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RI - Matheson Bridge

Photos 

View from US 24

Photo taken Aug. 2004 by James Baughn

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BH Photo #101518

Map 

Street View 

Documents 

E-Newsletter of the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railroad Issue #13 October, 2016

PDF (4.8 MB)

Posted by Luke

https://docplayer.net/43743446-E-newsletter-of-the-chicago-r...

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Facts 

Overview
Abandoned two-span through truss bridge over Big Sandy Creek on former Rock Island RR east of Matheson
Location
Elbert County, Colorado
Status
Railroad line discontinued with tracks removed
History
Originally built 1883 by the Lassig Bridge & Iron Works as an eight-span bridge at Colona, Illinois, over the Rock River. Two spans relocated here and modified by the American Bridge Co. in 1920 to replace an 1899 trestle. Rails removed in 1992.
Builders
- American Bridge Co. of New York
- Lassig Bridge & Iron Works of Chicago, Illinois
Railroad
- Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railroad (RI; CRIP; ROCK)
Design
Two pin-connected, 9-panel Pratt through trusses
Dimensions
Length of largest span: 153.5 ft.
Total length: 307.0 ft.
Also called
Matheson Railroad Bridge
RI - Big Sandy Creek Bridge
Rock Island Bridge #5489
Approximate latitude, longitude
+39.17817, -103.96140   (decimal degrees)
39°10'41" N, 103°57'41" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
13/589709/4337061 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Matheson
Inventory number
BH 11866 (Bridgehunter.com ID)

Update Log 

  • September 26, 2018: Document added by Luke
  • February 16, 2014: New Street View added by Luke Harden
  • February 16, 2014: Updated by Dylan VanAntwerp: added info
  • June 12, 2006: Posted additional photos from Naisho

Sources 

  • Naisho, The Bridge Lady - mnaisho [at] msn [dot] com
  • Dylan VanAntwerp - dylan_vanantwerp [at] live [dot] com
  • Luke

Comments 

RI - Matheson Bridge
Posted September 19, 2018, by John Marvig

It looks like the 1920 date is a typo and it should be 1902. I would also agree. Perhaps the bridge was rebuilt in 1902 using secondhand material, and rebuild again in the 30s or 40s?

RI - Matheson Bridge
Posted September 18, 2018, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Clark,

I agree with your observation, those punched handhole style plates suggest a post-1930 alteration to the bridge.

RI - Matheson Bridge
Posted September 18, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

The top chord and endpost construction makes me think later than 1920. Could this have been rebuilt heavily some years after relocation?

RI - Matheson Bridge
Posted September 18, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

https://books.google.com/books?id=zRRHAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA146&lpg=...

This article provides a great insight on the relocation process, including the "splitting" method used on trusses and girders. It makes specific mention of pin connected trusses rebuilt in this manner, such as this bridge.

RI - Matheson Bridge
Posted December 11, 2017, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Robert,

This is exactly what I was thinking. these alterations would make sense to reduce a bridge from double to single track.

RI - Matheson Bridge
Posted December 11, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The vertical members are lightweight built-up members which I would anticipate seeing on an 1883 Bridge. The sway bracing is composed of large rolled beams which I would not anticipate on an 1883 bridge.

RI - Matheson Bridge
Posted December 11, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

For a bridge that was constructed in 1883, this one is very heavy even by railroad bridge standards.

I suspect that it might have had some parts replaced when it was moved. The portal bracing and much of the lateral bracing looks a little heavy for 1883 even though this is a railroad bridge. Railroad bridges often had portal bracing replaced as trains got taller so this would not be a surprising alteration.

RI - Matheson Bridge
Posted December 10, 2017, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

According to an annual report from 1883, the bridge was built double track. It appears that it was cut down in 1902 to a single track, including rebuilt portals.