Rating:
2 votes

Stewart Point Road Bridge

Photos 

Stewart Point Road bridge

Photo taken by Craig Philpott in September 2009

Enlarge

BH Photo #175285

Map 

Street View 

Description 

Whole log timber stringer bridge, abandoned, next to current county road.

Facts 

Overview
Abandoned timber stringer bridge over Unamed tributary Gualala River on Old Stewart Point Road
Location
Sonoma County, California
Status
Abandoned
Design
Whole log timber stringer
Approximate latitude, longitude
+38.66712, -123.30519   (decimal degrees)
38°40'02" N, 123°18'19" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
10/473449/4279881 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Annapolis
Elevation
235 ft. above sea level
Inventory number
BH 45996 (Bridgehunter.com ID)

Categories 

Abandoned (3,257)
Beam (13,781)
California (2,226)
Have street view (24,813)
Owned by county (19,555)
Sonoma County, California (80)
Timber stringer (3,568)

Update Log 

  • February 27, 2019: New Street View added by Daniel
  • August 29, 2010: Updated by Cliff Darby: Refined GPS
  • August 29, 2010: Added by Craig Philpott

Sources 

Comments 

Stewart Point Road Bridge
Posted September 1, 2010, by James Baughn (webmaster [at] bridgehunter [dot] com)

Missouri had bridges that were even more primitive. See:

http://bridgehunter.com/mo/crawford/scotia-hog-trough/

One slip of the steering wheel and you'd be in the creek!

Stewart Point Road Bridge
Posted September 1, 2010, by Anthony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

It is interesting!

I figured you had to line your wheels up......and hope for the best! That's why they call it the rugged Northwest!!

Stewart Point Road Bridge
Posted September 1, 2010, by Michael Goff (michael [dot] goff [at] odot [dot] state [dot] or [dot] us)

Here in the Pacific Northwest I have seen a few of these log bridges. Most have been replaced but the remnants like the Stewart Point Road Bridge remain in many places.

One example I can think of is near Sandy, Oregon. There was a log bridge built with four or five 4-foot diameter logs laid side by side with gravel fill on top of them. I have attached a sketch of this bridge showing the layout.

These log bridges deteriorated quickly relative to other bridge types, but they did the job of allowing log trucks and equipment to access logging sites.

I remember when I was younger you would see bridges like these all over the woods but they are few and far between now due to their rapid deterioration and the shut down of the logging industry.

These log bridges are just another example of the regional preferences in bridge construction during the early 20th century. While many steel trusses and girders were used in the midwest and east, timber covered bridges and timber stingers were common in the Northwest due the avalibility of timber.

Attachment #1 (application/pdf; 19,920 bytes)

Stewart Point Road Bridge
Posted August 31, 2010, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

That is very interesting! The whole setup makes a lot more sense to me now that I know it would originally have had wooden planks on top for a deck.

Stewart Point Road Bridge
Posted August 31, 2010, by Craig Philpott (cphilpott [at] puc [dot] edu)

Not a joke. This timber is first or second growth redwood timber that was laid down and cross planked with 10x10 square cut timber for short spans such as this. In the state forests of Sonoma County, Mendocino County and Humbolt County of Northern California there are still a few such whole log bridges that are still crossed by 4x4's and pickups. This one was bypassed years ago by a concrete box culvert and the timbers remain. No huge design interest, just interesting.

Stewart Point Road Bridge
Posted August 31, 2010, by Anthony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Appears to be a 2-lane joke at that!

Stewart Point Road Bridge
Posted August 31, 2010, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I am just asking because I am not that familiar with California bridges... but is this a joke?