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Bridge comment
Posted March 28, 2017, by Anonymous

ASSHTO

American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials

Posted March 28, 2017, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Homer Simpson viewed this bridge...

Posted March 28, 2017, by Virginia Small (virginiasmall7 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The bridge was designed by Ferry & Clas (not Class).

The following report by the City of Milwaukee's Historic Preservation Office says it's believed to be the only bridge jointly designed by George Bowman Ferry and Alfred C. Clas, renowned Milwaukee architects who designed many major civic commissions. They also designed a nearby pavilion and the Grand Staircase as part of a neoclassical cluster in Lake Park.

http://city.milwaukee.gov/ImageLibrary/Groups/ccClerk/HPC/PD...

Posted March 28, 2017, by Tom Hoffman

Well there have been a few bridges at this location. First there was a 3-span Kennedy covered bridge well over 500 feet in length. It had a short 20 year life being destroyed by a storm like in the 1890s. All this according to the George Gould guidebook. I'd say this through truss was built after the storm and replaced by the stringer bridge in 1950. Then that bridge was replaced like last year.

Posted March 28, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

If the date of 1858 is correct, this is an extremely old bridge. Does anyone have a photograph of it?

Posted March 28, 2017, by K. Allen Ballard (speedeeprint [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge was moved to Adams County Fairground. I'm told this was called the "old Quincy Road".

Posted March 28, 2017, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] mysterycorals [dot] com)

The bridge is on Lincoln County Line, and happens to be listed in Lincoln County which is why you may have missed it in the NBI. The NBI Number is 3412. The continuous steel stringer bridge with AASHTO girder approach spans was constructed in 1985, and appears to be supported by concrete bents built at the same time as the superstructure (meaning not from a previous bridge). The bridge thus appears to be of typical modern construction throughout. Is there some significance to this bridge that I am missing?

Posted March 28, 2017, by Anonymous (odolaas69 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Not list in the NBI for some reason

Posted March 28, 2017, by Sherman Cahal (shermancahal [at] gmail [dot] com)

The pond, when it was maintained, was full of water. It was probably attractive then. Not so much now.

Posted March 28, 2017, by Sherman Cahal (shermancahal [at] gmail [dot] com)

My pleasure!

Posted March 28, 2017, by Brad Smith (Bwana39 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

3rd

Posted March 28, 2017, by Ted Curphey (funnelfan [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Here is a photo of mine taken May 20th, 2015 looking up Latah Creek at the Chestnut St Bridge with the Inland Empire Way bridge in the distance. You have my permission to add this to your wonderful website.

Posted March 28, 2017, by Ted Curphey (funnelfan [at] yahoo [dot] com)

The original purpose of this span was to cross the Washington Water Power interurban electric railway to Cheney and Medical Lake. That railway ran from the Sunset Blvd Bridge over Hangman/Latah Creek to Lindeke Ct-13th Ave-Roseamond Ave and crossed under this span 90 degrees to the current freeway off ramp.

Posted March 27, 2017, by Tracy montgomery (tracymontgomery [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Does any one have older pictures of this bridge when it was in use?

Posted March 27, 2017, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Pigeon droppings can also be a health hazard for bridge inspectors. In the Pacific Northwest (Washington State) I noticed that Ospreys like to nest at the top of bridges, notably main post "towers" of cantilever through trusses. This results in quite a mess of droppings...

http://historicbridges.org/washington/fortspokanebridge/fort...

Posted March 27, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)
Posted March 27, 2017, by Brad Smith (Bwana39 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

2nd picture

Posted March 27, 2017, by Brad Smith (Bwana39 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Picture of the East portal as it exists today

Posted March 27, 2017, by Rich Kaduce (rkaduce [at] outlook [dot] com)

The bridge was built 1923 by the Southwest Engineering and Construction Company at cost of $60,444.51.

Ref. Centennial History of Grundy County Missouri 1839-1939

by William Ray Denslow. Page 139

Posted March 27, 2017, by Anonymous

The Trenton Bridge was just south of the city over the old Grand River channel. It was built in 1870 by Smith Truss Bridge Company at cost of $9,000 dollars. Iron piers were added later at cost of $1,800. (40.066N ,93.621W). The bridge was repaired 1877 which the 1881 source cited. There was a major flood in 1909 that moved the county to straighten the river channel. With the completion of the Charlie Dye Bridge in 1923 the channel was changed and the Trenton Bridge was no longer needed. The Trenton Bridge was removed in 1937 and replaced with a concrete culvert. The site of the bridge had been the Benson ferry crossing from 1846 until 1870.

Ref. Centennial History of Grundy County Missouri 1839-1939

by William Ray Denslow. Text Page 139. Bridge Photo Page 35.

Watts Mill Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted March 27, 2017, by Dave Holoweiko (egnatz1 [at] aol [dot] com)

Updates on Watts Mill There is a meeting tomorrow between our state Rep and Penndot . Will know more then. But we have many groups on board to save the old girl. State Rep is a member of our historical society and is all for trying to save the bridge. Hopefully we can come to some resolution that does not include demolition.

Penn Street Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted March 27, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I did take a walk over and around this bridge on 3-25-17.Most of the work I saw was being done on the sides of the bridge.The parapets as you call them are still on the bridge.Don't know when or what they will do with them.The arches are not being worked on as of yet.The railing on the outbound side has been removed.Hopefully it is replaced with a matching railing of the one that was there originally.Also the sidewalk is being worked on from what I saw.It is closed off to pedestrians at this time.As for the inbound side I can tell you the railing will be removed and the sidewalk replaced because I was able to see the street that runs underneath due to the holes through the sidewalk and railing.I also was able to look underneath the outbound side because they cut a hole so they could check the approach beams on that side.When I get more information I will probably take a stroll down and check it out.

Witch's Bridge
Posted March 27, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I noticed I spelled witch's wrong.Not Witche's.At least I caught it.

Witche's Bridge
Posted March 27, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Dana and Kay,that was me asking about a tunnel named Carrs Tunnel that goes by the name Witch's Tunnel,not Witch's Bridge.

Posted March 27, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Not to interject seriousness into this levity...

But bird's mess can be acidic and bad for metal. This issue emphasizes the importance of cleaning, maintenance, and fresh paint on bridges with extreme bird activity.

If you go to the San Antonio Riverwalk you might notice betting on the underside of the bridges. Of course, this has to do with people under the bridges...

Posted March 27, 2017, by Geraldine Clark (ottroad [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Chenango River Bridge or Cady Mills Bridge: pic attached from 12/27/13 by Geraldine Clark, Greene NY

Posted March 27, 2017, by Rusty Pugh (rustypugh123 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I love that bridge, and always stop to walk around and look whenever I am in Vicksburg.

I crossed it in August of 1967 with my family; 5 of us packed into a brand new '67 Buick Wildcat, headed to visit relatives in El Paso.

I'll always remember it. It was early in the morning, and I was asleep in the back seat. My mom woke me up so I'd see the bridge. I remember still my dad talking about how narrow it was, and how the mirrors of trucks would hit when they passed.

In '67, parts of I-20 from Jackson to Vicksburg were open, but we still had to take old highway 80 through Vicksburg and across the river.

Posted March 27, 2017, by The Answer
Posted March 27, 2017, by Anonymous

Eun fhalbh

Posted March 27, 2017, by Daniel Barnes

While this bridge is barely accessible due to the low maintenance road, tracks on the ground and the condition of the bridge indicates it is still in use

Posted March 27, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

They usually pick the side with the superior view... Thus increasing the odds that a human will come in contact with it.

Posted March 27, 2017, by Anonymous

Please refrain from using coarse, offensive language on this august Web forum.

There are more appropriate words that could have been uses to convey the same meaning.

Dookie springs to mind as a good choise.

Posted March 27, 2017, by Anonymous

Maybe they like to take off into the wind, and jettison excess cargo before liftoff.

Perhaps the breeze is better on one side of the bridge, so more cargo is left there.

Posted March 26, 2017, by Anonymous

Most Avian excretion takes place on the wing....so which way does the wind blow?

Posted March 26, 2017, by Justin clark (justintravisclark [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I walked across the old bridge and noticed that one railing on one side only was completely coated inbird shit while the railing on the other side didn't have so much as a spec can anybody tell me why this is

Posted March 26, 2017, by Larry Foerster (foerster [at] dfcllp [dot] com)

I serve as the Chairman of the Montgomery County Historical Commission. The old truss bridge was built about 1910 for Montgomery County by the El Paso Bridge and Iron Company. It served as the old Highway 105 bridge spanning the San Jacinto River until the 1930's, but continued to be used by vehicles until the 1960's. The bridge is no doubt targeted for demolition as the adjacent FM 2854 will be widened in a few years. Our Historical Commission is currently working with local officials to find a way to move the iron bridge to another location in a Conroe city park.

Larry Foerster, Chairman

936-756-3337

Posted March 26, 2017, by Anonymous

VIVANT ET MAGNUM PARCEM STATIONE PONTIS

Witch's Bridge
Posted March 26, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

Wasn't some one looking for a witches bridge? any way this one is Norton MA circa 1908

Watts Mill Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted March 26, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

Dave any updates? State Rep helpful?

Posted March 26, 2017, by Ed Hollowell (erhollowell [at] aol [dot] com)

Why would they have done a 1990 inspection on a bridge that had been closed for over 40 years? I will discount the traffic count of 100 as a WAG.

Posted March 26, 2017, by Ed Hollowell (erhollowell [at] aol [dot] com)

I was scared almost to death every time I crossed this bridge! It was too narrow and if a overweight person came from the opposite direction it barely possible to clear!

If it was removed, why is the status still "Open to pedestrians"?

Posted March 25, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Sounds plausible to me Don... Thanks for the great detective work!

And yes, I agree that an edit post feature would be nice if possible. Many times I have written a long-winded comment and posted it... Only to find that I made a typo or other gaffe of some kind!

Posted March 25, 2017, by Albert Pope (popealbert [at] bellsouth [dot] net)

This bridge used to lead to a parking lot for Alcoa workers at the South Plant. Alcoa has changed the parking situation for it's workers and torn down the approach to this bridge. The bridge actually crosses 2 railroads: NS and the Alcoa Terminal RR (ATRR). Several trains a day pass under it. There was a time when Alcoa had landscaping and lights on the bridge, it was an attractive setting.

Posted March 25, 2017, by Don Morrison

There was a bridge at 39.068438, -86.300785. It was gone before 1998 Google Earth imagery, so it may have been in place for 1992 and 1996 NBI.

The bridge doesn't exactly cross Middle Fork, but it's road begins near Maumee Rd, and may have been an extension of Maumee rd. at one time. Bing calls it N. county road 1300W.

In fact, a bridge in Jackson County on the same road has been listed as a Maumee rd bridge, over Combs creek.

So, maybe we can assume that the Maumee Rd. over Sycamore concrete bridge (1935) (NBI) (at 39.049813, -86.288802) is also along this road between the geo coordinates I gave for the lost bridge area and the Combs creek bridge, and get a 2 for 1 bridge locations.

Anyone agree?

The Sycamore bridge can be seen in Bing and both Sycamore and the lost bridge area can be seen in Google Earth 3/30/2005 imagery.

Note to James: Is it possible to add an edit post option to the forum?

Posted March 25, 2017, by Mark Ridenhour (nwharleypair [at] gmail [dot] com)

Photo of the bridge taken in 1951.

Penn Street Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted March 25, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

As per an article printed in todays Reading Eagle 3-25-17 the $42 million rebuild of this bridge has already started but no deck work as of yet.This project will be fully undertaken once the Buttonwood Street Bridge is reopened which because of a snowstorm that we had pushed the opening back to 4-14-17.I am planning on taking a look at the work so far performed on this bridge maybe later today or tomorrow being Sunday.Curious as to what they've done so far on the West Reading side.I have posted some work that was done on the Reading side.The picture i did see showed a platform being built under the far arch on the West Reading side.

Posted March 25, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Glad you got to it Mike! I have some rather poor quality County highway department pics of it taken I guess when it was still open, but I decided not to post them here. Good to know it still exists!

Posted March 25, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Not sure if the coordinates are correct though, from my knowledge of the area Maumee Road is farther to the South.

Posted March 25, 2017, by Anonymous

Thank you for the post. Made my morning.. Unfortunately seems this bridge was plagued by trolls as we can see by the comment section..

Posted March 25, 2017, by Mike Daffron (daffronmike [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Great! I will track down the photo I have of Maumee Road bridge!

Posted March 25, 2017, by James Baughn (webmaster [at] bridgehunter [dot] com)

I tracked down the coordinates for this bridge from the 1996 NBI, and it appears that this is the same bridge as this:

http://bridgehunter.com/in/brown/elkinsville-youno/

Posted March 25, 2017, by Mike Daffron (daffronmike [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I have searched everywhere in this area for this and Maumee Road bridge in Jackson County. The park rangers that I have talked to don't know anything about truss bridges in the park. I believe that, since the county line is very much the center of both, the two bridges may be the same one (???) I'll keep digging.

Posted March 25, 2017, by Christopher Finigan

It's likely the bridge was destroyed by the Christmas Flood of 1964.

Posted March 24, 2017, by Steve Roberts (acct01 [at] hutofsticks [dot] com)

Photographs #3 is described as the piers of the original bridge. In fact, this is the remains of a low water crossing that was, I believe, installed whilst the replacement bridge was under construction. The piers of the original bridge were constructed from large blocks of granite - many of which (perhaps all) are still lying around in the riverbed beneath the current bridge.

This is an interesting site. Thank you for making all this information available!

Posted March 24, 2017, by Mike Daffron (daffronmike [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Another one of the cant-get-there-from-here items. The deck is paved, but the land owner, who is around 50, grew up there and sez that the bridge was never open in his lifetime. There is a lot of damage to the southwest corner, which the owner sez has been there as long as he can remember. This truss is still used by the farmers in the area.

Posted March 24, 2017, by Douglas Butler

This is the detail of the bridge with the operating machinery mounted on the counterweight bridge tower and struts pinned to the bascule truss

Posted March 24, 2017, by Douglas Butler

This is the second picture

Posted March 24, 2017, by Douglas Butler

This first picture is a Northern Pacific railroad Strauss Heel trunnion bascule bridge constructed in 1911 of The Railway And Engineering Review showing the operation strut pinned to the counterweight bridge tower and the machinery on the bascule span.

The second two pictures of the same bridge of the Northern Pacific railroad bridge used now used by the Burlington Northern & Santa Fe railroad repaired between the late 1920's to the 1930's with the energy changed from the span to the counterweight and the operating machinery built into the counterweight bridge tower and the strut pinned to the bascule truss.

Posted March 24, 2017, by James Reyome (justreyome [at] gmail [dot] com)

I used this bridge for climbing practice in the mid 80s. It was perfect; the angled structures on the side made perfect stepping-off places. As I recall it was about a 90 foot free rappel. Then I would clip Jumars onto the rope and climb back up. I spent many a happy afternoon here!

Salina Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted March 24, 2017, by Nathan Holth (nathan [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

George,

Yes, the bridge and crossing can be improved to hold those weights. The question as to whether they are willing to do that rather than demolish and replace the bridge is another story.

All information relating to the ongoing Section 106 Review (including my own personal comments) is in the public record and may be viewed on Project PATH by downloading the postings at the bottom of the page here https://search.paprojectpath.org/ProjectDetails.aspx?Project...

Salina Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted March 24, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Just read the article.Art,can that bridge be strengthened to carry that higher weight limit?

Posted March 24, 2017, by Topher (ksufan88 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

There is an old stone pier to the south of this bridge. It can be clearly seen driving over this bridge. There are also walking trails along the creek that allow for a good view of the pier.

Posted March 23, 2017, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Clark,

It prevents ice and debris from getting inside of the timber piers and causing damage.

Posted March 23, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

ELI5...What am I missing about this structure?

Posted March 23, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

OK railfans--what is the purpose of the cribbing around the pilings? Is the assumption that debris will only be a problem when the river is higher?

Posted March 23, 2017, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)
Salina Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted March 23, 2017, by Art S (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)
Whats in that barn?
Posted March 23, 2017, by Dana

Have in my travels seen unbelievable things. Always stop at yard sales and ask. They may have used coffee cups for sale doesn't mean they don't have grandpa's arrowhead collection, great grand pa's civil war uniform and a 1912 motorcycle. Have to start asking if they have any old bridge trusses! Actually saw a 1903 Stanley in pieces in a living room once! Conjecture it may be but I Guarantee you there is whipple out there some where, probably made into a clothes line holder and yard ornament but its out there! I'll keep looking..............

Posted March 23, 2017, by Brad Noack (bradnoack [at] hotmail [dot] com)

The bridge is officially reopened as of 3/20/2017 as a pedestrian/bicycle only bridge after complete rehabilitation.

http://www.chicagotribune.com/suburbs/daily-southtown/news/c...

Posted March 23, 2017, by Richard Rogala (rich [at] dimensionsui [dot] com)

My Grandfather, Richard Bearden, was the operator of that very bridge from 1929 until he retired from the Northern Pacific Railroad in 1959. I remember spending the night with him there several times, amazed by the machinery and waiting for hours for a train to come so I could watch Grandpa make the bridge go down to let the trains cross.

RE: Erie canal Whipples
Posted March 23, 2017, by Art S (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Nathan,

My comment is pure conjecture. As the bowstring truss configuration has been used as a roof truss application, I thought an old Whipple might retain value above scrap for reuse in that roll. Considering bowstring roof trusses were used as bridges in the 1940s, why not the reverse. I realize its a long shot but, considering the variety of stuff that is found in old barns (Ferraris, WWI & WWII airplanes, etc.); why not.

To reiterate, I'm not suggesting this exists, but next time anyone is driving in the area on the old Erie Canal, it may be worth keeping an eye out for a barn roofline that has an unusual profile.

Regards,

Art S.

RE: Erie canal Whipples
Posted March 23, 2017, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

The unusual and complex construction and shape of the Whipple arches probably didn't lend themselves well to being repurposed by farmers. Simpler bridge beams are another story. I have a vertical member from a Pratt truss given to me by a farmer who had been using it for years to support part of his barn, which had collapsed.

Posted March 23, 2017, by Anonymous

ORIGINAL SITE: MAIN STREET, BROCKPORT. HAD THREE MAIN MEMBERS, TWO ROADWAYS, TWO SIDEWALKS. WHEN BROCKPORT GOT A LIFT BRIDGE, MOST OF THE WHIPPLE ARCH WAS RE-USED ON THE CANAL BUT JUST TWO MAIN MEMBERS. WHEN THE BARGE CANAL WAS BUILT, EHRMENTRAUT GOT THE TWO MAIN MEMBER VERSION AND HAULED TO THE LOCATION WHERE IT IS NOW.

THE FIRST MOVE WAS DONE BY THE CANAL FORCES, AND THEY WOULD HAVE STORED OR RE-USED THE THIRD MAIN MEMBER. VERY LIKELY IT WAS SCRAPPED UNLESS IT WAS RE-USED AT ANOTHER LOCATION.

Erie Canal Whipples
Posted March 23, 2017, by Dana

HMMMM.. interesting thought Art. Sounds like something an astute road supervisor would do . Maybe at the town barns .....

RE: Erie canal Whipples
Posted March 23, 2017, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Dana,

My thought isn't that they are stored in barns, but barns were made out of them. A series of Whipple bowstring trusses would make a great roof structure. No proof, just conjecture.

Regards,

Art S.

Erie Canal Whipples
Posted March 23, 2017, by Dana

Seems as if at one point these were being excessed. Guarantee you SOMEWHERE between Lockport and Albany there is one stored in a barn. Have to start asking in my travels, you never know!

Posted March 23, 2017, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knit [dot] com)

Nathan,

I had read that but forgotten - been distracted by other things. Thanks for reminding/correcting!

Thus, unfortunately, no chance of a stored third truss.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted March 22, 2017, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Art, I would like to draw your attention to my existing documentation of this bridge (prepared with help from Jim Stewart some years ago). As you will see, the bridge has been moved twice and by the time the bridge was moved to this farm, the third truss line was long-gone, having been disposed of during the first move. http://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=ne...

Posted March 22, 2017, by Art S (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

James,

While I realize the third truss line wasn't reused, If the farmer bought the bridge, wouldn't he buy the whole thing? If so, I would assume he made use of the third truss line around the farm rather than sell it for scrap. I could be wrong but, it seams reasonable. Just a thought.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted March 22, 2017, by Art S (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Built in conjunction with NY Penn Station; both were wonders but only the bridge still stands.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted March 22, 2017, by Diane L Clark (graciehillfarm [at] juno [dot] com)

How sad that it's just a plain concrete bridge with no character whatsoever. Just another overpass over a little river you can't even notice while driving over it now. Very sad commentary on the history of the area (and it's a very interesting and colorful history, if one bothers to research it). Just so sad that we tear down the past and replace it with drabness.

Posted March 22, 2017, by Diane L Clark (graciehillfarm [at] juno [dot] com)

My mother used to tell me about how she and her family would go swimming in the creek under the bridge. She said there were huge Billy Gars (fish) in the creek, but they never bothered them. My great grandfather, Marion Rice, owned the general store in Fall Creek, next to the RR tracks, and earlier, he owned the farmhouse with the large barn and silos with the turquoise roofs at the intersection of the present day highway (36?) and the old highway 57 (I think) that runs from Quincy to Marblehead and then Fall Creek. I don't live in that area so am just going from memory.

My mom also said there was an old school house in the Fall Creek area where local folks used to picnic. I think the school was closed but the area people would use the school grounds for picnics.

The train would run from Quincy to Marblehead to Fall Creek and beyond. My grandmother would take the train to visit her relatives (Hickersons, Rice, Rollins) in the county.

So sad that so many area artifacts are either falling down or have been replaced. The last time I was in the area with my mother (who was born in Quincy), we drove up a road and ran across a scenic overlook that had an historical marker about Fall Creek, etc. It was looking pretty ragged at the time. I went back after Mom's death and couldn't even get up the road. It was closed. Very sad. I know my relatives in Adam's County pay some seriously high taxes. Why aren't the historical areas being maintained? They mean a lot to some people. Do we have to start a campaign? I look at what's left of Creightown Cemetery outside of Marblehead and it breaks my heart, how so much of it has been swallowed up by the trees and field grass. Not to mention the damage and destruction to the remaining headstones. Isn't there anyone there, in the area, who still cares and can do something about it? I live far away but I'd be willing to try to help!

Posted March 22, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)
Posted March 22, 2017, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

The Ohio Historic Bridge Inventory revealed the history of this bridge. I added the information verbatim to this bridge's page as an essay.

Posted March 22, 2017, by JIM STEWART (JAMESEMSTEWART57 [at] GMAIL [dot] COM)

THE BUILDER OF THIS WAS JOHN HUTCHINSON. THE THIRD MAIN

MEMBER WAS NOT RE-USED WHEN THE BRIDGE WAS MOVED FOR THE

FIRST TIME. THIS BRIDGE IS PRIVATE PROPERTY.

Posted March 22, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Thank you as always Mr. Baslee!

Posted March 22, 2017, by Rene Lovett (rtlovett [at] comcast [dot] net)

Does anyone know the engineer who built Orr Bridge? My husband thinks it might have been his great grandfather.

Posted March 22, 2017, by Calvin Sneed

This elegant bridge is no longer with us. Blown into the water on Monday, March 20, 2017. RIP.

Posted March 22, 2017, by David Case

One has to wonder about the color selection for this bridge, but it does look good.

Posted March 21, 2017, by Anonymous
Posted March 21, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

Courtney, Nice Shots thanks for sharing! Looks like another cool bridge where 6th Street Crosses Neosho river. BE CAREFULL on live Railroads!

Bridge Comment
Posted March 21, 2017, by Douglas Butler

This spring I'm going back to Ashtabula Ohio to take some pictures of a Norfolk southern railroad bascule bridge of a Strauss heel trunnion type called Jm and video this bridge lowering this bridge is my favorite type

Posted March 21, 2017, by Dana & Kay

Art it is worth the trip! No one around and didn't want to trespass so didn't go on or under. Appeared to be in fine shape of course wood deck maybe on a 20 year time frame for replacement but of no significance. There were deer and human footptints leading to it but doesn't look like it sees vehicle traffic.

Bridge comment
Posted March 21, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

Well Douglas cool coincidence! Always appreciate your art. Want to go back to Erie Canal Fairport in season and get shots of it working.

Posted March 21, 2017, by Art S (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Awesome indeed! This one is on my bucket list to see. Wonder if they kept and stored the third truss line when they moved the bridge. I doubt it, but wouldn't put it past a farmer to do so.

If I recall, Nathan has some great and detailed shots of this one on his site.

Regards,

Art S.

Bridge Comment
Posted March 21, 2017, by Douglas Butler

Dana

I don't know that you just visiting the Erie Canal bridge

Posted March 21, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)
Posted March 21, 2017, by Douglas Butler

Then studied the inventors also since 2000 past 17 years as a student then I drawn just about every single movable bridge type rolling lift bascule bridges heel trunnion bascule bridges bascule bridges single and double leaf double decker bridges lift and swing bridges so I came across bridge hunter and that is the Great source of inspiration for bridges especially with maps

Posted March 21, 2017, by Douglas Butler

Well as a kid grown up in Ohio I

started drawn ore loaders and ships after I had a dream of a rail bridge of a jackknife type then few days later I seen the actual structure in the raised position abandoned next to Jefferson street and West 3rd street. I started drawidrawing this particular bridge and years later at 12 years old I explore this bridge and ironic this railroad bascule bridge had the counterweight high up above the tracks. Then I explore another bridge next to the Lorain Carniege bridge years later I studied movable drawbridge types around the United States and Canada and foreign bridges at the university library

Posted March 21, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

Douglas how did you know we were visiting this bridge today? Now that's bridge hunting!


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