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Posted August 8, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I'm surprised it hadn't been noticed (or at least noted) before, but the larger two spans of this bridge were Triple-Intersection Pratt trusses. This is the first example I have seen besides the extant Laughery Creek Bridge.

Cheshire Bridge (New Hampshire)
Posted August 8, 2020, by Luke

The railroad wholly owned the bridge, so the tolls directly funded the Boston & Maine-owned Springfield Terminal. The Guilford-era ST abandoned the line ca. 1983, but continued to own it until 1992 when New Hampshire bought it. They collected tolls until 2001, per Wikipedia

https://cite.case.law/nh/126/425/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cheshire_Bridge_(Connecticut_R...)

Unknown Abandoned Bridge
Posted August 8, 2020, by Chester Gehman (gehmanc2000 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Nick:

The bridge you are referring to is the Monadnock Mills Bridge (BH 49549) It is a bowstring designed by Thomas Moseley and is one of only four, I believe, still extant.

Chet

Unknown abandoned bridge in Claremont, NH - bowstring?
Posted August 8, 2020, by Nick Boppel (nickboppel01 [at] gmail [dot] com)

While exploring the waterfalls and dams along the Sugar River between the Connecticut River and Newport, New Hampshire - I stumbled upon this mysterious abandoned structure in downtown Claremont, NH. The bridge is located directly above the Upper Falls of the downtown dam. Unfortunately I could not identify the proper way to access the bridge up close, so the only photos I could get were these two extremely zoomed and poor quality photos, taken from a modern truss bridge that was built just below the Lower Falls. However, from the looks of it at a distance, it appears that this may be an abandoned bowstring arch/truss bridge, which as I understand are some of the oldest and most significant metal bridges in the country. Given that, I was wondering if anyone here might be able to identify the bridge or at least provide some more details from my two bad photos? If not I'll ask the team at HistoricBridges.org since they seem to be familiar with these types of bridges.

Posted August 8, 2020, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

According to the design-build firm linked in the photos, during the 2010 rehab: "The stringers, bearings, and the existing deck were all replaced, and riveted connections were redesigned and replaced with bolted connections."

Preserved with modifications.

Posted August 8, 2020, by Tyler

The picture thatís here is of the other Bailey bridge in this area. This one has no railings

Cheshire Bridge (New Hampshire)
Posted August 8, 2020, by Nick Boppel (nickboppel01 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Site visit 08/06/20: Bridge needs a paint job. Large patches of brick-red rust are visible on the otherwise gray paint scheme. It does create a unique paint scheme in a way, but I know that it's not supposed to be that way.

Does anyone know when this bridge ceased to be a toll bridge? Also, when this was a toll bridge, was it privately owned, or a joint-state venture? And which side (NH or VT) was the toll booth located on? I couldn't find out any of these things during my site visit.

Posted August 8, 2020, by Chester Gehman (gehmanc2000 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Bridge has been replaced by a Bailey bridge which is likely to be permanent as road serves a few houses and is a dead-end.

Posted August 8, 2020, by George A Oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Nice pictures,Ian.Especially with the drone.I noticed pictures taken on the ROW.Is it possible to get to the bridge without too much trouble,like climbing for example?Also wondering how long the netting which is a great idea has been under the bridge over the roadway if anybody knows that.

Posted August 8, 2020, by Keith W Gates (commuterdude [at] gmail [dot] com)

Bridge lost; replaced with new concrete deck bridge sometime in the last year.

I have a photo from July 7th, 2019 when it was still in place; but 8/7/2020 passage found it gone, unfortunately.

Posted August 8, 2020, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

This is the funniest "meme" I've seen about this year. Well done Luke!

Posted August 8, 2020, by STEVEN D. HUELSKAMP (stevendhuelskamp [at] gmail [dot] com)

Photo taken August 6, 2020.

Posted August 8, 2020, by STEVEN D, HUELSKAMP (stevendhuelskamp [at] gmail [dot] com)

Here is a photo taken August 6, 2020.

Posted August 8, 2020, by George A Oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

According to WNBC channel 10 news the barges that were stuck underneath this bridge were removed late thursday morning.I-676 is still closed until more inspections are completed.The only damage noticed so far was a bent stiffener bracket which is not threatening the structural integrity.The bridge can open before this repair according to a PennDOT district executive.

Posted August 8, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

That's for damn sure!

Armstrong Tunnel (West Virginia)
Posted August 7, 2020, by Richard McClintock (trainsasachild [at] gmail [dot] com)

According to the West Virginia Historic Property Inventory Form for the Armstrong Tunnel (apparently the source for the previous comment), it was built by the Pocahontas, Coal River, and Kanawha Railway Company (after 1903 called The Coal River & Western Railway Company). The right of way records indicate that the land was purchased from James T. Armstrong on February 5, 1900. The construction on the tunnel was started sometime in 1900 by an unknown contractor for the railroad. In 1907 the company was sold to C & O. The tunnel was used for the railroad for many years until a new tunnel was constructed some time around 1930, to decrease the grade on the roadbed and to accommodate larger locomotives.

Armstrong Tunnel (West Virginia)
Posted August 7, 2020, by Richard McClintock (trainsasachild [at] gmail [dot] com)

According to the West Virginia Historic Property Inventory Form for the Armstrong Tunnel, it was built by the Pocahontas, Coal River, and Kanawha Railway Company (after 1903 called The Coal River & Western Railway Company). The right of way records indicate that the land was purchased from James T. Armstrong on February 5, 1900. The construction on the tunnel was started sometime in 1900 by an unknown contractor for the railroad. In 1907 the company was sold to C & O. The tunnel was used for the railroad for many years until a new tunnel was constructed some time around 1930, to decrease the grade on the roadbed and to accommodate larger locomotives.

Fort Henry Bridge (West Virginia)
Posted August 7, 2020, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Getting dark, but driving through it looks like this is getting a new coat of royal blue paint.

Posted August 7, 2020, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Luke, truth 💯

Posted August 7, 2020, by Luke

.

Posted August 7, 2020, by Nick Boppel (nickboppel01 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I would be very, very surprised and in fact shocked if Portland actually went and demolished the Burnside Bridge (or any of their other historic bridges, for that matter). I agree with Nathan that Oregon in general and especially Portland have amazing records when it comes to historic bridge preservation. I believe that, with the unfortunate exception of the Sellwood Bridge, Portland has managed to preserve *all* of its historic bridges (the Tilikum Crossing was built new and did not replace a demolished bridge as far as I know).

I am sympathetic to the discussions around the future of the I-5 Bridge, since having a moveable bridge on a primary and busy expressway is definitely not desirable (in fact, I want to say that moveable bridges on the Interstate Highway System might have even been outlawed by AASHTO after the new Woodrow Wilson Bridge in Alexandria); but all of the downtown bridges definitely have no reason to be demolished, and if additional capacity is needed, should be bypassed or twinned with a bridge of a similar profile and then left in place. California should provide plenty of evidence of the ability of seismic retrofits.

Posted August 7, 2020, by Nick Boppel (nickboppel01 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I have now re-listed the current bridge at http://bridgehunter.com/fl/brevard/bh90167/ and this time I did it right so that the page actually works.

Posted August 7, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I am not real clear on the process they are following because it is my belief that Section 106 has NOT yet been conducted, but would apply to this bridge, YET, this news article is presenting the demolition and replacement of this highly significant historic bridge in the heart of downtown Portland as a preferred option.

https://www.opb.org/article/2020/08/06/earthquake-ready-burn...

The demolition of this bridge, a Joseph Strauss and Gustav Lindenthal masterpiece, would be a horrific scar on Oregon's preservation track record. As one of the core iconic downtown Portland bascule bridges, this would be akin to Pittsburgh demolishing and replacing one of the Three Sisters Bridges. Its ironic when we must consider Pennsylvania showing a greater commitment to preservation than Oregon. Indeed if you read the article the admission is made that rehabilitation (including retrofit for earthquakes) is possible, but apparently being dismissed.

This also raises serious concerns for the future of Portland's other surviving historic bridges. What's next for the scrapyard? The Ross Island Bridge? The nationally significant Broadway Bridge?

Posted August 6, 2020, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

You're very welcome!

Posted August 6, 2020, by Jonathan Blankenship (stormchaser [dot] 88 [dot] jb [at] gmail [dot] com)

Closed due to major structural deterioration

Posted August 6, 2020, by Tom Hoffman

That's okay Melissa. I knew you could find something on this one. It just caught me by surprise when I suddenly ran into a 30th anniversary article online. From what you put, it sounds like it was the north bridge from Biddle Island. The one listed here I think is the south one, and the north isn't listed. But they were both concrete arch. Thanks for posting this Melissa.

Posted August 6, 2020, by Jonathan Blankenship (stormchaser [dot] 88 [dot] jb [at] gmail [dot] com)

Closed mid July 2020. Being replaced by new bridge.

Posted August 6, 2020, by Jay (jay_54714 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Google Earth and other maps show it without a doubt being in Okmulgee County. A few years ago, I started to ride my motorcycle down to it from the south. The jeep ruts were so deep and full of water that I turned around. I will try again if we ever return to summer droughts.

Posted August 6, 2020, by Scott Sexton

This photo was taken on March 20, 2014 during the rehabilitation.

Armstrong Tunnel (West Virginia)
Posted August 6, 2020, by Luke

According to https://www.highwaysthroughhistory.com/Content/tunnels/Armst... is was replaced/converted to road use around 1930 for both grade reducing and as you guessed, accommodating the modern+larger locomotives/rolling stock.

Armstrong Tunnel (West Virginia)
Posted August 6, 2020, by Richard McClintock (trainsasachild [at] gmail [dot] com)

The aerial view seems to confirm the strong possibility that it was built as a railroad tunnel, since the alignments of the current track and of the Armstrong tunnel route effectively converge not far beyond the ends of the tunnel. Likely the new route and tunnel were built when this bore became too small for modern traffic. Are there any photos of the new tunnel to compare bore sizes?

Posted August 5, 2020, by George A Oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I was watching the news tonight on WPVI channel 6 out of Philadelphia and saw that a barge that the Army Corps of Engineers was using to dredge portions of the Schuylkill River above the Fairmount Dam broke free during Tropical Storm Isaias on Tuesday around 5 p.m. and ended up hitting this bridge,forcing the bridge to be closed to traffic.Bridge inspectors were on the scene Wednesday to look for any damage.Only minor structural issues were discovered,and there was no damage that would compromise the structural integrity of the bridge.PennDOT said this bridge will be closed until Thursday afternoon.That's when the river level is expected to recede to the point the barge can be moved.Detours are in effect during the bridge closure.

Posted August 5, 2020, by George A Oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Speaking of SCI-Retreat closing i remembered that SCI-Graterford in Graterford,Montgomery County Pa closed being that i lived in Montgomery County not far from the prison.Before the prison closed the state of Pa was thinking of selling SCI-Graterford.As far as i know since the inmates and employees were transferred to the new SCI-Phoenix which is located next door to SCI-Graterford this prison is sitting vacant and still property of the state department of corrections.SCI-Retreat,like SCI-Graterford will be hard to sell especially due to the present economy so i think it's safe to say none of the prisons mentioned here are going anywhere.If anybody hears of SCI-Retreat being sold that would be very interesting in the least.Of course,this is only my opinion.I think it's safe to say the bridge is safe for the foreseeable future.

Posted August 5, 2020, by npugh (npugh0333 [at] gmail [dot] com)

They just rebuilt and reopened it!

Posted August 5, 2020, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

The Times: April 17 1988

Posted August 5, 2020, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Tom, I'm so sorry I just saw this comment. I will look for something for you

Posted August 5, 2020, by Tyler

I did it today. I couldnít get an elevation photo because of private property on both sides of the bridge. A nice parking lot has been added on the south approach and lights have been added to the rail crossing

Posted August 5, 2020, by Tyler

Bridge has been closed to traffic

Posted August 5, 2020, by Nick Boppel (nickboppel01 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Y'know, it really bothers me that they still call the modern replacement USEB (Ugly Steel Eyesore Bridge) "The Arch Bridge". Sure, the steel girders have a slight arched/curved shape to them, but continuing to call the crossing "The Arch Bridge" seem unwise at best, insulting at worst.

Posted August 5, 2020, by Nick Boppel (nickboppel01 [at] gmail [dot] com)

There is a new modern pony truss bridge at this location. I'm currently on a trip up in this area so I will try and get some photos.

Posted August 5, 2020, by Darrell Powers (Systemofadown311 [at] outlook [dot] com)

Not in too bad shape.

Posted August 5, 2020, by Darrell Powers (Systemofadown311 [at] outlook [dot] com)

A few days ago..

Posted August 5, 2020, by Darrell Powers (Systemofadown311 [at] outlook [dot] com)

Inside..

Posted August 5, 2020, by Darrell Powers (Systemofadown311 [at] outlook [dot] com)

A few days ago.

Posted August 5, 2020, by Karen Daniels (karen [dot] daniels [at] modot [dot] mo [dot] gov)

I just checked the 1920 County Highway Map for Miller County, and the road was classified as a County Seat Road, so it already existed before the State Highway Department took it over in 1921. It connected Tuscumbia and Waynesville. Based on notes on the map, the road in Sections 7 and 18 would have been realigned very shortly after the highway department took it over.

Posted August 5, 2020, by Luke

Also, UP intends to replace this bridge.

Posted August 5, 2020, by Satolli Glassmeyer (info [at] HistoryInYourOwnBackyard [dot] com)

Here's a link to a video I just did on the history of the bridge: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PMFapNvoF8o&t=8s

Posted August 5, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I got some additional information from the land owner. He also believes the road was originally the old state highway, and today the former road dead ends near the bridge. He says his wifeís grandmother herded her dairy cows across it daily back in the 40ís. He also said the Google Map is incorrect in showing the road curving to the west, since that is a private drive he built and leases to his neighbor and is not public.

Posted August 5, 2020, by Tyler

Iím surprised that nobody has photo documented this bridge yet. Iíll try to do that over the weekend.

Posted August 5, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

This article suggests that only the collapsed span needs to be replaced, which considering that half the bridge was on fire, is a pretty good outcome. https://www.rtands.com/rail-news/tempe-replaced-section-of-r...

Posted August 5, 2020, by Luke

Center truss span matches this AmBridge built Harriman Lines Common Standard design.

https://bridgehunter.com/or/lane/bh50689/

Posted August 5, 2020, by Karen Daniels

It is possible that this section of road was part of the 1920s alignment of State Route 7. The road was realigned in the early 1930s. MoDOT Project History Maps (https://www.modot.org/sites/default/files/documents/maintenance_/project_history_maps/miller.pdf) show a small segment abandoned at Tavern Creek, but not at a scale you can really tell anything.

Posted August 5, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I am not sure when the bridge seen today was built but there is no way a massive concrete slab bridge on concrete bents dates to 1884. The main span is a bascule bridge that replaced a swing bridge. As near as I can tell 0% of this dates to 1884 and I would say it is incorrect to list the bridge as such. This video contains up close views of the approach spans leading to the bascule span. https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=62&v=v8K6TdEuyOc...

Posted August 5, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I am not sure when the bridge seen today was built but there is no way a massive concrete slab bridge on concrete bents dates to 1884. The main span is a bascule bridge that replaced a swing bridge. As near as I can tell 0% of this dates to 1884 and I would say it is incorrect to list the bridge as such. This video contains up close views of the approach spans leading to the bascule span. https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=62&v=v8K6TdEuyOc...

Posted August 5, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Was this bridge really built by Phoenix, or is the referenced record referring to a previous bridge at this location?

Posted August 5, 2020, by Tom Kipphorn (tkipph [at] gmail [dot] com)

Thank you for posting this. I've been researching Lancaster County's covered and open wood truss bridges. Nothing to prove it yet, but there is a strong likelihood that there was a wood truss bridge at this location prior to the Warren Truss bridge shown here. Regardless of whether the Warren Truss bridge was built between 1888 and 1901, there had to be some type of bridge before this one, as the railroad bridge to the east of Rohrerstown (PA/38-36-136x Columbia-Philadelphia Railroad Bridge near Rohrerstown) was built in 1830, and the Overhead Bridge at Mountville (PA/38-36-U07x, proven to be originally a wooden Howe Truss, replaced after 1886) was built about about 1842.

The road is old and appears on the 1824 Joshua Scott Lancaster County Map and the photo shows the Warren Truss bridge was built on stone abutments. The 1864 Lancaster County Atlas shows the crossing was on a skew even back then, as the photo shows the Warren Truss bridge on a skew, so the abutments were probably original.

There were two tracks at this location, the other track being off the picture to the right, so you only see about 1/2 of the bridge. I did a rough measurement using the Historicaerials.com scale and found it to be approx. 90ft X 20ft. All the other railroad crossings between the Harrisburg Pike and the bridge at Mountville were level with the roadway. Given the earlier date of 1830 for 136x, if there was a wood truss bridge here, it was probably either a Town Lattice or Burr, as the site is too early to have been a Howe-type Truss.

Posted August 4, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Well lets cross our fingers and hope for the facility and bridge to be reused in a new capacity.

Posted August 4, 2020, by Patrick Gurwell (pgurwell [at] gmail [dot] com)

It is a nice bridge. Right on the hwy, nature trail along the river. Even though the prison guards have eyes on you when you stop, it is a really pretty location, and good looking bridge.

Posted August 4, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Current street view shows a new paint job and beautifully maintained bridge!

Posted August 4, 2020, by James Baughn (webmaster [at] bridgehunter [dot] com)

This one reminds me of this bridge in Caldwell County, MO:

http://bridgehunter.com/mo/caldwell/john-deere/

Posted August 4, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

That's probably a safe bet John.

Posted August 4, 2020, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)
Posted August 4, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

The substructure of this bridge indeed dates back to Theodore Burr's 1804 structure.

Posted August 4, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Kellogg and Maurice would go on to fabricate iron railroad trusses, apparently Charles went in another direction. I do believe K&M ended up morphing into the Union Bridge Company.

I believe this was the longest remaining covered bridge in the US at the time of it's demise.

Posted August 4, 2020, by Art Suckewer (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

There may have been a prior covered bridge here, built in 1831.

I found this paragraph:

According to the Bicentennial Celebration publication, Historical Sites of Knowlton Township, (1976) , the covered bridge was built by the Charles, Kellogg and Maurice Company, and was finished in 1869. It was a Burr truss bridge, and was 775 feet long and 18 feet wide. The plaque on the Portland side of the bridge reads, "Site of the last of 16 covered bridges that once spanned the Delaware. Erected 1831-1869. Destroyed by flood August 19, 1955."

here: https://www.njskylands.com/tncolumbia

Any thoughts?

Art S.

Posted August 4, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Looks like a late pinned Pratt from perhaps ca. 1915 to 1920. The verticals appear to be angles connected with battens, which is rather unusual.

Historic Aerial imagery from 1945 shows that the bridge was part of Charcoal Kiln Road before being abandoned. The road was eventually routed over to connect with SR 17. Could this possibly be an old alignment of the highway?

Posted August 4, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Tony, It's survival is no coincidence... its not owned by PennDOT its owned by the Department of Corrections. The prison is slated to close so eventually bridge and prison are expected to go up for auction.

https://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=p...

Posted August 4, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I had someone contact me and ask about this bridge's history. I was surprised it wasn't even listed here in BridgeHunter. If anyone knows the history of this bridge, please post a comment or update the page.

Kern Bridge (Minnesota)
Posted August 4, 2020, by Jason Smith (flensburg [dot] bridgehunter [dot] av [at] googlemail [dot] com)

Summary of the bridge up for grabs. Currently two suitors but that may change in the coming weeks: https://bridgehunterschronicles.wordpress.com/2020/08/04/ker...

Posted August 3, 2020, by Edward Weber (edweber1600 [at] gmail [dot] com)

My great uncle Richard Dale built this bridge. It was built when my great grandparents owned the farm. John and Sarah Dale. They owned the land from 1902 to 1956. The farm was sold after their deaths.

Posted August 3, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

What a really cool bridge...

I'm amazed it has escaped the evil eye of PennDOT!

Posted August 3, 2020, by David W. Buckley (deebuck53 [at] sbcglobal [dot] net)

My Uncle and 2 passengers were killed in a single car accident on the south end of Pack Saddle Bridge near Wolf Creek on Wednesday Jan 1 1964 around 1:00 pm. The three were my Uncle Jerry Webb a cousin Eddie Mahl and a friend of theirs Bob Garrison returning from a pheasant hunting trip to Nebraska. The car was a red Rambler station Wagon left totally unrecognizable after the accident leaving pheasant strewn along the path as the car went off of the right side of the hiway right after crossing at the south end of the bridge. All three were headed back home to Elk City. It was a terrible day.

Posted August 3, 2020, by Jonathan Kothenbeutel (Jonkothenbeutel [at] aol [dot] com )

The counties or private individuals built the bridges such as Jones Bridge. The ones abandoned were either built by the counties or by a private individual that ran them as toll bridge.

Over time the population grew and the State of Georgia built new bridges to replace these.

In the case of Jones Bridge both counties abandoned maintaining it. Which the old Jones Bridge no longer exists.

Posted August 3, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

You would need to check with the town about swimming there.

Beautiful bridge that I'm glad to see preserved.

Posted August 3, 2020, by Katie (Jk07ar12 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Can you swim in the water?

Posted August 3, 2020, by JIM STEWART (JAMESEMSTEWART57 [at] GMAIL [dot] COM)

I THINK SHIPMAN WAS INVOLVED IN THE WEST LAFAYETTE BRIDGE IN COSHOCTON COUNTY, OHIO (AS WELL AS THE RODERICK BRIDGE). SEE BRIDGE THIS ON BRIDGEHUNTER.

ALSO HE WAS THE SON IN SHIPMAN & SON. THIS FIRM WAS LOCATED IN THE COOPERSTOWN AREA OF NYS AND DID AT LEAST

ONE WHIPPLE ARCH IN NYS.

DARNELL'S DIRECTORY HAS INFORMATION OF JAMES SHIPMAN.

Posted August 3, 2020, by Jason Smith (flensburg [dot] bridgehunter [dot] av [at] googlemail [dot] com)

Hi everyone,

As part of the BHC's 10th anniversary special, I've started a new campaign where we would like to share about bridges that became part of a music album. This bridge is an example. If you have one that you would like to share, feel free to post it. Information is available via link here:

https://bridgehunterschronicles.wordpress.com/2020/08/03/bhc...

You can also share your stories about your favorite bridge cup, your first historic bridge you photographed or even the most bizarre bridgehunting story.

Looking forward to your stories. Have a great summer. :-)

Posted August 2, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Another name to keep in mind as a possible builder here is James W. Shipman, the nephew of Squire Whipple. It is well documented that his Coshocton Iron Works only built one Whipple Bowstring, the Rodrick Bridge, in 1872 before going into receivership.

http://bridgehunter.com/oh/licking/rodrick/

However, I recently found that a suspension bridge built the following year in Indiana was credited to James W. Shipman & Company. One look at those cast towers and I have little doubt he had the capacity to produce more of his Uncle's patented spans.

http://bridgehunter.com/in/dearborn/harrison-suspension/

Posted August 2, 2020, by Neil Krout (kickinpony [dot] 66 [at] gmail [dot] com)

As I always do, I swing my head while I cross a "New Bridge". As I did this today, I was pleasantly surprised to find this old girl, still standing proud!

Posted August 2, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

It definitely looks tubular, but I can't make out enough definition to say one way or another.

Van Ness Bridge (New Jersey)
Posted August 2, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Wow Art!

IDK... Maybe a Warren/Post Hybrid? LOL

Posted August 2, 2020, by Luke

Nice add, Geoff.

Van Ness Bridge (New Jersey)
Posted August 2, 2020, by Art S. (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Tony,

I haven't researched this one but I thought you'd like it. Note the tension members. What are we calling it?

Regards,

Art S.

Posted August 2, 2020, by Art S. (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Oh, my second choice is Rezner, either as Ohio Bridge Co. or once acquired by WIBCo. There isn't enough crispness in the images for me to say what the arches tube profile is.

Posted August 2, 2020, by Art S. (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Thanks Tony!

I went down a rabbit hole that was pretty deep.

I discovered there was a bowstring here a while ago but had only one photo with part of one span showing.

Now there are just a few more.

I'm leaning toward Wrought Iron Bridge Co. but I'm not sure. What are your thoughts?

Regards,

Art S.

$274.8 million earmarked for Reading Pa area bridge/road projects
Posted August 2, 2020, by George A Oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

The Reading Area Transportation Study group recently unanimously approved a $274.8 million four-year transportation improvement plan but there is uncertainty about how the coronavirus pandemic will affect it.This plan will be reviewed by PennDOT and finalized in October.The following amounts and bridges are included in the plan.$4.3 million to replace a bridge on Friedensburg Road over Antietam Creek in Lower Alsace Township,$6.9 million to replace/rehabilitate a N/S bridge over Centre Ave.(Rte.61) in Reading,$1.1 million to replace/rehabilitate a bridge on Tollgate Road over Leak Creek in Amity Township,$2 million to replace the Peach Street Bridge on East Normal Avenue over Sacony Creek in Kutztown,$7.4 million to replace/rehabilitate bridges on Old Route 22 in Bethel and Upper Tulpehocken townships and $1.6 million to replace the Glendale Bridge that carries Winding Road over Ironstone Creek in Douglass Township.The $2.2 million Gibraltar Road Bridge rehabilitation is included in this plan.There was no listed start date for these individual projects.

Posted August 2, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I figured one or two of those spans closest to the one that collapsed were irreparably damaged... hopefully the rest of the trusses will remain.

https://www.azfamily.com/news/tempe-town-lake-bridge-demolit...

Posted August 2, 2020, by George A Oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

A $2.2 million rehabilitation project has been approved for this bridge as part of a four year traffic improvement plan by the Reading Area Transportation Study group.No date was given for when this rehabilitation will start.

Seven Island Bridge (North Carolina)
Posted August 2, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

It is indeed tragic in a state that has such a limited collection of historic trusses remaining. Photo documentation just isn't the same!

Posted August 2, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Nice collection of historic photos Art!

Posted August 2, 2020, by George A Oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Just read on the web by USA today that a portion of this bridge was imploded.Looks like it was the span next to the damaged one.There is also a video of the implosion.Don't know if this happened today or yesterday.

Seven Island Bridge (North Carolina)
Posted August 2, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)
Posted August 1, 2020, by SCOTT Ash (sash5282 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I took this right before they opened and striped the rehabilitated bridge 2019 !

Posted August 1, 2020, by Tom Hoffman

Yes, I can remember seeing in the George Gould book a JJ Daniels covered bridge listed at Milton built in like the late 1850s. For years I was like,"What?" Because I thought he was in Parke County. Then years later I read about how Daniels was from Ohio. He must have stopped at Milton before moving to Rockville.

Posted August 1, 2020, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

I really like photo # 2. The deck is great

Posted July 31, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I believe this bridge replaced the first covered bridge to be built in Indiana by J.J. Daniel's. He would go on to become one of Indiana's "Big 3".

Posted July 31, 2020, by Tom Hoffman

Thanks to whoever added this bridge. My mom said there was an old mill next to this one, but did not remember what kind of bridge was there. Wow! a neat Camelback with pony approaches once existed. I don't know if the mill just collapsed or was torn down at the same time the bridge was. The new bridge is a long viaduct style off to the east. Long ago my late grandpa said he remembered in Friendship there was a covered bridge that he saw get replaced by a metal truss, then the metal was replaced too.

Posted July 31, 2020, by Nancy (nllinet [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I would love to go, but the searches I have done does not give any directions to get to the bridge?

Posted July 31, 2020, by JIM STEWART (JAMESEMSTEWART57 [at] GMAIL [dot] COM)

PARDON MY ERROR. IT'S ILLINOIS NOT INDIANA.

PERHAPS MAKING IT MORE UNUSUAL.

Posted July 31, 2020, by JIM STEWART (JAMESEMSTEWART57 [at] GMAIL [dot] COM)

VERY RARE IN CENTRAL INDIANA. A NUMBER OF THESE "WHIPPLE ARCHES" HAVE BEEN POSTED FOR SITES ALONG THE ST. JOSEPH RIVER IN NORTHERN INDIANA AND SOUTHERN MICHIGAN. THESE

HAVE BEEN ATTRIBUTED TO SIMON DeGRAFF AND ARE LONGER THAN THE "STANDARD" VERSIONS FOUND IN NEW YORK STATE.

DeGRAFF BUILT WHIPPLE ARCHES OF THE COMMON SEVEN / NINE PANEL LENGTH AND SOME OF THE LONGER VERSIONS IN NY STATE.

I HOPE YOU CAN DETERMINE THE ORIGIN OF THIS ONE.

CHANGE VERY RARE TO UNHEARD OF.


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