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Posted November 11, 2017, by Roger Deschner (rogerdeschner [at] gmail [dot] com)

So, what's my deal with all these bridges in Winona MN? I've passed through three times in the past year, and each time I find another fascinating current or historical bridge. This bridge is one of the most interesting, with a complicated history and good written and photographic records. I'm sure there's yet more to find when I make it back to this picturesque old river town. Which I plan to do when the rehab of the 1942 highway bridge is complete in 2018.

Mystery Bridge-like Structure?
Posted November 11, 2017, by Anonymous

I recently discovered a potential bridge near Gaffney, SC. Supposedly it's located on the former set of the James Cammeron movie The Abyss, which in turn was on the location of a former planned nuclear plant. The set was abandoned for almost 20 years until being demolished in 2007. This photo was taken in 2003. I could not find the "bridge" on modern satilite photos. I'm not sure it's actually a bridge, since it could be just part of the now-removed set or the planned plant. Also, a new plant may be built here soon. Is this a bridge, and if so, is it still there?

Photo credit of Austin Meyer: http://austinmeyer.com/2003/03/26/the-abyss/

Posted November 11, 2017, by Patrick Feller (nakrnsm [at] aol [dot] com)

It looks like good kayak entry up at NE Lawton Rd.

Posted November 11, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Warning on this one, stopped on 90th street to the west and was looking out over acreage to about where I thought bridge was, was immediately approached by 2 men in a truck with guns on their laps, very protective of not only this private property, but the one to the east of it, a total of 2 properties that need to be traversed to reach bridge, guys were very nice and cooperative and even give me a few phone numbers to call to reach the spot. Will try again another day.

Posted November 11, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Visited today, it is private property and locals told me, as I could see at a distance, that this bridge was removed.

Posted November 11, 2017, by Erik Hoffman (edh4801 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Dear John Leighton,

That WAS the prognosis, but Yuba County just got a grant, so now they say they're going to for sure fix it in Spring 2018.

Posted November 10, 2017, by Anonymous

Please post it.

Posted November 10, 2017, by George oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

As per an article printed in the Reading Eagle maintenance work will be performed including work on the overhead and underground tolling equipment this weekend possibly causing traffic delays.Work will be performed from Saturday to sunday.

Posted November 10, 2017, by Anonymous

Dave that's a duplicate entry the pictures should move to PCNJ Rahway River Bridge

Posted November 10, 2017, by Dave (DD) Phillips (julesrules4fun [at] gmail [dot] com)

I have a 1916 picture of this bridge on opening day 1916

Posted November 10, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This is a very unusual Bedstead with multiple unusual features. I will try to update the KHRI when I get home. This one MUST be preserved at all costs!

I would be interested to know what the experts on here think about it.

Posted November 10, 2017, by Wade Pitcher (wpitcher1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

November 2017

Posted November 10, 2017, by George oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Just found something out about this bridge while reading an article in todays Reading Eagle about the Bingaman Street Bridge being designated for a military unit.In the article it mentions that this bridge is designated the Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard.Never knew that.

Posted November 10, 2017, by Dana

So Noted.

Posted November 10, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Pretty dang interesting bedstead. Most definitely need input on understanding this one better, among the more unique features are the elongated-triangular verticals and diagonal connections, narrowing at the top, could not find another one in the archives quite like it, the bent loop connections underneath seem strange, several things.....bit of a rural spot yet remains open and seems solid, could have hung around with this old thing all day

Posted November 10, 2017, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Dana,

Bridges like this are modern/non-historic. The railing is a standard crash-tested barrier used in a number of states. They are either going to be supported by pre-stressed concrete box beams, pre-stressed concrete girders (aka AASHTO girders), or steel stringers. Certainly nothing interesting under the bridge. Nick included this photo as evidence/confirmation that the historic truss bridge was demolished/replaced, not to imply that the replacement bridge is noteworthy.

Posted November 10, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

A stringer built from recycled truss parts?

Posted November 10, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This one is so bizarre, I don't know where to start...

Endposts pinned to the substructure in an odd fashion, eyebars with oversized loops, bottom chord well below the deck...

It is an odd duck, but a very beautiful one! This one should receive a high priority for preservation.

Posted November 10, 2017, by George oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

As per an article printed in the Reading Eagle on 11/10/17 a ceremony was held and a plaque unveiled designating this bridge as the name of the military unit i mentioned in the last post.I might have erred saying the bridge will be renamed which is untrue.This bridge still retains its name but is designated honoring the military unit I mentioned in the last post.

Posted November 10, 2017, by Wade Pitcher (wpitcher1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Seawillow Bridge

Posted November 10, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

This one was a shorty - road closed and bridge GONE.

Posted November 10, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Solid - still open, pretty spot

Posted November 10, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

This does not look like original condition, but could be mistaken - short heighth steel throwing me off

Posted November 10, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

This one has been removed. Imagine it was quite a thing with that elevation back when.

Posted November 10, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Un-interesting concrete thing. No longer unknown.

Posted November 10, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Got there at sundown. Beauty old bedstead, hanging on.

Posted November 10, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

This one is CLOSED. Pretty queenpost off the beaten path.

Posted November 10, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

This one has been replaced.

Posted November 10, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Love this one. 1896, plaque intact (mostly). Few unique features, good-looking curved abutment slowly decaying, rotting boards - just awesome, wish it someluck but odds against it's survival.

Posted November 10, 2017, by Kenny Fairhurst (dwf0403 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I remember when I was taking a hike in the area and I came across this trestle. A train was rolling by at the time.

Posted November 10, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Cool closed pony. Interesting swinging hinged gate on wheels open the day I visited - possibly locals using for hunting access on ATV's or something. At least 2 more ponies very close in proximity.

Posted November 10, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

very nice curved stone abutment on one end

Posted November 10, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

This one is CLOSED. 2 different ponies very close in proximity (at least, may have missed a 3rd just west of this one), very similar in design.

Posted November 10, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Old original crumbling stone reinforcement wall/abutment underneath on one end.

Posted November 10, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Bedstead. Very nice. Seems particulatly tall vs. traditional bedsteads found in KS.

Posted November 9, 2017, by Catherine G Scavo (cgscavo [at] gmail [dot] com)

Do you know the builder of any of these stone bridges?

Posted November 9, 2017, by Richard C Hitchcock (atsf3768 [at] cox [dot] net)

I photographed this bridge from the road and photographed the nearby creek in May 2004. I have marked up an aerial view (B&W) which I downloaded to illustrate the area. Rick.

Posted November 9, 2017, by Michael Quiet (mquiet [at] gmail [dot] com)

Well I'll be! I'd be curious if it was still lurking there since the entire segment of road was abandoned. Next time I make it down to Rockingham County I'll make sure to check up on it.

Posted November 9, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I have always liked Smith County. Very rural with nice rolling hills. It appears to have a great collection of pony trusses as well!

Posted November 9, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Interesting, these would be the 1st photos ever posted of any bridge on the site, surviving or defunct, in Smith Co., KS. Not a well-traveled route. Very sleepy in fact. More to come - visited at least 5. Beaitiful country, awesome people.

Posted November 9, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Double. So incredibly remote.

Posted November 9, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Top o' the county's priority list, I'm sure....1) House-jack Limestone Creek Bridge back up ASAP

Posted November 8, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Bing aerial shows a gap (until you zoom in and get trees). It looks like it's gone.

Posted November 8, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

That'll buff out...

Posted November 8, 2017, by James Baughn (webmaster [at] bridgehunter [dot] com)

The 2004 NBI gives coordinates near the end of Folsom Mill Lane. This bridge was dropped from the NBI after that.

Posted November 8, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Bedstead !! Collapsing !! Noooooo.....should've been saved, long ago. Road and bridge very much closed, wouldn't be surprised if noone had checked in on this one in a loooooong time. Sad.

Posted November 8, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

That Cottonwood tree was massive! It was also a very beautiful tree. I figured that it might have to be cut down one of these days. I was always a little bit worried about the roots of that tree trying to undermine the foundation and the wing walls of the bridge. Of course, the tree might have been dying as it was a very old tree.

The trunk of the tree was only a couple feet from the wing wall. The stairs by the bridge were wedged between the wing wall and the tree. This made for a nice photo opportunity.

Posted November 8, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Stone arch bridge built 1899 according to plaque.

Posted November 8, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Little sign on Rust Rd. is the only way I was aware of this one - very cool story - Apparently a gigantic tree that is written about on the plaque was cut down recently , very sad, must have been a behemoth

Posted November 8, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Solid pony, quick jog off HWY 24

Posted November 8, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

1909 !!

Posted November 8, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Neat one. Got to see an engine and a short line of cars cross this one also.

Posted November 8, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

It is always good to see this one! It will look great in Fort Scott!

Posted November 8, 2017, by Luke

I found a Railway Age article, and while it doesn't have pictures of the actual completed bridges, it has info.

Gimme a few minutes and I'll have it screencapped and uploaded.

Posted November 8, 2017, by Michael Quiet (mquiet [at] gmail [dot] com)

I concur Royce, I can't find anything to line this up with either. I'd opt for junking the entry.

Posted November 8, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

I found a BNSF track list showing this short line. It looks like it was used for ten years, 1917-1927, with the last section abandoned in 1928.

Does anyone know the history of this project with at least two large bridges, and why it was abandoned so quickly?

Posted November 8, 2017, by Royce and Bobette Haley (roycehaley111 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

There is no Black Hill Road near the area. There are only two roads crossing The Pawtuckaway River. Ghost bridge?

Posted November 8, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

We do have a similar pony here in my home county that was built in 1910... But yes Robert, I would agree that it could be a little older. I don't see 1880's but if I was to give a 10 year window I would guess 1898-1908.

Posted November 8, 2017, by Royce and Bobette Haley (roycehaley111 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

TY for the answers. Deleted

Royce

Posted November 8, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

There's nothing wrong with a bridge that is made in a way that it resembles a classic Luten. Good looks are ageless. It just needs to be noted as modern and the purists may point out that it in neither historic nor noteworthy.

Posted November 8, 2017, by Weewok (weewok [at] hotmail [dot] com)

New Jersey's oldest operating bridge reborn!

Photos at: http://s.nj.com/mDWERBM

Posted November 8, 2017, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

This is a Con-Span. It is essentially a concrete Mail Order Bridge (MOB). It is made by the same company that makes most of the steel truss MOBs you see. http://www.con-span.com/CON-SPAN/nof_main.html

Con-Spans are easy to ID because they have the same general arch shape, and you can see the rib segments when you look underneath.

They are a modern type of bridge.

Posted November 8, 2017, by Royce and Bobette Haley (roycehaley111 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

So, should I remove it or put it into a different category?

Also, does it not function as an arch? Is there a significant difference between being precast and poured on site, other than time and money?

Thanks, Royce

Posted November 8, 2017, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Nice to see this bridge again.

Posted November 8, 2017, by Anonymous

I believe that photos 9 and 10 are of a different bridge downstream.

Posted November 8, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

This spot tough to get to, finally came across property owner that showed me spot where bridge was, and was removed, about 1990. Road cut off at highway decades ago.

Posted November 7, 2017, by For info

Circa (from Latin, meaning 'around, about'), usually abbreviated c., ca or ca. (also circ. or cca.), means "approximately" in several European languages including English, usually in reference to a date.

Posted November 7, 2017, by Norm Webb (normwebb [at] comcast [dot] net)

Re the bridge: Was it made in Calif.? If not, what does Ca. mean?

What was you source of the year of the bridge? (1915)

Keep up the great job!!

Norm

Posted November 7, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This is another bridge for which I will question the Kansas Default Date of Circa 1910. I would suggest that 1910 is about the latest that this bridge could have been built. There is a reasonable chance that it could be pre 1900. It might even date back to the 1880s.

Posted November 7, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

In truth, many of truss bridges can be repaired and maintained for lightweight vehicular traffic. If heavy farm equipment needs to get across the creek, the old bridge can always be reused somewhere else. These little pony trusses can be moved relatively easily.

Clearly there is a need for trail bridges based on the sheer number of MOBs that have been appearing in recent years.

Posted November 7, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Looks precast to me. I suspect that it is a modern bridge trying to pass as a closed spandrel. These things can fool you at first glance.

Posted November 7, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

aah....I'm sure there are some standard, modern-day safety features not being met by these old beauties also....no railings for dozens of feet, slowly-rotting planks, not sure honestly I'd want my kids driving across these, but certainly modifications can and have been made on similar antiques to keep them safe, open, and viable...I wish this was ALWAYS the first default...

Posted November 7, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Easy access. Great spot to stop and relax.

Posted November 7, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Nice find! This one could be rather old given the fact that it's pin connected and every panel is countered.

Given the nearly complete eradication of truss bridges in this region in recent years, I fully expect this bridge to get demolished and replaced within the next couple of years.

Posted November 7, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

aaaaah....replaced. Concrete trumps iron again 😔

Posted November 7, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Solid old guy.

Posted November 7, 2017, by Luke

Actually, all that needs to happen is that Brian's msi-added Panaramio imports need to be deleted from this entry and Jack's proper images made the default.

Two bridges at two different GPS coords.

Posted November 7, 2017, by Anonymous

https://bridgehunter.com/me/androscoggin/bh59000/

Might want to merge these entries.

Posted November 7, 2017, by Anonymous

... and of course Maine didn't care about that.

Posted November 7, 2017, by George oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

The Reading Eagle printed another article today concerning the open house they are having on replacement of this bridge.The article is exact,word for word.

Posted November 7, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Loooong approach on this one, great old form pillars, gorgeous spot

Posted November 7, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

oooh....this is an awesome one

Posted November 7, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

also open to TRAFFIC.....

Posted November 6, 2017, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

National Register Nomination form attached.

Attachment #1 (application/pdf; 149,898 bytes)

Posted November 6, 2017, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Something looks fishy here in the satellite view, it appears to me that the original bridge was demolished and replaced with a (Bailey?) truss. The road lines up differently now, and old abutments are seen to the north.

Bayou La Batre Bascule lift bridge (double leaf)
Posted November 6, 2017, by Fred Wheeler (fewheeler [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Here is an early picture of the mechanical bridge over Bayou La Batre, Al bayou. It was replaced in 1984 by the current vertical lift draw bridge.

Posted November 6, 2017, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Excellent news article about an award for this project. http://thecabin.net/local/news/2017-11-05/bridge-project-rec...

Posted November 6, 2017, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I would describe it as a replica (albeit using bolts instead of rivets) that reused a few original members in the replica. A very small number of members on the bridge are original. If you look close you will find a few Phoenix brands on the steel. http://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=wv...

Posted November 6, 2017, by George oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This guy caused an oil spill in the Schuylkill River in Pa.?When did this happen?I live near the Schuylkill River in southeastern Pa.

Posted November 6, 2017, by Roger Deschner (rogerdeschner [at] gmail [dot] com)

Was this bridge rehabilitated, or was it completely remanufactured in 1997? The NPS ranger at the US 19 bridge overlook called it a "replica" bridge. I just visited this bridge, and I was amazed that nearly all rivets had been replaced with bolts - giving its built-up latticework a very bumpy appearance. Some parts are definitely original, such as the main upper and lower chords. However some members, such as eyebars, look very smooth and new. But I have to wonder, how much of it is actually original, other than the design?

BTW after 20 years, the 1997 wooden deck is definitely deteriorating.

If visiting, stop first at the NPS US 19 bridge overlook to pick up a free CD guided tour of Fayette Station Road.

Posted November 6, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

So dang close to NE, should have hopped across for a second, solid, neat little bridge, open to yraffic, could go another 87 years

Posted November 6, 2017, by Ed Hollowell (erhollowell [at] aol [dot] com)
Posted November 6, 2017, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Not exactly sure what these mean. I know others have an actual date, and sometimes a letter.

http://bridgehunter.com/photos/40/72/407274-L.jpg

Best I can figure is they are either mileposts, elevations or another set of numbers relating to the construction of the bridge.

Posted November 6, 2017, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Interesting. I'll have to see if I can find a date for the truss. I know the Missouri Pacific had annual reports discussing the building of large bridges.

Posted November 6, 2017, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Nothing good that I am aware of. Its been a while since I heard anything, but last I heard MaineDOT definitely wants to replace the bridge. There was some local opposition, but given Maine's handling of other projects I doubt this will change the outcome (demolition and replacement). If someone has more recent news, I would welcome it too.

Posted November 6, 2017, by Brian J. Patterson (pattersonbj [at] earthlink [dot] net)

The REAL shame about the Waldo-Hancock Bridge was that the Maine DOT allowed it to quietly rot away for so many years. To even support its own dead weight, they would still have to have replaced both main suspension cables, because they didn't do the maintenance the bridge needed when it needed to be done. It IS sad, and hopefully they are no longer neglecting their remaining Robinson and Steinman bridges.

Posted November 6, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Yeah, would doubt it. PS - concrete relacement/reinforcing pillars beneath embossed "1944"

Posted November 6, 2017, by John Marvig

I donít think this one will ever be rebuilt then...

Posted November 6, 2017, by Rhys Martin (rhysfunk [at] gmail [dot] com)

Beautiful location!


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