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Posted October 29, 2017, by Arnold Berke (Berke2 [at] aol [dot] com)

I am writing an article that includes mention of this bridge, which crosses Silver Lake in Rehoboth. The deck, balustrades, etc., are concrete, but is the under-structure make of wood? Also, I'm trying to determine what year(within the last 10 or so years) a proposal to update the bridge was shot down (thankfully) by citizen opposition. And what exactly was that proposal proposing? Many thanks. Arnold Berke

Posted August 9, 2017, by Nathan Delaplaine (ndelaplaine [at] gmail [dot] com)

This drawbridge no longer operates, but now it has been replaced by a 2016 replacement bridge with no bascule span.

Posted July 21, 2017, by Nathan Delaplaine (ndelaplaine [at] gmail [dot] com)

I would want to see this bridge operate in person.

Posted June 22, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

Hand Operated

Posted September 12, 2016, by Craig O'Donnell (craig [dot] odonnell [at] doverpost [dot] com)

Known as Pigeon Point.

Posted September 12, 2016, by Craig O'Donnell (craig [dot] odonnell [at] doverpost [dot] com)

Bridge was replaced with a replica. How historically accurate, I don't know.

Posted September 12, 2016, by craig.odonnell@doverpost.com (craig [dot] odonnell [at] doverpost [dot] com)

This drawing of the shear pole swing bridge is actually the 5th Street Bridge in Delaware City. (The Corps of Engrs considers Reedy Point Bridge over the C&D Canal and this bridge as one "system" but they are different.)

The existing 5th Street bridge was installed about 1930, is a bascule welded shut now, and was closed Sep. 12 (today) 2016 for replacement with a concrete span.

Two pix taken about 7 AM 9-12-16, looking south down the roadway and looking southeast along the (old) canal.

Posted May 18, 2016, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Truss repairs continue and are nearly finished. Splice plates are drilled, the packed rust gone, and the new steel is melded into the old. By welding! Yes folks you can weld old iron.

I believe the plan is to erect it in the parking lot to get exact dimensions on the lateral and diagonal connects. Be cool to see those new vertical posts and outriggers doing their jobs.

If you want to hear more about this project and others, Nels talks about it at http://koolprojects.com/content/nels-raynor-bach-steel. He calls it his most challenging. Perhaps he wishes now he hadn't said it could be fixed, had he not, we would not be where we are now at Workin' Bridges.

Posted January 10, 2016, by Alexander D. Mitchell IV

A state database gives an 1890 construction date for this bridge: https://www.deldot.gov/archaeology/historic_pres/delaware_br...

Posted November 27, 2015, by Michael Otoole (mikeanjakey [at] aol [dot] com)

What year was the bridge build and how?

Posted November 27, 2015, by Michael Otoole (mikeanjakey [at] aol [dot] com)

What year was the bridge build and how?

Posted November 21, 2015, by Douglas Butler

Evidence of a girder swing bridge in the open position

Posted August 11, 2015, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I reviewed the Delaware Historic Bridge Inventory and refined the bridge type. This is a REALLY late example of a rainbow arch. It is reinforced by rods (rebar) and functions as a tied arch (bottom chord is a tension member, and the arches do not thrust into abutments), so is not a "Marsh" variety of rainbow arch. Rainbow arches designed as tied arches were popular in Ontario, Canada, where they are commonly called concrete bowstring bridges.

Posted December 31, 2014, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

nice swing bridge.does anybody know if this bridge will be removed or rehabbed?it is abandoned according to the listing.any information would be greatly appreciated.

Posted July 9, 2014, by Don Morrison

Hey Douglas;

That is the Christina River; I think the most likely place for this bridge would be 39.732426, -75.530334

East 7th at Brandywine Creek.

Posted May 31, 2014, by Douglas

Thanks Luke

Posted May 30, 2014, by Luke Harden (lukemh9 [at] gmail [dot] com)

No, because you're on the Brandywine River.

Posted May 30, 2014, by Douglas Butler

Is this location correct?

Posted April 3, 2013, by Alexander D. Mitchell IV

The railroad is effectively a "dead-end" branch-line railroad ending at an industry about a mile east of the bridge, with only one crew, one locomotive, etc. The trains operates at fairly low speed. The crew members on the train are often (usually? I've seen a guy in a truck drive out to close the bridge in advance once...) the ones cranking the bridge open and close. It's akin to the gate or garage door at the end of a driveway being open or close before you drive out onto the road--you don't need a signal to tell you your gate or garage door is open or not, do you?

Posted April 2, 2013, by Anonymous

Wow, very unique bridge. But how does the railroad know when the bridge is open? Does the open bridge turn the railroad signal to "red" status?

Posted November 30, 2011, by Cawwac (cawhitman [at] sbcglobal [dot] net)

Do you know who the architect was or the project engineer for this bridge? Any information would be appreciated. Thank you

Posted November 30, 2011, by Cawwac (cawhitman [at] sbcglobal [dot] net)

Do you know who the architect was or the project engineer for this bridge? Any information would be appreciated. Thank you

Posted February 1, 2011, by J.P.

The original bridge here was a covered bridge with a stone arch approach built in 1833. The covered bridge was replaced but the stone arch bridge approach is still there and open to traffic. Both bridges were recently worked on in 2009. So exactly how would you list that on here the stone arch is across a old mill race that has been filled in, and actually has its own NBI data........thoughts.

Posted October 29, 2010, by Anonymous

This bridge is in New Castle County not Kent County.

Posted October 29, 2010, by Anonymous

This bridge is in New Castle County not Kent County.

Posted August 20, 2010, by Rush W.

Has long since been locked in place and all equipment related to opening removed.

Posted January 13, 2010, by Anonymous

This bridge is the same design as the Rehoboth Road bridge on Business Route 1 in Milford, DE. I looked at the Wisconsin bridges and look to be the same.

This is a Scherzer rolling lift bascule bridge designed by the Scherzer Rolling Lift Bridge Company. The designer for the Milford bridge was Keller and Harrington. Keller and Harrington were former Scherzer Rolling Lift Bridge company employees.

This bridge no longer operates and the one in Milford operates only a few times a year.

Posted November 16, 2009, by Robert Thompson (rkt [dot] engineering [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge looks remarkably similar to the Eureka WI Fox River bridge and the Kewaunee WI bridge. It seems to have been a stock design to allow navigation for smaller vessels.

Posted March 15, 2009, by Frank Danberg

Judging by condition when photographed, this bridge has been rehabilitated again in recent years (certainly some time in the last 10 years and well after 1979 as indicted under facts). The bridge deck is in good to very good condition. It is not posted so you should probably assume it is not structurally deficient although it may be functionally obsolete.

Posted July 24, 2008, by Anonymous

This bridge was rehabilitated a couple years ago.

Posted July 24, 2008, by Anonymous

This bridge no longer operates.

Posted July 24, 2008, by Anonymous

This bridge no longer operates.

Posted July 24, 2008, by Anonymous

This bridge no longer operates.

Posted July 24, 2008, by Anonymous

I believe this bridge was originally design by Hardesty & Hanover but was originally at another location along the Lewes-Rehoboth Canal. I think they floated it down stream and erected it in a new location.

Posted July 24, 2008, by DJ (djm883 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

This bridge was designed by Hardesty & Hanover in the 1980s.