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Posted April 8, 2020, by Luke

That style of postcard was common in the 1930s-late 1960s

Posted April 8, 2020, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Sadly that seems to be a "bloody shirt" of choice even when the bridge they're concerned about is nothing like the I-35.

Here in Bay City, with two bascules sold to UBP (yes, *that* UBP) at the end of last year, the fear-urgency behind having a solution for some kind of repair/replacement work for them, at least on the Mayor's part, was a complete fear of having a collapse happen here.

bridge in Italy collapses
Posted April 8, 2020, by Lyon_Wonder (lyon_wonder [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Another bridge collapses in Italy, less than 2 years after the Genoa bridge collapsed in 2018.

https://apnews.com/f969bdea4f95d189584d63d4dd6c6bfe

Posted April 8, 2020, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

...that postcard really dates to the 50s? (This bridge has a build year of 1950.) Seems like it'd be older than that.

Harbor River Bridge (South Carolina)
Posted April 8, 2020, by Nick Boppel (nickboppel01 [at] gmail [dot] com)
Posted April 8, 2020, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

They sure love "Waving the bloody shirt" of the I-35 bridge. No one points at concrete trucks and screams "Danger".

Posted April 7, 2020, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

Previous photos in this thread are of other bridge on west side of Ottawa on same trail....our new photos here are from visit today, our 1st tome experiencing this bridge, very nice, some stretches of trail to the east seem to be yet developed but we are hoping soon.....

Posted April 7, 2020, by Betsy Fontenot (betsyfontenot [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I was in 4th grade we moved to Kingwood in 1980. Not unlike every teenager, we thought Kingwood was "boring, etc." but one of the things we loved doing in high school, was to gather under the bridges (US59 aka I69 have had at least 2 highway lanes in both directions running right next to this San Jacinto crossing. The bridge had section of the roadway wash away in the flood waters caused by Tropical Storm Allison. The powers that be, chose to build new motor vehicle crossing right beside the Bevel Jarrel but managed to save the old bridge, turning it into a pedestrian bridge. The new nature trail another post mentions I believe is finished, the initial 40 mile section, that is.. Love this newly discovered website! Thanks!

Posted April 7, 2020, by John Marvig

Iíve also seen this design in Colorado. Iím guessing it was a standard design for the railroad. It appears most were built between 1897-1902.

Posted April 7, 2020, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Looking at the stone piers with concrete caps I wonder if there was a prior bridge here.

Posted April 7, 2020, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Similar to the AT&SF stone and brick arches in Leavenworth County Kansas.

Posted April 7, 2020, by Matt Lohry

The 2020 St. Louis County construction schedule is out, and thankfully this bridge has escaped Foldesi's ruthless wrecking ball for another year. I hope he stops and thinks what he's doing when he schedules this one for replacement, as this is the very last conventional truss bridge left in the entire county...but I doubt he will. NOT holding my breath.

Posted April 7, 2020, by Cliff Darby (clif30 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Such a shame we've lost almost all of our K-Truss bridges.

Gilbert Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted April 7, 2020, by George A Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I agree with JS about PennDOTs ability to not leave historic truss bridges where they are and demolish them.There are a couple of factors involved with their decision making which I find questionable at best but we all know what those factors are so i'm not going to go into detail about that.Bridges which are able to be rehabilitatd instead of being replaced should be maintained which I see that PennDOT is not interested in which irritates me even though I live in southeastern PA.I've seen a few of the truss bridges where I live demolished so I don't and won't defend PennDOT when anybody jokes about them or makes them look like a hot pile of fresh cow doo-doo.

Posted April 7, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

John,

I did a full walk-through of this bridge despite the long walk back and crappy weather conditions. Do not yet have photos online yet. But this is a fascinating bridge and as i recall i did find details indicating the doubling of the Whipple.

Posted April 6, 2020, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

On recent visit, friend Taylor Kesl noticed barricades blocking any traffic now at this bridge.

Posted April 6, 2020, by Luke

FWIW the only pictures I can find of the Atchafalaya Basin Phoenix truss are all from the same bank, and there could have been Pratts as part of the approach on the opposing bank.

Posted April 6, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Something is amiss here. The bridge shown is comprised of several Pratt trusses while the link for the previous location shows a series of Whipple spans.

Posted April 6, 2020, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The Whipple span on this bridge appears to have been doubled up and possibly relocated from another location. It probably dates to the mid-1880s, and my guess is that if Missouri Valley did the 1905 work, they may also have originally fabricated it. It seems odd however that the swing span (clearly 1905 vintage) is the exact same size as the Whipple. It could be possible that they combined the spans of the previous bridge to form a single span, and only brought in one new large span.

Posted April 6, 2020, by Jimmy (Jkeefe1988 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I walked across this bridge in 2016 and it had been abandoned for sometime. Any way someone can verify that it is still abandoned?

Posted April 6, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

This nationally significant historic bridge is now on the verge of collapse, a condition that has developed this year as the result of recent floods. Scour has undercut a concrete foundation on which the tower rests, and one of the towers has dropped enough that the deck now has a significant sag to one side. One of the supporting bents under the towers has also snapped. The county is now pursuing DEMOLITION of this NATIONALLY SIGNIFICANT historic bridge on the claim that when it collapses it will destroy the modern bridge next to it. The county further claims it does not have the needed money to non-destructively dismantle the bridge and place it into storage. So, in short, unless a source of funding can be found to dismantle and put the bridge in storage or perhaps repair it in place, this bridge is otherwise in imminent doom, whether by collapse of demolition. The events that caused the recent collapse had not taken place when I visited the bridge last year for a full photo-documentation of this fascinating bridge. https://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=t...

Posted April 5, 2020, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Chester,

Standard ASSHTO requirements silliness...

However, I think you are looking at this incorrectly. No restoration took place. The preservation aspect is that the original structure was ignored and not interfered with in the opening of the crossing for pedestrian use. Compared with demolition, which was likely considered, this is a relatively benign outcome. Someday, if idiot-proofing to present levels isn't required, the bridge can be restored.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted April 5, 2020, by Luke

Melissa, if you would be so awesome as to grab pics from https://www.newspapers.com/image/53302177/?terms=%22New%2BBr...

Posted April 5, 2020, by Jen Savage (reoracer [at] gmail [dot] com)

Wow, I have never seen this one! Looks very cool. Will have to check it out next time I go to Chain O Lakes!

Posted April 5, 2020, by Luke

Heads up Geoff, imagery is actually copyrighted. I'm trying to find a pic on Newspapers.com Melissa can grab.

Posted April 5, 2020, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Looking at the street view of the underside, I don't see that the stringers are concrete encased.

Posted April 5, 2020, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)
Florida ICW Bridges
Posted April 5, 2020, by Nick Boppel (nickboppel01 [at] gmail [dot] com)

So, while randomly scrolling through the website this evening, I noticed that a large handful of the pages for the various bridges over the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway in Florida have either one or both of these problems:

* The map marker/coordinate point is *way* off (I mean, not on the bridge in question, or in some cases, not even on the bridge approach road)

* The entries do not use the official name for the bridge and instead are just labeling it as "Intracoastal Waterway Bridge".

Not all of the ICW bridges have official names, and granted, many seem to be identical bascule bridges at first glance, but the ones that do have official names (such as the Deerfield Beach Bridge, which I fixed) should display their official names, IMO.

I am quite familiar with the ICW bridges in Florida because I grew up in the area (even though I now live in Massachusetts). I've started going through and fixing the obvious map marker errors, at least.

(Disclaimer: this is just an explanation in case anyone is wondering why the update log is being flooded with seemingly identical changes on multiple different bridges).

Posted April 5, 2020, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

Re-visit today.....new photos, evidence of plaques that were once mounted on each side, and original stone abutment on west side....112 years old, thing is still solid except for a huge tree ding, this sucker is sooooo remote, fun time

Posted April 5, 2020, by Chester Gehman (gehmanc2000 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Acting on Mr. Cunningham's lead, we visited this site recently.I don't like to be critical when it comes to attempts to preserve historic bridges, but this job is pathetic. The bridge and its trusses are totally non-functional; the I-beams rest on abutments several inches above the originals (I know, trail bridges need to be able to support EMT vehicles, but they could be less obtrusive.) And a good paint job is needed. What a shame.

Posted April 5, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

DOOMED:

FY19 Consolidated Rail Infrastructure and Safety Improvements (CRISI) Program Projects

15 Rural Projects - At least $63.7 million required, up to $127.7 million awarded

Alaska Ė M.P. 86.6 Bird Creek Pony Truss Bridge Replacement Up to $3,871,913

Alaska Railroad Corporation

Replaces a nearly 70-year-old bridge on the Alaska Railroad (ARR) mainline that will allow ARR to operate 286,000-pound (286K) rail cars and double-stack trains.

Posted April 5, 2020, by Anonymous

Did anyone else notice that in Nathan's photos, someone had vandalized the weight limit sign to read "20300 tons"? Hopefully that didn't convince any truckers from driving over it and collapsing it

Posted April 5, 2020, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

I'm thinking this is pinned in the wrong place, though so too is its entry on BridgeReports, because the county probably has it mis-labeled.

They have it as crossing Thornapple "Creek", but looking at both the satellite and old aerials of the location...neither shows a bridge. Go up the road to where it's clearly the Thornapple RIVER, on the other hand...

As there is only one entry for Mason Road at all, it's probably the river crossing at 42.617415,-85.05434. 1955 easily gives the best image there.

Posted April 4, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

You might be able to replicate a similar looking product... But the history is still lost.

Posted April 4, 2020, by George A Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Nice B&O logos on the middle pier on both sides.

Posted April 4, 2020, by George A Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Nice bridge.I see steps at the Reed Street entrance but there sure is alot of weed growth covering the steps.Can this bridge be re-used as a pedestrian bridge?

Posted April 4, 2020, by Matthew G Cunningham (Mgccunning [at] aol [dot] com)

It looks like this has been replaced with a new walking bridge.

Posted April 4, 2020, by Robert Heffner

This bridge is to be replaced in 2020 with a modern galvanized truss.

Posted April 4, 2020, by Nick Boppel (nickboppel01 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge is slated for demolition and replacement as part of the First Coast Expressway project, although no timetable has been set.

The new bridge will likely be of a similar design to the Henry H. Buckman Bridge upstream - concrete girder/trestle bridge but with a high rise span to allow marine traffic to pass through without a moveable span.

There is a possibility that the new bridge will be privately-owned and therefore will be a toll bridge, however it seems unlikely. The FCE is/will be privately managed, but as far as I know the new Shands Bridge will be public infrastructure.

Posted April 4, 2020, by Lorraine Czajkowski (leczaj [at] att [dot] net)

Where is the schedule for the bridge building breaks. I have to be at Backus at 10:30am each day for radiation. Any help around?

Posted April 4, 2020, by Ed (beepbeep3095 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Bridge removed in 1980.

Posted April 4, 2020, by Joe Winner (unkajoesplace [at] gmail [dot] com)

It is amazing that the view I have on this bridge has a complete mountain behind it where as this picture above the skyline is visible. My grandparents were Elbin's on the other side of the mountain in the valley. My brothers and cousins would walk to this creek and play in it often as a child.

Reading & Northern recognized for bridge project
Posted April 3, 2020, by George A Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I read an article in yesterdays local paper that Railway Age Magazine has named Reading & Northern Railroad its 2020 Regional Railroad of the year for the 4th time.The railroad was recognized for its multi-year project to construct a new bridge spanning the Lehigh River near Nesquehoning,Carbon County.The $14 million bridge was a public/private partnership between the state and the R&N,with R&N contributing $4 million.The new bridge is 450 feet long and 55 feet high,connecting the railroad's Reading and Lehigh divisions.The railroad broke ground for the project in August 2017 and set the first beams in July 2019.Work was completed in February.I don't know if this bridge replaces another bridge.My guess is it doesn't because that wasn't mentioned.

Posted April 3, 2020, by Mike Goff (michael [dot] goff [at] hotmail [dot] com)

The ownership of this bridge was transferred to a private owner from Grant County around the year 2011.

Posted April 3, 2020, by Mike Goff (michael [dot] goff [at] hotmail [dot] com)

This comment is almost a year late on the subject, but I guess better late than never.

The bridge was completed in 1960. The plans were put together in 1957 and 1958 per ODOT records.

The "Picket Fence" rail was called out on the plans based on a 1954 standard drawing. So Kirk was correct in the fact that the rail was from the dates he stated, just not the actual construction date. With that said, there is a chance that the 7th Street Bridge was the last bridge with the "picket fence" rail type built in Oregon.

RE: Sky Bridges
Posted April 3, 2020, by Luke

If it's notable to the area, then it's worth posting.

I posted one from my childhood area. It's neither historic nor nationally notable, but it IS locally notable.

Sky Bridges
Posted April 3, 2020, by Mike Garland (Rapier342 [at] comcast [dot] net)

I'm not sure if sky bridges should be included in this database. I just came across some pictures I took of the Western Avenue Sky Bridge, located at Pike Place Market in Seattle that I took in 2017. Before I post them, and add this bridge to the database, I wanted to get everyone's opinion if this qualifies.

Posted April 3, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

This bridge has deteriorated. However, the Jefferson County Chapter, Ohio Genealogical Society is working with the city to find sources of funding and restore this bridge. Note: GPS Location given for this bridge is an estimate.

Posted April 3, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Likely due to either vandals or an out of control car. What was once a slab with beautiful balustrade railings is now just an ugly slab.

Posted April 3, 2020, by Nathan Brown (squidskid [at] gmail [dot] com)

The north side is blocked by a heavy gate with a lock. The owners of the surrounding property live next to the bridge and are very friendly though as you mentioned, they are not keen to trespassers. The King's Mill Bridge, as it is known in those parts, used to be a route for the Oakman High School bus and we can imagine how scary that must have been to ride across. Even when open, only one car at a time could use the bridge due to the width. If you have not found it yet, there is another bridge that was recently closed, Brown's Bridge, crosses Lost Creek just a couple of miles downstream, and just down the holler from Tubb's Church of Christ. You can actually see through the decking to the water below as of this writing. It would be wonderful for these bridges to be restored. Not only do they have historic and communal interest value, they were thoroughfares for locals who now have to navigate a complex system of winding backroads to get anywhere. Beautiful area in those Oakman backroads.

Posted April 3, 2020, by Luke

Unfortunately I've yet to find an image of the bridge, but https://www.newspapers.com/newspage/10460384/ shows that the bridge was closed due to a failing pier.

HistoricAerials has amazing aerial views of the long-lost truss.

Posted April 3, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

PDF Version of Referenced Article Attached.

Attachment #1 (application/pdf; 1,641,823 bytes)

Posted April 2, 2020, by George A Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Thanks Luke for clearing that up.

Posted April 2, 2020, by George A Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Thanks Luke for clearing that up.

Posted April 2, 2020, by George A Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Thanks Luke for clearing that up.

Posted April 2, 2020, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Skewed concrete arches are special in my mind.

Posted April 2, 2020, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

The damage in pics 2 & 3 make me think it's a slab. I don't think the railing carries any load.

Posted April 2, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

They need to just incorporate it into the trail system and let cars use the I-5 Bridge.

Posted April 2, 2020, by Sawyer Regensberg (sawyer [dot] regensberg [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I was told once that this was the Highest Wooden Bridge in Kansas: I don't know what to make of that. My understanding is that the Abilene & Smoky Valley RR used to run a "railbus" service over this section down to Woodbine with a school bus that had Hi-rail wheels on it but I think that has been discontinued now. Sadly the removal of the diamond crossing in Enterprise with the BNSF line (and the--for all practical purposes--impossibility of restoring said crossing) basically means the A&SVRR will likely never get east of Enterprise.

Posted April 2, 2020, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

Tried to see this bridge today but about an 1/8 of a mile of water separated me from it. There is another arch bridge on the same creek about a mile to the south, in Sullivan County. Still a little farther south there used to be a through truss. Maybe it is still there. I have found a few bridges that SHAARD have said were demolished. Anyone got any info on this area? The Wabash is just to the west. Yeager Drive is the only bridge that shows on satellite images. Too many trees.

Brazos River Highway Bridge
Posted April 2, 2020, by Geoff Hubbs (geoffrey [dot] hubbs [at] att [dot] net)

Anyone know where in Waco (if really in Waco) this bridge was? And built and loss dates?

Posted April 2, 2020, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

Oh Wow! Some a-hole has completely destroyed this little bridge. All the pieces seem to be there, just all over the place. It's still open and solid.

Intercity Viaduct between KC MO and KC KS
Posted April 2, 2020, by mike bowline (mbowline [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Hello I am a model railroader preparing to include a background model of the Intercity Viaduct on my KC West Bottoms layout.

Can anyone help me locate a side view of the original steel bridge structure, before it was replaced with the current concrete piers and beams?

I am going to use any photo(s) provided in Photoshop as a beginning of a background flat.

Thank you

Posted April 2, 2020, by Nick Boppel (nickboppel01 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge has been replaced with a UCEB. It's laughable how Rhode Island Turnpike & Bridge Authority, which owns this bridge along with the Mount Hope, Newport Pell, and Jamestown-Verrazzano Bridges have attempted to make this bridge "attractive" by adding a series of nighttime illuminations to the bridge. It just doesn't work.

Posted April 2, 2020, by Luke

Definitely a shoofly bridge.

Posted April 2, 2020, by Nick Boppel (nickboppel01 [at] gmail [dot] com)

As of fall 2019, the bridge is still standing. The substructure work mentioned by Brianna below appears to have just barely gotten started but was then halted/abandoned. Footings appeared to have been in place but no other work had occurred. The bridge's ultimate future is uncertain.

Posted April 2, 2020, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Today

Posted April 2, 2020, by Geoff Hubbs (geoffrey [dot] hubbs [at] att [dot] net)

My guess it was a temporary bridge while the lift span was being installed; it disappears from topos by 1975

Posted April 2, 2020, by Alan Wray (alancwray [at] sbcglobal [dot] net)

Anyone have any idea about the side bridge next to it from the early 1970s?

Posted April 2, 2020, by Brad Smith (gaberdine [at] hotmail [dot] com)

This is from memory and only ocasionally being there, but I BELIEVE this bridge was closed for a couple of years before the 1992 reconditioning.

Posted April 2, 2020, by Brad Smith (gaberdine [at] hotmail [dot] com)

The bridge underwent rehabilitation/repair projects in 1992 and 2013. In 1992 the historic fabric removed

included the original concrete deck, metal guardrails, and bearing assemblies on all spans that were

replaced with updated bearings with neoprene pads. The remaining fabric, including the steel trusses,

concrete caissons, shafts, steel pile bents, is original. The approach spans and floor system of the

trusses were altered in 1992 with the addition of line beams on the centerline of the bridge. The 2013

project included rehabilitation of a bent portal member on one truss, minor repair of other steel truss and

floor members, and patching of concrete spalls. The 2013 project did not result in notable alterations to

the bridge

Attachment #1 (application/pdf; 489,494 bytes)

Posted April 1, 2020, by Christopher Ciesla (n2rdp [at] n2rdp [dot] com)

I've attached a picture of the collapsed section that was taken April 1, 2020.

Posted April 1, 2020, by Luke

George, the Rio Grande was the Royal Gorge route: http://www.drgw.net/info/RoyalGorgeRoute

Posted April 1, 2020, by George A Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I see in picture #2 a Royal Gorge logo behind the Rio Grande logo.Was this a name of a rail line?

Posted April 1, 2020, by George A Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I see the Rio Grande logo on the girder.Nice touch.

Posted April 1, 2020, by George A Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Will PennDOT replace this bridge?

Posted April 1, 2020, by George A Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Awesome leaving the Rio Grande logos on the girders.

Posted April 1, 2020, by George A Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Nice touch leaving the Santa Fe logos on the bridge.

Posted April 1, 2020, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

But is it related to CBW ? LOL

Posted April 1, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Yeah, I never thought my "Bunny Slippers Bridge" moniker would still be going strong 10 years later! 🤔🙄😝

O'Neall Bridge (South Carolina)
Posted April 1, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Melissa this one is right up your alley! lol

Bunny Slippers Bridge Survives Apocalypse
Posted April 1, 2020, by Anonymous

Fort Scott, KS, USA (non-AP) Year: infinity

Following the end of the world last week, a group of dedicated bridgehunters looked down from Heaven to witness and amazing site. The awkwardly engineered Bunny Slippers Bridge (or Mill Creek Bridge if you prefer) in Fort Scott, Kansas had somehow survived the utter destruction of the world on the Last Day.

For decades, bridgehunters from all over the world had wondered how this odd bridge, with its mismatched turnbuckles and eyebar verticals had managed not to collapse on day one. After all, no card-carrying member of the American Association of Engineers would have ever put eyebars in compression, yet despite the amateurish design of the bridge, it survived many floods and falling trees until the Last Day.

From Heaven, we all watched as the Earth melted away into a formless flaming void, yet after the fires went out, Mr. King pointed to an 11 panel, pin-connected truss spanning a river of cooled lava. Somehow, that Bunny Slippers Bridge managed to survive the complete destruction of the universe, mismatched verticals and all. The bridge definitely seemed to have a bit of a pinkish tint to it, but aside from that, all was well with this beloved landmark. Mr. Morrison seemed quite relieved to know that the bridge was now safe from falling trees.

As the world watched in wonder, a gentleman by the name of P.E. Lane politely excused himself to go check on some bridge over the Whitewater River.

Posted March 31, 2020, by Kris Payne (krispayne999 [at] gmail [dot] com)

FYI. The original P&SV Railroad Trestle was built in ~1886-1887 of wood. Railroad was completed and opened to Placerville in 1888. Old foundations are still visible under 1903 steel girder bridge (trestle).

Posted March 31, 2020, by Kris Payne (krispayne999 [at] gmail [dot] com)

FYI. The Railroad Trestle over Weber Creek was converted into the El Dorado Trail Bridge in 2009. This Trestle section of the EDT was completed on November 21, 2009.

Attachment #1 (application/pdf; 642,885 bytes)

Posted March 31, 2020, by George A Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I see the PRR emblem on every tower.Awesome!

O'Neall Bridge (South Carolina)
Posted March 31, 2020, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Gorgeous!

O'Neall Bridge (South Carolina)
Posted March 31, 2020, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

John,

Thank you for the great photos. Riding back roads and coming upon a preserved historic bridge is my idea of a great day.

I wish you many more.

Posted March 31, 2020, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

It sure was! It's correct now. I drove it many times as well going to Snead's BBQ.

Posted March 31, 2020, by Chris Knight

I believe this was a pump house for the Kaw Velley Power Station right there currently moth balled.

Posted March 31, 2020, by Chris Knight

This is the map showing the old bridge location upstream from the current bridge https://www.historicaerials.com/location/39.08633678590651/-...

oneal bridge in newberry sc
Posted March 31, 2020, by John Goforth (john_wesley73 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Clark,

I'd be honored you would like to post the picture...The wife and I were on a motorcycle ride yesterday and came across it covered in the beautiful wisteria.

Posted March 31, 2020, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Could 1932 be the rehabilitation date? It looks like a pair of riveted truss lines were added to the original pin connected deck truss. The original truss looks like it may date to the late 1890s.

Rocks Village Bridge (Massachusetts)
Posted March 31, 2020, by Nick Boppel (nickboppel01 [at] gmail [dot] com)

It's a shame that they didn't add a sidewalk on this bridge when they rehabilitated the bridge in 2013-2014... it sure would be nice to walk out on the bridge but except during bridge openings (which seem to be rare), there is too much traffic to walk on the roadway.

Basiliere Bridge (Massachusetts)
Posted March 31, 2020, by Nick Boppel (nickboppel01 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Just confirming that I am the one who posted the comment below shortly after my visit to this bridge last fall. As I've thought about it more and looked through my photos, it is evident to me that the bridge has not operated for routine water traffic in some time. As I noted, the former steel grate deck on the bascule span has been filled with concrete, and the operators tower has been chained shut. Both of these alterations do not appear to be recent. Additionally, the lack of any traffic signals or gates on the approaches suggests that the bridge is not active.

This is interesting because both the Bates Bridge and the Rocks Village Bridge downstream are both still operable.

Posted March 31, 2020, by Chris Knight

I remember going accross this back in 2000 it was still there. Also the map location is in the wrong place.

Posted March 31, 2020, by John Rupp (arkansasflash [at] sbcglobal [dot] net)

The bridge may also be reached by a short trail that is about 100í before the locked gate on Stewart Ct.

Posted March 31, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

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