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Re:Another bridge damaged this time in Pa.
Posted May 18, 2017, by Patrick S. O'Donnell (1 [dot] 991km [at] comcast [dot] net)

50 ton Crane vs 2 ton posted bridge makes for the highest ratio of load to limit I'm aware of... 25:1

http://sanatogapost.com/2017/05/17/bridge-remnants-littered-...

Posted May 18, 2017, by Chris (cfdellarocco [at] gmail [dot] com)

PARKE COUNTY, Ind. (WTHI) - The Parke County Sheriff’s Office is looking for information in regards to damage done to the Jackson Covered Bridge located on Bdale Road over Sugar Creek.

Deputies report on Tuesday around 11:30 p.m. they were called to the bridge to investigate the damage.

They report the damage is consistent with a large truck and they believe a semi attempted to go through the bridge. Damage shows the vehicle made it part way through.

Officials are looking for a dark blue semi that should have damage to the upper most part of the cab.

If you have any information, contact the Parke County Sheriff’s Office at (765) 569-5413.

http://www.wthitv.com/story/35451055/jackson-covered-bridge-...

Posted May 18, 2017, by David Jones (david2jpix [at] yahoo [dot] com)

The spans of this bridge are different. The northern span seems to be pin connected while the southern span is riveted. The date on the southern abutment is 1928 but the builder's plaque on the southern span, the riveted one, is 1899. Was the southern span moved to this location? NBI says the bridge was built in 1928.

Posted May 18, 2017, by Matt Lohry

I believe that Robert was referring to the category that was assigned to the bridge, not the location. There is no dispute that this is the correct bridge, location, and it is the Fox River--however, the category that was previously assigned was the Fox River that passes between Green Bay and Appleton--Wisconsin has 2 Fox Rivers, which makes things confusing. This Fox River originates just north of Waukesha and passes through Burlington and down into Illinois. Just wanted to clear things up.

The Red Bridge (Connecticut)
Posted May 18, 2017, by Michael Quiet (mquiet [at] gmail [dot] com)

Very interesting find here...it indeed looks like a bridge built of the Douglas patent. I have seen occasional mention of Corrugated Metal Co. building a few spans based on the Elliptical truss patent, but these bridges were quite crude and did not hold up well (no doubt owing to some of the design faults visible in the patent drawings, note that the diagonals are sloping in the wrong direction!). It was only when the Yale educated engineer Charles Jarvis was brought in that the design was refined (adding counters to each panel and smoothing out the upper and lower chords) to create the lenticular truss we know.

I'd opt for referring to it as an Elliptical Truss though, just to highlight the difference between this bridge and the extant lenticular trusses that remain today.

Another truck-bridge accident
Posted May 18, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

As per an article printed in the Reading Eagle on 5/18/17 the Dryville Road railroad bridge in Richmond Township Pa was damaged by a box truck hitting it,shearing off the top of the box truck.Yaya Fane,26,of Philadelphia was cited after the accident.There was no listing of what he was charged with.I looked on google satellite and saw that the bridge is concrete.Oh well.Stupid is,stupid does.

Re:Another bridge damaged this time in Pa.
Posted May 18, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

As per an article printed in the Reading Eagle on 5/17/17 the crane that fell into Sprogel's Run was removed by 11 p.m. Monday night.The crane was taken for repairs but the wooden bridge on the other hand is a whole different story.Lower Pottsgrove police Sgt. William James said Tuesday the bridge is totalled.As of right now there is no estimate for the cost of repairs or how long the bridge will be closed.

Bridge comment
Posted May 18, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Thanks for clearing that up,Don.That's why i ask people who know.

Posted May 18, 2017, by Nick Trimberger (kc9jts ---- [at] ------ gmail [dot] com)

As this original photographer of the image shown I can guarantee that it is just south of Burlington, WI and is not in Illinois. While in high school in the late 1990s I worked for a horse farm that owned the land which is how I had access to get that picture.

Posted May 18, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Nick:

That sounds like a reasonable estimation. This bridge appears to be constructed with riveted connections. Rivets began to fall out of favor in the years after WWII as bolted and welded connections became popular.

Posted May 18, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

20's to early 40's it's looking like?

Posted May 17, 2017, by Erik Hoffman (norcalroadswebsite [at] gmail [dot] com)

As of May 2017, this bridge has been inaccessible due to slides since January, and I expect it to stay closed through June.

Hell's Gate (Indiana)
Posted May 17, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Yeah... Need a Gondola to get through there right now!

Posted May 17, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

Hey Jack Schmidt, do you get down this way now again? Saw you had captured bridges around this county.

Hell's Gate (Indiana)
Posted May 17, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

Nice shot Janis, any ghost trains or boats!?

Posted May 17, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Here is the page for it!

Little Sandy Elvis Bridge
Posted May 17, 2017, by Dana And Kay

Wow needs a visit! 600 miles for me any one closer?

re: Little Sandy Mystery Elvis Bridge
Posted May 17, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Yes, definitely check with the landowners. I don't know if Kentucky tends to transfer bridges to landowners or not. Sometimes it's hard to tell if an old right-of-way has become private or is still public but I always ask just in case.

38.2932831674, -82.9594272931
Posted May 17, 2017, by Anonymous

Doesn't Look like a far walk in from Hill Road or Vincent Road. Might ask about for local guide. Wish I was closer!

re: Little Sandy Mystery Elvis Bridge
Posted May 17, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Well, great news indeed. Anybody up for a Bluegrass Bridgehunt?

Posted May 17, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Salt trucks strike again!

Posted May 17, 2017, by GIRailfan (rgeceo [at] gmail [dot] com)

Apparently this bridge is slated to be demolished sometime in the near future. Work is to be done by IDOT. I don't know if it will happen this year or in 2018.

Mebane Bridge (North Carolina)
Posted May 17, 2017, by Alex Dunn (erdnay [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Looks like this is open-spandrel.

Little Sandy River Mystery Elvis Bridge... Maybe!
Posted May 17, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Oh Snap... Tony might have found something hiding in the weeds near all of those other LSR coverted RR spans! I saw a couple of abandoned structures listed... But not this one! Looks like a through truss that was abandoned SW of the end of Vincent Road (Hil? Road is the road farther to the SW).

Check it out...

38.2932831674, -82.9594272931

I'm too far away for an inspection. M Cox do you know anything about this one? If not... Nick S. wanna take a road trip? ;-)

Posted May 17, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This is a rare example of a Pratt - Warren Hybrid. There was another example in Johnson County Kansas, but it has been replaced.

Posted May 17, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Geeze... I've never seen so many converted RR spans in one county!

Posted May 17, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I don't know if there is support for rail trails in Kentucky, but I do know that based on my experience in West Virginia there seems to be a lot of people there who support them. These trails have been a pretty good boon to West Virginia from what I understand.

If this road in Kentucky were to become a trail it would certainly be a local attraction. If people want to support it might become a nice asset for the area.

Posted May 17, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Neat one - just on northern border of sleepy little RR town

Posted May 17, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Wow!

Little Sandy River EL&BS Railroad Bridge's 1, 2, and 3
Posted May 17, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

What a neat stretch of converted rail corridor! Would make a great walking trail!

Posted May 17, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Not a 1913 bridge... More like ca.1890.

Posted May 17, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Photos 9,10 and 11 are not the same bridge as 1-8.

Posted May 17, 2017, by Mike Rosenberger (mfrosenberger [at] gmail [dot] com)

Suggested correction: Williams Viaduct connected at 7th Street.

FYI... the bridge it replaced connected at 9th Street. The bridge that replaced the Williams Viaduct connects at 5th Street.

Posted May 17, 2017, by M Cox (trock859[at]yahoo[dot]com)

Closed to all traffic. Deck rotting away.

Posted May 17, 2017, by M Cox (trock859[at]yahoo[dot]com)

Closed to all traffic. Deck rotting away.

Posted May 17, 2017, by M Cox (trock859[at]yahoo[dot]com)

Closed to all traffic. Deck rotting away.

Posted May 17, 2017, by M Cox (trock859[at]yahoo[dot]com)

Slated for demolition and replacement. Get out to see it before it's gone!

Posted May 17, 2017, by M Cox (trock859[at]yahoo[dot]com)

Slated for demolition and replacement. Get out to see it before it's gone!

Posted May 17, 2017, by M Cox (trock859[at]yahoo[dot]com)

Scheduled for demotion and replacement.

Posted May 17, 2017, by Melissa Jurgensen

The bridge is scheduled for replacement and currently the State of Kentucky is trying to give the bridge away with certain restrictions according to a September 11, 2016 Lexington Herald Leader Story. The bridge was still standing upon my last visits in March of 2017.

Bridge comment
Posted May 17, 2017, by Don Morrison

Culverts:

CMP = Corrugated Metal Pipe

RCP = Reinforced Concrete Pipe

Bridge comment
Posted May 17, 2017, by Don Morrison

Culverts:

CMP = Corrugated Metal Pipe

RCP = Reinforced Concrete Pipe

Earl Township Pa bid proposal
Posted May 17, 2017, by george oakley (georgewoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I have questions on this article which appeared in the Reading Eagle on 5-17-17.It's concerning sealed proposals being received by the Earl Township Pa Board of Supervisors for the following scope of work.This is the article word for word and i'll ask the question i have afterword.Replace existing 36" CMP crossing Blackberry Road with 44lf of 53" x 34" elliptical RCP,to include precast headwall,cast-in-place retaining/endwall,excavation and backfill,guide rail installation and pavement and site restoration.The question i have is what is CMP and RCP?I understand the rest of the article but not those two sets of letters.Anybody know fill me in on this puzzling question to me.

Re;A nother bridge damaged this time in Pa.
Posted May 17, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Tony,i would have to agree.If you look at street view of this bridge you can see what it actually looks like.I failed to mention what you did say.The crane did go over the side after the collapse.The picture in the paper proved that.For anybody who wants to look at this bridge it is on SunnyBrook Road east of Pottstown Pa off of High Street.I looked on Bridgehunters and didn't see it listed.I don't think it would be listed,would it Tony?

Frisco Bridge Memphis 1891
Posted May 17, 2017, by Liz Eubanks (eaeubanks [at] aol [dot] com)

My great-great grandfather, Samuel Robison (sometimes misspelled Robinson) was an engineer on the Memphis Frisco Bridge. His name used to be on a plaque under the bridge on the East side under the bridge. I saw it with my grandmother in the '70's. I have had people look for it, but I guess it is not there anymore. A great aunt said that he was lifted onto peoples shoulders during the bridge opening celebration and fell (off the bridge?). He died at home the next day. I don't know which engineering company he worked for. I would like to verify this family history. Any suggestions?

Posted May 17, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Unfortunately, I think that the manufacturers of these MOB's (or Modern Ugly's as I like to call them) like to tout them as being "just as good" as the historic spans they replace. And while maybe they are stronger, in no shape or form can they match the integrity of those iconic structures that are lost. Weather the powers that be 50 or so years from now deem these modern trusses as historic remains to be seen. But for now I can't understand the logic that is used (Not Used!) in most of these situations. While I have no problem with these modern spans being used in new applications, I will always abhor them replacing an historic bridge that can be rehabilitated.

Posted May 17, 2017, by Michael Quiet (mquiet [at] gmail [dot] com)

Robert,

Something must have changed in the last few years with NY's approach to historic bridges, as my last couple of jaunts through upstate NY (Clinton/Essex counties) have shown a large number of historic bridges lost, either being replaced by modern welded pony trusses or in the most recent ones just UCEB's. Even some of the more modern 1930's have been subject to replacement in the last few years, despite still being in relatively good condition.

Bridge comment
Posted May 16, 2017, by ALMICEB

A t

L east

M ildly

I nteresting

C oncrete

E yesore

B ridge

Posted May 16, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I have been wondering if it was still somewhat intact, albeit undoubtedly mangled.

Posted May 16, 2017, by James Baughn (webmaster [at] bridgehunter [dot] com)

Field check today: the wreckage is still in the water. The river is still high so only a portion is visible. It's hard to imagine how much water it took to push this bridge off the abutments.

Posted May 16, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The loss of this bridge is a surprise. If you visit Nathan's page (see link), this bridge looked like it had a relatively new coat of paint. Plus, it was in New York, a state which from what I can tell has an exceptionally good track record for preservation.

Re: Another bridge damaged this time in Pa.
Posted May 16, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

It doesn't look like this span is anything more than a modern stringer at best. Looks like one side gave and the truck flipped over.

Another bridge damaged this time in Pa.
Posted May 16, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

As per an article printed in the Reading Eagle on 5-16-17 a 50-ton crane far too heavy for the wooden bridge that serves as an entrance to SunnyBrook Ballroom in Lower Pottsgrove crashed through the span Monday morning.Lower Pottsgrove Police Sgt. William James said the crane had come to work on an HVAC system in the facility.The crane fell through the bridge just after 9:30 a.m. while driving away from the facility off SunnyBrook Road.The bridge-one of two entrances to the facility-has a 2-ton weight limit that is posted directly in front of the entrance off the street.James said he did not know if the other side of the bridge,the side exiting the property,had a similar sign.The driver of the crane,Shawn Sunday,30,had a few cuts and scrapes,James said,but was otherwise uninjured.Crews worked well into Monday evening to try to remove the crane,which remained lodged upside down under the bridge,from Sprogel's Run,which runs beneath the bridge."They're going to counter-balance the weight with trucks so they can lift this thing out of the water and off the bridge and get it out of here",James said.A time frame for when the crane would fully be removed from the water was unknown,although James said he believed crews would work through the night until the truck was removed."As long as it takes",James said."They want to make sure nobody gets injured,and they don't want to do any more damage to the ecological system".James credited fire crews from Sanatoga and Ringing Hill fire companies for a prompt response to hydraulic fluid from the crane leaking into the water."They jumped on it,and minimized any damage"James said.With the bridge out of commission for the foreseeable future,only one entrance,off High Street,remains open to the SunnyBrook property,which includes both the ballroom and Gatsby"s restaurant."I don't foresee the bridge closure affecting our business as we do have a secondary entrance on High Street and will have signage up directing our customers where to enter",Holly Becker,marketing director for the ballroom said in an e-mail."At this time,we do not know how long it will take to reopen the bridge,but we hope to get it opened as soon as possible".I posted this article word for word so you all can see what an idiot can do to a wooden bridge.They didn't mention the crane company's name but from the names on the cranes in the picture it was Eisenhart Crane Co.

Posted May 16, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

We had a nice conference and tour up here a few years back that covered Southern Indiana Robert... But I would be open to another one featuring some Northern spans!

Posted May 16, 2017, by Michael G.

Yes, this bridge is still at its location as of 5/16/17.

Posted May 16, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

That is my suspicion as well. If the towers have any structural function at all, then I would definitely call it a continuous truss, even if the spans could remain standing, albeit weakened a bit, without the towers.

As far as I can tell, the only way that the three spans could be 100% simple is if the towers are purely decorative.

This has been a really fun and enlightening discussion. I appreciate all who have participated. I think that we are starting to figure this bridge out.

Posted May 15, 2017, by Don Morrison

Also interesting is that the upper chords almost follow a catenary curve, giving it a suspension bridge look as well.

It must have been an experimental continuous truss.

Posted May 15, 2017, by Anonymous

This is an ALMICEB

Bridge comment
Posted May 15, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Luke,that bridge in the picture is the one I was thinking of.The other bridge date sounds too much newer.

Posted May 15, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Also, I deleted the essay that I wrote years ago. It was out of date as many contributors on here have done some detective work with this bridge.

Posted May 15, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

That is too bad. This county had an incredible collection of truss bridges. One of these days, when metal truss bridges are rare, they will be an attraction like covered bridges are today. Maybe someday you will see a Whipple Truss gracing a tourism brochure...maybe...

Posted May 15, 2017, by Nathan Holth (nathan [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

As far as I know the arch bridge is the only historic bridge that the county has even thought about preserving. Otherwise, historic bridges in this county are only seen as an irritant by farmers and dealt with in the same way as rodents on the farm: total mass extermination.

Posted May 15, 2017, by M Cox (trock859[ar]yahoo[dot]com)

at least it's a truss, not a UCEB.

Posted May 15, 2017, by M Cox (trock859[at]yahoo[dot]com)

demolished and replaced

Posted May 15, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Iroquois County is still on my bucket list - mostly because of the P.E. Lane through arch bridge. Hopefully, that one will be preserved as it is unique.

Posted May 15, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

A nice problem, eh? Of course, Indiana is blessed with the same problem. I hope to make a trip there someday. Conference in Indianapolis?

Posted May 15, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

We would need a week or two... To even begin to cover Kansas!

...Eastern Kansas!

Posted May 15, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Tony, it is funny that you mention of a through truss bracketed by Pony trusses and then connected by a couple of towers. I was thinking about what could happen if you could modify the nearby Careys Ford Bridge resemble something like this. Just don't forget to flip the endposts of the pony trusses upward to meet the towers.

http://bridgehunter.com/ks/miami/careys-ford/

I have not found any evidence that the Kansas City Bridge Company ever constructed anything else like this. I suspect that it was indeed a one-off design.

Thankfully this bridge did not get demolished when it was closed. I am pretty sure it was not yet on the national register when the closure a card so the fact this thing is still standing is a miracle. Not to mention that this bridge survived a devastating flood in 2007.

Hopefully you will get to see it someday. Maybe if one of these years we have a Bridgehunter conference in Kansas City, Saint Joseph, Springfield, Topeka, or Wichita, then we could include this bridge. Wouldn't it be nice if this one was actually restored by then. Everybody check your couch cushions for cash...

Posted May 15, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Not good news considering what county it is in!

Posted May 15, 2017, by Scott (Themufflerman [at] live [dot] com)

Unfortunately, This bridge is now closed.

Posted May 15, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Ummm... Okay

Posted May 15, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Exactly Don! I have never thought this was a cantilever structure either. I almost think it could be classified as a 3-span continuous truss. Think of a through truss bracketed with a pony on each end... But make them continuous. I'm not sure exactly what the designer was trying to accomplish here, and although we are fortunate to have this rare example... But it may have been a one-off thing.

Posted May 15, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Interesting thought. Thus, if the spans are simple, and if the towers are largely decorative, those rivets I mentioned earlier would not have to bear any load stress.

Posted May 15, 2017, by Don Morrison

I guess I assumed the bridge might tend to sag slightly under a large load at center span. It is pin connected. This might put the tower top chords under tension. But overall, I think it operates as three separate spans.

Posted May 15, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

So, my comment from earlier today really did not break any new ground with respect to whether this bridge functions as a cantilever. We are all in agreement that it does not.

The only question left is whether the tower top chords relay any stresses from span to span. This will determine if the bridge is simple or continuous.

I still think that the answer lies in the tower top chords.

Posted May 15, 2017, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge is a mishmash of information. The photo actually correlates to the current bridge at this location, which was rebuilt after the flood and still exists. However; the first crossing east of here was removed in 1960 and moved to a current location in southern Mandan.

Posted May 15, 2017, by Anonymous

All your freedoms are being taking away right now!

Posted May 15, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I have spent some time looking at photographs of this bridge lately. Granted, I am not an engineer, nor do I play one on TV, but I have two theories about this bridge.

Theory #1: This bridge has no cantilever function at all.

Theory #2: The laced top-chords that radiate out from the towers are in compression, not in tension.

I will start by addressing Theory #1. This bridge, like (almost) all pin-connected truss bridges, features a pin at every connection on the top chord of the main span. If you look at the top of the endpost of the main span, you will see that there is a pin which secures four members together: the endpost, the top chord, the hip-vertical, and the diagonal member. There is nothing unusual here, save for the fact that the top chord is inverted. (Ie, making it look like a "Reverse Parker" instead of a standard Parker). In the case of this bridge, the hip vertical is a built-up member as opposed to being a simple eyebar, but this is probably beside the point when considering cantilever function.

You will notice that the built-up top chords that radiate off of the towers do not connect to the endpost/top chord pin. In other words, I am thinking that this bridge does not have the true hinge points that you would find on a cantilever bridge.

This brings me to Theory #2. Let me repeat myself by stating that those top chords that radiate off of the towers do not connect to any pins on the main span. Instead, they are simply riveted to the endpost of the main span. This makes me suspect that these members are in compression, and not in tension. Imagine if the main span were to be subject to a heavy load. Would those rivets that connect the tower top chord to the endpost be able to withstand any tension? Could they withstand any significant forces that were not absorbed by the endposts? I would have my doubts. On the other hand, I would theorize that those rivets would be sufficient to attach the tower top chord to the endpost if in fact those tower top chords are in compression, and not in tension.

The only other option is the idea that the towers are just decorative. In other words, they serve no other purpose than being glorified plaque holders, giving the bridge a bizarre appearance, and making bridgehunters go insane looking at the bridge in a futile attempt to make sense of it.

Now, giving credit where credit is due: If you have not visited Nathan Holth's page for this bridge at HistoricBridges.org, I strongly recommend that you look through his photographs and read his discussion. http://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=ka...

He has done a very thorough documentation of this bridge and his photographs have been extremely useful to me as I have been considering the function of this bridge.

Bridge comment
Posted May 15, 2017, by Luke

You're probably thinking of the 1882 Forth railroad cantilever.

The Forth Road Bridge is a far newer (1964) suspension bridge.

American Bridge Company
Posted May 15, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I read an interesting article on this company in the Reading Eagle on 5-14-17.The article detailed the ups and downs of this company over the years since their founding in 1900 and their future whatever it may be.I didn't know this but they are currently working on the new Tappan Zee Bridge in New York which was built by them in 1955.Also they are bidding on two of the biggest infrastructure projects in the hemisphere:the $4.5 billion Gordie Howe International Bridge between Detroit and Canada and the $3.5 billion George Massey tunnel replacement and bridge construction project in British Columbia.They have one international project which is the $1 billion replacement of the Forth Road Bridge near Edinburgh,Scotland.The question about this last bridge mentioned is i think i know which bridge this is but i'm not sure.I've seen pictures of the bridge i'm thinking about but i don't know if it's this one.I'll have to research it.

Monument Road bridge replacement,Windsor Township,Pa
Posted May 15, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

As per an article printed in the Reading Eagle on 5-14-17 work will be starting Monday to replace the Monument Road bridge over the Windsor Creek in Windsor Township.The road will be closed between Old Route 22 and Windsor Castle Road.The project costs $394,044 and includes replacing the bridge with a box culvert,constructing new pavement bridge approaches,guide rail updates,new paint and signage and other miscellaneous construction.The monument Road bridge is a steel I-beam bridge constructed in 1939.It is 14 feet long and 24 feet,6 inches wide.The new bridge will be a precast concrete box culvert that is 16 feet long and 28 feet,6 inches wide.The bridge carries an average of 281 vehicles daily.One thing that strikes me as odd is why replace a bridge with a box culvert?Seems weird to me.

Windsor Castle Road bridge reopening
Posted May 15, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I have to say i made a few errors on the previous articles because i used a smart phone over the weekend to enter in the information and didn't catch the errors before posting the articles.Just wanted to let everyone know.

Posted May 15, 2017, by Chris (c319chris [at] aol [dot] com)

The tree's official name is "El Palo Alto".

Posted May 15, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I wondered if this might be a Frankenbridge, or at least a heavily modified bridge. I have come to learn that there are a lot more of those out there than one might think.

I look for empty rivet holes when I visit a bridge now, but I didn't notice the ones here.

Posted May 14, 2017, by Anonymous

UI Engineering senior project?

Posted May 14, 2017, by Nathan Holth (nathan [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Take a look at Photo #7. End post terminates prematurely into gusset plate containing empty rivet holes (evidence of salvaged material). Elsewhere, welded construction is apparent. It appears to be a "Redneck" bridge. Sometimes when you have someone hold your beer while you build a bridge, the diagonals just don't quite come out where they are supposed to be, you know? And someones that pesky endpost, just isn't quite long enough... That's what the scrap plate in the back of the truck is for!

In short, I don't really think a specific truss classification was a consideration during this bridge's fabrication!

Posted May 14, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

Whoops duplicate county lines..........

Posted May 14, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

What kind of lift bridge is this?

Posted May 14, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Bizarre... I've never seen one quite like this!

Posted May 14, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

So, is there a such thing as a half-hip Warren truss? This question is about half serious and half joking...

Windsor Castle Road bridge reopening
Posted May 13, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Missing from the previous article is this bridge is designed with a 100-year life span.The bridge is referred to as JV-171 and is one out of the 558 bridges being replaced under PennDOT's Rapid Bridge Replacement Project.Also I meant I couldn't find this bridge on the Berks County site.

Posted May 13, 2017, by Rhys Martin (rhysfunk [at] gmail [dot] com)

Stopped by today; the new bridge is completed and the old bridge is, indeed, open to pedestrian traffic.

Windsor Castle Road bridge reopening
Posted May 13, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

As per an article printed in the Reading Eagle on 5-13-17 the Windsor Castle Road bridge,spanning Windsor Creek in Windsor Township,was opened to traffic Thursday morning.The original closure was scheduled for 75 days,but the project team,C. H. & D. Enterprises Inc. of New Stanton,was able to expedite construction and complete the project 30 days ahead of schedule,a PennDot statement said.Replacement of the bridge allows PennDOT to remove it from Berks County's structurally deficient bridge list.The new crossing is longer and wider than the one it replaced and is referred to as JV-171 and is one out of the 558 bridges being replaced under PennDOT'S Rapid Bridge Replacement Project.JV refers to joint-venture partnership between Walsh/Granite,which is leading construction for the entire project.The Rapid Bridge Replacement is a public-private partnership between PennDOT and Plenary Walsh Keystone Partners,under which PWKP will finance,design,replace and maintain the bridges for 25 years.I looked on the Berks County forthis bridge and didn't see it listed.I also have reported on the partnership between PennDOT and private firms before.

Posted May 13, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Although somewhat common on ponies, through truss spans with plaques on the railings are an unusual sight Chester. At least you did catch that partial shot with the builder!

Posted May 13, 2017, by Chester Gehman (gehmanc2000 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

These old eyes of mine must be failing. Both my wife and I were on that bridge and didn't see that plaque. We looked on the end posts and the portal area but failed to look down. Can't say I've ever seen a Berlin through truss plaque that low. Even had it in my camera lens! A slightly lower shot might have revealed a build date. Sorry, guys. I'll get it next time.

Posted May 12, 2017, by Don Morrison

Sad to see another cantilever lost.

The method seems more sensible than the usual BOOM/splash then drag the pieces out of the river too.

I wonder if the cantilever spans' demise will be so graceful.

Posted May 12, 2017, by Brian J. Patterson (pattersonbj [at] earthlink [dot] net)

This line was completely removed and ROW "taken over" by neighboring land owners circa 1985-1986. It barely made it into CSX's "books" if indeed it made it at all. It was Seaboard System when it was removed.

Posted May 12, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)
Posted May 12, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

Regardless of Tee Beam opinion They are an extremely durable design!

Posted May 12, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

Daniel nice find!


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