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Iron Bridge (New Jersey)
Posted February 25, 2017, by Michael Quiet (mquiet [at] gmail [dot] com)

This looks like it might be a small Mosley Lattice bowstring/arch. Compare with the last remaining example:

http://bridgehunter.com/pa/chester/hares-hill/

Posted February 25, 2017, by Chris P (thatcrispykid [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I walked over it today, the wood deck feels solid (though there are a few tiny holes that allow you to look into the creek). Anyone know when and why the bridge closed?

Posted February 25, 2017, by Dave King (DKinghawkfan [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Looks like this bridge will be replaced

http://www.decorahnews.com/news-stories/2017/02/15826.html

The City of Decorah is getting some financial help from the Iowa DOT in replacing the Oneota Drive Bridge near the Decorah Campground. The DOT says it will spend up to $1 million in state funds to pay 80 percent of the cost of a new bridge.

State inspectors gave the bridge a "deficiency rating" last year, but temporary fixes were made and the state allowed the bridge to remain open..

City officials have gotten estimates from WHKS Engineering on the cost of six options for a new bridge, ranging from $1.3 million for relocating the road and installing a pre-engineered steel truss bridge to $970,000 to rehabilitate the existing bridge structure. City officials will spend 2017 studying the options and getting public input. The new bridge would then be installed in 2018.

Posted February 25, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

East or West?

Posted February 25, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

Thank You!

Posted February 25, 2017, by Billy Sargent (pemigewasset [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Ah, the good ol' Live No More Falls Bridge! I do not contest the liability, but what makes it more an issue now? I cannot believe that jumping from the bridge is a new sport- I doubt it was new when the bridge was closed two thirds of a century ago, I doubt it was unheard of when it was new 130+ years ago! Being a mite afeared of heights, I never went on the bridge myself, but it was always a pleasant swimming hole & fine place to observe the bevy of cutie beauties, local & student alike taking the sun & enjoying the fresh air.

Fun fact: In Playboy's first top ten party college picks, appearing in the October '87 issue, Plymouth State was honoured. The mill ruins were the site of the photo shoot. I can't recall if the bridge was in the background or not...

Posted February 25, 2017, by Billy Sargent (pemigewasset [at] yahoo [dot] com)

You might consider adding the PVRR- Pemigewasset Valley Rail Road (aka pumkin vine RR) as a user. Pop grew up on Winter St in Plymouth, next door to section boss Rob Woodard. I haven't heard the stories in a while, so I'm fuzzy on where the PVRR ran, but I'm fair certain it partnered with B&M somehow. I think they must have run on the line past Livermore Falls & over the buttermilk rapids this bridge spans.

Posted February 25, 2017, by Don Morrison

Dana; your picture is of Twin Bridges, on 5th Street north northeast of town, see the Twin Bridges entry on Bridgehunter, also the Bluffs along the river match the 5th Street location.

Posted February 24, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

It looks like this one is so low it turned back the street view car.

Posted February 24, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

Thanks Chester!

Posted February 24, 2017, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

We are reaching out to several states to add Heritage Bridges to our roster. The ones that do need to stay in place. More will be revealed but we are adding to the roster of services that we can provide to the DOTs as they manage their historic truss management plans.

1. Action. If we are going to go out and document and provide real numbers we might as well take along a team to clean up the bridge of trees and debris, clean the shoes. Then make it clear other necessary maintenance items.

2. Bridge Brokering - Once we have identified trusses that must be moved then the real numbers come into play, finding other sources of funding for moving onto trails or other crossings.

3. Heritage Bridges - Hayden and Bunker are two that are under ownership. We are always open to being the interim owner between responsible entities but here we are taking these bridges on for the long term, providing an avenue to save them that the DOTS nor SHPO can do.

We'll see if we can figure this out. IF anyone else has interest or ideas along these lines that would be great. We're in this 7 years now, and we just got our land conservancy insurance that allows us to open these bridges for recreational use. The pieces are beginning to come together. The projects are big but

I know you know!

It worth it. Thanks for the tips and tricks along the way.

Julie

Posted February 24, 2017, by Anonymous

If I'm understanding them correctly, neither design proposal seems to be inclined to preserve the bridge: https://iastate.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_agTcUOpXJPT9Gm1

Posted February 24, 2017, by Matt Lohry

I daresay this bridge and the bridge next to it are both doomed--GE satellite imagery shows a new alignment with new bridges being built right next to these.

Posted February 23, 2017, by Jared Rainer (chumrain [at] att [dot] net)

This bridge has been repaired (at a cost of almost $5 Million) and has been reopened to traffic. Below is a link to a news report confirming this:

http://kfdm.com/news/local/repaired-burrs-ferry-bridge-reope...

Posted February 23, 2017, by David Backlin (us71 [at] cox [dot] net)

http://www.modot.org/central/news_and_information/District5R...

MoDOT Moving Forward with New Gasconade River Bridge

Current Structure Will Remain in Place for Now

Posted February 23, 2017, by Topher (ksufan88 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

We visited this bridge on 2/18/2017. Maybe I should say we attempted to visit it. It's gone. Not a piece left of it.

Posted February 23, 2017, by Topher (ksufan88 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

We visited this bridge on 2/18/2017. It is now closed.

Leesport Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted February 23, 2017, by Anonymous

As per an article on this bridge printed in the Reading Eagle on 2-22-17 engineer Jason Newhard outlined an updated timeline for PennDOT'S Wall Street Bridge replacement.PennDOT is accepting bids starting in April of this year.A pedestrian bridge wide enough for an ATV is tentatively scheduled for construction this summer.Closure of the main bridge may be in September or October.Newhard said everyone will know the actual dates at the preconstruction meeting.Representatives,including members of area municipal governments and involved utility companies will be at the PennDOT meeting late this spring according to Newhard.Sounds like a big project and when i hear or read anything about this bridge ui will pass it on.

Posted February 23, 2017, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Jeff,

I'm OK reworking things but Congress Street looks like a concrete arch with a stone finish and the old abutments don't appear visible based on the aerial/satellite views.

How confident are you in your statement?

Regards,

Art S.

Posted February 23, 2017, by Jeff Lovejoy (jeffrey [dot] lovejoyo [at] gmail [dot] com)

Your location is wrong. This is the Congress Street bridge crossing the Stroudwater River in Portland. The stonework is still there, even though the bridge was modernized in the late 1970s.

Posted February 23, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

When I saw photos of the plaque, I figured that the Missouri Valley Bridge & Iron Works built this one in accordance with a railroad company design. Generally speaking, MVB&IW would have otherwise used angled lattice portal bracing at this time.

Posted February 23, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

John - followed regular street signs from the west and north all the way to the bridge, unless I missed something, it was at that point it became very obvious to step on or cross the bridge was private property.....did not meet folks on private side. Just so I'm understanding everyone read what was actually on the plaque - I posted 2 photos, one with effects, to make it easier to read "MO _____ BRIDGE & IRON WORKS, A. J. TULLOCK & CO. PROPRIETORS, LEAVENWORTH, KANSAS 1887

Posted February 22, 2017, by John Marvig

Nick,

Were the landowners friendly and welcoming to the bridge? And I recognize the portals, looks quite a bit like Missouri Pacific trusses.

Posted February 22, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Nathan:

I think that we were posting at the same time. I made my first comment before Nick had uploaded a photograph of the plaque.

Posted February 22, 2017, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Maybe some people don't know, A. J. Tullock was a founder of that company. He died, and it reorganized into Missouri Valley Bridge and Iron Company in 1904.

Posted February 22, 2017, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

It has a Missouri Valley Bridge and Iron Works plaque on it. Nice, although sad the top part is broken. Very nice example of an 1880s railroad truss.

Posted February 22, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Okay, Missouri Valley Bridge & Iron Works. This firm built quite a few bridges in Missouri and Kansas although they did venture as far as Texas. To the best of my knowledge, they never built any bridges east of the Mississippi. Thus, this bridge probably came from somewhere in the local region as opposed to being moved from somewhere like Ohio or Pennsylvania.

This bridge is also significant as having been built before the company changed its name to the Missouri Valley Bridge & Iron Company.

Too bad the plaque is damaged, but at least most of it is still intact so we can get some important information off of it. Cast iron components can be very pretty but they are also prone to shattering.

Posted February 22, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge has 7 panels, which is quite a few for a Pratt through truss that is supposedly only 100 feet long. In other words, the panels on this bridge are just over 14 feet long assuming that the span length is correct. These are rather short panels, although older Pratts from the 1870s may have much shorter panels yet.

Generally speaking, older Pratt trusses of roughly 100 feet have shorter panels than newer Pratt trusses of roughly 100 feet. The same concept applies at lengths of roughly 80', 120', etc. Of course there are numerous exceptions to this rule, but from my observations it seems to pan out more often than not. Otherwise, this looks like a bridge that might have been constructed Ca. 1900.

Posted February 22, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Kind of tricky getting to this one... have to enter from the south up the public road. Very pretty spot.... apart from the lumber missing looks very solid.

Posted February 22, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

This one has been removed, visited today

Posted February 22, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

This one is extant. Replaced by something with much less character.

Posted February 22, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Interesting bridge with unusual portal bracing and away bracing. Does anybody recognize these features?

Posted February 22, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Fairly obvious an old train bridge, 1887 in fact according to the plaque, would agree that it's most likely been moved to this spot as the private property on the east side shoots up a steep incline very close to the bridge. Very cool, very hearty.

Posted February 22, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Very nice, and possibly even pre - 1900. Ca. 1900 would be my guess.

Posted February 22, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I would call them outriggers.

Posted February 22, 2017, by Royce and Bobette Haley (roycehaley111 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Is the bracing here note worthy, I do not believe I have seen this before. Is it acting as an outrigger or a vertical? Or both?

Posted February 22, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

currently dropped pin denotes this old unimpressive thing on east side of tracks, iron bridge 150 yards west of tracks on same straight E-W line

Posted February 22, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Approached from the east down old public 3300 Road, the current dropped pin is actually the location of a concrete arch little bridge, you need to cross the tracks and continue west to get to the correct bridge...reminds me of several 19th century light traffic bridges I've run into....a neat old thing with a lot of lumber left

Posted February 22, 2017, by Royce and Bobette Haley (roycehaley111 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I am guessing this bridge was not built in 1932. Probably the original bridge here was built in 1932. This looks to be a welded MOB.

Royce

Posted February 22, 2017, by David Backlin (us71 [at] cox [dot] net)

New bridge could open as early as February 28.

7th Street Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted February 22, 2017, by Pat Seyford (Pat [dot] seyford [at] gmail [dot] com)

Bridge was replaced in 2012. New bridge is shown in image.

The designers did a nice job. They maintained the original look of the bridge.

Posted February 22, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Nathan,you couldn't be more on the money.You nailed it perfectly!

Posted February 22, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

From what i read i have a bad feeling about the end of this bridge as we know it Robert.Keep up the good work with any news you get on this bridge Robert.

Posted February 22, 2017, by Nathan Holth (nathan [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Latest construction cam shows that the Pepe Le Pew Memorial Bridge substructure is underway.

Posted February 21, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Stone pylons are so much more interesting than concrete ones, but sadly they have been the ruin of many a bridge. Sometimes they stand in a partially collapsed state for years and sometimes they collapse with little warning. At this stage, there are three possibilities: collapse, demolition, or immediate stabilization. The first two options are never fun. As I am fond of saying, nobody wins when a bridge collapses.

Posted February 21, 2017, by Nathan Holth (nathan [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Site visited this bridge last weekend. Bridge clearly has been closed to traffic for emergency repairs, but should reopen soon. It appears someone hit one of the endposts, damaged/destroyed it and the hip vertical, and also hit the vertical-mounted guardrail so hard the guardrail bolts tore themselves out of the wrought iron. The county's implemented repair is sketchy at best. The new hip vertical looks fine, but they welded a new endpost together and also put inserted real rivets, but they appear to have cut, welded, and ground the field end of the rivets. So its flat looking on the field end. It probably took 10x longer to make this sorry attempt at a replica than it would have taken to hire a company like Bach Steel to simply fabricate and ship an exact replica using real rivets.

Posted February 21, 2017, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Oh yeah, one other thing. SHAME ON INDOT for choosing demolition!

Posted February 21, 2017, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Site visited last weekend. Bridge is still there, no construction activities yet. My guess is later this spring.

Posted February 21, 2017, by Max

Actually only the bridge superstructure itself was replaced. The original piers were reused and still present under the new deck.

Posted February 21, 2017, by Anonymous
Bridge model
Posted February 21, 2017, by Douglas Butler

I want to build a model railroad bascule bridge of a Jm drawbridge a double track Strauss Heel Trunnion Bascule Bridge in Ashtabula Oh any suggestions on how to build a model railroad bascule bridge with the machinery on the bascule span with the struts connected to the counterweight bridge tower?

Posted February 21, 2017, by J.P. (wildcatjon2000 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge was painted to look like JAWS by the city because of the number of trucks vs bridge accidents that have occurred here.

Posted February 21, 2017, by Royce and Bobette Haley (roycehaley111 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

They looked brand new, right out of the box.

Posted February 20, 2017, by Andy Winegar

Nice job capturing the EMD SD70ACe-T4 demonstrators!

re: Wisconsin or Michigan Pratt Through Truss
Posted February 20, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

It can be hard to identify a builder from just a photograph or satellite imagery. But, if the Bridgehunter community knows about a bridge, the speculating will soon begin in earnest. Sometimes after a lengthy discussion we come up with the answer.

re: Wisconsin or Michigan Pratt Through Truss
Posted February 20, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Okay, I see the double portal bracing now. I did not notice that at first. Probably rules out CBW. This truss must be much taller than I had thought.

Posted February 20, 2017, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I found hidden on the ends of one of the railings behind a bush/tree two plaques, one original for National Concrete, the other a rehab plaque from 1991. The rehab plaque says the bridge was originally built 1908-1909. Easy to miss! Sadly, I also found this bridge is in a sorry state today. They added ugly corrugated steel under the arch barrel, and wrapped the spandrel walls in the orange plastic safety fencing. So it looks absolutely horrible. Sad to see this outcome for one of the oldest Luten arch bridges in existence.

re: Wisconsin or Michigan Pratt Through Truss
Posted February 20, 2017, by Nathan Holth (nathan [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Yeah I don't know how anyone could determine much of anything from this photo other than its basic structural design.

re: Wisconsin or Michigan Pratt Through Truss
Posted February 20, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Not a Columbia from what I see.

Tall Pratt truss with doubled portal bracing. Don't see finials but it looks like there might be a rather large plaque on the Right end. Pegging a builder off of this photo would be purely speculative.

re: Wisconsin or Michigan Pratt Through Truss
Posted February 20, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Well, I could be barking up the wrong endpost here...

...but the profile of this bridge almost makes me think Columbia Bridge Works. I may be off base though.

Posted February 20, 2017, by Geraldine McNatt (Szuch) (jszuchj09 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This may have been the bridge where my father was a bridge tender for three years ending in 1948 when he was killed. We lived in a little house by the railroad track. Does anyone know my father, Charlie N McNatt? He was married to Christine Williams from Okeechobee, Florida.

WI or MI 8-Panel Pratt Through-Truss Bridge
Posted February 20, 2017, by Joe Breeze (joe [at] mmbhof [dot] org)

I'm hoping to find information on an 8-panel (5-vertical post) Pratt through-truss bridge that was (likely lost) in Wisconsin or Michigan in at least 1896. See photo. I've looked through BH.com under WI, MN, and IL and IN states (JIC). No luck. In the photo you will (barely) see that the bottom chord runs along the BOTTOM of the floor beams. I've looked through ALL state BH.com entries for Milwaukee Bridge Co. and Chicago Bridge Co. bridges (makers of this rare type). No luck. So perhaps someone knows another delicious source of this high-fiber content, a site that includes PTT bridges that caved long ago?

Posted February 20, 2017, by Michael grow ( mgrow5260 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I remember Crossing the chain Lakes Bridge with my mom and dad and the boards rattling underneath the tires scared me to death I must have been four or five years old while going across one day I even saw a hobo across the railroad tracks wonderful memories I'm 62 years old now

Posted February 20, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Still crazy how much this resembles the Cicero Creek Bridge!

http://bridgehunter.com/in/hamilton/bh42651/

Posted February 20, 2017, by Mike Tewkesbury (gb_packards [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Although difficult, my hope is to get a few pics from the opposite side of the creek.

Madison Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted February 20, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

As per an article printed in the Reading Eagle on 2-19-17 this bridge will not be rehabilitated.According to this article Montgomery officials approved a $20 million project to demolish and rebuild this bridge which is to start in 2019.The design of the new bridge is expected to be finished this year.The funding for this project is 80% federal,15% state and 5% funded by both Montgomery and Chester counties.I do have this article if anybody has any questions.

Posted February 20, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Here is the latest on this bridge as per an article printed in the Reading Eagle on 2-18-17.Contractors have been named to do the work on this bridge.The plans to repair this bridge have not changed.No cost estimate is available yet.Opening of this bridge is set for early April.Officials still hope the damaged I-beam can be repaired by constructing a permanent splice to reconnect the damaged section.Before that can be done crews must first realign the bisected segment by deploying 8 temporary towers and hydraulic jacks to return the span to its original position.The construction contractors include Allied Painting Inc.,Cornell and Company Inc.,Moretrench American Corp. and PKF Mark III.I have the article if anybody needs to know anything.

Deficient bridge ranking for the top 2 states
Posted February 20, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

As per an article printed in the Reading Eagle on 2-16-17 the yearly American Road and Transportation Builders Association report on structurally deficient bridges ranked Iowa and Pa numbers 1 and 2 respectively.Being from Pa i can agree on Pa being up there because of the shape of our bridges and the snails pace they are proceeding at to repair our bridges.Has anybody heard of this group that put out the rankings?

Posted February 20, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Anonymous,this is the bridge i mentioned that was north of the Tilghman Street Viaduct.Thank you for clearing this up.

Posted February 19, 2017, by Cliff Darby (clif30 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Couple more pics.

Posted February 19, 2017, by Cliff Darby (clif30 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

As is the case west at little river, the piers still exist in the river.

Posted February 19, 2017, by Cliff Darby (clif30 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

The piers still exist. Several bridges and small tressles exist along the grade all the way to feriday.

Posted February 19, 2017, by Nathan Holth (nathan [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Swing spans are hard to classify and in my experience 99% do not follow the textbook appearance of any common truss configurations, and in addition they may not always display forces matching a particular truss (diagonals must be in compression with a Howe, and in tension with a Pratt). My understanding of swing spans (and explanation for atypical member arrangements) is the issue is reversal of forces in the truss... because when the span is closed (bearing on the ends with wedges in place) forces are arranged in one fashion, and when the bridge is swung open, the ends must cantilever from the tower/pier.

Posted February 19, 2017, by Mike Daffron (daffronmike [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This was my first visit since they started replacement. I hated to see it, but progress...@#$&%!!!!

Posted February 19, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

Bridge plaque still there. Deck is shot but bridge appears to be in remarkably good shape. Needs rust help but no section loss visible. Abutments appear fine, concrete probably 1970's Original blue stone abutments used as rip rap. Does vibrate when you walk on it. If it had deck would not hesitate to drive on it. HAVE driven over far more questionable spans.

Posted February 19, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

Nice shot Mike. Snap a few more if you get a chance!

Posted February 19, 2017, by Mike Tewkesbury (gb_packards [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This is my photo. I pass this bridge on Caywood Road on the way to my daughter's house once or twice a week. Some years ago a portion of the trestle that passed over the road was burned so that portion was removed away from the road. You can still see the burn marks on the heavy beams facing the road. The bridge now belongs to Ken Strahler and is part of the Duck Creek Farm.

Sincerely, Mike

Posted February 19, 2017, by Sean Dalton (Dsmdalton [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Bridge removed sometime in early February 2017. Replaced with a new span, still had construction dirt on it when I drove over it February 19th.

Posted February 19, 2017, by Rick (Reaj2008 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The bridge is still there standing on its 100 year anniversary! Although I made sure to paddle under it quickly as it honestly looks like it could all come down at Any moment. Of course the pillars will be there for hundreds of years after the steel structure ends up in the river. The state will certainly have a clean up on their hands when it falls as the water is only like 5 feet deep on average, so the bridge fall will block the waterway.

Posted February 19, 2017, by Luke

...

Posted February 19, 2017, by Jack Wright (jackwright1956 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Correction - you list Blue Tom bridge/tunnel in the CSX Coal River subduction as being in Kanawha County. It is not in Kanawha County - it is in Lincoln County by better than 5 miles. When you turn up Coal River off of WV 214 you go about 3 miles or so and the blacktop ends and you're in a rock base gravel road. The county line is where the blacktop ends. At this point you're in Lincoln County. I'm positive of this - my grandparents live in the first house in Lincoln County after you crossed the county line back in the 1960s-70s.

Posted February 19, 2017, by Anonymous

Apparently the 2nd image is of the predecessor bridge. I'll make the changes when I'm able to access a proper terminal.

Posted February 19, 2017, by Michael Quiet (mquiet [at] gmail [dot] com)

The date is correct, this is a rebuilt one. The original 1867 bridge was destroyed by an overweight truck in 1980.

This is about as close as you could get to the original as possible though, it was built to the speicifications of the original by a local bridgewright Arnold Graton, who constructed his bridges in the exact fashion as they would have been historically (down to building them on the ground and dragging them into position by Oxen).

Posted February 19, 2017, by Michael Quiet (mquiet [at] gmail [dot] com)

Looks like an Owego Bridge Co. plaque. Given the area that would fit.

Posted February 19, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

That smaller X braced center panel over the center pier (and above the swing mechanism) certainly has a Howe look to it CV.

Posted February 19, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Not convinced these 2 photos are of the same structure.There were likely many RR spans in the Allentown area.

Posted February 18, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Anyone else see a Howe truss on the swing span?

NS Overpass (Virginia)
Posted February 18, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

My father was a CE with the KS highway Dept ca 1950 and the term he used was "catiwhompus". I haven't run across the exact definition in any of his old books yet.

Posted February 18, 2017, by David Huffman (davhuffm [at] mindspring [dot] com)

From the satellite photo it appears the bridge is gone.

Posted February 18, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

John G. Here is Baptist Road Bridge per your description, thanks again

Posted February 18, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

John added Builder plaque photo to body of bridge description and bridge up the road per your description. If you travel that way take more pictures and thanks for sharing!

Posted February 18, 2017, by JohnG (jfgorham [at] att [dot] net)

Correction 1918 construction.

Posted February 18, 2017, by JohnG (jfgorham [at] att [dot] net)

The 1911 Starners Dam Bridge crosses the Monocacy River on Shoemaker Rd. You have the location correct. The two branches of Alloway creek are crossed by modern spans on Baptist Rd, about 100 yds. northeast of this bridge.

Posted February 18, 2017, by Luke
Posted February 18, 2017, by C Last (atlast [at] speedconnect [dot] com)

The rail line from Elmira through Tipton to Clinton was opened late 1884. The bridge had to be completed by then.

Posted February 18, 2017, by Tom Hoffman

Is this 1982 date right or is this a rebuilt bridge?

Structurally deficient bridge rankings
Posted February 18, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I saw this article printed in the Reading Eagle on 2-16-17 which stated that Iowa and Pa are ranked #s 1 and 2 respectively in structurally deficient bridges.This report was by the American Road and Transportation Builders Assn.Never heard of them.Has anybody else?

Montgomery county bridges comment.
Posted February 18, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

As per an article printed in the Reading Eagle on 2-17-17 Montgomery County Commissioners Chairwoman Valerie Arkoosh said that due to the $5 vehicle registration fees collected in 2016 will allow the county to repair 8 bridges.She didn't mention which bridges would be repaired.Still this is good news.

Posted February 18, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I don't know if anyone noticed but there is a 4 span truss between the American Parkway and the Lehigh Valley Thruway north of this bridge.Don't know if this is on Bridgehunters.

Posted February 18, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

Know there is some debate about T Beams being historic but none left in my area where once common. Regardless sounds like this one will be replaced. Thanks for keeping us in the loop.


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