Rating:
2 votes

Oregon Creek Covered Bridge 05-58-01

Photos 

Overview

Photo taken 1992 by Larry Matthews

BH Photo #101327

Map 

Description 

The future is bright for this wonderful bridge. It is scheduled for a rehabilitation in 2016. Update, 2018, it is reopened to light motor traffic. Covering has been reconstructed and original truss remains in use.

The Oregon Creek Bridge was built in 1860 by Thomas Freeman on Alleghany Road and was known at the time as Freemans Crossing bridge. It is located just off Highway 49 where it crosses Oregon Creek near the entrance to Oregon Creek Campground. It is over seventy-seven feet long. It was an important crossing on the Middle Yuba road providing mining towns most needed supplies from Central Valley towns. In 1883 a dam on the Middle Yuba River called English Dam broke, and washed down mountains of logs and debris, blocking Oregon Creek. The waters flowed upstream, washing the bridge off its foundation and upstream over 100 feet. As the waters subsided, it washed back downstream 150 feet. Using oxen teams and log rollers, the bridge was pulled back upstream and reattached to its foundation. It was swapped 180 degrees in the process so the east end is now west and the west end east. -- backcountryexplorers.com

Facts 

Overview
Covered bridge over Oregon Creek on Alleghany Ridge Road at Oregon Creek Campground
Location
Yuba County, California
Status
Open to light traffic
History
Built 1860 by Thomas Freeman, closed 2010, rehabilitated and reopened 2017
Builder
- Thomas Freeman
Design
Covered Singular Howe pony truss bridge.
Dimensions
Length of largest span: 77.1 ft.
Total length: 101.1 ft.
Deck width: 11.8 ft.
Vertical clearance above deck: 327.8 ft.
Recognition
Posted to the National Register of Historic Places on May 30, 1975
Also called
Freeman's Crossing Covered Bridge
Approximate latitude, longitude
+39.39694, -121.08194   (decimal degrees)
39°23'49" N, 121°04'55" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
10/665161/4362582 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Camptonville
Average daily traffic (as of 2005)
60
Inventory numbers
WGCB 05-58-01 (World Guide to Covered Bridges number)
NRHP 75000499 (National Register of Historic Places reference number)
CA 16C-17 (California bridge number)
BH 11758 (Bridgehunter.com ID)
Inspection report (as of December 2017)
Overall condition: Good
Superstructure condition rating: Good (7 out of 9)
Substructure condition rating: Good (7 out of 9)
Deck condition rating: Good (7 out of 9)
Sufficiency rating: 17.4 (out of 100)
View more at BridgeReports.com

Categories 

19th Century (7,380)
Built 1860 (44)
Built during 1860s (488)
California (2,528)
Covered (1,599)
Howe pony truss (65)
Howe truss (538)
NR-listed (2,919)
One-lane traffic (7,565)
Open (39,532)
Owned by county (20,525)
Pony truss (16,056)
Preserved (1,163)
Span length 75-100 feet (6,379)
Thomas Freeman (1)
Total length 100-125 feet (5,122)
Truss (32,396)
Wooden deck (6,048)
Yuba County, California (30)

Update Log 

  • January 9, 2019: New photos from Larry Matthews
  • March 30, 2018: Updated by James Baughn: Merged duplicate pages
  • March 29, 2018: Updated by Craig Philpott: updated status, open
  • January 19, 2018: Backcountry Explorers
  • October 13, 2015: Updated by Erik Hoffman: Fixed design and road name
  • October 12, 2015: Updated by Erik Hoffman: To be rehabilitated and reopened to automobiles in 2016!
  • October 11, 2015: Updated by Erik Hoffman: Rehab possible soon
  • July 3, 2011: New photos from Craig Philpott
  • December 4, 2008: New photo from Larry Matthews
  • October 16, 2006: Posted photo from Larry Matthews

Sources 

Comments 

Oregon Creek Covered Bridge 05-58-01
Posted May 6, 2020, by Will Truax (Bridgewright [at] gmail [dot] com)

Thanks so much, Tony!

It's not a mongrel though, such trusses are found in clear span roofs in numbers.

Oregon Creek Covered Bridge 05-58-01
Posted May 6, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Sounds good to me Will!

Although "Multiple King Rod" is kinda catchy! Or perhaps a "Hybrid Mongrel"?

Oregon Creek Covered Bridge 05-58-01
Posted May 6, 2020, by Will Truax (Bridgewright [at] gmail [dot] com)

Okay, let's not compromise.

It is what it is and it isn't what it isn't, and never the twain shall meet.

Oregon Creek Covered Bridge 05-58-01
Posted April 30, 2020, by Will Truax (Bridgewright [at] gmail [dot] com)

How about we compromise if the multiple panel thing is making it impossible to acknowledge it as a Queen.

And with is not being a Howe, not even a supposed single/singular.

If it defies categorization as things are shared and understood, perhaps we create one that fits?

Could it not reasonably be thought of as a Multiple King Rod?

Oregon Creek Covered Bridge 05-58-01
Posted April 28, 2020, by Will Truax (Bridgewright [at] gmail [dot] com)

Such is where there is a departure in terminology between the worlds of Timberframing and Timber Bridges and later patent trusses typically built with iron or steel.

I've been in dozens of clear-span roof systems in public buildings (Town Houses/Halls, academy buildings & churches) With King and Queen trusses with secondary struts and "Prince & Princess" posts and rods. Though rarely seen by anyone, these trusses exist in large numbers and are incredibly akin to this one

These elements are seen as secondary and as not truly adding panels to the truss and totally redefining it.

As a working Timberframe and Joined Timber Bridge preservationist, I will continue to use the phraseology common to my allied trades. And as someone who has restored (including the current project bridge) and replicated a number of Howes, I see a necessary element in defining a timber example as being the presence of Angle Blocks at the panel points.

Oregon Creek Covered Bridge 05-58-01
Posted April 23, 2020, by Erik Hoffman (norcalroadswebsite [at] gmail [dot] com)

Given the single ties and all of that, I think that it is also possible that this bridge was not built with a specific known design (Howe, Singlar Howe, Multiple Kingpost) in mind, given that it was built by one otherwise-unknown engineer in the mid-1800's. In these cases with older, smaller bridges and less established/formally trained engineers, especially given the nature of the California foothills at the time, bridges were often not built with specific design ideas at play, and were more often than not a hit-or-miss type of operation. This was often due to a lack of knowledge or experience, but also abnormal stipulations during construction, such as a lack of particular materials or fabrication capabilities. This was obviously more the case in the foothills and mountains as opposed to somewhere like Sacramento, and explains why many bridges of the time in the foothills were 1) designed very weirdly and 2) lasted at the latest until the early 1900's (but often much less) before failing. These would be situations where the engineer missed the mark, and there are comparatively few situations where they hit the nail on the head (think this one, Honey Run, Happy Valley Cutoff, Bridgeport, Purdon, Knights Ferry, Old Bidwells Bar, Walker (Folsom), Laytonville Dos Rios, Mosquito Road, Angels Footbridge). Note that nearly all of these bridges above have some sort of weird and very unique feature as a result of this construction process, some of which can be difficult to classify. All of this is to say, this "unclassified" method of designing could have very conceivably given the Oregon Creek Bridge similarly weird features that do not completely match any exact category, and were not built with these categories or models in mind. I do realise this completely goes against my previous comment about "dictionary definition", but you guys brought up some structural points I hadn't considered.

Oregon Creek Covered Bridge 05-58-01
Posted April 16, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I guess it's a rebuttal to Will's previous comment lol.

I would label it as a bit of a "Simple-truss" myself. My only real knowledge of the term "Howe-Single" is from the Bean Blossom Covered Bridge. I guess based on that one could conceivably dub this a "Covered H-S pony truss"... if there is such a thing. I haven't read enough into Mr. Howe to know if he ever actually developed a single version of his truss, or if this was simply a moniker coined by someone else. Of course we well know of his traditional truss featuring counters to form the classic X panel design. The Howe-Single could technically be classified as a Multiple-Kingpost truss using metal rods in place of wood for the verticals. The advantage being the ability to adjust the trusses by tightening the nuts at the ends of said rods.

I would love to hear more from Will on what he would classify this one... He being far more versed on these structures than myself or most anyone else.

Oregon Creek Covered Bridge 05-58-01
Posted April 16, 2020, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

I'm missing something. Why was there a question regarding the truss type?

Oregon Creek Covered Bridge 05-58-01
Posted April 15, 2020, by Erik Hoffman (norcalroadswebsite [at] gmail [dot] com)

It's the dictionary definition of a Howe.

Oregon Creek Covered Bridge 05-58-01
Posted October 20, 2019, by Will Truax (Bridgewright [at] gmail [dot] com)

Most definitely not a Howe.

Oregon Creek Covered Bridge
Posted March 29, 2018, by David Backlin (us71 [at] cox [dot] net)

Flagged as duplicate

Oregon Creek Covered Bridge 05-58-01
Posted March 29, 2018, by Craig Philpott (craigphilpott63 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Bridge has been rehabilitated and new photos submitted by friend of site.

Oregon Creek Covered Bridge
Posted March 29, 2018, by Craig Philpott (cphilpott [at] puc [dot] edu)

This is a duplicate posting of bridge: Oregon Creek Covered Bridge 05-58-01

Oregon Creek Covered Bridge 05-58-01
Posted January 12, 2018, by Elizabeth Yarlott (H2oyarlott [at] aol [dot] com)

In 1975 my husband to be and I carved our initials on this bridge. In 2007 we revisited the bridge, and though there had been a fire, we still made out our initials.

Oregon Creek Covered Bridge 05-58-01
Posted May 21, 2015, by Danielle (Backyardiganmom [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This was yesterday 5-19-15

Oregon Creek Covered Bridge
Posted July 26, 2011, by Dale Engblom (engblomd [at] sbcglobal [dot] net)

It has been a long time since I have seen this old bridge. 15 years ago I moved from Citrus Heights to Cameron Park and have not seen that bridge that whole time. I used to fish the river and would drive my motorcycle across the bridge to get to the parking area. I usually had pretty good luck fishing in the Yuba. I hope the bridge can be restored before it gets to the point of being beyond repair. You just don't see bridges like this too often anymore.

Oregon Creek Covered Bridge
Posted July 3, 2011, by Craig Philpott (cphilpott [at] puc [dot] edu)

This bridge is in significant disrepair. While apparently structurally sound it has been closed to traffic with K-rails randomly shoved across the entrances. The graffiti is extensive and sad and the anti-graffiti fencing inside the bridge adds a sense of hopelessness.

Oregon Creek Covered Bridge
Posted May 9, 2011, by Carolyn Perkins (wiseskywoman [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I hate to say this, but you were hardly the only ones to have seen the bridge in decades. The swimming hole there on the Yuba is very well used in the summer and lots of folks walk across to get to the river.

Oregon Creek Covered Bridge
Posted September 19, 2010, by Sierra Mayhem Jeep Tours (Pans4au [at] sierramayhemjeeptours [dot] com)

Bridge is now closed to vehicle traffic and it has suffered some graffiti on the inside. Still an interesting stop.

Oregon Creek Covered Bridge
Posted December 15, 2008, by dot (dotbushette [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Absolutely loved the bridge!Felt like my husband and I were the only ones to have seen it in decades! So very old and off the beaten path. A true delight!

Oregon Creek Covered Bridge
Posted December 15, 2008, by dot (dotbushette [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Absolutely loved the bridge!Felt like my husband and I were the only ones to have seen it in decades! So very old and off the beaten path. A true delight!