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Posted February 15, 2017, by Martha Kirkpatrick (marti [dot] kirkpatrick [at] verizon [dot] net)

Because I, and a lot of heavy trucks and commuter traffic cross this bridge a lot and it's listed here as Appraisal: Structurally deficient, might it be replaced before it falls in the river, and if so when please? I don't see it listed on the county master plan.

Posted February 15, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Well, I am not familiar with this area, so I could only speculate. Any California contributors on here?

Posted February 15, 2017, by Ed Pohlman (elpmlp [at] aol [dot] com)

Nice Photos. Believe it or not as a child I lived right next to that bridge (Toledo side). I saw the train the day it derailed in early 1982. Spilled corn all over the place that reeked for weeks.

I also walked that bridge a couple times and when the river froze over walked under that massive center span looking up. Many years ago.

I saw on the upper tressel (sic?) a plate that said "1902" on it.

Across the street (River Rd. Toledo) between the turnpike and the tracks back in the forest was the remains of a foundation for a small station that probably was a stopover for train engineers. When that RR bridge was constructed that area was nearly all wilderness. The first homes did not appear until the 1920s.

Sorry to hear the bridge will be demolished this year. Happy to hear that Metroparks Toledo will be converting some of the land where the tracks ran into a trail for walkers and cyclists.

Posted February 15, 2017, by Dan Reitmeyer (danr [at] clrincgrp [dot] com)

There is a rather large dead looking tree that is in danger of dropping on this bridge before too long if nothing is done with it.

Posted February 15, 2017, by Morgane (morganeroth [at] gmail [dot] com)

I'm doing some genealogical research and found a reference to "the new bridge, a little out of town, on the Washington road". From the Nevada Journal, 5 Dec 1856, published out of Nevada City, CA.

Would the Bidwell Bridge be the bridge referenced?

Posted February 15, 2017, by Nathan Holth (nathan [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Sherman: Most certainly you are correct, an 1860s metal railroad bridge would have cast iron details and other unique features that would immediately place it in that period. Further, we do know that this style of bridge (despite it being somewhat late for pin connections) was being built around the turn of the century. This Michigan example was dated 1898. http://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=tr...

Posted February 15, 2017, by Sherman Cahal (shermancahal [at] gmail [dot] com)

I was leaning on that. The other issue I have with this bridge is that the E&P rebuilt many of their bridges at the turn of the century, like at Wheatland (which itself was rebuilt for two tracks).

The original bridge at Wheatland was wood. I am assuming that this one isn't original to the 1860's but early 1900's.

Leet Street Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted February 15, 2017, by Sherman Cahal (shermancahal [at] gmail [dot] com)

Still closed.

Posted February 15, 2017, by Nathan Holth (nathan [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

The bridge is likely the design of the railroad not a builder. The distinctive portal bracing can be found on a number of Pennsylvania Railroad lines, including the Grand Rapids and Indiana line.

Schaeffer Rd bridge
Posted February 15, 2017, by George oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

As per an article printed in the Reading Eagle on 2-13-17 this bridge which is located on Schaeffer Rd between Gallagher Dr and Cornerstone Dr off of Rte 222 is going to be rehabbed and possibly replaced.Bids are going out for this job pretty soon according to the article in the Reading Eagle.When i get more information i will let you know.

Salem Road Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted February 15, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Got some good news on this bridge.As per an article printed in thee Reading Eagle on 2-13-17 Preservation paperwork is being filed to protect this bridge.When i get more information i will let you know.

RE:Knox bridge
Posted February 15, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoaakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Thanks Luke for bailing me out.I would have said Reading Railroad or Septa being from southeastern Pa.

Posted February 15, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley492 [at] ahoo [dot] com)

I agree this bridge should be part of a rail-trail.Beautiful location.

Posted February 15, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Sherman,i would love to see this bridge used for a rail-trail but i think it would have to be moved due to where it's located.I don't know who the designer or manufacturer is offhand.By the way,there is an abandoned r.r. bridge over Neshannock creek.Did you know about that one and is that one on Bridgehunter?

Posted February 15, 2017, by Douglas Butler

This former lift bridge is similar to the Lake Ewauna rail bridge in Klamath Falls OR.

Posted February 15, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I should have clarified...the Bell Town reference makes sense in light of the link that James posted.

Posted February 15, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This general area of Fort Scott has traditionally been known as Bell Town or Belltown. This article refers to the U.S. 69 Mill Creek Bridge in Belltown:

http://www.fstribune.com/story/1770707.html

I suspect that the article refers to this bridge:

http://bridgehunter.com/ks/bourbon/509250060000034/

Posted February 14, 2017, by James Baughn (webmaster [at] bridgehunter [dot] com)

The Fort Scott Tribune of March 28, 1969, mentioned that a bridge over Mill Creek had been closed to traffic. This might be the same bridge:

http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1906&dat=19690328&id=a...

Posted February 14, 2017, by Nathan Holth (nathan [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Absolutely! I had missed this detail on this bridge last time I viewed it. Look at the sway bracing, this appears to have been reused and altered, as empty rivet holes and splices indicate. I assume the bridge was widened slightly and it also appears some verticals and endposts were strengthened.

The bridge should be properly described as an 1884 bridge rehabilitated/altered in 1901. As such, it is among the older truss bridges in Oregon.

Posted February 14, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Also, for those who missed it, Nathan Holth has provided a detailed documentation of this Frankenbridge over at his website historicbridges.org. See link above.

Posted February 14, 2017, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Plate says 1884 but the portal says 1901. I'm guessing this means the bridge was built in 1884 and reconstructed in 1901? Thoughts?

Posted February 14, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Julie:

That is great news. Thanks for the update.

Parker county, Texas, bridge on I-20 access road
Posted February 14, 2017, by Royce and Bobette Haley (roycehaley111 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

The photo is of the correct bridge on the access road. The caption for the photo is incorrect.

Parker county, Texas, bridge on I-20 access road
Posted February 14, 2017, by ann o. nimmes (ann [at] jchs [dot] org)

This page:

http://bridgehunter.com/tx/parker/21840031401006/

has a picture of a bridge that is labelled

"Bridge over the Brazos...

US 281 bridge over the Brazos River near Santo Texas (Palo Pinto County)

Photo taken by Albert Johnston in November 2015 "

But it says "Through truss bridge over Brazos River on I-20 North Frontage Road" under "Facts/overview"

I think this needs to be straightened out as to which it is. (The photo does not look like the I-20 bridge to me, but it could just be the angle.)

Posted February 14, 2017, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The Fort Scott Bourbon County Riverfront Association is moving forward with roads and bridges in that general neighborhood with a new park and river access, utilizing Long Shoals as well as the Military Bowstrings in their planning. They are well aware of the Mill Creek Bridge and how it does serve the neighborhood as a walkway crossing, and could serve the trail plans that they are building in phases. It's an expensive undertaking - cleaning up a river and beside this bridge is a true dump of stuff.

They understand what a rich history of bridges that they have, and how they all can serve an historic role in their already historic community.

Posted February 14, 2017, by David Case (dcase [at] woosteroh [dot] com)

Recently visited this bridge to view the restoration job and what a pleasant surprise. It looks very nice now. Some old timbers are present in the truss. Thanks to the County Engineers for all their work here, securing the funds and seeing the job through. It is appreciated!

Posted February 14, 2017, by Dennis (dmwierz [at] att [dot] net)

Pay no attention to the comment above. This is CN Bridge 69.61 in Racine County, WI

Posted February 13, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

Looks Like this replaced

Posted February 13, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

To complicate this further, the bridge rests on old limestone abutments which are probably much older than the 1950s. If/when Historic Aerials uploads old imagery, we might have evidence, or perhaps some clues as to when this bridge was actually built. The limestone abutments cause me to doubt that the bridge was really constructed in the 1950s even though the maps show that no bridge was here until the 1950s.

This bridge may require a search of city or county records, if such records even exist.

Posted February 13, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

According to the Topo Maps on Historic Aerials, this bridge appeared sometime between 1954 and 1959 but was abandoned by 1978. Unfortunately, Historic Aerials does not yet feature pre-1991 aerial imagery of Fort Scott.

http://www.historicaerials.com/

Obviously, the components of this bridge are much older than 1954. If the maps are accurate, then perhaps this bridge was built in the mid to late 1950s from whatever random bridge parts happened to be laying around at the nearest scrapyard.

That said, I am not sure what purpose this bridge would have served. The nearby Crawford Street Marsh Arch (1927) was already carrying traffic across Mill Creek.

http://bridgehunter.com/ks/bourbon/509250060000034/

So, perhaps this bridge was built simply as a shortcut. Alternatively, perhaps it was built as a pedestrian bridge and never carried vehicles in its currently location. Or maybe the maps are wrong.

RE: Knox Bridge
Posted February 13, 2017, by Luke
Knox Bridge
Posted February 13, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

Sherman, or George?

Mercer Lawrence counties
Posted February 13, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

Sherman any idea where this trolley line was? 1912 postcard view

Posted February 13, 2017, by Douglas Butler

I know this bridge had a two paralleled bascule bridge at one time when was the bridge actually built before it was replaced?

Posted February 13, 2017, by Sherman Cahal (shermancahal [at] gmail [dot] com)

The pier(s) for the c. 1864 wooden railroad bridge can be seen from the bank. The replacement crossing was built in 1899 but I am unsure on when it was replaced with the twin-track bridge.

Posted February 13, 2017, by Douglas Butler

Is this bridge still functional or not?

Hertzler Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted February 13, 2017, by JS (jscottyg73 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Took this last spring on the bridge...someone in our marketing department liked the composition so I thought I'd post it.

Posted February 13, 2017, by Clarence Siman (absaroka6 [at] att [dot] net)

I went and visited this bridge, and discovered that the North arch has completely collapsed. Metrolink, that now uses this alignment, has used steel cribbing and rock to backfill the eroded area.

The creek is filled with massive slabs of concrete, rail, and everything from the roadbed above.

The South arch appears to be stable for now.

Posted February 13, 2017, by Sherman Cahal (shermancahal [at] gmail [dot] com)

Not sure. It connects to a very active concrete casting factory, so it would need to be relocated to another location. I'd love to see this fitted on a rail-trail!

--

Could this be a Penn Bridge Company or Morse Bridge Company design?

Posted February 13, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Sherman,what i meant to ask is anything going to be done with this bridge?From what i see on the satellite imagery it doesn't look like too much can be done besides maybe removal for a trail somewhere.The only other alternative is scrapping the bridge which alot of people on this site would like to see avoided if at all possible and i also agree.Hopefully both spans can be saved instead of ending up on the scrap pile.

Modjeski subject of new film
Posted February 13, 2017, by Will Truax (Bridgewright [at] ymail [dot] com)
Posted February 12, 2017, by Sherman Cahal (shermancahal [at] gmail [dot] com)

Very much abandoned. It's a former PRR, connecting their Erie & Pittsburg Division at West Washington Street to their Oil City Division near Furnace Street. It cut through two steel plants.

Posted February 12, 2017, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Tony,

I'm pretty sure its not a WIBCo. The plaque shape looks like a Smith or Toledo to me but the portal bracing looks like King. I just don't have the time research it right now (wish I did).

Regards,

Art S.

Posted February 12, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Hard to tell for sure Art.

It has a couple unique features including what appear as Fish-belly floorbeams, but with what appear to be paired nuts at the points. Also the finials appear to be straight and solid in composition. The upper portal bracing features 4 rounded brackets that give an oval appearance, with a single X-brace and likely a date plaque in the center. I have seen those date plaques used by several firms, including King and WIBCo.

Posted February 12, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

Too bad Bedstead gone, Thanks for making the journey!

Posted February 12, 2017, by Anonymous

This little beauty is sitting just to the east. Quite an item. An ancient road grater made in Indianapolis.

Posted February 12, 2017, by Joel Bader (joenonac [at] hotmail [dot] com)

There used to be three railroad overpasses at that location. I believe the third one was associated with the Chicago Great Western/Northwestern railroad line which ran up to the Berwick area. That line crossed East Euclid Avenue on another overpass (also removed) up to the north. Correct me if I'm wrong.

Posted February 12, 2017, by Bryan (likinglifetoday [at] gmail [dot] com)

I am saddened to lose this bridge. First time I crossed it was in 1966. I was 8. We lived on the other side of Illinois and were on a family outting for the day and drove across this bridge. I got on my great grandpas lap and hung my head out the passenger window. I will never forget looking through the decking to the river below. We threw pennies out the window, into the river for luck. I didnt have any idea where we were back then, but I never forgot that bridge. Fast forward to 2002. I bought my first Harley, which I still have, and went on a ride to the river with some friends. I couldn't believe it when we turned onto this bridge. It was my long lost friend. As we rode across, I teared up with emotional memories of my first trip across that bridge. The guys thought I was nuts when I turned around and rode back over it again, then returned. I have rode out to that bridge at least once every year since, just to ride over it and remember. Goodbye old friend. You will be gone, but not forgotten......

concrete
Posted February 12, 2017, by Anonymous

There are only two kinds of concrete on Earth! That which IS cracked and That which is GOING to crack. Not qualified to comment how this relates to safety.

Posted February 11, 2017, by David Thompson (davidthompson20 [at] aol [dot] com)

The concrete base of this bridge looks seriously compromised in Jan. of 2017. A lot of traffic goes under this bridge, while locomotives use one of the two tracks on the bridge, at the same time that hopper cars are parked on it. Is this bridge safe?

Posted February 11, 2017, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Smith or King?

Dumbarton Bridge (District of Columbia)
Posted February 11, 2017, by Pam Anderson (bluedandy1 [at] aol [dot] com)

I've heard that sometime during the late '20's or early '30's someone cut the tails off the buffalo on the bridge. Do you know anything about that?

Posted February 11, 2017, by Cliff Darby (clif30 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

No signs of imminent replacement.

Posted February 11, 2017, by Luke

Thanks Michael!

Posted February 11, 2017, by Michael Quiet (mquiet [at] gmail [dot] com)

Good find on the builder Luke, I was curious about this one! Its a pretty remote one for Massillon as well.

Posted February 11, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Reference to a bridge (possibly this one), being built at Ashland in 1902.

http://www.rileycountyks.gov/333/1900-1910

Posted February 11, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Now, that this bridge has resurfaced, I have checked online, hoping to find a photograph. Thus far, I have found nothing. The south span is a 5 panel Pratt through truss with a length of roughly 110'. The northern span also appears to be a Pratt through truss, but it appears to be a bit longer at roughly 130'. According to the Riley County GIS, this bridge was still standing as of 2016.

How old is the bridge? I am not certain. It may have been built here after the Flood of 1903. If so, it is probably just a standardized Pratt through truss with A-frame portal bracing. On the other hand, it might be an older bridge that survived the Flood of 1903. If so, it might be a more interesting wrought iron structure.

When was it abandoned? I am not certain about that either. I would guess that the Kansas River changed courses in 1951, leaving most of the bridge on dry land (perhaps destroying a southern span or two, or three...). Yet, the 1954 Topo map shows the bridge still in use. Perhaps the bridge remained in service after the Flood of 1951, or perhaps the 1954 Topo map just did not get updated.

This bridge is VERY close to Manhattan, Kansas. For those familiar with the area, it is just below Stagg Hill and the Sunrise Cemetery. I would anticipate that the city will annex this area very soon if it has not already. I hope that the bridge can be preserved somehow, especially if it predates the Flood of 1903.

Posted February 11, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The 1950 Topo Map on Historic Aerials showed a long lost bridge at this location. Figuring that it had been destroyed in the Flood of 1951, I zoomed in on Google Earth hoping to at least see some pylons. To my surprise, there were two truss spans still extant on the north side of the river! This bridge (at least part of it) is still in place!

Posted February 11, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

"Oldest wooden bridge in Maine Jay ME 15"

Probably long gone. What a shame.

Posted February 11, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Good eye Nathan on noticing the differences on the sides of this bridge.I have to agree by doing what they did ruined the historical significance.

Posted February 10, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Well, thank you. I have tried to do my best. It is good to have you and others on here as well though. I greatly appreciate the contributions from those who live in areas that I have not visited.

I have been told so many times by so many people, "there are no historic bridges in Kansas". That is when I realized that I needed to grab my camera and document bridges in an attempt to raise awareness of the bridges in my backyard. Nearly losing the John Mack Bridge to the wrecking ball drove home the point even further. Losing the Columbia Bridge to a collapse greatly increased my motivation to advocate for bridges, instead of just photographing them.

Posted February 10, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

Thanks Robert! While we are are passing out awesomes one for you too! WOW! You're awesome dude!

Posted February 10, 2017, by JohnM

Bridge was closed for repairs but has reopened to traffic.

Posted February 10, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The bridge in the postcard is an interesting find. It is not the same bridge as this one because it has 2 extra panels. This bridge has five panels whereas the one of the postcard has seven. Perhaps the one in the postcard was located near where Highway 24 crosses Cross Creek. This would be closer to the downtown area of Rossville.

Dana
Posted February 10, 2017, by Luke

You're pretty awesome too, dude.

Luke
Posted February 10, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

You are awesome dude!

Posted February 10, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

James, Robert, Nick. Could attached be this bridge? 1910 postcard

Posted February 10, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

Wasn't sure where this was! 1915 Postcard

Posted February 10, 2017, by Luke

Also a really nice find!

Posted February 10, 2017, by Luke

Yet another nice find, Dana!

Technically a three-fer, as there's a pony truss to the north of this one, and there used to be a through truss over the northern portion.

Posted February 10, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Thanks, Nathan. I had not gotten that far yet. Hopefully, one of us Bridgehunters can do a field visit someday.

Posted February 10, 2017, by Nathan Holth (nathan [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Robert: The PA Historic Bridge Inventory states the following:

The 2 span, 68'-long stone arch bridge built in 1893 was widened on one side in 1948 with a stringer extension to accommodate a sidewalk. The upstream side is original with its stone parapet. The parapet on the downstream side was removed to accommodate the widening, which is finished with a concrete balustrade. Both sides have been shortcreted. The bridge is located in a residential section of Ashland dominated by highly altered houses. Neither the bridge nor its setting are historically or technologically significant.

Posted February 10, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I am not sure what type of bridge this is without looking underneath. It was listed as a Marsh arch, which is obviously not correct.

Posted February 10, 2017, by George Hollingsworth (geohollingsworth [at] msn [dot] com)

Glad you found it. In addition to the bridges built after the Smokies became a national park there a lot of smaller bridges deep inside the park. Most of the campgrounds in the park were originally lumber mill sites that were serviced by narrow-gage rail lines going back into the mountains. After the park was formed the rails were removed and hiking paths formed. Several of the old truss bridges remain and were converted for pedestrian use. Here are two N35.607323, W-083.332968 and N35.610552, W-083.254940. These are the coordinates of the Google Earth photos of the bridges. Enjoy.

Posted February 9, 2017, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

My research suggested removal of the lift portions of the bridge occurred in two projects, one in 1966 and the other in 1979. My guess is machinery was removed in 1966 and the tower removal was 1979. http://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=wa...

Posted February 9, 2017, by Luke

Aerial imagery from historic aerials shows lift towers in 1940 and 1968/69

Posted February 9, 2017, by Douglas Butler

I wonder if this former vertical lift bridge that had the machinery counterweight and towers removed is similar identical or resembled the Murray Morgan bridge crossing the city/ Foss waterway?

Posted February 9, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

Got it.

Posted February 9, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This is one of those 4 panel pony trusses which is commonly classified as a Pratt pony. Others might suggest that it follows the Warren configuration however.

Posted February 9, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Reportedly, this bridge was scheduled to be demolished and replaced back in the 1980s. I drove across it a few times in the 1990s and early 2000s. I might have a photograph of it somewhere.

When I was 16, I began working as a summer staffer at the nearby Rock Springs 4-H Center. I continued working there through high school and part of college. During these years, I got to do some Bridgehunting in Geary and Dickinson counties in my bright red 1973 Cadillac. Those were the days!

Posted February 9, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

This one very much not open - forgotten I had visited on October '16 and took some pix. Neat little pony.

RE: Bridge Comment
Posted February 9, 2017, by Art S (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Douglas,

I don't know where that one is/was but there was a similar crossing in NJ where Rt. 1 crossed the D&R Canal. It was only functional for a few years as the canal ceased operations in 1931. Kind of an interesting bridge as the road crosses at a skew but the pivot is along the canal bank.

Regards,

Art S.

Smoky Mountain Bridge
Posted February 9, 2017, by George Hollingsworth (geohollingsworth [at] msn [dot] com)

The bridge is on the old route 73 that is now called the Little River Gorge Road. The coordinates are N35.669348, W-083.662560. The bridge was built in the 50s. A lot of the bridges in the Smokies were single and multiple arch concrete bridges faced with stone and built in the 30s. This one is pretty unique to the Park.

smokey mountain bridge
Posted February 9, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

Nice George is it 321 over Walden or Cove Creek?

Smoky Mountain Bridge
Posted February 9, 2017, by George Hollingsworth (geohollingsworth [at] msn [dot] com)

Here is another photo of the Smoky Mountain bridge

Smoky Mountain Bridge
Posted February 9, 2017, by George (geohollingsworth [at] msn [dot] com)

There is a beautiful bridge in the Smokies on the road from Gatlinburg to Townsend. It is on the county line between Sevier and Blount Counties but is not in the data bases as yet.

Posted February 9, 2017, by Daniel Barnes (barnes [dot] daniel34 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The picture titled 2nd Ave Overpass could not have been taken in 1975. The truck on the right is a Ford F-Series ca. 1987-1997. Also the car on the left is a version of the Chevy Cavalier ca. 1988-1994, with what looks like a 19891998 Isuzu Rodeo behind it.

Bridge Comment
Posted February 9, 2017, by Douglas Butler

Can someone tell me where this bridge located of a county/city of this bascule bridge in Florida of a Hopkins type

Posted February 9, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I can't find this bridge in the KHRI. Given its length, it might be a Kingpost, or perhaps a short Queenpost. Of course, knowing Doniphan County, it could be a surprise.

Posted February 9, 2017, by Brian Brandmeyer (bbrandmeyer [at] oblatesusa [dot] org)

how do you search for used bridges for sale

Posted February 9, 2017, by Nathan Holth (nathan [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Maria: Its actually the county you would most likely need to contact, as it appears to be a county-owned bridge.

Posted February 9, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Hi Maria:

I would recommend contacting the city about this matter. Those of us who contribute to Bridgehunter like to see bridges maintained, including lighting, but having no ownership of this bridge, we have no say in its maintenance.

Good luck with this. Feel free to reference this website in your quest to have the problem fixed.

Robert

Posted February 9, 2017, by Maria Elena (meem06 [at] aol [dot] com)

Please Please have the light bulbs in those beautiful light fixtures replaced! I go over this bridge everyday to & from work..and its so sad to see this bridge looking so absolutly neglected..Bulbs have been out for months now.And some of the light fixtures are broken..it is really falling in to disrepair & needs to be addressed asap.. Its dark & depressing while going over it!!!

I will send photos if needed...

Thank you very much for your prompt attention to this matter.

A taxpayer of ventnor....

Posted February 9, 2017, by Maria Elena (meem06 [at] aol [dot] com)

Please Please have the light bulbs in those beautiful light fixtures replaced! I go over this bridge everyday to & from work..and its so sad to see this bridge looking so absolutly neglected..Bulbs have been out for months now.And some of the light fixtures are broken..it is really falling in to disrepair & needs to be addressed asap.. Its dark & depressing while going over it!!!

I will send photos if needed...

Thank you very much for your prompt attention to this matter.

A taxpayer of ventnor....

Posted February 9, 2017, by christina scott (cdabbour76 [at] gmail [dot] com)

We use to go to Chelsea bridge when I was growing up. I think there use to be a grave site around there. We use to go to the grave site and drive around in it and use to play CB Tag

Posted February 8, 2017, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

My point about the review of my photos is that if the plaque were not either original or an exact (ie made using a rubber mold of an original) copy it typically would have a smooth, modern, look to it.

I believe you refer to Alan King Sloan's King Bridge Company website? His impressive efforts are an ongoing research project and while he has an impressive wealth of information I would not assume it to be 100% complete to be sure. If you poke around on his website you will find a catalog of standard designs. It includes standard plaques. Your plaque was Standard Name Plate #4.

Obviously, the 1886 plaque on 2nd Street isn't one of the Standard Name Plates. However, it is not uprising that one of the company's longest span trusses located in the heart of a city would be given some "non-standard" treatment.

Also, I would add that King Bridge was one of the largest bridge companies in the country. It is unfathomable that a successful company of this size would have only built one bridge in 1886. No doubt there are many bridges they built that we don't have records of today.

Posted February 8, 2017, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

David,

The lower central plaque on the bridge has the maker's name and is standard for late King Whipple trusses. In fact, you will note it even has a date cartouche at it's top. However, it is blank - apparently the commissioners wanted a bit more 'bling' hence the large date plaques at the top.

Your plaque is for a smaller, probably Pratt, truss; look up the 1885 Mine Road bridge in Mercer County, NJ for comparison.

By the way, by restoration, do you mean that you have the capability of restoring the missing section and mounting tabs on your plaque and have done so on similar examples of old cast iron? If so, I'd love to see examples of your work!

Regards,

Art S.

Posted February 8, 2017, by David Lgendre (dlegend62 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I have done some more research on the King Iron Bridge and Manufacturing Co. I still did not find another bridge they built in 1886. I did however come across a typo that dated the 2nd street bridge at 1883. On their website is a tab for Bridge Plates-The Builders Signature. There they have examples of period Bridge plates which are identical to the plate I have pictured. The new photos that I am seeing of the 2nd Street Bridge have a the same shape Bridge Plate on the top cross-beam but only contain the year 1886. There is no example of such a plate on the King Iron Bridge website. The website also mentions how many bridges contained 4 to 5 plaques depending on the requests. I did not understand the comment about the photos you have. I would mention that I restore old cast iron and the picture I posted is after restoration. It did contain much rust with significant build-up. It also had the original iron hangers on the back which appeared to be cut-off with a torch. I removed and retained the hangers and the period bolts.

Posted February 8, 2017, by John Goold (BlueWilliamus [at] yahoo [dot] com)

That new bridge makes me want to throw up.

Posted February 8, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Nice discovery. There are some small, unassuming bridges out there with strong significance. Looks can be deceiving.


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