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Stoneman Bridge

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Photos 

Stoneman Bridge

Photo taken for the Historic American Engineering Record

View photos at Library of Congress

Map 

Street View 

Description 

The Stoneman Bridge is the last of seven stone-faced reinforced concrete spandrel arch bridges in Yosemite National Park and reflects the National Park Service "rustic style" of architecture as applied to park road bridges.

-- Historic American Engineering Record

Facts 

Overview
Concrete arch bridge over Merced River on Valley Loop Road in Yosemite Valley
Location
Yosemite Valley, Mariposa County, California
Status
Open to traffic
Future prospects
At risk for demolition and replacement.
History
Built 1933
Builders
- Kuckenberg & Wittman (Contractor - Finished Contract)
- Sullivan & Sullivan (Contractor - Started and Lost Contract)
Design
Closed spandrel concrete arch with stone facade
Dimensions
Length of largest span: 71.9 ft.
Total length: 205.1 ft.
Deck width: 23.0 ft.
Also called
Valley Loop Road Bridge
Approximate latitude, longitude
+37.74056, -119.57361   (decimal degrees)
37°44'26" N, 119°34'25" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
11/273230/4180148 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Half Dome
Inventory number
BH 11118 (Bridgehunter.com ID)
Inspection (as of 07/2012)
Superstructure condition rating: Good (7 out of 9)
Substructure condition rating: Good (7 out of 9)
Appraisal: Functionally obsolete
Sufficiency rating: 58.8 (out of 100)
Average daily traffic (as of 2012)
1,500

Update Log 

  • July 12, 2012: Updated by Nathan Holth: This bridge is at risk for demolition and replacement.
  • February 2, 2012: HAER photos posted by Michael Goff

Sources 

  • HAER CA-95 - Stoneman Bridge, Spanning Merced River on Stoneman Crossover Road, Yosemite Village, Mariposa County, CA
  • Mike Goff - michael [dot] goff [at] hotmail [dot] com
  • Nathan Holth

Comments 

Stoneman Bridge
Posted January 14, 2013, by Roger Deschner (rogerdeschner [at] gmail [dot] com)

These bridges have now been named to the National Trust for Historic Preservation's list of "America's 11 Most Endangered Historic Places" for 2012. See http://www.preservationnation.org/issues/11-most-endangered/...

Stoneman Bridge
Posted July 12, 2012, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

The Wild and Scenic designation for rivers is an extremely hypocritical designation. The stated goals of the Wild and Scenic River Act include the preservation of cultural aspects of the river (like historic bridges) but I have seen this designation repeatedly used as a convenient excuse to demolish and replace historic bridges. This appears to be what is unfolding here.

Stoneman Bridge
Posted July 9, 2012, by julie bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I find political talk here a gross generalization and doesnt go with bridges. We do not make a lot of money but we also do not sit around and blindly talk crap about who people are that make up a political body.

We save bridges though and don't collect free healthcare or welfare while

we do it. Our non profit has worked for our reputation and we save

Historic resources. Donate here so we can pay for our fun. Buy a dvd and see how you can help spread the word.

Beg to differ but politics on this site doesn't work very well.

Julie

Stoneman Bridge
Posted July 9, 2012, by julie bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I find political talk here a gross generalization and doesnt go with bridges. We do not make a lot of money but we also do not sit around and blindly talk crap about who people are that make up a political body.

We save bridges though and don't collect free healthcare or welfare while

we do it. Our non profit has worked for our reputation and we save

Historic resources. Donate here so we can pay for our fun. Buy a dvd and see how you can help spread the word.

Beg to differ but politics on this site doesn't work very well.

Julie

Stoneman Bridge
Posted July 9, 2012, by julie bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I find political talk here a gross generalization and doesnt go with bridges. We do not make a lot of money but we also do not sit around and blindly talk crap about who people are that make up a political body.

We save bridges though and don't collect free healthcare or welfare while

we do it. Our non profit has worked for our reputation and we save

Historic resources. Donate here so we can pay for our fun. Buy a dvd and see how you can help spread the word.

Beg to differ but politics on this site doesn't work very well.

Julie

Stoneman Bridge
Posted July 9, 2012, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Mr. Erickson/Mr. Kizonu/et.al

Good point about this potential conflict between preservationists and environmentalists. My personal suspicion is that the government bureaucracy is really the biggest problem. You can see this problem firsthand with the National Wild and Scenic Rivers when a historic bridge must be disposed of if a new bridge is built.

The environmental debate is one between preservation (of natural resources) vs. conservation. In other words, a preservationist would say "we have a finite number of resources, let's not use them or even allow people to come see them". Whereas a conservationist might say "we have a finite number of resources, lets use them wise, appreciate them, and maintain them".

Stoneman Bridge
Posted July 9, 2012, by Joe Kizonu

The main problem we have politically is not the Tea Party Republicans, but the blind followers of Obama. These are lazy folks, who do not want to work, nor strive for a better quality of life. They are content to just sit around and collect their welfare checks "free" health care, etc.

In many respects Obama voters have much in common with some of the idiot MODERN/NOT HISTORIC posters we get on Bridgehunter. They don't seem to be able to make any coherent thoughts on their own.

Stoneman Bridge
Posted July 7, 2012, by K. A. Erickson

I have found that most “environmentalists” have more in common with Tea Party Republicans and al-Qaeda than with the average individual. Neither one wants or desires Western civilization. Remove all the dams … remove safety nets … blow up things … Terrorists every single one of them.

In my own area “environmentalists” from other states routinely SUE to block restoration of historic structures. Green Mountain Fire Lookout is one example. Having a historic building or structure apparently “hurts the environment.” Several individuals affiliated with have mentioned BURNING DOWN THE STRUCTURE, unless the government removes it first. Wrap your heads around that one.

They will not be happy with Yosemite until it resembles the form that their messiah John Muir walked in almost 200 years ago.

That being said I have a similar predicament involving a bridge that is historic. I'd like to see it restored and/or placed on the NRHP. There are other complications as well.

Stoneman Bridge
Posted July 7, 2012, by David Backlin (us71 [at] cox [dot] net)

This bridge, and several others are in danger of being removed

http://www.kgwn.tv/story/18971450/historic-bridges-of-yosemi...