side note, I found that this bridge is already listed on LandmarkHunter. Is there a way to merge the entries, if the bridge is notable enough to deserve a page on this side of the site, or should I delete this entry from BridgeHunter?

Bridge of Southeast Kansas
Posted May 1, 2013, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I think that I may have found your bridge. The one below was located in Elk County, Kansas.

http://khri.kansasgis.org/index.cfm?in=049-0000-00042

Posted May 1, 2013, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I am completely unfamiliar with the geography of Alabama, but could this bridge be the same as this one?

http://bridgehunter.com/al/tuscaloosa/northport/

The dates do not agree, but the bridges are very similar. Also, the Northport Bridge was moved in 2008, which would be in accordance with the Google Earth Imagery.

Posted May 1, 2013, by Zachary S

Ugh. Well that's terribly disheartening. I guess the focus will have to shift locally, then, to preserving the small handful of other historic bridges in the county that will probably meet the same fate in the next several years unless action is taken. I'm quite familiar with the old Johnsey Bridge which was demolished and replaced a few years ago (live within a few miles of it, even) so I hate to see yet another fall prey to the replace-rather-than-restore mentality.

Posted May 1, 2013, by Zachary S

I was unable to locate the bridge in a recent very high definition update to Google Earth imagery, despite no sources indicating its removal or otherwise loss. Photos indicate a rather derelict appearance which may suggest that it may unfortunately join the ranks of other lost historic bridges throughout the state. I'm fairly positive I can pick it out, along with the old road bed that led to it, in the 2006 set of Google Earth images, but it appears to be completely absent as of 2012 or 2013. There seemed to be a passing mention in a NRHP report of at least some notion of relocating and restoring it one day, but I can't find any documentation to suggest that this was ever done.

Google +
Posted May 1, 2013, by J.P. (wildcatjon2000 [at] gmail [dot] com)

A quick note, If you use google+ I have started a community for historic bridge lovers.

https://plus.google.com/u/0/communities/101524589909545666614

Posted May 1, 2013, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Satellite view shows the stark white of another UCEB.

Posted May 1, 2013, by J.P. (wildcatjon2000 [at] gmail [dot] com)

So tired of seeing these bridges taken down.

Uploaded file: JPEG image data, EXIF standard, 531065 bytes

Chicago Bascule Bridges - endangered
Posted May 1, 2013, by Roger Deschner (rogerdeschner [at] gmail [dot] com)

Landmarks Illinois just named their 2013 list of the 10 most endangered historic places in Illinois, and Exhibit A is Chicago Bascule Bridges. While they praise the current rehab of the Wells Street Bridge, they mention the Chicago Avenue Bridge, the two Division Street Bridges, and the North Ashland Avenue Bridge as particularly endangered. See their web page at http://www.landmarks.org/ten_most_2013_chicago_bascule_bridges.htm

Posted April 30, 2013, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Chris,

Highly detailed general information on movable bridges is available in these books:

http://archive.org/details/movablesbridges01hove

http://archive.org/details/movablesbridges02hove

Posted April 30, 2013, by chris Lynch (sirpoet73 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I have always been a fan of this bridge since i can remember. I always wondered how did this thing actually work? i know there are sets of wheels to make them turn but, how was it made to turn? was there a person on each side in a box and they would press a button and it would start to turn? if so, how did each of them talk to each to tell them to turn the bridge if needed be? Now since this bridge is no longer working what happens if the open side needs to close how would they go about doing that? Also, I heard from many people that this bridge was struck by lighting many years ago. Finally if it is possible where can i find specs on this bridge meaning, how it was actually moved was it by wires, steam, moved using a hand crank. and could you direct me to a site that has more information on this type of bridge? I would greatly be thankful oh and one last thing, these tracks on the bridge where do they lead to? starting from Omaha to Council bluffs Iowa.

Posted April 30, 2013, by Zachary S

News articles indicate that there is a new bridge at this location as of about a year ago. By the tone of the article I suspect this bridge may be lost, though they used 'repair' rather than 'replace' - still I'm not entirely sure. I should head over that way and check for myself in a few days or so.

Bridge of SE Kansas
Posted April 30, 2013, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Tedd,

The date doesn't match but this one is due south of Emporia, almost in OK.

http://bridgehunter.com/ks/chautauqua/100170/

If you go into Search and use type "Marsh Arch" and location "Kansas", you will see all that are known, including lost.

Posted April 30, 2013, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Very nice to see pictures of this forgotten bridge.

Posted April 30, 2013, by Luke Harden (lukemh9 [at] gmail [dot] com)

There is no more public access to the island. This bridge was the only way for the public to access the island.

Posted April 30, 2013, by B. Lauver (bllauver [at] toad [dot] net)

Is there any longer public access to Sylvan Island? The road bridge is closed and the RR bridge appears to be shut off from trails.

Posted April 30, 2013, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

INDOT did a complete about-face on this one. After deciding to rehabilitate instead of replace, a certain district chief with way too much power decided to raise a stink. Apparently he had an issue with the vertical clearance being just a couple inches under guidelines...DESPITE the fact that said clearance had already been deemed acceptable.

So another completely serviceable state highway Parker truss bites the dust. And although I won't give this award to INDOT as a whole, to that one gentleman who thinks he knows more than the rest of us... Here's to you!

Todd Baslee photo

Uploaded file: JPEG image data, JFIF standard 1.01, 24265 bytes

Posted April 30, 2013, by Daniel McCully (tbird [at] southwind [dot] net)

here are some pictures I took of this bridge on 4/25/2013

Uploaded file: JPEG image data, EXIF standard, 533686 bytes

Uploaded file: JPEG image data, EXIF standard, 455048 bytes

Uploaded file: JPEG image data, EXIF standard, 602300 bytes

Uploaded file: JPEG image data, EXIF standard, 604990 bytes

bRiDGE oF s/E kANSAS
Posted April 30, 2013, by Tedd (tl9ok [at] aol [dot] com)

Please help me identify the location of this bridge in South East Kansas. The only clue I have is that it was built in 1928. I photog'd this KS Bridge in late July 1987, and for sure - south of Emporia. Thank You Bridge Hunters ... once we find the locale I'll post 'er on Bridehunter dot com

Uploaded file: JPEG image data, EXIF standard, comment:

Posted April 30, 2013, by Nathan Holth

"Too much bounce?" Seriously? Whoever inspected this bridge does realize this is a PIN CONNECTED truss bridge, right? Obviously, these bridges do flex noticeably under load. Does this person not know this? The only situation where "bounce" would be of concern is if an underlying issue caused excess flex, and if so, it is the underlying issues that should be described, such as section loss, sinking abutments, etc.

Posted April 30, 2013, by Chris Gonnerman (chris [at] gonnerman [dot] org)

A friend sent me demolition pictures of this bridge; apparently it's being taken down right now.


< Previous Page 49 of 256 Next >