Rating:
1 vote

Bridge Creek Bridge

Photos 

Bridge Creek

Looking NE

Photo taken by Craig Philpott in January 2010

Enlarge

BH Photo #152793

Map 

Street View 

Facts 

Overview
Concrete tee beam bridge over Bridge Creek on State Route 254
Location
Humboldt County, California
Status
Open to traffic
History
Built 1938
Design
Concrete tee beam
Dimensions
Length of largest span: 40.0 ft.
Total length: 160.1 ft.
Deck width: 25.9 ft.
Approximate latitude, longitude
+40.28260, -123.85700   (decimal degrees)
40°16'57" N, 123°51'25" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
10/427149/4459476 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Myers Flat
Average daily traffic (as of 2009)
565
Inventory numbers
CA 04-9 (California bridge number)
BH 43902 (Bridgehunter.com ID)
Inspection report (as of August 2016)
Overall condition: Good
Superstructure condition rating: Good (7 out of 9)
Substructure condition rating: Good (7 out of 9)
Deck condition rating: Good (7 out of 9)
Sufficiency rating: 76.2 (out of 100)
View more at BridgeReports.com

Update Log 

  • March 18, 2015: Updated by Ian Bowen: Added category "US 101" to reflect location on historic alignment
  • April 10, 2013: New Street View added by Mike Goff
  • January 17, 2010: Added by Craig Philpott

Sources 

  • Craig Philpott - craigphilpott63 [at] gmail [dot] com
  • HAER CA-269 - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City vicinity, Del Norte, CA
  • Mike Goff - michael [dot] goff [at] hotmail [dot] com

Comments 

Bridge Creek Bridge
Posted March 19, 2015, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Is wood railing common/interesting enough for a category? I often see it on wood stringer humpback railroad overpasses and some of the park bridges out west.

Bridge Creek Bridge
Posted March 19, 2015, by Matt Lohry

I'm not sure who put the concrete balustrade category in there, as Photo #2 plainly shows wood rot where the horizontal rail beams connect to the post, and Photo #1 shows wood grain texture and heavy moss, which normally doesn't grow to this extent on concrete. My vote is wood for sure.