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Posted September 18, 2017, by Joe Fishbein (jmfmando [at] gmail [dot] com)

The replacement bridge, 69A30, is a 3-span steel girder bridge with timber deck and rails and a bituminous overlay. At least it isn't a UCB!

Posted September 18, 2017, by Joe Fishbein (jmfmando [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge has been replaced by a single-span steel girder bridge with timber deck and rails and a bituminous overlay (Bridge No. 69A58).

Posted September 18, 2017, by Joe Fishbein (jmfmando [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge is gone, replaced in 2016 by a single span prestressed concrete beam bridge (69591).

RBMN-West Huller railroad undrepass in Berks County hit by trucker
Posted September 18, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley449 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Just looked on street view and saw both sides of this underpass are posted with height signs so this trucker can't blame nobody but himself.

RBMN-West Huller railroad underpass in Berks County hit by trucker
Posted September 18, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

As per an article printed in the Reading Eagle on 9/16/17 the West Huller Lane railroad underpass was closed for 2 hours Friday after a tractor-trailer crashed into it,not noticing the underpass was shorter than the rig.The driver,Jerry Franklin was able to back the rig out of the tunnel,but the trailer nearly broke in half,said Sgt.Ronald Mohl of Northern Berks Regional police.The road was closed while the rig was unloaded.Mohn said Franklin was trying to drive a rig 13 feet 6 inches high through a bridge 7 feet 10 inches high.The truck was hauling nonhazardous materials to a company on the other side of the underpass.Franklin was cited for failing to adhere to height restrictions.This underpass is on the same line as the overpass that crosses Rte 222.Also don't know if this underpass is on Bridgehunters.

Leesport Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted September 18, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

As per an article printed in the Reading Eagle on 9/18/17 a prefabricated metal pedestrian bridge is set to go in soon at this location.A large granite marker and the brass markers from the old bridge will be donated to the Leesport Area Historical Society.The bridge work is a PennDOT project.

Wiley's Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted September 18, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

My goofup on the double posting.Duh!

Wiley's Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted September 18, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

As per an article printed in the Reading Eagle on 9/18/17 Berks County has sent a letter to PennDOT for a grant to rehabilitate this bridge.When i hear or read more i will post it here.

Wiley's Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted September 18, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

As per an article printed in the Reading Eagle on 9/18/17 Berks County has sent a letter to PennDOT for a grant to rehabilitate this bridge.When i hear or read more i will post it here.

Posted September 18, 2017, by Dana

Luke thanks as always. Wonder if James can add, Guam, Northern Mariana Islands, US Virgin Islands and American Samoa!

Posted September 18, 2017, by Luke

Dana, from what I've been able to uncover, 1981/2012 were rehab dates for the bridge.

Posted September 17, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

When I first started looking for bridges in Kansas, I expected that perhaps a few would appear amid the trees. I never imagined the sheer number that ended up appearing in recent years. Nick has taken bridge discovery to a whole new level. While I don't think that there is still a large number of bridges waiting to be discovered in Kansas, there might still be a few more hiding out there. I always look forward to Nick's discoveries because many of the bridges that he is found are of national significance and some of them are of very high National significance. He might find a few more bridges in Kansas yet.

I would expect that a person can find a lot of abandoned bridges in the eastern United States given the heavier population and the large number of rivers and streams there. I would think the in rural areas of New York, Pennsylvania, and Ohio, one might find some abandoned bridges but I have not spent much time in that area.

That being said, if a person wants to find some unknown bridges, Nebraska might be a good state. There have been relatively few Bridgehunters working in Nebraska, but the state has a surprising number of truss bridges especially in the Southeastern area.

Posted September 17, 2017, by David Cranor (volcrano [at] gmail [dot] com)

Never mind. My error.

Posted September 17, 2017, by David Cranor (volcrano [at] gmail [dot] com)

That's the Oswegatchie River.

Posted September 17, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Not saying there's not a few hiding up here Mike, but definitely nothing like there is in Kansas. More wide open spaces and abandoned roads than you will ever see in the Hoosier State.

Posted September 17, 2017, by Mark Brown (markwbrown66 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Bridge has been replaced, with new bridge, old bridge no longer exists.

Posted September 17, 2017, by John Marvig

Judging by the design, I would say approximately 1900 is a good bet. This design was a standardized Santa Fe truss.

Posted September 17, 2017, by Mike Daffron (daffronmike [at] yahoo [dot] com)

These modern bridge pictures are a poor excuse for their originals, but I have a good time locating them. Plus, you never know when you might find something interesting.

Posted September 17, 2017, by Thom (twj [at] thewayfarersjournal [dot] com)

When was this train truss bridge built.

Posted September 17, 2017, by Ed Hollowell (erhollowell [at] aol [dot] com)

Obviously the bridge in the street view is the CA 162 bridge.

Posted September 17, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Yes, I appreciate seeing all these bridges that you have been tracking down. It is good that they were photographed back in the day.

I have really been amazed at what Nick has found. He has discovered some incredible bridges that I had no idea existed. I would not be surprised if there still some great bridge is hiding in the trees in Indiana.

Posted September 16, 2017, by Mike Daffron (daffronmike [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I am still trying to find these forgotten gems that, no doubt, are still stashed away. Will keep trying! Maybe Nick Schmiedeler can come over here and shake the trees and a few will pop out!

Posted September 16, 2017, by Luke

.

Asia Bridge (Florida)
Posted September 16, 2017, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Looks like this could have been an older road use bridge, relocated here in 1999?

Posted September 16, 2017, by Nathan Delaplaine (ndelaplaine [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge no longer operates, but the original drawbridge is now shown as display while it was relocated to St. Michael's in 1998. And why did I get two comments?

Posted September 16, 2017, by Nathan Delaplaine (ndelaplaine [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge no longer operates, but the original drawbridge is now shown as display while it was relocated to St. Michael's in 1998.

Posted September 16, 2017, by Nathan Delaplaine (ndelaplaine [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge no longer operates, but the original drawbridge is now shown as display while it was relocated to St. Michael's in 1998.

Posted September 16, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I clicked on this page hoping to read about another bridge I could visit whenever I get to Indiana. Then I realized it was lost...

This would have been a nice one to save.

Posted September 16, 2017, by Bill Bishop (wbishop48 [at] gmail [dot] com)

My pals and I dived off the suspension bridge at Bidwell Bar State Park many times in the 1960s. The ranger was nicknamed "Smiley". If he saw us he would yell and wave his arms but he couldn't catch us-didn't even try. There used to be a picture of Smiley in the Municipal Auditorium in Oroville with his real name. We used to carry our tubes up the railroad grade past the confluence of the South Fork and then float back down to Bidwell Bar. Used to be a concession on the north side with a bumper pool table. I was very sad when they built the dam.

Posted September 16, 2017, by Mike Daffron (daffronmike [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Great little bridge. Don't try to take a car back it see it though. The hills in the area will laugh at you.

Posted September 16, 2017, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Judging by the aerial imagery, that extra set of piers under the bridge has probably been there for a while. It appears to have been there in 2014 and even as far back as 2012. Not sure why those extra piers would be built, except for additional support. Weird.

Posted September 15, 2017, by Cliff Darby (clif30 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Now I am even more intrigued by the abandoned bridge northwest of here on the old alignment of highway 1. Carnahan Creek is about as big as Bayou Jean de Jean and is a low area. The bridge is visible on Google Earth. Makes me wonder if it is also a deck truss.

Posted September 15, 2017, by Lisa James (ivy76 [at] msn [dot] com)

Great pictures! I didn't know that there were memorial stones on the bridge; I'll have to go look at them. Unfortunately, the bridge is no longer open to automobile traffic (either over it or under it) for safety reasons. It is still open for foot traffic, though.

Posted September 15, 2017, by Mike Daffron

"Newbern Bridge Haw Creek"??? Tony! What name should this bridge go by? "Lincoln Park" bridge? Lincoln Park/Newbern" bridge? "Good-Job-Not-Recycling-This-Bridge-Bartholomew-County" bridge???

Posted September 15, 2017, by Mike Daffron

Talked to a local gentleman who told me that Galbraith had been open about 6 months. Unfortunately, Fall Fork bridge is still closed. He did not know whether it is to be repaired or not.

Posted September 15, 2017, by Cliff Darby (clif30 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Thanks for the new pictures, Brian. This is one of my favorite bridges on the site. Sad to see it deteriorating, as your pics make it seem the beams are starting to rust pretty bad.

Posted September 15, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

That new Streetview really shows the condition of the area around this bridge. A nationally significant bridge remains in danger...

Posted September 15, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

aah no worries, Dana and Kay !!

Posted September 14, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

Whoops! Sorry Nick jumped in on street view , was following Roberts 2009 trial at same time you were. Sorry

Posted September 14, 2017, by Dylan VanAntwerp (dylan_vanantwerp [at] live [dot] com)

Good work John, very unique bridge.

Posted September 14, 2017, by David Backlin (us71 [at] cox [dot] net)

This bridge is still drivable, but the road is in rough shape.

Posted September 14, 2017, by Kelvin Burgoon (kburgoon [at] columbus [dot] rr [dot] com)

This bridge was not burned, just replaced in 1967

Posted September 14, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I am pleasantly surprised to see that this bridge is still in place. Usually when the bridge has not had an inspection since 1991 it is not necessarily a good sign.

This one is definitely older than 1930. Try circa 1900. I suspect that the date of 1930 probably refers to when the concrete pylons were poured.

Nice find!

Posted September 14, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Wow, this one - road closed to west, road and bridge absolutely not open to auto traffic,long long long walk down deserted road to east between fence lines to this one. Special little bridge.

Posted September 14, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Well, that is a shame. It might explain the mass removal of truss bridges all across the county in the last few years.

Posted September 14, 2017, by Jim Hennigan (jhennigan101 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The county showed up unannounced and removed bridge. Same person owns land on both sides of creek, now has to drive four miles around to farm other side.

Posted September 14, 2017, by David Backlin (us71 [at] cox [dot] net)

I visited this bridge September 15th, 2017. Construction is well underway on the new bridge, though I don't anticipate completion until 2018

Posted September 14, 2017, by Richard Spencer (richard [at] natchezrailway [dot] com)

Bridge was removed in late 2015 or early 2016.

Posted September 14, 2017, by Jason Rhodhouse (Rhodes130 [at] aol [dot] com)

Actual name of the bridge is the Kanawha Bridge and Terminal Company as per the Chesapeake and Ohio Railway Kanawha Subdivision Side track Record and Charts PGs 74-75. The Bridge was purchased by the C&O around 1922 to 25, and one can still read the C&O lettering on the bridge above Kanawha Boulevard, on a good day. Last trains to cross the bridge would have been in the late 80s.

New Photo Numbers
Posted September 13, 2017, by Othmar

New photo numbers on the site will make it easier to nominate for Othmar H Ammann Awards!

Posted September 13, 2017, by Bryan Jackson (bryan [at] ebryans [dot] com)

It’s Wheelie Wednesday – September 13, 2017

I had the opportunity to spend a little time at this beautiful nostalgic bridge over the Colorado River in Coleman County. It’s known as the Waldrip Bridge, due to it being close to Waldrip Texas, population 15. The bridge has an incredible story to go along with its incredible beauty. It’s a 698ft through-truss-bridge featuring a 170ft main span using a steel-and-wooden-deck. It underwent numerous obstacles getting built as the original contract for construction was awarded in 1894. After a couple of floods, one reaching 65 feet above normal levels, the bridge was finally opened in September of 1911. The bridge closed a few years ago for restoration and renovation and opened back up for traffic in September 2011.

Thank you for tagging along. As I continue to travel around and celebrate 50 years on motorcycles with the Doug Domokos Tribute, I am so fascinated with creation - - - it screams of the creator God Himself. I am in awe that He continues to enable me to go and do what I do and see hearts and souls changed for the Glory to God.

Many more beautiful things to come.

Special thanks to my wife Tina Jackson for capturing these memorable moments through the lens, Dwayne Dove for finding this little gem and sharing it with me, and Dusty Messenger of Fry'D Rice Cycles in Olden Texas for keeping all these wheelie units going. You dream it – He can build it.

Full photo shoot online at https://www.facebook.com/bryan.jackson.186/media_set?set=a.1...

Posted September 13, 2017, by Betty Knuth Baumann (bbbells34 [at] mediacombb [dot] net)

I rode the #10 streetcar over this viaduct every workday from 70th and Main St (We lived on S. 68th and Main - newly married) to Allen Bradley. I can't remember if it was the 3rd St bus or the 6th St bus that took me from Wells to Greenfield and AB. It was a wonderful ride. I looked forward to the adventure each day. Thank you for the correct information on the bridge, and I found a great photo of the streetcar courtesy of the Milwaukee County Historical Society. I love that it was designed by a man from Pomerania, as am I by way of my ancestry. I am 82 years old and rode the trestle, as I called it, in the years 1955 and 1956.

Posted September 13, 2017, by Mike Gregg (rdmikeg [at] gmail [dot] com)

Our company recently did some work on this bridge. The story that we were told was that KY DOT paid to have the bridge built back in the 70's. In turn IDOT was responsible for maintaining it.

Posted September 13, 2017, by Banks/Collins/Gabriel/Hackett/Rutherford

666 is no longer alone

He's getting out the marrow in your backbone

And the seven trumpets blowing sweet rock and roll

Gonna blow right down inside your soul

Pythagoras with the looking glass reflects the full moon

In blood, he's writing the lyrics of a brand-new tune

Posted September 12, 2017, by David Backlin (us71 [at] cox [dot] net)

The original bridge was built circa 1890

Posted September 12, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Whoop....wrong photo, removing that one, Clark....6 bridges yesterday, slowly sorting, posting....thanks

Posted September 12, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Thanks Don for all of your help on these 2 bridges.Like i told Dana And Kay i can't believe they're replacing the bridge on the Northeast Extension.

Posted September 12, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Dana and Kay,i have been over this bridge on I-476 but never on Crackersport rd.This bridge didn't look to me to be needing to be replaced.Then again,i don't work for PennDOT.Thanks for finding out about this bridge,Dana and Kay.

RE: Rail to road
Posted September 12, 2017, by Luke

Yes, as the bridge's original function was for railroad, not road.

Posted September 12, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

met several locals crossing this 87 y.o. beauty - they all seemed very proud of this bridge, old stories about playing in creek on long stretches of beautiful flat rocks

Posted September 12, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

She's a goner.

Posted September 12, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Very close to Caney Bridge, very pretty drive through this area east to west, and desolate...so very few people and no traffic.

Posted September 12, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

No evidence of new bridge construction that I saw. Little towns of Hewins and Osro next door to east all but dried up, sad, but pretty area.

Rail to road
Posted September 12, 2017, by Royce and Bobette Haley (roycehaley111 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Is it considered rail to road if a RR bridge is now being used as a road bridge on what has always been a road?

Royce

Posted September 11, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Is there a reason to think this bridge ever carried the Jefferson Highway?

Posted September 11, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

It has been years since I have crossed this bridge so I'm really glad to see that it's still in place. Did you see any evidence of new bridge construction?

If Chautauqua County wanted to build a new bridge, it would be very easy to bypass this bridge to the south. Chautauqua County has lost several historic bridges over the last couple decades, but this one should be a good candidate for preservation as it is in such a rural area and on a rather scenic drive to boot.

Posted September 11, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Nathan:

Good thought concerning the similar bridges in Oklahoma. The only major difference I can see is this one has every panel countered whereas the Oklahoma examples do not seem to have those extra counters. The lacing on the verticals varies a bit between the trusses as well. Otherwise, the bridges are certainly very similar. The idea that a truss could have been moved across the state line seems quite plausible.

Also, for those who might not be familiar with this area, Cowley County preferred to use Stone Arch Bridges instead of truss bridges for small crossings. In the early 1900s, the county would have been much more likely to have installed a Stone Arch Bridge instead of a truss bridge at this location. The Silver Creek and Grouse Creek valleys were popular locations for Stone Arch Bridges to be installed so a truss bridge looks a little bit out of place here.

When looking at the concrete substructure on this bridge, I begin to wonder if it might have been moved to this area sometime around World War II perhaps.

Posted September 11, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Yep, sometimes you have to look underneath! Some of these Stone Arch Bridges hide in plain sight.

Posted September 11, 2017, by Glen Frey

There she stood in the doorway;

I heard the mission bell

And I was thinking to myself

'This could be heaven or this could be Hell'

Posted September 11, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Stone arch hiding under there !!

Posted September 11, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

George, Don is the bridge Titan on this one. Crackersport road view has interesting additions to ,I'm assuming control concrete spalling. looks like banding on columns and wood bottom decking. 50's and 60's stringers are disappearing in PA. Was in PA not to long back and got a few shots of a 1966 stringer, had interesting railing and while not hugely rare was going to be gone in a week. Might be less than historic or notable but the fact of being gone is hard to dispute! Shout out to Don, YOU ROCK DUDE!

Posted September 11, 2017, by Don Morrison

George;

It seems that I was wrong about the Beaver River bridge. That is not the weekend replacement project.

The weekend replacement is a 1951 box beam over Brush Creek at milepost 20.47.

Re:PA Turnpike
Posted September 11, 2017, by Don Morrison

George;

That link got truncated. Here's another try and a plain text copy of it without the www.

https://www.paturnpike.com/travel/accelerated_bridge_constru...

paturnpike.com/travel/accelerated_bridge_construction.aspx

PA Turnpike
Posted September 11, 2017, by Don Morrison

Sorry, George;

I assumed Dana had found that one for you. The bridge in question is over Crackersport Road, a little north of the Lehigh Valley Thruway. It's a 1956 stringer not listed on BH.

Here's the Uglybridges report: http://uglybridges.com/1659537

And here's the story. Click on the detour links at the bottom of the page to see specifics.

https://www.paturnpike.com/travel/accelerated_bridge_constru...

Posted September 11, 2017, by Cliff Darby (clif30 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Historic Aerials has a great image of this bridge in its prime in 1971.

Tioga Bridge (Louisiana)
Posted September 11, 2017, by Cliff Darby (clif30 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Someone better versed in the Jefferson Highway please chime in. This bridge was built in 1931 on US 71 / SR 1, which was designated on the Jefferson Highway. Therefore, is this considered a part of the Jefferson Highway, or since it was built after the route was numbered, it is NOT part of the Jefferson Highway?

Posted September 11, 2017, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I suspect this bridge was made of recycled parts, especially when considering the numerous different builders.

Posted September 11, 2017, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

This is an interesting find. Note how close it is to Oklahoma. Well, there are (or were) nearly identical examples in Oklahoma of this same style. So I'm not sure if its the design of a builder, or if its a state design that moved over state lines.

http://bridgehunter.com/ok/kay/123850000000000/

http://bridgehunter.com/ok/kay/123840000000000/

http://bridgehunter.com/ok/kay/45500000000000/

Posted September 11, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Very tidy little thru-truss. Can hardly believe the county is keeping this one, saw noone in the hour I spent there relaxing - zero traffic, very remote....but why "fix what ain't broke"? A classic.

Posted September 11, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Thanks Don for answering that question about the Beaver County bridge being replaced.Now if i could only just find out which bridge on the Northeast Extension around Allentown is being replaced then both questions will be answered.

PA Turnpike
Posted September 11, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Dana and Kay Klein,thanks for answering the article i posted about the bridges.Good guess about the Jordan Creek bridge but the article didn't say if the bridge in question was north or south of Allentown so i'm just wondering which bridge it could be.If i hear or read anything about this bridge i'll let you know.As for the other bridge it might be easier to find being that i said it was in Beaver County near Rochester.How many bridges are in that vicinity i don't know.

RE: Design
Posted September 11, 2017, by Mike Goff (michael [dot] goff [at] hotmail [dot] com)

In Oregon our bridge inspection manual defines a culvert as...

"A drainage structure beneath an embankment. Typically they: carry water, are surrounded by fill or an embankment, may or may not have a bottom and the design construction plans are generally standard culvert drawings."

I guess what that is saying is if you have a drainage structure that is buried in an embankment, it is a culvert.

Posted September 11, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

http://untappedcities.com/2011/10/05/centralia-pennsylvania-...

What clueless person let that number become official?

Posted September 10, 2017, by Anonymous

Likely.............

Posted September 10, 2017, by Anonymous

Being as it's on Route 666, you'll likely burn in HELL if you cross it!

Re:Bridge east of Grouse Creek Bridge
Posted September 10, 2017, by Don Morrison

Thanks, Clark

I couldn't tell what the bridge was, but shadows gave me the impression of a truss like structure. It looks different in Google Earth than it looks in either Bing maps mode.

Just wishful thinking, I guess.

Posted September 10, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Topos as far back as 1950 have the current Norfolk & Western alignment, but back in 1892 this was the original railroad.

Posted September 10, 2017, by Luke

Updated artcle says "Islamorada Fire Chief has said the bridge is “driveable.”"

Posted September 10, 2017, by Luke

The narrowness suggests RR to me.

Bridge east of Grouse Creek bridge
Posted September 10, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Based on older topo quads, it looks like the lake was formed after the rail was laid, so my guess is they blocked the culvert under the railroad and added a spillway. The bridge appears to be a simple beam with a wooden deck.

Posted September 10, 2017, by James Baughn (webmaster [at] bridgehunter [dot] com)

This bridge has reportedly been damaged by Hurricane Irma. http://keysweekly.com/42/snake-creek-bridge-reported-as-out/

Posted September 10, 2017, by Royce and Bobette Haley (roycehaley111 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Is it possible this was an old rail bridge? The span looks pretty light but the abutments scream Railroad? Any RR guru have old track line maps around here?

Royce

Posted September 10, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Thanks to Nick's field visit, we can see that this bridge features a B.S. Co. Lackawanna brand. This brand indicates that the steel was fabricated after the merger of Bethlehem Steel and Lackawanna. You will only find this brand on bridges that were constructed in the 1920s onward.

Referring back to my previous comment about the scarcity of heavily constructed truss bridges from the 1920s and 30s in Kansas, it becomes apparent that a B.S. Co. Lackawanna brand would be a rare find in Kansas. The presence of this brand increases the local significance of this bridge.

Posted September 10, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Anybody who has spent time looking at truss bridges on the Kansas-Oklahoma border region is well aware of the fact that there is a very stark change in design as one crosses the state line.

Oklahoma is known for its massive membered and heavily constructed truss bridges that were generally built after about 1910, plus a few somewhat lighter bridges that were built between about 1900 and 1910. Oklahoma continued to build a variety of large, heavy truss bridges as the truss bridge era was winding down nationwide. Today, as one drives around Oklahoma, one is likely to encounter some large Parker trusses and Oklahoma's true specialty, the K Parker Truss. By contrast, Oklahoma has very few of the extremely lightweight Victorian era wrought iron truss bridges that can be found in states to the north and east.

After you cross into Kansas, the picture changes dramatically. Kansas has very few large, massive membered truss bridges from the 1920s and 1930s. During the latter part of the truss era, Kansas was building concrete Tee beams and Marsh Arch bridges. Surely these bridges would have cut into the number of trusses that were built at the time. Most of the remaining truss bridges in Kansas are the older and smaller lightweight, pin connected variety which are rare in Oklahoma.

This bridge, due to its massive construction, would fit in perfectly in Oklahoma. Yet and its current location, it is an outlier. A bridge like this is highly significant at the state level in Kansas, just as a wrought iron Victorian era truss would be extremely significant at the state level in Oklahoma.

Re:Design
Posted September 10, 2017, by Don Morrison

Both culvert and arch may be correct, but this looks more interesting than what I consider something called a "culvert" to look like. Less interesting than some "arches", though. LOL

IMHO, it's okay to call this an arch, though some may not agree...

Posted September 10, 2017, by Don Morrison

If you follow the apparent ROW from that old rail bridge to 37.027264, -96.853121, there is a structure that is not a rail bridge. It's on a different alignment because of a jog in the (dirt?) road that follows the ROW. It appears to have a wood deck and an overhead structure in satellite imagery.

Looks to be on private property, over the spillway of a private impoundment. Checked Cowley (and the adjacent county), but it doesn't appear on BH. Maybe it's a MOB?

Robert Elder documented a Timber Creek bridge that is "most certainly lost". Could it have been moved here? About 15 miles south of the "Try to find on map" default coordinates of the Timber Creek bridge?

What does anyone else think? Do we need someone on the ground?

Who we gonna call?

Nick Schmiedeler!

Posted September 10, 2017, by Don Morrison

This is the bridge George mentioned that is being replaced, near exit 13 (milepost T13.21). Also, 3 overpasses and a culvert are being or have been replaced between mile 12 and mile 14.

https://www.patpconstruction.com/mp12to14/overview.asp

RE: Design?
Posted September 9, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

In Indiana a culvert is generally any structure with a main span length of 30 feet or less. I'm not sure if that distance varies from state to state or not.

Posted September 9, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Loved visiting this one today. Gorgeous from the side especially. And plaque stolen....of course...😤


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