Rating:
4 votes

Laytonville - Dos Rios Bridge

Photos 

Laytonville Dos Rios Bridge

Looking NW

Photo taken by Craig Philpott in February 2010

Enlarge

BH Photo #156607

Map 

Street View 

Video 

Laytonville Bridge over Burger Creek

Drone video overhead views of historic bridge.

craig philpott photography

Play video

Description 

Whipple (Double-Intersection Pratt) Deck truss bridge with pinned connections and Phoenix Columns. Rehabilitated with seismic retrofits. Retrofit, 2006. Link to seismic retrofit contractor: http://www.gsbridge.com/burgercreek.html

Facts 

Overview
Deck truss bridge over Burger Creek on Laytonville - Dos Rios Road
Location
Mendocino County, California
Status
Open to traffic
History
Built 1888
Design
Whipple (Double-Intersection Pratt) Deck truss with pinned connections and Phoenix Columns.
Dimensions
Length of largest span: 154.2 ft.
Total length: 230.7 ft.
Deck width: 16.4 ft.
Recognition
Eligible for the National Register of Historic Places
Also called
Dos Rios Bridge
Burger Creek Bridge
Approximate latitude, longitude
+39.69389, -123.41278   (decimal degrees)
39°41'38" N, 123°24'46" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
10/464608/4393864 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Laytonville
Elevation
1824 ft. above sea level
Inventory number
BH 43905 (Bridgehunter.com ID)
Inspection (as of 08/2014)
Deck condition rating: Very Good (8 out of 9)
Superstructure condition rating: Very Good (8 out of 9)
Substructure condition rating: Very Good (8 out of 9)
Appraisal: Functionally obsolete
Sufficiency rating: 48.7 (out of 100)
Average daily traffic (as of 2011)
137

Update Log 

  • July 23, 2017: New video from Craig Philpott
  • May 10, 2010: New photos from Craig Philpott
  • April 5, 2010: New Street View added by Craig Philpott
  • March 2, 2010: Updated by Craig Philpott: added retrofit link
  • March 1, 2010: Updated by James Baughn: Added new "Whipple deck truss" category
  • March 1, 2010: New photo from Craig Philpott
  • March 1, 2010: Updated by Nathan Holth: Updated design type.
  • February 28, 2010: Updated by Craig Philpott: Added photos, corrected design
  • January 17, 2010: Added by Craig Philpott

Sources 

Comments 

Laytonville - Dos Rios Bridge
Posted August 17, 2017, by Carrol (carrolcox2000 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Is there anyone out there that is familiar with the Martindale Bridge in Laytonville, CA. about the era of 1836? Any info on that bridge or if you can tell me where I might find a pic. of the bridge would be appreciated.

Thank you...

Laytonville - Dos Rios Bridge
Posted July 23, 2017, by Craig Philpott (craigphilpott63 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Road through bridge is open, just posted drone video of bridge.

Laytonville - Dos Rios Bridge
Posted May 17, 2017, by Erik Hoffman (norcalroadswebsite [at] gmail [dot] com)

As of May 2017, this bridge has been inaccessible due to slides since January, and I expect it to stay closed through June.

Laytonville - Dos Rios Bridge
Posted September 30, 2015, by Daniel Ketchum

The CalTrans Historic Highway Bridges of California book and the road sign visible on Google Maps both call this Burger Creek Bridge rather than the current name.

Burger Creek Bridge
Posted August 24, 2015, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

I think this is the same bridge:

http://bridgehunter.com/ca/mendocino/bh43905/

Regards,

Art S.

Laytonville - Dos Rios Bridge
Posted December 12, 2011, by Darrell Smith (darrell [dot] ev [dot] smith [at] gmail [dot] com)

By the way, some pictures of the original Benwood Bridge with Whipple truss can be found here:

http://www.myspace.com/davidkeenerphotography/photos/2146339...

and here:

http://users.stratuswave.net/~wd8jik/bellaire/HIST24.JPG

with a drawing of a similar structure here:

http://www.structuremag.org/article.aspx?articleID=384

at the very bottom of the page.

Whipple Deck Truss spans. Gone since about 1906 (?) replaced with Warren Truss spans.

Laytonville - Dos Rios Bridge
Posted December 12, 2011, by Darrell Smith (darrell [dot] ev [dot] smith [at] gmail [dot] com)

Craig,

I'm not going to be doing anything with a bridge model for a few years at least, so getting the photos with scale at your convenience is totally acceptable. I might suggest that you get or make a scale for architectural photography so that when you do get a chance to photograph bridges or buildings or whatever that the scale can be included in the photos.

I think my email is attached to these comments, so perhaps if you do get to make photos with the scale you could email me to let me know. Thank you in advance!

Darrell Smith

Laytonville - Dos Rios Bridge
Posted December 3, 2011, by Craig Philpott (cphilpott [at] puc [dot] edu)

Darrell, I appreciate your comments and I wished I were closer to the bridge to add some photo's with a scale indicator as you suggest. This bridge is 125 miles from home for me and I might get up that way in the next six months but not any time soon.

Laytonville - Dos Rios Bridge
Posted December 3, 2011, by Darrell Smith (darrell [dot] ev [dot] smith [at] gmail [dot] com)

This is a most interesting find for me. I have been interested in the B&O railroad bridge over the Ohio River at Benwood (WV) - Bellaire (OH) for some time. It was originally built as a multiple span Whipple truss, with both through and deck spans. This bridge, and the excellent photos of it, give me hope of actually someday building a partial model of that span. I am 99.9% sure that this (Laytonville) bridge was originally built for a railroad, as there would have been no need for such a massive structure at that time for merely horse-and-wagon traffic.

It sure would be helpful if some of the photos included a scale for dimensioning. Such a scale is usually a 4' stick with black and white paint, or even such a square as posted on this site:

http://coreldraw.com/forums/t/21536.aspx

so that someone desiring actual dimensions can work off a photo instead of having to climb all over the bridge (that is 1500 miles from home) to get them. Just a suggestion....

Thanks

Darrell S.

Laytonville - Dos Rios Bridge
Posted May 10, 2010, by Craig Philpott (cphilpott [at] puc [dot] edu)

New photos of this Whipple deck truss bridge. I finally returned to this spot on a sunny day and took the detail photos I have been wanting. Take a look.

Laytonville - Dos Rios Bridge
Posted March 2, 2010, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

How about a Bedstead Whipple pony!

http://www.bridgehunter.com/ks/republic/790787003105/

It is possible that vertical members have been added later, so I don't know if I quite qualify for the Million Extra Pontist Points...

Laytonville - Dos Rios Bridge
Posted March 2, 2010, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

That Baltimore pony is really interesting to see. Along those lines, has anyone ever seen a Pennsylvania pony? I haven't, but always thought it would be an interesting find.

Laytonville - Dos Rios Bridge
Posted March 2, 2010, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

A Whipple pony truss would be a spectacular find indeed! Thus far, I have failed in that quest. The closest thing I have found would be a Baltimore pony.

http://www.bridgehunter.com/ks/miami/611095004947/

Laytonville - Dos Rios Bridge
Posted March 2, 2010, by J.P.

ok cool learn something new everyday.

Laytonville - Dos Rios Bridge
Posted March 2, 2010, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

J.P.,

There is a difference between the Whipple truss configuration and what is known as a "Whipple Arch" which is what the webpage you found is referring to. However that page is a bit misleading. Some people call ALL bowstring truss bridges Whipple arches (like that webpage), but this is misleading. Usually experts retain the name "Whipple Arch" to refer to those bowstrings which were designed directly from Squire Whipple's patent for a bowstring truss bridge. These bridges bear a specific cast iron top chord design. There actually is a true Whipple arch a short distance from the Chili Mills Stuart Road Bridge however: http://www.historicbridges.org/newyork/ehrmentraut/index.htm

Laytonville - Dos Rios Bridge
Posted March 1, 2010, by J.P.

ok just decided to do a google search on the whipple pony truss. and turns out there is on in new york. its a bowstring whipple at that. thats what the state lists it as for its design at least.

http://www.monroecounty.gov/dot-bridgestuart.php

Laytonville - Dos Rios Bridge
Posted March 1, 2010, by James Baughn (webmaster [at] bridgehunter [dot] com)

I'm offering a Million Extra Pontist Points(*) to the first person who can find a "Whipple pony truss". Good luck!

*Approximate retail value, $0.00.

Laytonville - Dos Rios Bridge
Posted March 1, 2010, by Craig Philpott (cphilpott [at] puc [dot] edu)

I shall bask in the joy of this find... until at least next weekend.

Laytonville - Dos Rios Bridge
Posted March 1, 2010, by Anthony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Craig, nice spot of that hip casting. Fascinating to find a Whipple Deck truss. I see that James has added a whole new category for it.....not sure that we will see many more of them. Extra Pontist points for that one!

Laytonville - Dos Rios Bridge
Posted March 1, 2010, by Craig Philpott (cphilpott [at] puc [dot] edu)

I knew I could depend on knowledge far beyond mine on this bridge. I have learned a lot. I have reviewed my pictures and want to point out a detail I had not noticed before that really supports the discussion regarding the design NOT being a through truss conversion. If you enlarge and look at the top corner detail picture you can see that the corner casting both appears original and appears to integrate the top plate for the road deck into the original piece.

Laytonville - Dos Rios Bridge
Posted March 1, 2010, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Michael,

Yes, I strongly agree with you on this point. There are two other Phoenix column bridges in California that come to mind (not deck trusses though) and if memory serves they were relocated in the manner you mention as well.

Laytonville - Dos Rios Bridge
Posted March 1, 2010, by Michael Goff (michael [dot] goff [at] odot [dot] state [dot] or [dot] us)

Upon further review of the connections I would have to agree with Nathan. The connections do not appear to have been altered where the floor beams would have been if this was a through truss.

Unless significant care was taken in the details of the retrofit (which is doubtful) I would lean towards a unique design for this location.

The location of this bridge would lead me to think this bridge was recycled at this location. Original wrought iron or steel structures of this age are extremely rare on the west coast, especially away from population centers. Many bridges were moved from developing areas in the Midwest and east coast to the rural west coast during the early part of the 20th century.

Laytonville - Dos Rios Bridge
Posted March 1, 2010, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I fail to see any details on the Laytonville - Dos Rios Bridge that would lead me to believe it was once a through truss.

I can clearly see in Michael Goff's Ten Eyck Road Bridge photo that his example bridge is a through truss converted to a deck truss because there are transverse floorbeams visible where there is no deck today.

However in the Laytonville - Dos Rios Bridge, I see Phoenix Columns where the floorbeams of a through truss would be. To my knowledge, Phoenix Columns were never used as floorbeams. Their round shape would not adapt well to holding deck stringers. Those truss bridges which I have documented containing Phoenix Columns and original floorbeams all contained built-up i-beams for the floorbeams.

While I suppose it is possible that the sway bracing (struts) were swapped positions with the floorbeams, I do not see sufficient connection design alteration to account for such a drastic design change. The unique connection assemblies on the bottom chord connections appear to be intact and unaltered for the most part.

What I do see for sure is one of the only deck trusses which Phoenix Columnis I have ever heard of, as well as one of the only Whipple deck truss bridges I have ever heard of. Thus this bridge is extremely significant!

Laytonville - Dos Rios Bridge
Posted March 1, 2010, by Michael Goff (michael [dot] goff [at] odot [dot] state [dot] or [dot] us)

Craig,

That appears to be exactly what happened in this case. Up here in Oregon we have a few recycled bridges, and one that was used in this exact way.

The Ten Eyck Road Bridge was recently replaced, but it was an old through truss as some other location and was recycled as a deck truss over the Sandy River in Clackamas County, Oregon. I do not believe the truss over the Sandy River is as old as this bridge, but it is a similar use.

Good find! It is always nice to see the California structures.

Laytonville - Dos Rios Bridge
Posted February 28, 2010, by Craig Philpott (cphilpott [at] puc [dot] edu)

I find the design and installation of this bridge to be most interesting. To me, this appears to be a through truss bridge that was moved to this location, was too short for the span and was installed at a lower elevation to be used as a deck truss. I am most interested in hearing the opinions and experience of others more experienced then I am on the topic.