Forum

Page 1 of 347 Next >

Post a comment Contact webmaster

Posted January 21, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Empty space from north approach abutment to actual bridge probably 50-60 yards...would've loved to see it complete

Posted January 21, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Anecdote about this one today - "knock knock knock...", "who's there?", "hi sorry to bother, my name is Nick and I'm from Lawrence, I'm searching for a bridge I saw on your property in a satellite image, mind if I get a quick picture?", "I'm a night shift nurse and you woke me up, but no I don't care and if my husband and kids on ATV's see you tell them I said it's ok and not to shoot you", "oh wow....ok...thanks". Awesome old thing, glad she said "okay".

Posted January 21, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Many a stone arch spans have been "Ugli-fied" by the addition of corrugated ring liners! }:-[

Posted January 21, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Maybe there's some confusion on this one? Here is the three- arch stone bridge that is at that exact location, tiny thing just a few feet high. Possibly referring to a different one and/or incorrect pin?

Posted January 21, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Saw piles of cut stones couple dozen yards to south of road - apparently the arch has been disassembled and replaced with this average joe t-beam type structure directly under road....bummer

Posted January 21, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Ugh. Semi-devastated on this one. First clue was walking down abandoned (swampy) road from west side, seeing major tree trimming, and some sort of new erosion project or something going on - lots of work happening. Bad feeling got worse when I saw removal of the bridge, every bit of steel gone (and geocache also, Robert - thinking SMALL chance I just might find one you left - unless its the tape recorder) - sad, now only outdated satellite image to see what this beauty looked like

Posted January 21, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

And once again, Nick has gone the extra mile, both literally and figuratively.

This bridge has some interesting vertical members. Looks like they are built up with battens.

Posted January 21, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

And over here, ladies and gentlemen, we have a bridge dragging its heels...

Hard to tell on my mobile device, but it appears that perhaps the collapsed approach is partially propping up the bridge.

Posted January 21, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Yow!! This old railroad bridge is pretty awesome. Actually think the tagging adds to the beauty of it, but that's just me. Very very long bridge converted to the trail path..... fun experience hanging out at this one

Posted January 21, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Found this one today, I don't know, looks pretty solid to me at least for the time being, another pretty little spot, they all seem to be...little tricky getting to this one, just in terms of navigating the opened and closed roads in that area....

Posted January 21, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Looooong hike from the east down deserted county road to this double- beauty today. Falling apart on the west end, the abutment/support has slid into creek, sort of amazing that end hasn't completely collapsed. Fantastic old survivor, absolutely love it, beautiful spot.

Posted January 21, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

Doesn't look like a lot of crossings, must make for traffic back ups!

Posted January 21, 2017, by Douglas Butler

I never known that a Rall type bascule bridge was constructed in Ohio there according to the information they're were only 6 of a few Rall types constructed especially in East Chicago Indian and one in Chicago Illinois

Posted January 21, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

As per an article printed in the Reading Eagle on 1-21-17 a fracture was discovered in the truss on the Pa side during an inspection while the bridge was being repainted.This caused the Pa Turnpike Commission to close the bridge for today while engineers are inspecting the bridge.The bridge cannot reopen until repairs are made.Detours are in effect while the repair is being done.The location of the fracture was not revealed in the article.

Posted January 21, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Hi Moose. I would never intentionally trespass. Took me a bit to figure out but went one block E of Utah off Marshall, and drove S to graveyard, then walked S and W along creek line to bridge

Posted January 20, 2017, by Janice McLean (jamclean [at] rcgoodwin [dot] com)

The 1926-1927 Eighteenth Street/Lover's Lane Bridge at Corby Parkway (a.k.a. Maple Leaf Boulevard) was a contributing feature associated with Corby Parkway/Maple Leaf Boulevard, a NRHP-listed park system drive in the St. Joseph Park and Park System Historic District.

Posted January 20, 2017, by Janice McLean (jamclean [at] rcgoodwin [dot] com)

The Whitehead Creek Bridge is a contributing feature associated with Southwest Parkway in the NRHP-listed St. Joseph Park and Parkway System. The 1994 NRHP nomination form called it the bridge connecting Walnut Street to Southwest Parkway, built 1926-1927.

Posted January 20, 2017, by Luke

I believe it is.

Merge the postcard onto that entry.

Nice find.

Posted January 20, 2017, by Dave King (DKinghawkfan [at] hotmail [dot] com)
Posted January 20, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

1912 Stringer, not many left, Thanks for Sharing

Posted January 20, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Yes, that is right. I am not sure about WWI offhand, but I know that during WWII, you could get in at 17 if a parent would sign permission.

Posted January 20, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

It wouldn't be the first time a 17 year old answered the call of his country. Remember, a lot of kids were done with school after eighth grade.

Posted January 20, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The KHRI link includes several photographs of this bridge, one of which indicates that the bridge was dedicated in memory of Roy W. White who died serving his country in WWI.

The Coffeyville Daily Journal indicates that Roy White died of pneumonia at Camp Doniphan, OK in 1918.

https://www.newspapers.com/newspage/58933328/

The plaque states that he died in 1917. Perhaps the plaque has the wrong year. Had he died in 1917, he would have only been 17 years old.

Posted January 20, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The ca. 1910 postcard reveals that an endcap and finial had already gone missing. I like the fact that the postcard was intellectually honest about this.

Posted January 19, 2017, by Mark Cook (pvkscooks [at] aol [dot] com)

Hauberg Bridge.

Posted January 19, 2017, by Mark Cook (pvkscooks [at] aol [dot] com)

Hauberg Bridge.

Posted January 19, 2017, by Mark Cook (pvkscooks [at] aol [dot] com)

Hauberg Bridge.

Posted January 19, 2017, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Looks like an older Luten style arch to me.

Posted January 19, 2017, by Shayla Pfaffe (shaylapfaffe [at] gmail [dot] com)

The bridge "deck" is in the process of being replaced.

Posted January 19, 2017, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Pin connected - likely earlier than 1930.

Posted January 19, 2017, by Michael Quiet (mquiet [at] gmail [dot] com)

This is a neat find, its a shame that it didn't survive.

The design looks like a lenticular cut in half, but its actually an Inverted Bowstring truss, an obscure type of which only three remain, all in Ohio. Here's a remaining all metal example:

http://bridgehunter.com/oh/fairfield/bright-iron/

Posted January 19, 2017, by Michael Quiet (mquiet [at] gmail [dot] com)

I concur, and also removed the "Central Vermont" category as well, as the Central Vermont/NECR trackage enters White River junction south of this river and never operated over this bridge. The Montpelier and Barre trackage is what is now the Washington County 'Granite Division' and also never operated here.

Posted January 19, 2017, by Luke

Looks like the predecessor to the Victory Bridge.

Posted January 19, 2017, by Tony Taurisano (tony [dot] taurisano [at] outlook [dot] com)

Looks like this bridge will not be here much longer. Oneida county was given a grant to replace it.

http://www.wktv.com/story/34291380/cuomo-announces-more-than...

Posted January 19, 2017, by Mark Brown (markwbrown66 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

One of the sections that still remain. Is a Camelback Truss, the Far North truss.

The other one is a Parker.

Since there is only 3-4 Camelbacks left in the State , i thought this should be noted.

Posted January 19, 2017, by Mark Brown (markwbrown66 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

One of the sections that still remain. Is a Camelback Truss, the Far North truss.

The other one is a Parker.

Since there is only 3-4 Camelbacks left in the State , i thought this should be noted.

Posted January 19, 2017, by Steve LaBonte (mv_jct [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This bridge was not a part of the Montpelier and Barre or the New England Central RR.

Between the when the B&M left the line and the Washington County too over the line was operated by the Canadian Pacific railway.

Posted January 19, 2017, by Mark Brown (markwbrown66 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This bridge has been replaced. No longer exists.

Posted January 19, 2017, by Mark Brown (markwbrown66 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This is NOT a camelback bridge. , i will upload new photos soon.

Posted January 18, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The KHRI now claims that this one is potentially NRHP eligible. This Pratt through truss has some unique aspects and I really hope that it is still in place.

I have not had a chance to go Bridgehunting in Osborne County, but there are some potentially significant bridges there.

Posted January 18, 2017, by Roger Mitchell (rmitche1958 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Um, this is not a KCS line (although they have trackage rights). The original line was the Houston and Texas Central, followed in 1917 by the Galveston, Harrisburg and San Antonio railroad parallel to it. Those were both taken over by the Texas and New Orleans (a subsidiary of Southern Pacific) until it was merged into the SP. UP became the owner when they merged with SP.

So the correct owner is UP, along with the other bridges you have listed on the UP Houston Subdivision (Memorial Park, etc).

This also goes for your BH 54379 entry for the Katy Road bridge.

Roger

Posted January 18, 2017, by Brandon Cooper

Nice photo Dave. Thanks for the add.

Posted January 18, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This through truss is my latest discovery. I cannot positively identify the truss type from satellite imagery.

Posted January 18, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

That makes sense. I might change the date to ca. 1910 in that case. This is a very rural area, so a very late changeover from pinned to riveted connections would not be a surprise.

Posted January 18, 2017, by Nathan Holth (nathan [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

This bridge has enormously massive members for its span length. As such, I am guessing its a very late pin-connected truss. ca. 1915 is not out of the question.

Posted January 18, 2017, by Walter Laughlin (laughlin [dot] robert [at] gmail [dot] com)

I just got a better look. You're correct. The old bridge was bypassed and left in place.

Posted January 18, 2017, by Dan

Photo #15 is not the West Buxton Bridge, it is the old Bar Mills bridge before it was rebuilt in 2016

Posted January 18, 2017, by Walter Laughlin (laughlin [dot] robert [at] gmail [dot] com)

Unfortunately there's not street level imagery available, though I have not checked Bing Maps. I saw the barriers on the old alignment but it appeared to me that the old bridge had been removed. I did find a recent engineering report which recommended it for preservation but I would be curious to know the outcome. Specifically I need to get down there and see if I can reconcile the abutments with the covered bridge photograph.

Posted January 18, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I have removed the build date of 1925 and replaced it with ca. 1900. This bridge is pin-connected, so it is almost certainly older than 1915.

I can't positively identify a builder. Coffey County did use the Canton Bridge Co. and this bridge has some features that I have seen on Canton Bridge Co. pony trusses. Thus, if I had to take a wild guess, the Canton Bridge Co. would be my first inclination. Compare to this one, which is a confirmed Canton Bridge Co product:

http://bridgehunter.com/ks/shawnee/cross-42/

As a side note, P.E. Lane built some pony trusses in Coffey County as well. We should keep this in mind if any mystery bridges appear in the county.

Posted January 17, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Also, there are many historical societies that have used Bridgehunter as a resource. Nick is doing a great job of filling in a lot of blanks. This action has made Bridgehunter much more effective for researchers.

We cannot begin to save bridges if we do not know about them. Thanks to Nick, we all have a much better idea of the types of bridges that are out there, and also their conditions. It is not easy to traverse muddy roads on foot and to track down landowners.

Posted January 17, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Took some digging... But I knew I had a photo in my archives showing this little bridge sitting in the water.

Posted January 17, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The work that Nick has done on here is truly incredible. Almost all of the bridges that he has found are ones that I had no idea existed when I still lived in Kansas.

I don't worry about numbers either. When I was bridge hunting in Kansas, I was just trying to visit as many bridges as I could and get a couple of photos onto Bridgehunter. Because my time was limited I did not get to do a thorough documentation of many bridges. This is unfortunate, but I did what I could do at the time. Now, I am hoping to get back to many of our bridges now that I have a better idea of what I'm doing. I hope however, that my work has raised awareness and assisted others who want to visit publicly accessible bridges.

My other big goal now is to try to save as many bridges as possible. There are a lot of bridges out there that are either facing demolition or are on the verge of collapse. If we are going to take action to save them, now is the time. They may not be here 10 years from now. Thankfully there are contributors here who have the ability to make this happen. I have great faith in Nels, Julie, et. al. But, it is going to take all of us.

Each state is a little bit different. In Kansas many bridges have transferred back to private owners. If working in Kansas it is very important to build relationships with landowners. I am working to accomplish this goal. I am grateful to Nick for working on this aspect of it as well.

We are all in this together. If we are going to save bridges, then we must be action oriented. We all have a role to play. What is your role?

Posted January 17, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Fully agree with Nathan here... And the numbers can be greatly deceiving in relation to actual usable content.

Nick is forging through the "Jungles" of Kansas to shine the light on some long forgotten Gems that many of us have been wondering about... And have only dreamed of visiting!

Posted January 17, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Forgot to post this one from Jan. 11 driveabout - solid, some spray tagging going on, pretty bridge and creek otherwise

Posted January 17, 2017, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I don't worry about numbers, I concern myself with results. And to this end, Nick is delivering... not only by revealing important bridges that were previously just a no-photo inventory listing on this website, but also visiting bridges for which access is difficult. These are very valuable contributions.

Posted January 17, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Nor mine, John. Not uncommon to drive 2+ hours to my first destination of the day....loving my 44 mpg Versa Note more and more haha. 16% of all BH....wo!! 3 more bridges I will be at 150 since I started 11 months ago....all I know is this is fun as hell, and not about to stop, motivation to join the 16% club!!

Posted January 17, 2017, by Kelly McClanahan

At one time, I had confused this with the Copeland Tunnel. One of my [many] railroad videos, one of them covering the Pennsey (Pennsylvania Railroad)had a part where they where showing the progress of the railroad, one being bypassing tunnels. I have been "researching" on and off for this tunnel. and I finally found it.

Posted January 17, 2017, by Anonymous

abutments visible in water Sat views South east of pin

Posted January 17, 2017, by Nathan Holth (nathan [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I agree. Also looks like the original bridge was left standing and not demolished. Looks like Jersey barriers were placed in front.

Posted January 17, 2017, by Walter Laughlin (laughlin [dot] robert [at] gmail [dot] com)

Satellite imagery appears to indicate that this bridge has been removed and replaced by concrete at a slightly revised alignment.

Posted January 17, 2017, by M. (Rice)

This bridge belonged to my grandfather's family as part of their land. I remember my grandparents taking me to see it for the last time as the lake was taking it over.

Thurmond Bridge (West Virginia)
Posted January 17, 2017, by Sherman Cahal (shermancahal [at] gmail [dot] com)

The bridge is currently undergoing rehabilitation with pedestrian bump-outs being added: http://www.transportation.wv.gov/highways/engineering/commen...

Posted January 17, 2017, by Nathan Holth (nathan [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Thanks Mike, that definitely explains the odd appearance I was seeing in the aerial images!

Posted January 17, 2017, by Mike Goff (michael [dot] goff [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Nathan,

The first 26 spans from the east end are an odd looking steel trestle. Originally these spans were timber, but were replaced in 1984 with the steel.

I say the trestle is odd because instead of traditional driven pile, the trestle "columns" are inclined into a "V" shape off of a shared pile cap footing.

See the plan cut away for more information as to what I am attempting to describe.

Mike

Attachment #1 (image/tiff; 1,273,818 bytes)

Posted January 17, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Thanks to you Nathan and Dana and Kay for responding.I failed to mention that while out on the water you do have to watch out for other boat traffic.As long as you are not on their property and remain in the water you can actually take pictures of this bridge and the other lift bridge which looks to be closed from what i have seen on satellite and also looking at it on street view.I do know from boating what rules do apply while out on the water.As for the security guards which i call rent-a-cops i worked in a refinery which had private security and know what they can and can't do.

Private property
Posted January 17, 2017, by Douglas Butler

Nathan

They think that they own the property but they don't that's any so called private property I tried to take some pictures of the River terminal railroad bascule bridge a Scherzer type I even tried to make a video of it but I told those security guards in do respect they don't own anything.Its supposed to be free America to take some pictures and make videos of bridges all you want really God owns everything not the U.S. government nor any private owners However I did made a video about the abandoned Wheeling & Lake Erie lift bridge and mentioned that they don't own anything

Posted January 16, 2017, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Just to clarify for those not familiar, we are talking (around Zug Island) about coast guard regulated commercial waterways. These still allow access in the way smaller waterways might (such as for recreational use), but there also are these restricted zones that may override high water level etc. You would still be able to pass thru, but may not be able to utilize every square inch of the water (such as to get certain angles of photos). Certain number of feet may be required to be kept between your vessel and another vessel for a dock for example. I do not claim to be an expert on this stuff, but I have been on commercial waters with someone who as their job works on commercial barges. He told me those were things to watch out for.

Also including the NOAA Chart for this area.

Posted January 16, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

Riparian rights balance the rights of citizens free access to waterways and property owners rights. Vary by state and watercourse. GENERALLY access to high water mark of NAVIGABLE waterways allowed. Michigan varies by whether lake or river. Some counties in Texas extended property to center of watercourses specifically to prevent ingress. In general courtesy is your best friend. If asked to leave , leave. Air space another thing now that camera drones are available. FAA controls 500 feet and up, 83 to 500 feet a grey area. Up to 83 feet or fair use height is property owners.

Posted January 16, 2017, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I would assume that a clear pathway for the public must be maintained on the waterway. The restrictions would (again in theory) control how close you come to the shoreline or to docked boats. While it may be true that they can't force you to delete your photos, because in that scenario you are on the privately owned island, they could call the police and have you arrested for criminal trespass. US Steel is pretty hardcore with their security. I have, near other US Steel properties, been unlawfully told I cannot take photos from a public sidewalk. Unlike taking photos from private property, they have no right whatsoever to restrict photography from a public sidewalk.

Posted January 16, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

Patricia these are great thanks for sharing. I separated brightened and inserted into main body of bridge description with Gary credited as Photographer and you as contributor. Any idea what time frame? IE 1970's Thanks for sharing

Posted January 16, 2017, by Patricia Apple (Trisheapple [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I have pictures that my brother (Gary Blagg) took before the bridge was destroyed.

Posted January 16, 2017, by Ed Hollowell (erhollowell [at] aol [dot] com)

Good Movie Railing..........for short subject!

Posted January 16, 2017, by Ed Hollowell (erhollowell [at] aol [dot] com)

Good movie railing...if it was still there!

Posted January 16, 2017, by Mandy (gagnon [at] whatcom [dot] org)

went across it today....still a beauty.

Posted January 16, 2017, by Dcguess92

Wrong one im sorry :)

Posted January 16, 2017, by Dcguess92

Wrong one im sorry :)

Posted January 16, 2017, by Dcguess92

Unless this bridge was removed in the last couple months its still there

Dobson Road Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted January 16, 2017, by Laura Craig (imlo [at] comcast [dot] net)

This bridge is now closed to traffic.

Posted January 16, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Upon further review...

I think that I had the wrong bridge. This one appears to be on the NRHP. Note that the map on the KHRI link may be wrong.

I am trying to sort out the bridges in this part of Kansas.

Posted January 16, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I just added a KHRI link. This Kingpost was not considered to be NRHP eligible.

Posted January 16, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

If the other Jack Creek Kingpost has been demolished (unknown), then this one becomes even more significant locally. In the 1980s, this one was not considered to be NRHP eligible, but I have no doubts that it would qualify. Kingpost trusses are becoming rare, even on a national level.

Posted January 16, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

According to the NBI, this bridge was rehabilitated in 2015. It may have been replaced, so you might find a UCEB if you visit. It was still in place as of the most recent Google Imagery.

According the KHRI, this Kingpost was not eligible for the NRHP.

Posted January 16, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I have not found a KSHS page for this bridge. It is almost certainly a small pony truss, not a deck truss. Recent Google imagery reveals that the bridge is still standing.

The only Sappa Creek Bridge in the KHRI is a Canton Bridge Co. Inverted Kinpost/Lattice bridge that has been abandoned and transferred back to the landowner:

http://bridgehunter.com/ks/norton/690525803020/

Norton County has demolished a few bridges, but lately the county seems to abandon them in place or move them to a place where they can be preserved. Norton County is known for a collection of small, but significant, pony trusses.

Posted January 16, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I have changed the name of this bridge to match the KHRI and NRHP listings. In addition, I added the KHRI link for those who are interested in reading further.

This is clearly a Canton Bridge Co. product based on the plaque, but it has the threaded nut connections commonly associated with the Wrought Iron Bridge Co.

The date of 1906 comes from the Norton County Road and Bridge Dept. files. Interestingly, the members are marked "Jones & Laughlins". Thus, either the metal is pre-1905 (not unexpected given the fact that companies could stockpile metal), or the bridge is older than 1906.

Hopefully this one is still in Larrick Park.

Short Cut Canal Railroad Bridge
Posted January 16, 2017, by Douglas Butler

This bridge also was used by the Detroit Toledo & Ironto Railroad

Short Cut Canal Railroad Bridge
Posted January 16, 2017, by Douglas Butler

What about the short cut canal railroad bascule bridge used by Delray connecting railroad near Henry Ford for as the actual pictures?

Posted January 16, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Nathan,i read your post on taking pictures from boats dated 8-31-2013.As far as i know no waterway is owned by private companies which means as long as you are not a threat to the environment you can take pictures of whatever you want.Being that this is a lift bridge also lends credence to the fact that this is a shipping lane for boat traffic.As for the rent-a-cops they cannot force you to delete any pictures without a court order being that any cameras are your private property.This also makes me wonder why they have rent-a-cops.

Posted January 16, 2017, by Ross Brown (bluehavanaross [at] gmail [dot] com)

Satellite photo shows this bridge has been removed.

Old Town Bridge (Massachusetts)
Posted January 15, 2017, by Anonymous

Photo 7 , Movie rail Design

Posted January 15, 2017, by Anonymous

BAD Movie Railing...............

Posted January 15, 2017, by Anonymous

Good Movie Railing........

Posted January 15, 2017, by Anonymous

Good Movie Railing.........

Posted January 15, 2017, by Anonymous

Good Movie Railing......

Posted January 15, 2017, by Anonymous

Good Movie Railing..........

Posted January 15, 2017, by Anonymous

Good Movie Railing...............

bridge railing design in the early 20th century
Posted January 15, 2017, by F. Widmer (dustdevilfilms [at] gmail [dot] com )

Question for you design enthusiasts here: I'm doing location scouting for a period piece set in New England during WW2. At one point the hero has a conversation on an old stone bridge on a deserted rural road, for which we have 2 possible candidates. Neither one has a period-authentic railing (one has no railing, period) and we were looking into constructing one, because the scene calls for it and it's sort of important to the action of the scene.

I'm not really sure what such a railing would look like--if it would be wooden or have upright pilings of stone or some other materials linked by wooden runners or what.

Both bridges are arched stone and old, one pre-Civil War, so for authenticity I would imagine that the railings would have been replaced at some time, at least once, and because of the new England winters and farm traffic, a stone wall construction would have been infeasible to have as a railing, and that the railing in place in the 1940s would predate the Depression.

Any ideas, such as links to pictures or other resources like books would be greatly appreciated.

Posted January 15, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Andrew, your photo has been added to the correct page, photo #46 here:

http://bridgehunter.com/tx/comal/150460025303019/

Thanks!

Posted January 15, 2017, by Steve Abernathy (steveabernathy88 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I have a picture of this bridge dated December 1957 and don't know why is it of any interest to anyone.

Posted January 15, 2017, by Andrew

I am sorry that my comment is not on the bridge you made a comment on but i ran across a pic of the 281 guadalupe bridge from 1937 and wanted to post it on this sight can you help me get this photo to the correct spot thank you

Posted January 14, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Love it!!


Page 1 of 347 Next >