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Posted November 14, 2019, by George A Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Thanks,John.

Posted November 14, 2019, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

George,

It looks like there was a second track at one time. I am not sure when it was removed.

Posted November 14, 2019, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Hats off to Clark for initially adding several of these former interurban bridges. There are many more extant in Clay and Jackson counties.

Posted November 14, 2019, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge is very curious. A 1955 aerial view shows this spur is not here, while it appears in a 1963 view. At this time, it crossed the Little Blue River. The Little Blue River was realigned to the west between 1970 and 1990, leaving this bridge to cross West Fire Prairie Creek.

As for the structure, it appears this was a former turntable. I currently have no real way of knowing where the girder came from, or when it was originally fabricated. I would suspect it was fabricated around 1900, although it realistically could've come from anywhere on the Missouri Pacific system.

Posted November 14, 2019, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

Wo....this thing is very interesting!! Cool pix !!

Columbia Bridge Works / Columbia Bridge Co.
Posted November 14, 2019, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Well, in looking for something else, I've managed to answer the question of what happened to CBW!

It got into financial trouble, the employees quit work on or before April 11, 1890 (The Dayton Herald, April 11, 1890, Pg.3). The firm was subsequently sued by its employees and sold to Andrew Carnegie (of Carnegie, Phipps & Co.) for $38,000. at sheriffs sale on August 4, 1890 (the existing shareholders were wiped out). I found multiple references but so far, my favorite is page 4 of the Thursday, August 7, 1890 edition of The Miami Helmet.

Subsequently, the company was moved to Pittsburgh, PA and was still an entity as of April 22, 1901.

Sincerely,

Art S.

Posted November 14, 2019, by George A Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Am I seeing things or is there a fence which looks like it can be opened at the tunnel on street view?

Posted November 14, 2019, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

This is an interesting history of the company, the company's history with ornamental fencing explains why the bridge has the unusual ornamental details as well. As for the date, I checked the historic bridge inventory and there is no substantiation for the date. I field visited the bridge recently and didn't see any dates. I would have to look at my photos which aren't in front of me to see if I spotted any iron/steel mill brands that might suggest a date range.

Also, the Historic Bridge Inventory consultants describe the bridge in a manner that makes me think they barely looked at a single photo of the bridge:

The 1 span, 107'-long, pin-connected Pratt thru truss bridge is traditionally composed of built-up compression members and eyebar tension members. The 1905 pin-connected Pratt thru truss bridge is later example of a common type/design and has no distinctive details or features. The not eligible recommendation of the prior inventory remains appropriate.

Posted November 14, 2019, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Please show your support for preserving this historic bridge by voting in this local radio's poll:

https://www.facebook.com/WPHMradio/posts/10157597743996308?_...

Posted November 14, 2019, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Rodgers Iron Co. existed from 1882 - 2000. From but operated under this name from 1892 through (no later than 1905.

https://www.chicora.org/cemetery-fences.html

"Rogers Fence Company -- Incorporated in 1882 and first appears in the Williams City Directory (Springfield, Ohio) in 1883. It continues to be listed under that name through 1891. The name changed to Rogers Iron Company in 1892 and was then succeeded by the William Bayley Company by 1905. This company continued in business (manufacturing steel and aluminum windows and steel doors) through ca. 2000 (History of Manufactories of Springfield, Ohio). Chicora resources: single advertisement in History of Manufactories of Springfield, Ohio, showing a "bolted, clip and punched wrought iron rail fence" of two different designs."

I didn't see a date on the bridge. Is 1905 correct or is it a default build date.

Regards,

Art S.

PS. Note the type of rivet used.

Posted November 14, 2019, by Anonymous (Jcyr [at] middlebury [dot] )

Description says between Middlebury and Weybridge, incorrect it's Middlebury and New Haven.

Posted November 14, 2019, by Satolli Glassmeyer (info [at] HistoryInYourOwnBackyard [dot] com)

Here's a video we just did this past summer on the bridge: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AYxOYAqNbG0

Posted November 14, 2019, by Jason Smith (flensburg [dot] bridgehunter [dot] av [at] googlemail [dot] com)

16 more days to submit your entries to this year's Bridgeunter's Awards provided by The Bridgehunter's Chronicles. So far the entries have been low in some areas (best Bridge photo, best example of preserved historic Bridge) but high in other categories. Nevertheless, you still have time before 30 November at 11:59pm. Good luck with the submissions! :-)

JS

Posted November 13, 2019, by dan (dbutzirus [at] gmail [dot] com)

I scanned this postcard for you

Attachment #1 (image/x-ms-bmp; 20,852,390 bytes)

Posted November 13, 2019, by Luke

Nice find, Joshua.

Boxcar Bridge
Posted November 13, 2019, by George A Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Thanks,Melissa.Never expected to see that kind of bridge put together from boxcars.

Boxcar Bridge
Posted November 13, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Here's another for you George Oakley...in Oklahoma lasted from 64-02

Posted November 13, 2019, by Brian Ott (nana_poppa_ott [at] live [dot] com)

County engineers public meeting on 11/19/2019 at the Dunkerton City Library at 6pm to discuss options for this bridge. Options listed in the letter are 1. Do nothing and leave bridge as is. 2 Construct a new bridge.3 Remove existing bridge without replacement. Nothing said about repairing the existing structure.

Posted November 13, 2019, by George A Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Nice picture,Nick.I am always interested in old rail cars along with bridges being reused for other purposes.At least they're not being scrapped.

Posted November 13, 2019, by George A Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Thanks,Luke.I wasn't sure so I asked for confirmation.

Posted November 13, 2019, by Gil Graham, P.E. (ggraham [at] baileybridge [dot] com)

Great job! Congratulations to Bach Steel and all of those involved. The way that bridge appeared to be leaning before the restoration was scary. They rescued it just in time.

Carrier Bridge (North Carolina)
Posted November 13, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Right ? But they wanted a "sleek" modern concrete bridge.

Posted November 13, 2019, by Luke

It's a MOB trail bridge.

Posted November 13, 2019, by George A Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I see a bridge on street view if you're looking toward the lake.Is that a truss bridge?

Carrier Bridge (North Carolina)
Posted November 13, 2019, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Im not an engineer but if it takes three blasts to bring a bridge of this size down it probably wasn't at risk for collapse...

RE: Perry Creek
Posted November 13, 2019, by Luke

Nope. The middle school is now an elementary school

Posted November 13, 2019, by Luke

Helps if I post the right URL: https://www.newspapers.com/newspage/336209742/

MILW - Overpass
Posted November 13, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Luke, no photo on the link

Perry Creek Bridge
Posted November 13, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Luke...different bridge ?

Sioux City Journal October 20 1964

Posted November 13, 2019, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

George - ran into this just north of Lawrence, KS the other day, a barn built around 2 old boxcars.....not bridge related of course, just sharing the idea of what you had mentioned

Posted November 12, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I posted them for you Ashley.

Posted November 12, 2019, by Ashley Coon (thisgirlashhley [at] gmail [dot] com)

Not sure how i would submit photos but i was so enamored by the sheer anger of this waterfall that i had to get closer. As i did, i found a way under the bridge and found a neat stone wall. No clue how old it is or its history. Id love to know but seeing as i was just passing through, i have no clue the history of this particular spot.

Posted November 12, 2019, by Luke
N/S train derailment Westmoreland County Pa
Posted November 12, 2019, by George A Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Three N/S freight trains were involved in a derailment Friday just west of the Georges Station Road bridge in Hempfield Township,about 3 miles east of Greensburg,Westmoreland County.One westbound train struck the rear of another,and derailed cars hit part of an eastbound train.A total of 11 rail cars carrying 50 shipping containers drerailed,blocking the rail lines until Sunday when the tracks were cleared.I looked for the bridge I mentioned on Bridgehunter and couldn't find it.

Posted November 12, 2019, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Keep in mind that the Intercity Viaduct, which is located right next to the bizarre suspension-truss combo bridge, was completed in 1907, one year after the Rocky Ford Bridge was supposedly moved to Lyon County.

Posted November 12, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Definitely a possibility Robert! The portals and cross bracing appear to match up with the bridge in the postcard.

It's interesting that they paired a truss up with a suspension bridge.

Hampton River Bridge (New Hampshire)
Posted November 12, 2019, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

According to NHDOT, the previous bridge at this location was called the Mile Long Bridge, and as can be seen in this photo, was timber.

Posted November 12, 2019, by George A Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Am I seeing things or was there another bridge that was here and removed?Also is it on Bridgehunter?

Posted November 12, 2019, by George A Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I just noticed something.If you look at the building in the field near the bridge it looks like someone took a railroad boxcar and set it on the ground and connected it to the building behind it.If this is so it was a great idea.

Posted November 12, 2019, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I recently read a comment on Facebook that this bridge was moved here in 1906, having been moved here from its original location at the Kansas City Stockyards. Could it have been part of this most unusual structure?

https://www.westbottomsreborn.com/calendar/2018/4/29/strawbe...

Posted November 12, 2019, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Holy *beep*, surprising rural Kansas StreetView strikes again.

Granted, it's from 2007, but that's better than nothing as far as how it did look.

Posted November 11, 2019, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Likewise Chet!

Though I sometimes think I should have stuck with ephemera. :^)

Cheers,

Art S.

Pine Creek Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted November 11, 2019, by Anonymous

replaced by new bridge

Posted November 11, 2019, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Shame

Posted November 11, 2019, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Shame

Posted November 11, 2019, by Dylan VanAntwerp (dylan_vanantwerp [at] live [dot] com)

http://industrialscenery.blogspot.com/2016/07/losttp-bridge-...

One span was destroyed in the barge strike, but the bridge itself wasn't completely removed until the new highway bridge was built sometime in the 1980s.

Posted November 11, 2019, by George A Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Thanks,Dana and Kay for posting this bridge.My fiancée remembered the previous bridge that was here and why they replaced it.

Posted November 11, 2019, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)
Posted November 11, 2019, by Ron Reber

Well, too late again.

Posted November 11, 2019, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

It appears the National Road, Victory Highway, and US 40 aligned here.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Road_(Cambridge,_Ohio)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victory_Highway

Posted November 11, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)
Posted November 11, 2019, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Michael, Why was this bridge delisted? Was it demolished and replaced?

Posted November 11, 2019, by Ed Hollowell (erhollowell [at] aol [dot] com)

I think it's different. Early in the 20th century there was a good highways movement which spurred the creation of several highway associations which included the Lincoln Highway, Dixie Highway and National Old Trails Highway. These were not Federal highways, they were improved roads which the highway association had designated as part of their highway and promoted as a part of their highway.

The National Road was the first federal highway and was about 100 years before the National Old Trails Highway. The National Road was a part of National Old Trails Highway but only the eastern part of it. The western parts were largely U.S. 66 so it is not correct to say U.S. 40 was National Old Trails Highway. At best U.S. 40/National Road was a part of National Old Trails Highway but National Old Trails Highway was not a federal highway and National Road/U.S. 40 was.

Posted November 11, 2019, by Chester Gehman (gehmanc2000 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Nathan:

No offense taken. Discussions like this only increase our knowledge about our favorite topic. Your 3rd view is, I believe, a railroad car truck a little NE of the object in question, and close behind the aft end of a locomotive.. We do know that the bridge is, or perhaps was, on the property. As I said, it APPEARS to me to be the bridge--maybe not. Someone has to go and look. It would be a little bit of a hike for me, although not impossible. Has anyone asked the people at the museum?

Chet

Posted November 11, 2019, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Chet,

It was not my intent to offend, I just was not sure I was understanding what you had stated correctly. The area in question (noted by arrow) is about 21 feet x 7 feet in lateral dimensions so if it is the Haupt truss it is either very meticulously disassembled and stored, or this is only a portion of the truss. I poked through some photos on Google and found some photos that MIGHT be of the area in question. Im not sure of the 3rd photo.

Posted November 11, 2019, by Chester Gehman (gehmanc2000 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Nathan:

Read my entry again. "A Google Earth view appears to show it across the turntable pit from the roundhouse between two locomotives." It is at the foot of the red crossover over the tracks. The Google Earth view that I posted was merely an indicator where to look on Google, where it is possible to zoom in further.

Anonymous: It doesn't look like a pile of metal to me but an on-site investigation would clear that up. I am unaware of any other reference on this site concerning this bridge.

I will be happy to remove any part of the listing that is in error.

Chet

Posted November 11, 2019, by Anonymous

The pile of metal is the bridge, and according to another listing on here, this one is incomplete.

Posted November 11, 2019, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I am confused, the turntable bridge at this museum is a deck plate girder not a Haupt truss. Where is the Haupt truss in the aerial photo referenced? I see a pile of unknown steel/iron next to the south end of the red pedestrian overpass, is that where we are looking? If this Haupt truss survives I would be very interested to know more.

Posted November 11, 2019, by Chester Gehman (gehmanc2000 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This looks like the bridge

George Street Bridge,Reading Pa
Posted November 11, 2019, by George A Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I was looking through a local history book about Berks County Pa and came across a picture of this iron truss bridge.I do not know when this bridge was installed here over the railroad tracks which are presently used by N/S.This bridge was removed after August 7,1990 for reasons I do not know.A concrete bridge is presently in place.

Posted November 11, 2019, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Thanks Art. Everything takes so much time, but eventually things happen.

Posted November 10, 2019, by Rick (rick [at] hamell [dot] net)

Was originally known as the Austa Bridge on early maps.

Posted November 10, 2019, by Ed Hollowell (erhollowell [at] aol [dot] com)

Geez.. US 40 is the "National Road". Don't they teach kids history in schools anymore.

Posted November 10, 2019, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Assuming this was replaced with BH 20041, this was either built well before 1900 or else didn't have a terribly long lifespan. (Possibly a casualty of weather or human misdeed?)

Posted November 10, 2019, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Or, are these pictures of whatever appears to be crossing the creek at 43.981006, -84.496192, near where Cayuga Street is winding alongside?

Posted November 10, 2019, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

What's the story here? Was Cedar Avenue re-aligned and this crossing served a former alignment? Whereupon, the wooden deck that is (presumably still) now there allows for crossing this former span, most likely to serve a currently-existing trail.

In lieu of the bridge that Nick just posted, I'd like to be able to timeline the two, but the pictures posted for this entry are throwing me off.

Posted November 10, 2019, by Doug Law (lawd1968 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Locally this bridge is called "The Dewey Avenue Viaduct" or just, "The Viaduct". The 1924 name plate is attached reading, "Cambridge Viaduct National Road Guernsey County O. J.R. Burkey was Engineer in Charge of Construction. Designers were Braun, Fleming, Knollman & Prior, Columbus O. Contractor was Hickey Bros. No mention of US 22 or US 40 which together cross this bridge. This may have been built before U.S. highways.

These pictures taken fall 2019 after the new 2018 deck, lights, and "City of Cambridge" arch at the west end.

Posted November 10, 2019, by Doug Law (lawd1968 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Drone pic Fall 2019

Posted November 10, 2019, by Doug Law (lawd1968 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Fall 2019 drone pics.

Posted November 10, 2019, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Historic bridges between Hays and Denver are about as rare as hens teeth. The demolition of this bridge would be catastrophic on a regional level. It is one of a tiny number of large-scale bridges of any significance between Hays and Denver. It is one of the few, if not the only, examples of a through arch bridge in a multi-county area covering three or four states.

I like to refer to the nearby town of WaKeeney as the half mile high city. This area is right on the edge of the High Plains - a semi arid steppe environment with very few rivers of any size and very few significant bridges.

It would not be difficult for crane to set the arch structure aside for future use.

Posted November 10, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Beautiful portals on this bridge. Hopefully they will someday decide to restore it.

Posted November 10, 2019, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I'm curious about this one. Shadows from 3-2015 in Google Earth seem to indicate that its an old two span deck truss, with additional truss lines added and two helper bents per span.

Posted November 10, 2019, by Chester Gehman (gehmanc2000 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Thanks, Art. And I enjoy the historical photos you manage to find and post of our favorite subject.

Chet

Posted November 10, 2019, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I found the bridge closed upon recent visit. Signs around the bridge state that you are on camera, although no "no trespassing" signs were found. Property owners on southwest corner of bridge were quickly confrontational, although were cool about it when I explained I was only photographing bridge.

Posted November 10, 2019, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Doomed (actually, if this information is accurate then construction is already underway): http://www.kandrive.org/kandrive/roads/#construction/K-147/-...

Posted November 10, 2019, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

As of 2018 it was "Good" at 83%, so it may have had some repair or rehab work done in 2019.

Posted November 10, 2019, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Chester, Thank you for adding the pictures.

Sincerely,

Art S.

Posted November 10, 2019, by Kevin M Burt (k [dot] burt1 [at] live [dot] com)

Replaced

Posted November 10, 2019, by Kevin M Burt (k [dot] burt1 [at] live [dot] com)

This bridge has been replaced

Posted November 9, 2019, by JUSTIN PAONE (paonejustin [at] gmail [dot] com)

yes this was built in 1909. but the original burned down in 1894. wish I could find pictures of that bridge.

Posted November 9, 2019, by JUSTIN PAONE (paonejustin [at] gmail [dot] com)

this bridge was replaced in the 90's but it was rebuilt to be the same as far as I know. I remember driving over the temporary bridge put up next to it.

Posted November 9, 2019, by Michele Waugh (wmichele79 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Has this been rebuilt since the 2017 flood? It’s a very beautiful place and the bridge looked like it would be fun crossing

Pecos River Viaduct
Posted November 9, 2019, by Bob Barbara (bobbarbara1 [at] verizon [dot] net)

Is there any way to get dimensions for the Pecos River Viaduct bridge? Built by the Phoenix Bridge Company.

Circa 1909

Posted November 9, 2019, by George A Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Just read in the local paper that work has begun to increase clearance at this underpass.A contractor for N/S began preliminary work last week,removing the steel beam structure that was installed in early 2016 as part of a repair project to the stone arch bridge that carries 2 tracks over East Neversink and Painted Sky roads.Excavation to lower the road surface and increase the vertical clearance began this week.Looks like the work is finally being accomplished.

Posted November 8, 2019, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Too bad it is being torn down. Was restoration considered?

Posted November 8, 2019, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Neat series. Congratulations!

Posted November 8, 2019, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

For Immediate Release Grinnell, Iowa - Holt, Michigan

The long-awaited documentary by Ultimate Restorations on historic truss bridge restoration is now available for viewing at www.ultimaterestorations.com or Amazon Prime. Featuring the 1874 Springfield Des-Arc Bridge, an historic King Iron Bridge Co. bowstring truss in Conway, Faulkner County, Arkansas, the two episodes document how an engineer, craftsmen, two nonprofits, a city, county and state worked together to save a rare historic bridge in the USA. Local screening are also being scheduled.

Bach Steel of Holt and St. Johns, Michigan provided the iron restoration expertise. The craftsmen, Nels Raynor, Derek Pung, Brock Raynor and Lee Pung put their backs into this project from riveting to pack rust removal, repairing splice plates, lifting and resetting old iron. Jim Schiffer, PE of Schiffer Group Engineering, Traverse City, Michigan. (SGI) worked with Bach Steel to detail the repairs. SGI also engineered the caissons by request from Julie Bowers at Workin' Bridges who just didn't want to see another concrete abutment for the historic truss. "These are the kinds of projects we relish. The reuse and preservation of durable cast and wrought iron and steel, that are still serviceable with a little coaxing, to recreate elegant functional forms that the communities can enjoy is really fun. These are the projects that we enjoy applying our technical experience and training to bring to successful completion." stated Jim Schiffer after viewing the video. Though you don't see him in the site work, without his engineering neither Workin' Bridges nor Bach Steel would be able to act on these jobs.

Working with the City of Conway and Faulkner County, the planning and iron work for the restoration of this bowstring took well over a year after lifting it from the North Fork of the Cadron River. The bridge was restored and reset at Lake Beaverfork in August of 2016. The project began, however, with a site visit in 2010 to discuss the potential of the oldest road bridge in Arkansas, also a King Iron bridge. The project required the aid of the Prof. Kenneth Barnes, then a director of the Faulkner County Historic Society to continue raising the awareness that this vintage bridge needed help. Many of these stories can be seen on the video.

Bach Steel has worked on over 40 historic bridge projects across the country, winning awards for their work in Texas, Michigan and Arkansas since the 1990s. "The Springfield Bridge tells a story of one of the projects that we started with Workin' Bridges in 2010 and it took years to fund it. There are so many bridges across the country that can be restored but it takes political will, our engineer, money and us to get it done....and big cranes!" stated Nels Raynor at the shop in St. Johns.

Ultimate Restorations produced the shows out of the bay area. Producer Terry Strauss along with Executive Producers Bill Hersey, Loren Lovgren, and Bob McNeil have documented the restoration of some of America's beloved treasures. “The story of this bridge is what Ultimate Restorations is all about. The vision to save the iconic pieces of our history that would otherwise be lost, plus the skills, passion and talent to bring them back to life. Walking over that bridge, is like being told a story, reminding us of who we are and where we’ve been.” said Terry Strauss, who directed the film in Arkansas. More info at www.ultimaterestorations.com. You can view the Ultimate Restorations episodes on our bridge restoration as well as the full Season 2 of Ultimate Restorations on Amazon Prime with 1874 Des-Arc Springfield Bridge Part 1: Moving Day and Part 2: Another Hundred Years at https://www.amazon.com/gp/video/detail/B07ZZZJ8D5/ref=atv_dp

One of the red-carpet premieres of Springfield Bridge documentary will be at 2 pm on Sunday, November 24, 2019 in Burlington, Iowa at the restored Capital Theater. Community screening dates are also being pursued in Conway, Arkansas, Lansing / Traverse City, Michigan and Grinnell, Iowa and will be announced soon.

Questions and screening requests can be addressed to Julie Bowers at 641.260.1262 - jbowerz1@gmail.com. You can access more information on the web at www.workinbridges.org and on Facebook at Workin' Bridges, www.bachsteel.com and on Facebook at Bach Steel and www.schiffergroup.com. Restoration photos can be seen at Springfield Bridge on Facebook where the process was also documented.

Posted November 8, 2019, by Karen K Reay (kreay [at] vims [dot] edu)

A storm destroyed this bridge in November 2019 and it is being torn down. This is very sad for our family members who have lived there all their lives. Many other bridges were destroyed during this storm and some people lost their homes.

Sad Loss of Oregon Trusses
Posted November 8, 2019, by Mike Goff (michael [dot] goff [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Nathan,

I totally agree with the sentiment that the loss of the pin-connected trusses is a tragedy to our bridge inventory.

As I have said in the past, I do like seeing the effort to replace trusses with trusses, even if they are modernized versions. This bridge in particular, the truss was really the only option due to the vertical alignment of the bridge and the span required.

It seems there is a lack of local support for saving these structures. I believe the original 8th Street Bridge is in storage somewhere, but I'm not sure if an interested party has emerged to do something with it. The spans would make excellent pedestrian bridges.

Van Buren in Corvallis is a different beast. I agree with all of your points about it. However, from a pure planning and engineering standpoint it's replacement is long overdue.

Unfortunately for the bridge it is in a really bad location to be bypassed due to the alignment of the streets and the bypass highway on the east end.

Again, the local interest is minimal, so it is hard to justify spending a large sum of tax payer dollars to save it. If there was strong local support it probably would have happened.

I keep hoping that someone will step up and take on the fixed Parker truss span and the pony truss span for pedestrian bridges somewhere. The swing span would be difficult to relocate and find a home for that type of span configuration.

As for the McCullough coastal bridges their fate rides on the Cascadia Subduction Zone beacuse ODOT is committed to maintaining them forever.

As resources shrink, federal loading requirements increase and traffic demands rise it is becoming harder and harder to justify spend money on these other historic projects.

It seems the Oregon tax payers are willing to throw money at the coastal bridges and the Columbia River Highway, but everything else seems to be government waste.

Just a few thoughts, I'm with you as far as saving the structures!

Mike

Posted November 8, 2019, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Learn about local efforts to preserve this bridge and try to save it from demolition here: http://ppsri.org/advocacy/current-advocacy/crook-point-bascu...

Posted November 8, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

So something doesn't jive here... The bridge was removed in 1970, but the last pic is from 82'?

John Marvig this one's for you! ;-p

Posted November 7, 2019, by Larry Q. Farmer (lquestf [at] gmaii [dot] com)

Why is the new Duck Creek bridge alignment not available to the public?

Posted November 7, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Same Date

Posted November 7, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

The photo Luke added is also from 1961

Posted November 7, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

February 25 1961 The Montgomery Advisor

Posted November 7, 2019, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Melissa, Did you happen to see any reference to flooding in the 1950s of this bridge? I was contacted by someone who grew up near this bridge and they think it had another really bad flood in the 1950s, and were looking for confirmation of that.

Posted November 7, 2019, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I still feel this is a sad outcome. I hope this isn't the future for the Oregon Coast Highway Conde McCullough bridges too. I would have preferred to see the original pin-connected Pratt trusses widened and placed on a bridge as decorative elements, thereby preserving one of the last pin-connected highway trusses in Oregon, an outcome that has been done in other states like New Jersey. The design of the replacement truss lacks the character-defining features of the historic truss including but not limited to a Pratt truss configuration, pin connections, and built-up beams with lacing. The new bridge design is pretty standard, they might not be common in Oregon, but many states out east build welded/bolted modern trusses, some in large quantities.

The modern truss would have been a great solution, IF the historic trusses were relocated and preserved elsewhere. But I do not believe this is the case here.

Oregon has traditionally had a good preservation track record, I am concerned... why is there suddenly this effort to destroy historic bridges? The other one at risk is the Van Buren Street Bridge, a swing bridge that also has pin connections. In the context of Oregon, pin-connected trusses are one of the rarest bridge types in the state. Does this count for nothing?

Posted November 7, 2019, by Anonymous

And demolished!

Posted November 7, 2019, by Anonymous

Why does this bridge's status still say it's open? It's been closed for a few years now!

Posted November 7, 2019, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

This bridge was closed when I visited in the early '80s. Somewhere I have photos of a small art installation someone had placed on the roadway.


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