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Posted October 19, 2017, by Nathan Delaplaine (ndelaplaine [at] gmail [dot] com)

If this bridge no longer operates, then I think it’s time to replace this bridge with a non movable span.

Posted October 19, 2017, by Joe (jw72184 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I know the owners of the property surrounding it, they would prefer no one trespass on their land, however if one is willing to paddle up from the Eudora boat docks it is quite easy to get to. The cross under the bridge was a pet.

Posted October 19, 2017, by Ron Reber (ronreber [at] yahoo [dot] com)

It looks like this may have been a Tee Beam, there are uprights in the creek bed and along the bridge rail there are rebar where the uprights would have been. It had a pipe railing along the top as the pipe is still connected to the uprights.

Craighead Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted October 19, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Thanks Julie.That's what it looked like to me.

Posted October 19, 2017, by Daniel Schoenherr (htis2008 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Well your heart was in the right place. I think what happened here is that the previous Bar Harbor had ferry survived the previous Portland-Yarmouth,NS ferry by a few years.

This one is twice as fast as the old Portland ferry was if not even faster than that, but alas there's no mention there of a Casino on board?

Posted October 19, 2017, by Anonymous

I believe there is a mistake on this bridge. Its deck width has been placed at 124 feet. In reality, however, it is just a single-lane covered bridge.

Posted October 19, 2017, by Brian Powell

Both the Little Coal and Big Coal pedestrian bridges are owned by the West Virginia Division of Highways. The Big Coal bridge is County Route 15/14, and the Little Coal bridge is County Route 13/22.

The land where the two bridges meet was donated to the West Virginia Division of Natural Resources in 2016 to become Forks of Coal State Natural Area. WVDNR has established a series of trails, including one which basically leads to the bridges. Now that the bridges abut a park and are more accessible, maybe there will be more interest in repairing them.

Posted October 19, 2017, by Anonymous

It appears I have made a sad mistake. This ferry operates between Portland, ME and Yarmouth, NS. Perhaps we can make a separate entry?

Posted October 19, 2017, by Anonymous

The ferry has re-opened, and appears to feature a new ship : https://www.ferries.ca/thecat/

Posted October 19, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I like this one...

Posted October 19, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Well, I am glad that the webmaster has weighed in. I will accept his decision whatever it turns out to be.

James, it is funny that you should mention the Whitewater river in Missouri. We had a very similar thing happened with the Whitewater River in Kansas. It has been known as both the Whitewater Creek and Whitewater River but the official name is now Whitewater River. To make matters more complicated there are various branches known as Whitewater Creek which join the main branches of the Whitewater River.

Posted October 18, 2017, by James Baughn (webmaster [at] bridgehunter [dot] com)

This is a Pandora's Box for sure.

In 1972 the U.S. Board on Geographic Names decided that this is the Little Tallahatchie River. Their documentation can be found on the USGS website here:

https://geonames.usgs.gov/pls/gnispublic/

Perform a search for "Tallahatchie" in Mississippi, drill down to the entry for Little Tallahatchie River, and then look for the "BGN Subject Folders" section. (It's not possible to link to the specific page due to the screwy design of their website.)

On the other hand, it's hard to argue against local usage. The fact that the road signs say "Tallahatchie River" at this bridge is very compelling. Likewise, the National Bridge Inventory, based on records provided by MDOT, seems to prefer Tallahatchie River for the entire river below Sardis Lake.

The BGN Principles, Policies, and Procedures manual states: "The underlying principle of the BGN for establishing official geographic names and their applications is recognition of present-day local usage or preferences."

https://geonames.usgs.gov/docs/DNC_PPP_DEC_2016_V.1.0.pdf

However, the BGN has had a long history of not always following that principle. Instead of standardizing names, they've sowed confusion by adopting positions that are clearly the opposite of local usage.

Consider, for example, the Pittsburg(h) fiasco:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Name_of_Pittsburgh

I'm particularly peeved about one of their decisions several years ago in Southeast Missouri to demote Whitewater River to "Upper Whitewater Creek" despite zero evidence that the stream has ever been called a "creek" throughout 200+ years of history.

Luckily for us we're under no obligation to follow every BGN decision. And how!

To complicate matters, this particular bridge sits at the transition point between the original river channel and the modern Panola Quitman Floodway, a man-made diversion channel labeled as such by the DeLorme atlas.

And then there's Google Maps, which consistently labels the entire river system as "Little Tallahatchie River" -- even those portions that most everyone, including the BGN, consider to be the main Tallahatchie River.

So, in a nutshell, it's complicated.

Posted October 18, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Dummyline Road running through Asa follows the alignment of the Yazoo & Mississippi Valley Railroad according to the 1932 Sledge, MS quadrangle.

Posted October 18, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Dummy line was a term for some steam streetcars and interurbans.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steam_dummy

And the old song:

https://blog.jimgrey.net/2008/12/12/on-the-dummy-line/

Craighead Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted October 18, 2017, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Yep just down the creek is a railroad bridge.

Craighead Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted October 18, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Thanks Luke for identifying the bridge.

Craighead Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted October 18, 2017, by Luke
Craighead Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted October 18, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley492yahoo [dot] com)

I just noticed something.If you look at the satellite picture of this bridge and look to the right,it looks like a railroad bridge crosses this creek also.Just a guess but anything is possible.

Posted October 18, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I noticed that too. I have not found anything definitive, but these are a couple of interesting links:

https://www.kididdles.com/lyrics/d032.html

https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=29196

Posted October 18, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I'd like to know the story behind the naming of the nearby Dummyline Road!

Porter's Bridge (Mississippi)
Posted October 18, 2017, by Anonymous

"Unknown status", but nothing there so I would hazard a guess the bridge is lost

Posted October 18, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

According to Encyclopaedia Britanica, the river is also known as the Little Tallahatchie. Thus, I can see where there might be some confusion here.

As Luke pointed out, the variety of online maps do not agree on the name. That being said, we do want to have all information on here to be factual. If a few maps have the wrong river we still want to have the right river, or at least the most commonly accepted name. Bridgehunter has a special field for alternate name, and I think that we should use that special field for its intended purpose.

Based on my field visit, Tallahatchie seems to be the most common name. I crossed the river at two different locations, and at both crossings the name Tallahatchie was used. I have added a Google Streetview showing the sign with the river name as Tallahatchie. In addition, I have read several news reports about this bridge, and another one over the same river. All of these news reports use the name Tallahatchie instead of Little Tallahatchie.

For now, I have changed this listing back to its original name. Either way, I think that the Webmaster should make the call here - perhaps in consultation with our Mississippi Contributors. Those of us who are not from the area should defer to the locals and to the Webmaster on this one.

Posted October 18, 2017, by Anonymous

Bridge was removed sometime in 2016. Since the rail line is no longer active, it will not be replaced.

Posted October 17, 2017, by Luke

FWIW s topo map from 1965 also call this the Little Tallahatchie River, though those also spell streams wrong from time to time.

See: Worle Creek in Ames, Iowa.

Later topo maps and Google both misspell it as Worrell, when city documents/locals/older topos all use Worle.

Posted October 17, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I should mention that Google Maps seems to have erroneously labeled this river as the Little Tallahatchie. It is really the Tallahatchie. The Little Tallahatchie is to the West.

Posted October 17, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

That is good news all around. Hopefully Generation Z has an appreciation for historic bridges.

Posted October 17, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

What an awesome bridge! I sure hope that it might ultimately be preserved. Mississippi seems to have some nice bridges. I certainly hope to do some more Bridgehunting in the South someday.

Posted October 17, 2017, by tillerman

bridge to be replaced in 2018

Posted October 17, 2017, by tillerman

Bridge is being replaced in 2017

Posted October 17, 2017, by tillerman

Bridge to be replaced in 2018

Posted October 17, 2017, by tillerman

Bridge has been replaced

Posted October 17, 2017, by Nathan Delaplaine (ndelaplaine [at] gmail [dot] com)

It looks like this bridge is no longer operating.

Posted October 17, 2017, by Nathan Delaplaine (ndelaplaine [at] gmail [dot] com)

It looks like this bridge is no longer operating.

Posted October 17, 2017, by David Larson (dvdclrsn [at] gmail [dot] com)

It looks like some work has been done fairly recently to stabilize this structure. Interestingly, one of the most skilled stone masons in the area lives just a few yards from here and takes care to keep the area cleaned up. I'm informed that people come here for senior pictures, etc.

Posted October 17, 2017, by David Backlin (us71 [at] cox [dot] net)

Might this be part of the old Bankhead Highway?

Posted October 17, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Reading through news articles, I am seeing conflicting reports of repair vs replace. We might have to punt this one to the Mississippi contributors on here.

Posted October 17, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This is an interesting little foot bridge. It looks to me as though the deck has a little bit of a camber.

Posted October 17, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This is a great find and I am glad to see some photos on here. A similar bridge in Rush County, which was on the national register of historic places, was demolished a few years ago. It is good to see that this one is still standing so far. Hopefully it will be retained. I would I think that this bridge has a high chance of being found historic given its unusual design.

Posted October 17, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I drove over this bridge in November of 2014. There was no sign of construction here at all.

But...according to the June 2016 Google Streetview, trees are being cleared at both ends of the bridge. This one is being replaced. I don't know if it will be retained or demolished.

Posted October 17, 2017, by Bob Forrester (rmoribayashi [at] gmail [dot] com)

The reason ADT on Fisher's Lane Bridge went from 3100 to 50 was the closing of the southern end of Fisher's Lane by the year 2000. The lane had been an unusual inner city scenic shortcut during the day but the narrow roadway, poor lighting and winding path made "Snake Road", as it was locally called, a popular site for late night joyriding. Despite the closing it is still a magnet for automobile crashes and fatalities, one as recently as 2015.

Posted October 17, 2017, by Bob Forrester (rmoribayashi [at] gmail [dot] com)

The original bridge was demolished and replaced in the 1970's

Craighead Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted October 17, 2017, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

There was a celebration of new and old bridges in Carlisle on Friday. Note the irony of the PennDOT engineer speaking. I won't blow it. It says a lot however.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G0xsghUTwM8

Photo from Cumberland County

Posted October 17, 2017, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Grinnell, IA - Holt, MI - Hazelgreen, MO

Please join us as we as we launch the Gasconade River Bridge Rehabilitation Project. 

The North Skunk River Greenbelt Association (NSRGA)/ Workin' Bridges has been given the green light by the Missouri Department of Transportation(MoDOT) for a conceptual agreement to begin the fundraising efforts to actually restore the Gasconade River Bridge at Hazelgreen, Missouri. A new by-pass bridge has been designed and will be constructed in 2018 which left the historic bridge at risk for demolition. The Rte 66 Gasconade River Bridge Guardians have lead the effort for preservation and MoDOT agreed to let the efforts begin to find the funding required. Let me be clear, the historic bridge is still at risk for demolition unless sufficient funding for restoration can be acquired in the next fourteen months.

The four spans of the Gasconade River Bridge include two Parker Trusses, one Pratt truss and a Warren Pony Truss, built in 1923 and designed by MoDOT engineers. A current engineering estimate by MoDOT estimated repair work at over $3 million dollars. The Workin' Bridges qualified engineers and craftsmen will assess the bridge for possible phased options and costs that may differ from MoDOTs assessment. These real numbers, captured as Scope of Work and Estimates are required so that informed decisions can be made, for potential grants. Work with MoDOT on a risk management plan for their new bridge and the Interstate 44 bridge is being negotiated. We have proposed a Trust Account that would be in place for a catastrophic event, as well as utilizing the interest for future biannual inspections and site and security.

Developers are also being sought for this property and any design ideas are welcome. Route 66 has always been a mecca for travelers worldwide and with this bridge repaired the potential for crossing on special event days may still be an option as engineering will return the bridge to its former function. For more information on how the bridge was saved and how we are moving forward together check out Workin' Bridges: Route 66 Bridge Rehab on Facebook

Our goal is to raise $10,000 in funds. Those funds are for engineering and planning. Jacqueline (Jax) Welborn has been designated the Project Manager. She will undertake the outreach for donors to help with the immediate engineering and planning needs for the bridge. Contact Jax at rte66bridgerehab@gmail.com or call her at 573-528-1292.

Then our efforts will turn to finding the pledges, grants and in-kind donations necessary to reach our $3.5 million dollar goal by December 31, 2018. That money will go to repairing the piers and abutments that hold the spans up, the stringer and roadway replacement, floor beam repair. The deck, or at least a portion of the deck will be removed by MoDOT using their demolition funds for that purpose. The lead paint abatement solution is still to be determined.

Those efforts are currently underway. NSRGA has begun the process to become a legitimate nonprofit corporation in Missouri, then the bank accounts will be procured. In the meantime you can still donate at Workin' Bridges: Route 66 Bridge Rehab on Facebook. Your donations are tax deductible to the fullest extent allowed by law.

Other questions, please contact Julie Bowers at jbowerz1@gmail.com or 641-260-1262. Check out this project and others on Facebook at Workin' Bridges, www.workinbridges.org and become a Save Our Bridge (SOB) action figure today.

Posted October 17, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Great idea PennDOT using the ABC idea Don.I hope they use it on all concrete bridges that should be replaced.I just hope they leave the truss bridges alone.

Posted October 17, 2017, by Luke

According to https://books.google.com/books?id=8cs1AQAAMAAJ&q=Little+Rock... the construction on this bridge began in September 1904.

Posted October 17, 2017, by Jeff Dubea (jeffdubea [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I saw this on a boat trip in October 2017. It appears to be abandoned and is swung open. There are still wires crossing it, and the telegraph poles are still there. It is near the chemical plant.

I would like to know when it was built and how long it has been abandoned. I hope they do not destroy it. If anyone has any additional information, please contact me.

Posted October 17, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

This one's a Beauty!

Posted October 17, 2017, by Mike Tewkesbury (gb_packards [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I took this shot in March 2010.

Posted October 17, 2017, by Jeff Dubea (jeffdubea [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I went through here on the river as it was being dismantled. It is sad to see these old truss bridges go away, as the new ones are so plain and boring.

Posted October 17, 2017, by Jeff Dubea (jeffdubea [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I went over the Moncla Bridge many times. Just downriver, there are still concrete pilings visible from an even older bridge. The older bridge was built in the 1920s or 30s (possibly WPA, because I was told my grandfather worked on it) and collapsed during high water. There is still a road bed on the east side of the river going to the bank. The man who owns the property tells the story and heard that a car went off of the bridge when it fell. I'd like to know more about this, if anyone has information.

Posted October 17, 2017, by Jeff Dubea (jeffdubea [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I am from Avoyelles Parish, and I have heard many stories from older folks about driving cars over this bridge before the LA 1 bridge was built. My father remembers having to fold in his truck mirror when meeting another truck on the bridge, as it was a narrow road set around the tracks.

Posted October 17, 2017, by Jeff Dubea (jeffdubea [at] yahoo [dot] com)

albermarle52 - that railroad bridge is listed if you search for Krotz Springs, Louisiana.

Posted October 17, 2017, by David Larson

I posted those to the wrong bridge's page. I've moved a couple of them to the right place. I'll try to upload a few more later.

Posted October 17, 2017, by Jeff Dubea (jeffdubea [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Being from Louisiana, and spending much time on the waterways, I have seen these pipeline crossings many times. I always wondered if it was oil or natural gas that goes through these suspended pipelines. Also, why not bury them like many others? Scouring problems? It seems more expensive this way.

Posted October 16, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

One has to consider a couple of other factors here as well...

*The bridge is still in use on Federal Highway US 250, and some of the strengthening can be attributed to that. The 2 concrete piers were added in 1934 probably for that very reason.

*After being damaged by flooding in 1985, the bridge was nearly destroyed in 1989. A gasoline tanker was filling underground tanks at a nearby gas station when the fuel overflowed down a hill and onto the bridge. A hot muffler from a car crossing ignited it and set the bridge on fire heavily damaging it. The people jumped from the car before it rolled back to the entrance of the bridge. The bridge was renovated and reopened in 1991 costing 1.4 Million dollars. And although steel was added underneath to strengthen the weakened superstructure, as much of the original trusses as possible were retained.

Given all that this iconic structure has been through, I think I can overlook the additions that have helped it survive. Many covered spans that have been through much less have unfortunately had much to all of their historic integrity lost.

Posted October 16, 2017, by David Larson (dvdclrsn [at] gmail [dot] com)

Thank you, Robert. I'm hoping to come back when there is a train crossing the bridge early in the morning. This may be a challenge as trains just run a few times per week and I live about 45 miles from here.

Posted October 16, 2017, by Anonymous

Doubtful, seeing as the bridge this entry for is in the raised position with no tracks going to the bridge.

Posted October 16, 2017, by Michael Quiet (mquiet [at] gmail [dot] com)

Melissa/Robert:

Its a pretty mixed bag, with both variations in policy depending on what state you are in and what time it was done and the location/traffic of the bridge. For example in the 60's and early 70's it was very common in my home state of Vermont to add steel supports or even remove the entire bottom of the bridge and replace it with and independent steel and concrete bridge, retaining the authentic cover. At the time this was seen as progressive, but by the late 70's and 80's the sentiment moved more towards in-kind restoration and preservation. Today we have a comprehensive policy towards rehabilitation and maintenance of covered bridges that keeps them working as their original framers intended.

Cross over the Connecticut river into New Hampshire and there are only a handful of covered bridges with steel supports. Most of them were modified way back in the early 1900's with the addition of large laminated wooden arches. These modifications are old enough to be historic in their own right, and look more 'natural' then steel supports. Fortunately these arches strengthened them sufficiently to survive without further modification.

Certainly though it can be said that more covered bridges have been modified then any of us would like to see. I feel like there has been an increase in awareness for historic integrity of covered bridges though, so hopefully we won't see more of these modifications in the future.

Posted October 15, 2017, by Rick Drew (rickthephotoguy [at] gmail [dot] com)

I've been here several times - trains use it daily.

Milford Swing Bridge (New Hampshire)
Posted October 15, 2017, by Elizabeth Watson (aelizabethwatson [at] gmail [dot] com)

Happy to tell everyone that the bridge was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in July of 2017, and the Town of Milford is planning a complete overhaul (under supervision of the State Historic Preservation Office). Milford is in the Freedom's Way National Heritage Area, and this bridge is listed among potential National Historic Landmarks for its rarity.

Posted October 15, 2017, by Anonymous

A great bridge well cared for and protected. Bucket lister for sure

Posted October 15, 2017, by Greg L (gleime [at] sssnet [dot] com)

I visited the tunnel today (10/15/2017). It's in good shape. Mainly dry inside the tunnel except near the entrances.

Posted October 15, 2017, by David Jones (david2jpix [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This bridge is listed as closed. However, I drove across it and there is traffic that uses this bridge - the road is well used. There are no barricades or notices or anything else to show any closure of this bridge.

Posted October 15, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

That is possible. I am much more familiar with metal truss bridges in the Midwest.

Posted October 15, 2017, by Melissa Jurgensen

Robert, I disagree because the overwhelming majority of bridges I have seen in many states do not have any steel underneath and the truss still supports the bridge. It takes away from the character of the bridge and to me, makes it less authentic. Perhaps different states just have different ideas about "restoration"

Posted October 15, 2017, by Barry Woltag (bwoltag [at] yahoo [dot] com)
One year ago today...
Posted October 15, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Today marks the one-year anniversary of Nick hitting the Bridgehunter Jackpot. Does an 1878 Whipple truss ring a bell? Yep, that was one year ago today. WOW! JUST WOW!

Posted October 15, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge has a bizarre story to say the least. It carried traffic on Monument Road for several years. I don't know if that was its original location or not. It was still on Monument Road when I last visited it. In fact, it was still open to traffic.

Perhaps the most bizarre thing about this bridge is the fact that it was put together from random parts of an even older bridge. I would not be too surprised if the parts that compose this bridge originally came from more than one older bridge. This bridge might even comprised parts of three or four older bridges.

It is a Waddell truss in terms of overall layout but it was not built by the same firm that built the one in Missouri. Most likely, a creative County engineer designed this thing and a crew of County workers assembled it. Doniphan county has at least two other bridges that were altered and reused.

Posted October 14, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Thanks, Dana and Kay

Posted October 14, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

Nick you rock dude! Nice find

Posted October 14, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Searched for other listings of this historic (albeit modified) bridge on this site, but did not find any, hence this listing. Spotted from the road as I was driving by, great old thing, very happy locals had the thought to rehab it and make it very accessible to the public.

Posted October 14, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Another one of the odd paired angle Pony trusses in this region. This one happens to be in Queenpost form.

Posted October 14, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Well, that is too bad. I knew that it was doomed because of the KHRI update.

Posted October 14, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

This is a beauty - beaten up, but still going strong(ish)

Posted October 14, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

2017 - this old beauty has been replaced with something QUITE less interesting.

Posted October 14, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

1875 !!

Posted October 14, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Wow. 1st visit. Little thing is really neat, perfect spot for it in this city park.

Posted October 14, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

just saw listing for wood bridge - "Oxide Rd. plank bridge"

Posted October 14, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

the 3rd crossing and northernmost creek crossing on Oxide Rd.

Posted October 14, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

the second crossing of the creek over Oxide Rd.

Posted October 14, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Bridge is lost. As you proceed north up Oxide Rd., the road crosses the creek a total of 3 times, the southmost where the pin is currently located is now a low-water crossing, the next one north is a wooden bridge, and the last one northmost is another low water crossing

Posted October 14, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

new(ish) coat of paint? like how it stands out - was not searching for it but it jumped right out while driving by today

Posted October 14, 2017, by Don Morrison

yep, George. it's called ABC - Accellerated Bridge Construction.

Here's the page from PA Turnpike, and they include a video animation of the fast bridge replacement process from Michigan DOT.

https://www.paturnpike.com/travel/accelerated_bridge_constru...

Posted October 14, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I was visiting my fiancee Ann in Reading Hospital this morning and saw on the news that this bridge is being replaced this weekend actually having started on Friday.The Northeast Extension will open back up on Monday according to the news from the Allentown exit to the Mahoning Valley exit.Also they showed that the bridge is coming in already preformed which will speed up the replacement.I never knew this was possible with today's bridges.

Posted October 14, 2017, by Nathan Delaplaine (ndelaplaine [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge no longer operates.

Surf City Bridge (North Carolina)
Posted October 14, 2017, by Nathan Delaplaine (ndelaplaine [at] gmail [dot] com )

When the replacement bridge opens, the original bridge will no longer operate.

Posted October 14, 2017, by Nathan Delaplaine (ndelaplaine [at] gmail [dot] com)

Looks like this bridge needs to get replaced because it no longer operates.

Wando River Bridge (South Carolina)
Posted October 14, 2017, by Nathan Delaplaine (ndelaplaine [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge no longer operates.

Posted October 14, 2017, by Nathan Delaplaine (ndelaplaine [at] gmail [dot] com)

Now that a traffic light has been installed, vehicles will no longer need to stop at the electrical sign and vehicles will now only stop at the drawbridge gates.

Posted October 13, 2017, by Michael Tidrick (mrtidrick [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge is easily accessible with a street crossing on the north bank and public park on the south bank. Please use caution as rail traffic is frequent and they don't slow down much going through town.

On a side note... not too far to the east of this bridge is a 100+ year old suspended cable "swinging" footbridge that connects Gilman Public Park on the south bank of the Yellow River to South Riverside Drive on the north bank. Sadly I did not know its significance or I would have photographed it too.

Posted October 13, 2017, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

They used that "too dangerous to allow workers on the bridge to repair it" excuse to demolish this bridge's "sister span" over Lake Champlain in New York and Vermont. However, with the Lake Champlain Bridge, the reason for this excuse was due to substructure (pier) deterioration. It is not clear that this New Hampshire example suffers from the same type of deterioration. Sadly though this country seems to place little value these days on having its elected officials make truthful statements, instead rewarding those who make bombastic statements.

Posted October 13, 2017, by Michael Quiet (mquiet [at] gmail [dot] com)

In what shouldn't come as any surprise given NH's recent war on metal truss bridges, even this early and iconic example of a continuous arch bridge is now under threat, with possible replacement on the horizon for 2019.

http://www.fosters.com/news/20170203/general-sullivan-bridge...

My favorite part of the article is the state senator quote of “When they were first talking about restoring the bridge, the cost was about $30 million. Now, it is up to about $42 million. Also, the bridge is in such bad shape that the work will be dangerous to the people hired to do it.”. Amazing how not fixing the problem and continuing to allow it to rot increases the cost of fixing it. Sadly it sentiments like this which allow so many bridges to be lost.

Posted October 13, 2017, by Mike Daffron (daffronmike [at] yahoo [dot] com)

It sure as hell does work!! The power line above sizzles and the hairs on your arm will stand on end after a few minutes. It is Twilight-Zone-Worthy!!

Posted October 13, 2017, by D. Franklin

The abandoned bridge in the foreground only carried a water main, was abandoned in the 1970's.

Posted October 12, 2017, by just saying

.............did it work?..........

Posted October 12, 2017, by Mike Daffron (daffronmike [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Visited bridge with my a couple of my kids. My 21 year old son, who is not exactly enamored with bridges, declared: Best Bridge Ever! Very neat, not the best, of course. Well worth a visit with the fam! Will post a video ASAP.

Posted October 12, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

Barry thanks for info and good luck with preservation Efforts. Herkimer County appears to really appreciate there bridges!

Posted October 12, 2017, by Barry Woltag (bwoltag [at] austin [dot] rr [dot] com)

Additional info on civil engineer Frank Osborn: http://www.structuremag.org/?p=930

Posted October 12, 2017, by K. Allen Ballard (speedeeprint [at] gmail [dot] com)

My son, Ken, & I visited here Columbus Day, 2017 (09.09.2017). Bridge still very solid, serviceable; on low use county road; located just 1/8 north of Bee Creek Pony Bridge. Picturesque photo ops abound here. We were a bit early for full fall colors.

Posted October 12, 2017, by K. Allen Ballard (speedeeprint [at] gmail [dot] com)

My son, Ken, & I visited here Columbus Day, 2017 (09.09.2017). Bridge still very solid, serviceable; on low use county road; located just 1/8 south of Cedar Bluff Bridge.


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