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Posted September 24, 2021, by Bambi Dunlap (117bambwa [at] gmail [dot] com)

I was at the bridge this afternoon, Friday, Sept., 24, 2021. Water high on the big blue n bridge still rotting away.

Does anyone know if there really are still plans to do something restorative to this historical bridge??

Beautiful spot… also does anyone know how/where to access on other side of river… south side? I heard voices talking as I was about to leave.

Posted September 24, 2021, by Geoff Hubbs (geoffrey [dot] hubbs [at] att [dot] net)

Nathan- bridgehunter.com/ks/lincoln/bh36234/ and

BH 41019 can be combined.

Posted September 24, 2021, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

If you mean when was U.S. 41 re-aligned such that the truss no longer served highway traffic, I'd put that at 1933: http://bridgereports.com/1247668

Oddly enough, swapping one state-standard design for another (even if it was used on an atypical structure for the latter, being a culvert).

Posted September 24, 2021, by Dave King (DKinghawkfan [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Bridge is still there far as I can tell

Posted September 24, 2021, by Mark Stupperich (markstupperich [at] gmail [dot] com )

What year was this bridge replaced?

Posted September 24, 2021, by Stuart Hamilton (stu [at] davismcdill [dot] com)

Are there I & N G Railroad alignment maps available. I am a land surveyor and these would be useful to me and other surveyors.

Posted September 24, 2021, by Paul Plassman

Thanks for deleting the photos, Nathan.

Posted September 23, 2021, by Paul Plassman

Interesting story of a World War II pilot who flew UNDER the Shawnee (Main Street) Bridge: https://www.mymiamicounty.com/one-man-air-force

Posted September 23, 2021, by Paul Plassman

Nathan,

I took the liberty of trying to clean this page up by converting this page wholly over to the 2006 replacement bridge, adding a new page dedicated entirely to the 1914 crossing, and re-uploading the photos from this page that pertained to the 1914 bridge (namely photos #17 and #18). Could you please delete these two photos from this page as they are of the old bridge and have nothing to do with the 2006 structure?

Thanks,

Paul

Posted September 23, 2021, by Art S. (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Well, so much for getting photos beyond street view...

Posted September 23, 2021, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Listed as a 1900 through girder in a 1973 track chart. If this is true, this bridge was moved here from somewhere else.

Posted September 23, 2021, by Art S. (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Nick,

Great backyard!

Regards,

Art S.

Posted September 23, 2021, by Luke

Art, I am correct, because they're talking about the casting visible on the right railing in Streetview just before the road goes under I80.

Posted September 23, 2021, by Art S. (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Chris,

While Luke is probably correct, can you post some pictures, both of the bridge and sign, that will help in ensuring a correct answer.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted September 23, 2021, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

That's my comment below - visited recently but can't find photo so posted new sat imagery

Posted September 23, 2021, by Anonymous

Looks like a common stringer, no thru-truss here

Posted September 23, 2021, by Luke

HistoricAerials shows a curved intersection at this location in the 60s. Chances are it's a culvert, but an abandoned one is at least notable.

Posted September 23, 2021, by Dave King (DKinghawkfan [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Hard to tell but it looks like there might be a bridge here. Spotted from Google Maps

Posted September 23, 2021, by Jason Smith (flensburg [dot] bridgehunter [dot] av [at] googlemail [dot] com)

This and two other bridges along WI Hwy. 130/133 are being given away. Deadline to obtain the packages by WIDOT is October 31st. Details here: https://bridgehunterschronicles.wordpress.com/2021/09/23/thr...

Posted September 23, 2021, by Jason Smith (flensburg [dot] bridgehunter [dot] av [at] googlemail [dot] com)

This and two other bridges along WI Hwy. 130/133 are being given away. Deadline to obtain the packages by WIDOT is October 31st. Details here: https://bridgehunterschronicles.wordpress.com/2021/09/23/thr...

Posted September 23, 2021, by Jason Smith (flensburg [dot] bridgehunter [dot] av [at] googlemail [dot] com)

This and two other bridges along WI Hwy. 130/133 are being given away. Deadline to obtain the packages by WIDOT is October 31st. Details here: https://bridgehunterschronicles.wordpress.com/2021/09/23/thr...

Posted September 22, 2021, by Robert Thompson (rkt [dot] engineering [at] gmail [dot] com)
Posted September 22, 2021, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Obviously Wisconsin doesn't want to be one-upped by Maine in their quest for complete historic bridge annihilation.

Posted September 22, 2021, by Charles Pickern (cspickern [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Big fork concrete bridge. Abandoned

Posted September 22, 2021, by Charles Pickern (cspickern [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Big fork concrete bridge. Abandoned

Posted September 22, 2021, by Luke

By the virtue of it saying "State Highway 10" one would conclude that it carried an older alignment of New Jersey State Highway 10...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_state_highways_in_New_...

Winona Bridge (Minnesota)
Posted September 22, 2021, by Joe Fishbein (jmfmando [at] gmail [dot] com)

Truss bridges by their nature are considered "fracture critical" due to the lack of redundancy in the tension members. During the recent rehab, these bars were added to provide some redundancy to those members.

Posted September 22, 2021, by Chris S. (turnerstjames [at] gmail [dot] com )

Question...

Why does the concrete placard on the first pillar say:

"Highway 10"?

Doesn't make sense.

Were Essex or Market streets ever referred to as Highway 10?

Thank you

Posted September 22, 2021, by Joe Fishbein (jmfmando [at] gmail [dot] com)

We inspected this bridge last week. No major issues. Talked to one of the county bridge guys, who said they want to keep this one in place as long as possible.

Posted September 22, 2021, by Ed Hollowell (erhollowell [at] aol [dot] com)

Something that needs mention with this structure was the "reservoir war" in Pauling County Ohio where there existed a large reservoir on Six Mile Creek to supply water to the canal. In 1887 residents of Pauling County destroyed the damn, draining the reservoir and the canal. At that time the canal was not being used for transportation but was used for power in towns along the upper Wabash Valley. What ever the bridges earlier history it would have ended in 1887. Pauling County residents blamed Six Mile Reservoir for mosquitoes and disease and wanted it drained. Towns further south blamed the reservoir destruction on the failure of their local mills and factories who were dependent on water power. The W&E Canal was a reasonable venture but suffered from political interference as the segment south of Tera Haute was never successful and the funds should have been spent in improvements in the northern sections.

Posted September 22, 2021, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Oddly enough, on the satellite image that's currently showing, it looks like maybe someone did try approaching from the north?

Posted September 22, 2021, by Paul Plassman

Indeed! Thanks for adding that in, Nathan.

Now I'm wondering how much of this arch is truly original or if it has been substantially rebuilt like the ones in Henry County. I know the 1913 flood wreaked incredible damage on the canal system. Depending on how original this arch and the other ones on the canal are, they are likely the oldest or among the oldest bridges in northwest Ohio.

Time to check this one out personally....

Posted September 22, 2021, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Paul,

I added info from the Historic Bridge Inventory that you might find interesting.

Posted September 22, 2021, by Paul Plassman

Appears to be still extant in satellite imagery, and being a railroad bridge I doubt it was demolished. Likely the reason it was taken off the NBI is because Snyder Road was closed or semi-abandoned, as street view from Route 424 shows it was a pretty dinky road to begin with.

Posted September 22, 2021, by Paul Plassman

I thought the 1835 date on this bridge had to be bogus until I looked at a map and realized the Miami and Erie Canal used to go through this location and would have passed over this bridge. Doesn't conclusively prove the build date, but it does make it somewhat more plausible.

Posted September 22, 2021, by Paul Plassman

Looks like this one's headed for the wrecking ball as well as part of the same project: https://wisconsindot.gov/Pages/projects/by-region/sw/wis130-...

Posted September 22, 2021, by Paul Plassman

Adding insult to injury, it looks like the new bridges are going to be on a new alignment, which would make it feasible to leave the old ones for non-motorized traffic: https://wisconsindot.gov/Pages/projects/by-region/sw/wis130-...

Posted September 22, 2021, by Corey Coyle (coylecorey [at] gmail [dot] com)

Time as also caught up to these bridges as well. The Wisconsin Department of Transportation (WisDOT) is in the process of developing Design-Build documents for a proposed new Bridge structures replacements on WIS 130 over the all three Wisconsin River Channels South of Lone Rock.

Posted September 22, 2021, by Art S. (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Luke,

The coolest thing about that shot is that its the same car as in the other image and in the same position. Both shots were taken on the same day.

If we found a higher res pic, we could figure out the type of car :^)

Regards,

Art S.

Posted September 22, 2021, by Luke

Confirmed it's a pony truss and it looks a lot like other King bowstrings in the region, like Soper's Mill and McDowell

Posted September 21, 2021, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Hope I am not guilty of late night stupidity adding a duplicate bridge. Or did the other bridges at this location distract everyone from this riveted prize-winning suspension bridge? Anyway I spent some time uncovering as many of these very similar suspension bridges built by the same engineering firms and tried to fill in associated details. http://bridgehunter.com/category/builder/matthews-kenan/

Posted September 21, 2021, by Luke

You did, thanks.

Posted September 21, 2021, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

This is a beautiful bridge and its in good condition. But Maine is a lost cause. With the exception of any covered bridges and maybe that one timber tower suspension bridge, I would assume every historic bridge in Maine to be "slated for demolition." Worst preservation track record in the country. The last Section 106 Review I was a part of (Frank J. Wood) ended in the community filing a lawsuit against the department. Thats how bad it is. They demolished one of the last two belidor bascules in the country. They demolished a David Steinman suspension bridge. They demolished the last remaining pin connected highway truss in the entire state. This state's pure hatred of historic bridges knows no limits.

Posted September 21, 2021, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Luke,

I think I removed the things you wanted removed.

Posted September 21, 2021, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Seems OK to me to do so. Many people add bridges here having less than that photo at hand.

Posted September 21, 2021, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

As far as I know it is, although I haven't visited since 2005. https://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=t...

Posted September 21, 2021, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I am confused. They replaced the bridge, but they didn't contact BACH STEEL to select a replacement historic truss bridge?! Something is amiss.

Posted September 21, 2021, by Paul Plassman

I see in photo #2 that there is a double span railroad truss behind the arch bridge, which I would assume is the predecessor to http://bridgehunter.com/mi/st-joseph/bh94294/. The railroad truss appears to be unlisted--okay I make a page for it using that photo?

Posted September 21, 2021, by Dave King (DKinghawkfan [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Looks like it’s still there

Posted September 21, 2021, by Luke

The wagon bridge had only stone piers, so I think the tower is part of a barge.

Posted September 21, 2021, by Luke

Nathan, can you delete the postcard and comment from this duplicate entry I had to convert?

Posted September 21, 2021, by John Marvig

It’s listed as a 1940s postcard..it probably is the final stages of the demolition of the wagon bridge

Posted September 21, 2021, by Luke

Picture 70 is not of this bridge.

Posted September 21, 2021, by Art S. (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

One of the nice design elements on early bridges was that the floor beam hangers (I've heard by design) were the weak link. So, it had a very Darwinian effect, a genius ignored the limits, a floor beam or two would drop out, eliminating the problem at a much lower cost than total bridge replacement.

Posted September 21, 2021, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

To be replaced in the next year. Bridge replacement report gives a 1942 date, but the steel span was not yet present in a 1976 track profile. The "triple girder" makes me strongly believe this is a secondhand span.

In addition, the document puts weight on the statement that several bridges are deficient on this route. Five trusses exist between Canton and Elk Point, and a sixth was destroyed only two years ago in a flood, in addition to several other secondhand girder spans which may be of some significance. Two of these trusses are 1930s pony trusses, two more are relocated 1900 trusses and the span north of Hawarden seems to be a mid-1890s Pratt Through Truss. Numerous wooden trestles have been replaced in the past decade. I am hoping the trusses are not next.

Posted September 21, 2021, by Nick Hance (nhance [at] reenhanced [dot] com)

This bridge is currently closed to traffic due to damage from Hurricane Ida.

Posted September 21, 2021, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

This is sad but not as all surprising given that it's Maine.

Posted September 21, 2021, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Appears to have been cut down from a longer span.

Posted September 21, 2021, by Nick Merkel (nickmerkel12b [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge is the southern border of my property (my backyard)

Posted September 21, 2021, by Art Suckewer (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

DOOMED:

https://weeklypacket.com/news/2021/sep/17/falls-bridge-const...

BLUE HILL

Originally published in The Weekly Packet, September 16, 2021

Falls Bridge construction project scheduled

Project estimated at $10.5 million

by Jeffrey B. Roth

Bids for the replacement of the Falls Bridge, located on Falls Bridge Road, Route 175, are scheduled to go out on October 13, according to Paul Merrill, the public information officer for the Maine Department of Transportation.

Construction of the estimated $10.5 million replacement bridge is scheduled to begin in the early spring of 2022 and is expected to continue through the spring of 2024, Merrill explained in an August 24 email to the The Packet. He added that as the project moves forward, construction schedules and related information will be updated as needed.

The concrete bridge, officially named the Stevens Bridge when built in 1926, is one of two historic rainbow arch bridges remaining in Maine, according to historicbridges.org. The 114-foot bridge spans the Salt Pond tidal basin.

“During our last Falls Bridge Advisory Committee meeting, we discussed salvaging the bronze plaque on the bridge, and there was mention of removing the four existing finials,” Merrill said. “Mr. [Scott] Miller, [Blue Hill select board], asked if the town could request other items for salvage, and I indicated that the timeline was short because the contract documents need to be complete by September 15th.”

At the August 16 Blue Hill select board meeting, Miller noted that the bronze plaques—the one on the south entrance to the bridge is inscribed with the 1926 construction date, and the north entrance plaque carries the Stevens Bridge inscription—are scheduled to be salvaged. In addition, four concrete finials, each weighing about 200 pounds, will be salvaged during the demolition phase of the project. Miller explained that federal regulations require that archival photographs of the existing bridge must be taken to document the project.

“I informed Mr. Miller in a follow-up e-mail that if the municipality had additional salvage requests, we would need to know by September 8th,” Merrill said. “Since this is a concrete structure, demolition may limit or prohibit salvage with an emphasis being placed on the safe removal of the bridge. Salvageable items will be left within the project limits for the municipality to pick up.”

Miller told the board that the bridge advisory committee discussed a plan for the construction of a temporary one-lane bridge that could be used to divert traffic for 10 to 24 months, while the new bridge is being constructed. The current design specifications of the bridge are “basically as it was,” with two 11-foot wide lanes.

“There is one maintenance of traffic plan, and that is the installation of a temporary bridge on the Salt Pond side,” Merrill said. “The temporary bridge will be single-lane, alternating one-way traffic controlled by temporary traffic signals.”

Merrill said, “There will be specific construction activities that will require the contractor to detour traffic around the bridge site. The contractor will have the ability to close the bridge and detour traffic to Route 172 during construction, but the contractor is limited to a total aggregate of 60 days of bridge closure time.”

For more information on the Falls Bridge Project, visit townofbluehillmaine.org/falls-bridge-project.

Falls Bridge

Here today, gone tomorrow. A scenic view of Falls bridge at low tide.

Photo courtesy of Stephen Greenberg

Garges Road Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted September 21, 2021, by Art S. (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Closed (Ida flooding?)

Damaged parapet wall

- Bridge to be closed for roughly two weeks for necessary repairs

https://www.montcopa.org/377/Roads-Bridges

Posted September 21, 2021, by Art S. (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Closed

Approach, Road & Culvert Washout

- Detour Designed & Approved

- Detour Set

- Contractor on Board – H&K

- Repairs started September 13, 2013

- Repairs to be Completed – Oct. 5, 2021

- Bridge Insp. Required before Opening

https://www.montcopa.org/377/Roads-Bridges

Posted September 21, 2021, by Art S. (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Closed (Ida flooding?)

Spandrel & Parapet Wall Damage & Road Approach Washout

- Detour Designed & Approved

- Signs Made

- Detour Set

- Underwater Fieldwork Complete

- Underwater Report Pending

- Contractor on Board – Loftus Const.

- Repairs to be Started – Beginning Oct.

https://www.montcopa.org/377/Roads-Bridges

Price Road Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted September 21, 2021, by Art S. (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Closed (Ida flooding?)

Spandrel & Parapet Wall Damage & Road Approach

- Assessment On-going

- Detour Plans are in Design

https://www.montcopa.org/377/Roads-Bridges

Posted September 21, 2021, by Art S. (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Doomed (probably due to recent floods)

https://www.montcopa.org/377/Roads-Bridges

Posted September 21, 2021, by Kevin Dawson (Kadawson at the Gmail dotcom)

I miss the bridge for historical reasons, but a few of the floods we had really did a number on it. Also, there's not that fear factor of whether or not heading out towards Viola across the bridge at the wrong time might have you playing a game of "chicken" with a wide vehicle. My grandmother owned the flower shop in Clearwater for ages [Macredie Floral, Helen Jane Crews] and I remember going on deliveries out that way in the 80s. It was a bit of a graffiti magnet and to be honest it used to creep me out and I'd hold my breath going over it. The new bridge is wider, has abutments further up the bank, fewer visual obstructions, and is safer, but the old bridge was just cool. I graduated CHS in '96, and this was by far the coolest of the 3 bridges over the Ninnescah in the immediate area.

Posted September 21, 2021, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I don't THINK I added a duplicate, its weird to find a truss not already listed. Anyway this unusual bridge appears to have been reused from something else.

Posted September 21, 2021, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Pages merged into this one.

re: Hello and why I'm here
Posted September 21, 2021, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Jill,

Nice to have you here! I have activated your account and you may now log in! Welcome to the BridgeHunter community! We welcome your contributions. If you have any questions or need help, feel free to post a question to this forum.

Posted September 21, 2021, by Geoff Hubbs (geoffrey [dot] hubbs [at] att [dot] net)

Nathan- this page should be merged with Rainbow Bridge BH 58728, this page was originally posted somewhere in northern NY State

Posted September 20, 2021, by Don Morrison

That's very likely. They did some filming near Cambridge, including the exploding gas tanker truck.

Posted September 20, 2021, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I looked at historic maps for both counties to see if Ash Road might have originally crossed Baugo Creek to the South of this bridge. It currently ends at Washington Street and then starts again just to the South of that stream. It doesn't appear that it ever did.

I felt that the information stated on the back of the postcard seemed matter-of-fact enough to be given a fair degree of merit. Certainly that is not a 100% guarantee, but I figure until we can prove one way or another that it was the best option.

You make a valid point about the tree but I have seen too many unique situations through 40+ years of bridge research to count out anything. There may have originally been a longer earthen approach on one end (there still is a marginal one on the South end of the current arches). If so, by 1929 they may have felt a wider channel was needed. Many crossings of the St. Joseph in Southern Michigan still feature these features.

Either way I knew you'd be excited to see a new CBW span! 😝

Posted September 20, 2021, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Bridge was removed from the original location sometime between 2014 and 2020, and installed as a driveway bridge over Cottonwood Creek to the south of this location.

Posted September 20, 2021, by Art S. (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

If the image is not of this crossing, the builder may be incorrect and the truss type may be incorrect but everything else should be OK for the entry.

Posted September 20, 2021, by Art S. (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

BTW, I'm still stuck on this one. I have my doubts that the image is Ash Road. Note that there is a tree on the right side of the photo, and the photographer is shooting across the span suggesting this is a single span that is well under 200'

Posted September 20, 2021, by Art S. (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Tony,

I was guessing 1879-1882. I saw then listing on ebay and the note on the back. If the note on the back is correct then I found this:

1883

High water caused by a quick February thaw in 1883 caused

considerable excitement in Osceola. On February 15, 1883, a huge ice gorge formed against the County Line [Ash Road] bridge over the St. Joseph River. Despite efforts of road crews to dynamite the jam, the old bridge was carried away. There was also considerable speculation about the Bancroft dam in the Baugo which was in serious danger also.

https://www.historymuseumsb.org/the-history-of-osceola-india...

So, we now know the Ash Road Bridge was built in 1883.

If this photo is truly Ash Road, it was built in 1883 meaning it was built after David Morrison passed away and Columbia Bridge Works was transitioning to Columbia Bridge Co. making it either one of the last CBWs or first CBCo. bridges. Stylistically, its CBW.

I look forward confirming that the note is correct.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted September 20, 2021, by Dee Widener (WIDENER [at] RIOFENCE [dot] COM)

The location given, "Adwolf", is incorrect. The correct location is Seven Mile Ford, Smyth Co., Va.

Posted September 20, 2021, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This is an excellent example of railroads being resourceful. The girders were built in 1896, but the trusses were built by Edge Moor at an unknown date. A little more from the HAER data sheet:

"As it stood in 1908, the former B&P bridge over the mouth of Martins Creek needed

reinforcement to safely carry train loads, which increased dramatically around the turn of the

twentieth century. The result — girders on one span, trusses on the other — requires some

explanation. Rather than replace the entire structure, Bush specified that girders from one span

(referred to as span A) be doubled up with those of span B to provide the necessary strength.

Trusses of similar depth would then be brought in from elsewhere to replace span A.

Reconstruction of Bridge No. 138 on the DL&W's Buffalo Division released a number of

55'-6-l/2"-long riveted lattice trusses, which had been fabricated by Edge Moor Iron Works of

Wilmington, Delaware. Three of these together had sufficient strength. Because the trusses

were shorter than the girders, it was necessary to build a new reinforced concrete abutment for

span A. The opposite abutment was evidently encased in concrete to match."

Posted September 20, 2021, by Joseph Brennan (brennan [at] columbia [dot] edu)

It's both a deck truss and a deck girder bridge, one on each side of a center pier.

HAER No. PA-544 comments:

"This bridge has different structure types on each of its two spans, a result of its having been pieced together from two different bridges. This is an excellent example of how railroads demoted main-line structures to branch line service as train loads increased." The same HAER paper has Date of construction 1896 but also Date of Alteration 1908.

Thomas Taber's "Delaware Lackawanna and Western Railroad in the Twentieth Century" p.350 dates a bridge here as opened on Dec 28, 1885. A small photo on p.351 ascribed to opening day shows three piers in the river and a bridge that seems to be made of wooden deck truss sections, some of them with vertical wood strips on the side. So the present-day bridge is the second one.

Posted September 20, 2021, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Yes, they look to be similar to the floor beams on Tom's Run.

Posted September 20, 2021, by David Case

That bridge flight video is awesome! Hope this bridge can be restored some day. (soon)

Posted September 20, 2021, by Patty (pattygillard [at] live [dot] com)

The LIRR closed this bridge in September of 2019 for more than 2 months - during which time they had workers at the site for only a handful of days. The LIRR again closed this bridge on September 3, 2021 - without notice to residents, and there is currently no information available as to when it will be re-opened. The LIRR has known this bridge - which is more than 110 years old and in poor condition - is in need of replacement for at least a decade, yet they've done nothing but put band-aids on it. As the owner of this bridge, the LIRR should be required to invest in its complete overhaul. Closure of the bridge means that what was a quaint road in charming Eastport, NY is now a dead-end eyesore due to the concrete barriers and road closure signs. The Town of Southampton should be putting pressure on the LIRR to fast track this overdue bridge renovation, and the LIRR should be addressing its longstanding negligence in the upkeep of this historic bridge.

Posted September 20, 2021, by Dylan ulin (dylanulin76 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Is this the bridge where they fill up the pprobes towards the end of twister when they're chasing the f5

Posted September 20, 2021, by Art S. (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

BTW, note the trussed floor beams.

Posted September 20, 2021, by Art S. (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

NICE!

Posted September 20, 2021, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Here ya go Art!

Posted September 19, 2021, by Anonymous

Walked across the bridge today.

Posted September 19, 2021, by David hargrave (Pinky550tejas [at] juno [dot] com)

Approach to this bridge apposition from the river front park are still there . Strangely one of the only structures I have found unmentioned on bridge hunter and invisible on earth view .

Posted September 19, 2021, by David hargrave (Pinky550tejas [at] juno [dot] com)

Approach to this bridge apposition from the river front park are still there . Strangely one of the only structures I have found unmentioned on bridge hunter and invisible on earth view .

Posted September 19, 2021, by Luke

I don't know which person made this the immediate "predecessor" for the 1896 Arsenal/Governenment bridge and not the CORRECT 1872 listing, but perhaps, so it doesn't happen again, it should be merged into the main entry for the 1896 bridge, as it was constructed as part of its construction.

Posted September 19, 2021, by Don Morrison

New bridge in place. Built by Godberson-Smith Construction from Ida Grove.

No medeival architectural design influence noted. 8^P

Posted September 19, 2021, by Luke

Definitely was NOT a 1948 spec bridge. Per the article, they guesstimated it to be 1928, which seems a little more likely.

Posted September 19, 2021, by Tom Hoffman

I must say I can give this modern pony truss credit since it was built on a brand new road alignment leaving the scenic Indian Mill truss bridge alone in its place. Plus this bridge has more character with two short spans and one long span. UCEBs have no character!

Posted September 19, 2021, by Luke

Make an entry for each one if you know the history.

Posted September 19, 2021, by John Bernhisel (Johnmbernhisel [at] gmail [dot] com)

There have been at lest 4 bridges at this spot.

Posted September 19, 2021, by Joseph Brennan (brennan [at] columbia [dot] edu)

Note the supports are all WOOD not steel!

Posted September 19, 2021, by Paul Plassman

You're welcome, Art!

The Indian Mill area has long been one of my favorite Ohio scenic spots. With the river truss bridge, the little park bridge, the mill, and the mill dam on the river it's like stepping back 100 years in time in the 1-mile distance from US 23.

Posted September 19, 2021, by Art S. (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

It's interesting that 'frill' on top was a fashion at the turn of the 19th - 20th century of road bridges.

Most early 20th century bridges had it. Of those bridges that stand today, many have lost it.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted September 19, 2021, by Art S. (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Nice adds Paul!

Thanks,

Art S.

Posted September 18, 2021, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

NBI calls it a steel deck truss. Might be less disappointing than you thought.


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