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Posted February 17, 2018, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Great find! I have often believed that Nebraska just might be the most underrated state when it comes to Historic Bridges.

There are some great bridges in Nebraska but most of us don't seem to have been able to get there to get photographs.

Posted February 16, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Just found this structure. Looks like it is possibly privately owned. Appears to be a beautiful old Pratt Through Truss.

Posted February 16, 2018, by Anonymous

What a Marvelous Bridge to by pass in place. Canoe put in and tourist destination! Such history.

Posted February 16, 2018, by Kevin Skow (weatherbum [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Some or all of these photos appear to be from the Neosho Rapids bridge just to its east (http://bridgehunter.com/ks/lyon/bh36250/). This bridge does not have the approaches that many photos show.

Posted February 16, 2018, by Anne Thomas (annethomas20712 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The Maryland State Highway Administration is considering demolishing and replacing this bridge, according to an article in The Herald-Mail, Feb. 13, 2018.

Posted February 16, 2018, by Anonymous

You've gotten the bricked-up CNW tunnel confused with the still in use MILW tunnel: https://bridgehunter.com/wi/monroe/bh54347/

Posted February 16, 2018, by Alyssa Wolven (alyssawolven [at] cox [dot] net)

Wow, we miss you Ron Barnes! I just stumbled across this, saw your name. It's a shame that when you are were around I didn't know you were into trains also and possibly abandoned infrastructure also. If anyone else that knows me or (the now deceased) Ronald, and/or simply wants to walk the entire former Waterberry Meriden Connecticut River Line in an upcoming summer, HMU at my first & last name no spaces at cox.net . I'll fly out from San Diego as I do many late summers. Ciao

Posted February 16, 2018, by Doug (douglas [dot] venenga [at] att [dot] net)

cp Railway is currently looking at putting in a cellular repeater in the tunnel. I don't know of any collapse or that it was ever bricked but it is in use.

Posted February 16, 2018, by Tracey Richardson (tracey [dot] richardson [at] sumnerschools [dot] org)

Thank you so much. This is a great website. Very very helpful when trying to help out our school bus drivers with locations they've never been to. Much appreciated.

Posted February 15, 2018, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Only if they require federal permit (Army Corps for example) or are federally funded (very rare that taxpayer dollars fund private for-profit corporations, but this DOES happen sometimes). Many railroad bridges avoid Section 106.

Posted February 15, 2018, by Zachary S

Demolition should be nearly complete by now, was half removed back in November when I last went by - over the new bridge, for the first time. Was always a bit of a fun adventure to cross this one going to the mountains, and very frustrated it wasn't preserved as a walking bridge (there was quite a bit of support and a plan in the making) because of eleventh hour nonsense thrown in about its stability in case of a _10,000_ year flood. A small part might go toward building a bridge in a city park, but we'll see.

Posted February 15, 2018, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

If the bridges are NRHP eligible, would that trigger Section 106 and subject the bridge to KSHS review?

Posted February 15, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Reading about these bridges, they are eligible for NR listings in Kansas due to the truss design. There’s only a handful of railroad trusses left in the state (okay, a decent amount), but relocating or reusing even a few of these would be a major win. Fortunately, if nobody wants these, there are still a number of identical spans in the area that would give more of a chance to market the spans.

Posted February 15, 2018, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Hi John:

What I am deducing from your comment is that the current bridges would not be demolished before the new bridges are complete. If that is true, that could buy us a few weeks (or months) to find a buyer.

I have already e-amailed one of my contacts.

I was unaware that these bridges were NRHP eligible.

Posted February 15, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Robert,

What I've seen on other structures of this magnitude is they slide it onto temporary piers and demolish it there. A news article reports that there is a 32 hour window to switch out both bridges. Considering the new bridges are different in length (and by quite a bit), a parallel bridge could be constructed as well.

If you find someone whos a willing buyer, I'm sure we could put some heat on BNSF to give the spans away. Since both these are also eligible for the NRHP, there could be additional funds available. Not sure if there are still gaps where the trail crosses major roads, but a configuration like this could create some interest in the trail:

http://bridgehunter.com/mn/washington/manning-avenue/

Posted February 15, 2018, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

John:

If the 1890s railroad bridge near Augusta could fill that gap, that would be great. Thanks for letting me know that it could be scheduled for replacement.

As for this bridge, do you know if the railroad plans do to a crane lift or use a cutting torch? If they plan to crane lift it, could it be set aside temporarily while a new owner can be found?

Posted February 15, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Unfortunately, it’s almost certainly too late for these structures. Articles I’ve found online suggest work could begin in March. What I’m finding interesting is how the new spans are gonna be bigger. This almost certainly is to relieve flooding.

If you found someone who wanted a big railroad bridge, especially near Augusta; a span like this almost certainly would work. The only thing that would bother me about that location is how the old bridge was so easily undercut. Stream conditions probably aren’t ideal there and a adjusted alignment would be needed.

In my opinion, a bridge like this or Quenemo wouldn’t be a good fit for that location. If they wanted to use a historic railroad truss at that location, the best option would probably be an older and smaller structure. One that immediately rings a bell is that odd 1890s truss near Augusta. Almost certainly to be replaced in the next 10 years, that structure appeared to be in really good condition, despite clearance issues for the railroad. If you come across someone interested in doing better than a prefabricated pedestrian bridge, send them my way and I would be more than willing to talk to the railroad.

Posted February 15, 2018, by Anonymous

This bridge has been unused since 1976, and was operated by the SP.

Posted February 15, 2018, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

John:

This sounds great. Are you hoping to discuss this with the railroad? I can always check with local connections. Because you have worked with the railroad so much, I don't want to step on your toes in that aspect of the project.

There are several rail trails being built in the area, and I know that they occasionally need bridges. A classic example of course can be found at Augusta where the Whitewater River undermined an old railroad bridge leaving a gap where the trail needs to go. Of course, there are rail trails that are much closer to this bridge.

So, in short, I think it's probably best for you to be the man who talks with the railroad. I can check with some local contacts and see what ideas they might have. This is a very heavily built truss, so it's not like it can't carry pedestrians golf carts, vehicles and most types of farm equipment.

Posted February 15, 2018, by Steve Lindsey (stevelindsey60 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Letter-to-the-editor

An interesting read, by Steve Lindsey

Jan 30, 2017

I have always wanted to write a book. Not a serious book. A humorous one. A light-hearted book. One of those “Secret Lives of Something” books. A part of a recognized series. A book where there would be a revenue stream, so I could take interesting vacations. Something with entertainment and distracting value.

My title would be “The Secret Lives of Elected and Appointed Officials.” A work that would put forth how politicians and commissioners actually work and behave. This wouldn’t be anything salacious involving stains on dresses or congressional pages. It would involve those seeking power, jockeying for power. That sort of thing.

My favorite chapter would illustrate the need to humiliate and demean lessors in the political hierarchy. Of particular interest would be the degradation of the citizenry that endures the political caste system. Keeping the citizen inline and under the thumb would make for boffo material, a good read.

In recent weeks, a group trying to save the Harlan Fiske Stone Bridge dissolved after years of stonewalling by state authorities. The Chesterfield Arch Bridge Beautification and Preservation Society is no more. They wanted to save the 1937 riveted-steel arch bridge and turn it into a park and scenic overlook on the Connecticut River. Like Shelburne Falls’ Bridge of Flowers.

This was, of course, a doomed project that sees two nearby underfunded state parks faltering and failing: Pisgah Park and the Chesterfield Gorge Natural Area.

This news followed on the heels of the dissolution of another citizens’ group proposing a dog park for Keene. City officials likewise broke the will of this grassroots effort, too. How dare the uneducated and unofficial voice opinion and put forth programs? We live in a world of experts.

For you out there, thinking of getting involved beyond voting once a year for one of two candidates chosen by party bosses, consultants and special interests, buy my book. It will be a better use of your time.

Sincerely,

STEVE LINDSEY

17 Center St

Keene

Posted February 15, 2018, by Steve Lindsey (stevelindsey60 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

All we expected was bridge maintenance, by Lorraine Scrivani

Jan 31, 2017

Your editorial, “State shouldn’t fund bridge upkeep” (Jan. 24), states:

“… the group (Chesterfield Arch Bridge Society) is wrong to expect state transportation funds.”

It infers that we expected money from the state. Our group never expected money from the state.

We did expect some maintenance for the bridge. Although we had an encroachment agreement and we placed benches and flower barrels, the state owns and is responsible for some bridge upkeep and safety for pedestrians.

LORRAINE SCRIVANI

Chesterfield Arch Bridge Society

Posted February 15, 2018, by Steve Lindsey (stevelindsey60 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Sentinel Editorial

State shouldn't fund bridge upkeep

Jan 24, 2017

The Justice Harlan Fiske Stone Bridge, built in 1937, is rusting and hasn’t borne vehicle traffic since 2003, when a new, larger structure was built less than 20 feet away. Instead, it serves pedestrians, cyclists and those who just want to pause and enjoy the view of the Connecticut River.

The new bridge, dubbed the U.S. Navy Seabees Bridge, was long sought as concerns grew about the safety of the older bridge.

In 2009, a group of area residents formed the Arch Bridge Beautification and Preservation Society, hoping to not only keep the bridge in use, but also turn it into a lasting destination along the lines of the Bridge of Flowers in Shelburne Falls, Mass. Group members mowed grass, pulled weeds and installed planters at either end and in the middle of the bridge. They added benches and two water tanks to make watering flowers in planters easier. Local businesses donated money and materials for the project.

At one point, noting the deteriorating look of the bridge, the group applied for a N.H. Moose Plate Grant to fund the repair of some unsightly rusty cable conduits that run the length of the bridge, to no avail. The state Department of Transportation has been unwilling to fund repainting the structure, too.

The Arch Bridge Beautification and Preservation Society, having dwindled from about 40 members to a half-dozen today, announced recently it will disband. The announcement came with a tinge of bitterness that the state hasn’t stepped up to help fund its efforts.

As wonderful as those efforts have been for those who enjoy the pedestrian bridge, the group is wrong to expect state transportation funds.

New Hampshire has nearly 500 bridges on its “red list.” Those are just the ones deemed to be in such poor shape structurally that the state feels the need to inspect them more frequently and start planning to repair, rehabilitate or replace them. A separate list of 820 “mediocre” bridges — those close to making the red list — also exists.

Over the past 20 years, the state has essentially kept pace with the deterioration of bridges. Some years, it’s made a little progress; others, it’s fallen further behind. New Gov. Chris Sununu has promised to make transportation infrastructure a priority, so there’s hope the situation will get better.

In the meantime, as nice as it would be to have state funding to help keep the Harlan Fiske Stone Bridge viable, the prospect that even one Granite State bridge might fail for lack of repairs while funding went to repainting a closed and replaced bridge is horrific to contemplate.

The bridge group has certainly gone well beyond what could have been expected of its members, and it’s sad to see those members so frustrated that they’re ready to give up the effort. Perhaps a solution lies in applying for a grant through the state’s Land and Community Heritage Investment Program.

Or maybe they could follow another example the group’s leaders have cited. Shelburne Falls’ Bridge of Flowers, once slated to be destroyed, was saved by a community effort led by the local Woman’s Club. Though it was far more involved, the fundraising relied more on private donations and grant money than public funds. Its success created a reputation that has continued to garner support — enough to keep the maintenance going.

That’s a high bar and perhaps, when all is said and done, it’s not worth it to maintain a picturesque view and pedestrian trail. But putting state funds meant for public safety into such a project would be wrong.

The Keene Sentinel

Posted February 15, 2018, by Steve Lindsey (stevelindsey60 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Some excellent commentary on the fate awaiting the Schell Bridge here. Maybe some of you should consider joining me in commentating following a Greenfield Recorder newspaper article. Save one article, my opposition to the replacement of this heritage span never made print even through I spoke passionately at public hearings...

All stake holders appear to be on board with this "done deal."

Bring "the war" to them, with opposition commentary following articles. . Like I have. Let dissident voices be heard too. Let the historical record show...

(signed)

A former reporter.

Posted February 15, 2018, by Steve Lindsey (stevelindsey60 [at] hotmail [dot] com)
Posted February 15, 2018, by Steve Lindsey (stevelindsey60 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Looks to me like a boon for bridge replacement. All the bullrush on infrastructure issues. A logical fallout from this trend.

Posted February 14, 2018, by Bob Genova (rgeno [at] earthlink [dot] net)

This bridge brings back memories of growing up in Burbank in the Fifties and Sixties.

Those old SP logos, in brass I believe, would be a treasure. I think all four are still intact.

Posted February 14, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Robert,

I can see what will inevitably happen to this line. I'm sure BNSF wants these trusses gone, as they are a slight inconvenience. Fortunately, BNSF is more often than not willing to give away these historic trusses. However, a truss that size isn't going to fit well into a city square park. Best thing for it would to be relocated to farm use, as it should be durable and have years of life left. Also tough though, because of the clearance restriction.

It would be nice to see a group form and take charge of restoring and relocating historic railroad bridges. Lot of gems that are inevitably in trouble.

Posted February 14, 2018, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Well, that is a shame.

John, you seem to have a lot of good contacts of various railroad companies. If anybody could convince a railroad company to sell the bridge to someone who wants to preserve it then you would be the man!

Of the two bridges that are scheduled for replacement thus far, this one is the most significant. It has a rather unusual Camelback profile.

Who wants to save a bridge?

Posted February 14, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)
Posted February 14, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)
Posted February 14, 2018, by Meme Rud (2mary [dot] rudzinski [at] gmail [dot] com)

It appears this bridge has been demolished according to some ambiguous Facebook posts. Is anyone able to verify?

Posted February 14, 2018, by Meme Rud (2mary [dot] rudzinski [at] gmail [dot] com)

It appears this bridge has been demolished according to some ambiguous Facebook posts. Is anyone able to verify?

Posted February 14, 2018, by James Baughn (webmaster [at] bridgehunter [dot] com)

This bridge, and a whole bunch of acreage, could be yours for only $12,790,000

http://www.mossyoakproperties.com/land/15647

Posted February 14, 2018, by Zachary S

Very cool to find more info on this. I hadn't had much luck web searching or a chance to visit the area yet.

Posted February 14, 2018, by Luke

For anyone else wanting to see the image on realtree's site, add "/deer-hunting-in-the-deep-south" after "/galleries" in Nathan's link.

For those who don't want to do that, here's the image:

Posted February 14, 2018, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

A quick search for Noxubee River bridge on Google appears to provide some insight. A photo of the bridge (#9) on this page https://www.realtree.com/deer-hunting/galleries/deer-hunting... shows that this is a King bowstring with altered vertical members and altered overhead bracing. This is in fact a pony truss bridge by design. The webpage further mentions it is located in the Brookston Plantation. My Google search also found a postcard which I believe may be the same bridge. Note that the verticals are unaltered in the postcard.

Posted February 13, 2018, by Zachary S

Have yet to notice an article specifically stating such, but in passing by lately I notice the bridge closed sign is gone. And as a recent newspaper photo regarding the January snow showed a recent picture of the bridge seemingly open to traffic (aside from the dicey travel days with snow and ice) with new guardrails on the approach, I'm assuming it's back open to traffic again now. Pretty good news there.

DELETED (Oregon)
Posted February 13, 2018, by Amanda

There appear to be significant differences in details and information between what my sources and the NBI and its sources. As such, I’m deleting this bridge for now.

Re: Mystery Bridge
Posted February 13, 2018, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I am glad that somebody else was able to confirm what I'm seeing. Johnson County has demolished a lot of historic bridges and built a lot of MOBs. The discovery of any historic truss bridge in the county is purely a bonus.

Posted February 13, 2018, by Marc McClure (MARC [dot] MCCLURE [at] OUTLOOK [dot] COM)

The railroad is the Milwaukee Road. The Chicago and North Western crosses Highway 30 at LeGrand Iowa.

RE: Mystery Bridge
Posted February 13, 2018, by Luke

Shows up in 1991 aerial imagery, which fits with the park being constructed in the 1980s. In Google's version of the isometric "bird's eye" view, it's very clearly not a modern MOB like most of the other bridges in the park.

Mystery Bridge
Posted February 13, 2018, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I cannot tell from satellite imagery if this is modern or historic. It resembles a small Warren pony truss in Bing Bird's Eye.

38.980756, -94.813572

Posted February 12, 2018, by Leslie R trick

Does anyone know of more information about this bridge all I could find was this lithograph.

Posted February 12, 2018, by Leslie R trick

This is not a duplicate because the photo is looking south while the Riverdale bridge is north of here and the Northern Pacific swing bridge is of to the right of here. When I first saw the photo I had to double check but the determining factor is the NP swing bridge near by I understand your error.

Posted February 12, 2018, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I assume that the bridge was not bypassed and preserved in place...

Posted February 12, 2018, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I have been intrigued by this bridge for a long time. It would be awesome to find a Bowstring in Mississippi. Bowstring bridges are extremely rare in the Deep South from what I understand.

Posted February 12, 2018, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This is a stunning and tragic loss. This was an extremely significant bridge due to its unusual configuration and it's pairing of two very different spans.

Posted February 12, 2018, by Eric Kinkhorst (erick [dot] bud [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge has been replaced

Posted February 12, 2018, by David Backlin (us71 [at] cox [dot] net)

Bridge has been closed due to flood damage to one of the timber columns

Posted February 12, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

The GIS for the county is incomplete. The dirt roads do not appear to be county property but the system doesn't seem to have owner info attached to the parcels near the bridge.

It looks like feet on the ground asking locals for permission is going to get the pics.

This is a great piece that shouldn't be sold off to scrappers.

Posted February 12, 2018, by George oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

As per an article printed today in the Reading Eagle construction will begin on this bridge starting on June 22nd and ending on Sept 11th closing the bridge and the intersection of Cornerstone Drive and Shaeffer Road.

Posted February 12, 2018, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Haha, Anonymous. I see what you did there.

I agree with Nathan that it would be great to see the FO/SD ratings from previous years.

Posted February 12, 2018, by Anonymous

So the term "functionally obsolete" is, in a sense, now functionally obsolete?

Posted February 12, 2018, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I am confused, I understand the new system in replacement of SD/FO but do these ratings no longer exist?

Deck condition rating: Satisfactory (6 out of 9)

Superstructure condition rating: Fair (5 out of 9)

Substructure condition rating: Fair (5 out of 9)

Because these are very helpful to us and they are no longer showing on BridgeHunter!

Posted February 11, 2018, by David Miles (amereservant [at] gmail [dot] com)

I tried visiting this bridge today and access to it is prohibited as far as I can tell.

Both attempted approaches to get to it were met by Private Property signs. I've attached photos of both points I met private property signs.

The one with the gate was located at 33.147120,-88.621120. The one in the timber area was located at 33.118565,-88.719111. It was late and I didn't have time to try and find another route.

I would suggest trying to contact the owner of the place with the gate and see if they will allow you on their property to view the bridge. These are all dirt roads in this area.

Posted February 11, 2018, by Robert K. Thompson

I worked for a Director of Engineering who made it even simpler:

Is it "frowny face" or "smiley face"?

It certainly helped cut through the crap and the C.Y.A.

Posted February 11, 2018, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Interestingly enough, this bridge has been rated fair instead of poor. This is quite surprising given some of the media reports and the fact that road salt was causing severe deterioration on the bridge.

Posted February 11, 2018, by Anonymous

The railroad categories are for both the roads on and below the bridge.

Posted February 11, 2018, by Jason Moyer (prrk4s3750 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge was definitely never used by the Reading, it was on the PRR's Schuylkill Division as a crossing of the Reading's Philadelphia-Pottsville mainline.

Posted February 11, 2018, by Anonymous

Duplicate this photo should be posted on the Riverdale bridge Willapa River

Anthony's Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted February 11, 2018, by Jason Moyer (prrk4s3750 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Bridge demolished/removed Fall of 2017, and has not been replaced.

Posted February 11, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

Don, Awesome research! A likely Scenario.

Y.R.D.!

Posted February 11, 2018, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This wrought iron beauty is also rated as fair:

http://bridgehunter.com/ks/butler/80855306461/

This is encouraging. In many respects, I am happy to see the end of terms such as structurally deficient and functionally obsolete. These terms are often misunderstood by the General Public. A bridge that is functionally obsolete may still be very safe for travel and an outstanding condition aside from being too narrow by today's standards.

Likewise, structurally deficient does not necessarily mean that the bridge is going to collapse in the immediate future.

While the terms good, fair, and poor may seem over simplified, hopefully they won't be quite so frightening to the General Public as some of the current terms.

Posted February 11, 2018, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

As a reference, this Marsh Arch, which has had relatively little repair work done in recent decades, is still rated as Fair:

http://bridgehunter.com/ks/montgomery/coffeyville/

This bridge could be repaired and maintained relatively easily and remain as fair or perhaps even get upgraded to good.

Now, could a state or county let a Fair bridge such as this one deteriorate to poor and then ask for federal funding? This unfortunate outcome has resulted in the demolition of a large number of historic bridges. It has also resulted in a terrible waste of taxpayers money.

If such abuse is discouraged, then perhaps states and counties will find that it can be financially advantageous to conduct preventative maintenance.

Posted February 11, 2018, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Pardon the typos. Voice to text sometimes fails me.

Posted February 11, 2018, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I can see a few different scenarios panning out here.

A good scenario would be the encouraging of rehabilitation of poor bridges and fair bridges. Bringing these bridges into good condition would help would be good to poor ratio.

Another scenario might be the abandonment of poor bridges. In other words, states and counties might simply pawn these poor nridges off onto unsuspecting landowners who would then be responsible for them.

A bad scenario would be the demolition, but not replacement, of poor bridges.

In short, there are several ways that this could pan out.

Posted February 11, 2018, by Don Morrison

Possibly this bridge should actually be located at

42.622746, -73.773157, where old South Pearl Street crossed Norman's Kill.

Here's an historic 1891 atlas image showing the Kenwood crossing to be south of the railroad and the Sacred heart convent, as well as the small island. The atlas shows a grist mill on the west side, so there probably was a dam there as well.

It's the 33 section of Albany and Rensselaer counties, City of Albany, 1891. From David Rumsey map collection.

The link is long, here's a short version:

https://goo.gl/Kbv6GM

Hertzler Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted February 11, 2018, by JS (jscottyg73 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Good news for this bridge...

As a resident of Cumberland County, I was reading their Comprehensive Plan (land use, economic development, etc.) that was released last fall, and noticed that this bridge is officially named as one of two truss bridges (the other one being the Greenlane bridge) that they are specifically looking to preserve.

Posted February 10, 2018, by Dana

Art, nice find! Wandered near here not to long back. Time was short but detoured to Normans Kill farm bridge. Lifes to short not to stop and see the Whipples! Cannot say if span is one in Sterio view or not. Do have an observation, As a canoeist cant help but notice the fall line in Sterio view. Its the kind of sight that wakes you RIGHT up on a river. Penalty for not noticing can be severe! The 1905 concrete arch where you dropped pin while possible, does not exhibit river profile that view does. Of course damns come and go so could be anywhere on this stretch. Only river profile matching view is where Mill Road ends on west side. BIG drop there. Bridge would have been below this. Not certain just observation. And as my grandson once said, YOU ROCK DUDE!

Posted February 10, 2018, by Nina

Thanks, Don :)

Posted February 10, 2018, by Don Morrison

Pretty good chance that this is the bridge you're looking for, Nina.

Posted February 10, 2018, by Noel Lapointe (nlpnt [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This bridge was torn down and a new one opened in 1987.

Bridge outside of Los Angeles - help with identification?
Posted February 10, 2018, by Nina (sdpsdp [at] virginmedia [dot] com)

Hi

I was watching an episode of Jay Leno's Garage and would like some help with the identification of the bridge seen in the two photographs, please. I think the bridge in the two photographs is of the same one, but am not entirely sure.

Thanks.

Posted February 10, 2018, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Nick:

At first I thought that this bridge might be the same one that just appeared on the Facebook page. It is a very similar design if not identical.

Then I realized this one has no deck. Thus, we now have two of these bridges in Jefferson County. I really want to know where the other one is.

I still think that there's a chance that these two bridges could date back to the 1870s because they are so lightweight, they have cruciform outriggers, and they have those cloven hip verticals. (That is my term, not an official term).

It would be awesome if Jefferson County had three 1870s truss bridges including the bowstring in Oskaloosa. I can't say for certain that these two bridges date back to the 1870s but they certainly look very old to me.

Now that my schedule has gotten a bit less busy, perhaps I can get back to trying to save some bridges.

Posted February 10, 2018, by Anonymous

Screen shot photos

Posted February 10, 2018, by George oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

By the way,PennDOT wasn't mentioned in the article.

Posted February 10, 2018, by George oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

As per an article printed in the Reading Eagle today the Greenwich Township supervisors have been informed work on replacing this bridge in the spring.Berks County will advertise bids to replace this 114 year old bridge with work to begin on May 1st.Completion should be by December.The supervisors evidently decided not to save this bridge because of refusing to take ownership.Maybe someone out there might want to take ownership of this bridge.Let's hope so over this bridge becoming cans or cars.

Posted February 9, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

2nd visit today - Permission from property owner to go up high and get views from above, loving this thing more all the time, fantastic find from Robert Elder via satellite

Posted February 9, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Missouri is wiping out these state highway ponies at a discouraging rate. It would be nice to have at lease one left in place.

Posted February 9, 2018, by David Backlin (us71 [at] cox [dot] net)

Bridge is open with 3 Ton Weight Limit and 8 foot vertical clearance.

Posted February 8, 2018, by David Backlin (us71 [at] cox [dot] net)

Bridge is closed to the public behind a locked gate. Possibly a privately-owned hunting area?

Posted February 8, 2018, by Mark Phillips (msp [dot] dwohio [at] gmail [dot] com)

Facebook group now focusing on preserving the Gasconade River Bridge:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/savethebridge/about/

Posted February 8, 2018, by Topher (ksufan88 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

After additional reading on this site, I believe the stone pier visible on the southeast side as you cross this bridge is the pier from the previous three-span bowstring that was relocated to three different crossings. The only surviving span is now located in Topeka.

Posted February 8, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This one is in an absolutely horrible condition. I'm shocked it hasn't been replaced.

Posted February 8, 2018, by Anonymous

.

Posted February 8, 2018, by M Cox (trock859[at]yahoo[dot]com)

I would like to have one or two of those bricks.

Posted February 7, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Nice find. Maybe we need to break the "Fence Guardrail" category down to specify concrete or wood!

Posted February 7, 2018, by David Backlin (us71 [at] cox [dot] net)

Workin' Bridges has withdrawn from this project.

Posted February 7, 2018, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Good find on that bridge in Muscatine Iowa. It is very similar to this one save for the lack of outriggers and the horizontal member.

Then there is this 5 span example in Ellis County, Kansas:

http://bridgehunter.com/ks/ellis/bh36264/

With a Jack Arch deck to boot!

Posted February 7, 2018, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Hancock County Illinois seems to have some examples as well:

http://bridgehunter.com/il/hancock/34431208105/

Posted February 7, 2018, by Luke

I found one in Iowa a few months ago: https://bridgehunter.com/ia/muscatine/bh79331/

Posted February 7, 2018, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Robert is correct. These are not homemade bridges. They were as I understand lightweight bridges marketed to local governments (not sure what company or companies) as low-cost alternatives to traditional truss forms. Some of them even had built-in plates with holes for use by a crane or whatever type of equipment was used to hoist the bridge. They are mostly located in Missouri and Kansas, but we have a single example in Michigan. I believe the horizontal member is a "railing" in the most basic sense. It may stiffen the members slightly too. This was basically a "budget bridge."

Posted February 7, 2018, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Bedstead trusses in general are becoming uncommon these days. Double intersectional Warren bedstead trusses are downright rare. This is a highly significant bridge due to its unusual design.

It also has that strange horizontal member running through the middle of the Truss. A small number of pony trusses in Kansas have this member.

Posted February 7, 2018, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge is reminiscent of similar paired angle bridges in Kansas and Missouri. I have long suspected that the Wayland Bridge Company of Washington, Kansas built these odd structures but I don't know that for certain.

These paired angle bridges seem to come in a variety of designs including Camelback, Queenpost, and others.

Posted February 7, 2018, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The loss of this bridge would be a tragedy. It is a beautiful structure that almost reminds me of something that P E Lane would have thought up. I'm not suggesting that he was the builder here but the incredible amount of lacing on this bridge reminds me of some of his structures.

Regardless of builder, this is a great Victorian era Pratt truss bridge. A bridge like this is rare in the Mountain West.

Posted February 7, 2018, by Phil (Duffphil [at] hotmail [dot] com)

2/6/2018 Bridge update:

Informal conversation with Callaway County indicated that the alignment of the replacement bridge is not yet finalized.

As has been speculated, it may be preferred to move the replacement bridge upstream to resolve the hairpin turn in the existing road alignment.

This alone would not save the historic bridge, but could potentially buy some time if demolition is not required in order to construct the new bridge.

Posted February 7, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The railroad bridge at this location was a massive deck Truss structure approximately half a mile long. Possibly was one of the largest railroad bridges in Minnesota. I’m pretty familiar with this structure as my hometown is about half an hour away.

Posted February 7, 2018, by Laurie (Halladay3 [at] twcny [dot] rr [dot] com)

Check out www.newyorktrains.com. This line is not abandoned. It was used for canal traffic.

Posted February 6, 2018, by Sheila N. (silvermese [at] hotmail [dot] com)

This is scheduled to be demolished. 😢

http://www.kbzk.com/story/37443728/gallatin-county-commissio...

Posted February 6, 2018, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Ricardo: Did you approach this bridge from the north or the south? Which is the best way to visit this bridge and not anger local landowners?


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