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Posted October 28, 2019, by Kate (scottkatee [at] gmail [dot] com)

This article from the California Highways and Public Works journal provides some pretty interesting engineering info.

Posted October 27, 2019, by Ron Parker (n6ovnrpp [at] gmail [dot] com)

“Bourland Bridge”

All of West Side Lumber Company’s trestles were called bridges.

Posted October 20, 2019, by Will Truax (Bridgewright [at] gmail [dot] com)

Most definitely not a Howe.

Posted October 15, 2019, by Anonymous

Who built the bridge?

Posted October 15, 2019, by Mike Brady (mikebrady60 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Saw it at about 6:30 in this video (from 1960s 8mm film), from the railroad: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N-Rq8SwvxpA

Wondered what it was, since small-road suspension bridges are rare. Some people at a railfan site identified it.

Might be able to do a frame cap, but no guarantees re. quality.

Posted October 11, 2019, by Luke

From Wikipedia:

"Phoenix Iron Works (1855: Phoenix Iron Company; 1949: Phoenix Iron & Steel Company; 1955: Phoenix Steel Corporation)."

From https://www.hspa-pa.org/phoenix_bridge.html :

"The Phoenix Bridge Co. was organized in 1864 as a division of the booming Phoenix Iron Company."

Posted October 10, 2019, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Just a fast check of those three reveals that both Phoenix Bridge Co. and Phoenix Iron Works are said to originate from Phoenixville, PA.

(Click on the category in the search list and the result page will say [such-and-such company] of Phoenixville, Pennsylvania.)

That, in turn, is just 28 miles northwest of Philadelphia (per Wiki), where Phoenix Iron Co. is said to originate from.

Hence, my bet would be they're all related somehow.

Posted October 10, 2019, by Daniel

I thought that was likely, just had no clue where.

The 3 other Phoenix Column bridges that I've been to in NorCal are reasonably well documented as to origins. They're all very similar - one less original than the other 2, but I believe parts from the same multi-span bridge. This one I see nothing more than speculation of somewhere.

Also: this bridge is MUCH larger than I had thought: I'd looked at the pictures and thought it was a similar scale to the other 3. In reality, it's significantly wider and much deeper, as well as somewhat longer.

Related: there are 3 different Phoenix companies listed as categories. I'm not sure whether that's different iterations or what exactly. I'd have expected it to all be the same. I just got a copy of the book about Phoenix but haven't really gone through it yet.

Posted October 10, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Daniel, I believe there has been conversations on here in the past about some older spans like this being purchased and moved from the East. Not sure if that's the case here or not.

Posted October 10, 2019, by Daniel

Is there any info on where this bridge was originally built? It seems unlikely that a bridge of this caliber was originally constructed in this remote of an area, especially somewhere that wasn't a rail line (although it isn't all that far from one, I don't believe one ran here).

Posted October 7, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

The NBI doesn't even give a date of construction so I don't know where the 1900 came from. It looks more like ca. 1930 to me.

As far as the diamond tread stuff goes, you could note it in the comments but I don't think you'll see enough of them to warrant a category.

Posted October 7, 2019, by Daniel

Is this style of construction reasonable for 1900?

Also: while the deck is primarily wood, the wearing surface where tires go is steel (diamond plate). I'm not sure how to edit that on the bridgereports site, or if it can be done.

I crossed it yesterday, took a couple pics but they don't show anything different from the photos already posted.

Posted September 27, 2019, by Daniel

Unless I'm missing something, isn't this a deck arch rather than a pony arch?

Posted September 27, 2019, by Daniel

The lacing appears to be bolted on. Was this bridge taken apart to that extent when it was rehab'd in 1987?

Was this it's original location?

Posted September 24, 2019, by George A Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I remember trying to hitchhike over this bridge from the Oakland side to San Fransisco around September 1980.I was picked up by the police who gave me a ride over the bridge to San Fransisco after telling me I couldn't hitchhike on the bridge.Believe it or not I hitchhiked from Pa to Ca during September 1980.Made it cross country in 6 days.Talk about an adventure!

Posted September 24, 2019, by Daniel

there's been a section sitting at Laney for a couple years. it's now outside, unpainted, just sitting there rusting (it used to be inside).

no clue what their plans are for it.

Posted September 24, 2019, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Parts salvaged from the historic east spans are slowly popping up across California. Here are a few locations where they can be seen:

"Signal" public art: 699 Avenue of the Palms, Treasure Island

The Kids Truckee River Railroad Platform: Truckee River Regional Park

Bay Bridge "Centennial Art Gate": 6881 Mt Lassen Ave,Joshua Tree Harrison House at Joshua Tree National Park

https://louharrisonhouse.org/portfolios/bay-bridge-comes-to-...

https://www.ca-tt.com/projects

https://datebook.sfchronicle.com/art-exhibits/bay-bridge-ste...

Posted September 19, 2019, by Luke

I suggest PIA. NordVPN also has solid reviews.

Avoid tunnelbear/McAfee products in general.

Avoid "free vpn" browser addons such as "hola unblocker", as those are often botnets that use your computer as one of its many hosts.

Posted September 19, 2019, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Jason,

I am attaching a Text and PDF print of the article.

Also, you might look into a VPN to allow you to access materials like these from overseas. I use PureVPN and it performs well for me on my phone and PC, and works well both ways (viewing USA material overseas and viewing overseas material from USA).

Posted September 19, 2019, by Luke
Posted September 19, 2019, by David W (dwplantman [at] aol [dot] com)

When was this bridge built?

Posted September 16, 2019, by Jason Smith (flensburg [dot] bridgehunter [dot] av [at] googlemail [dot] com)

Nathan,

Can you cut and paste the article on this page? I cannot Access it from Europe but I want to include it in my Podcast. Your help would be much appreciated. Thanks!

JS

Posted September 16, 2019, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)
Posted September 16, 2019, by Tony Burzio (tburzio [at] burnhamshops [dot] com)

Bridge damaged by fire.

Posted September 13, 2019, by Daniel

I'm surprised that the feds care about a little dirt road. All I can think of is that it'd be egress in case of an emergency.

Are they replacing the Ponderosa Bridge too?

Last time I was there (earlier this year), I don't think the road was passable to normal cars - the rutting was that bad.

Also, the location is a touch off - the bridge pictured is about 265' North of the location on the map.

Posted September 13, 2019, by john (jzwillows [at] gmail [dot] com)

The federal government is currently working on a new bridge at this site.

Posted September 10, 2019, by Will Truax (Bridgewright [at] gmail [dot] com)

The needle is threaded! The Bailey Bridge which will serve as shoring to relax Bridgeport's Trusses to allow repair and replacement of compromised sections of timber during the rehab process has been emplaced >

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/omkach0ga75mrow/AADD5U_-qZtf9_QJZ...

Posted September 8, 2019, by Anonymous

Does this bridge look like it's on Interstate 8 to you?

Posted September 8, 2019, by Elizabeth de Moya (elizabethdmy [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge was constructed in 1974. https://www.aaroads.com/guides/i-008-ca/

Fernbridge (California)
Posted September 6, 2019, by Jared

Found an interesting article from '87 that stated that the bridge was likely doomed. Good job to the townsfolk who saved this gem.

https://www.latimes.com/archives/la-xpm-1987-03-13-mn-5613-s...

Shaffer Bridge (California)
Posted August 24, 2019, by Luke

Thanks to Erik adding the common name, we now know this bridge was built by a prolific regional builder.

Posted August 19, 2019, by Daniel

I stopped by yesterday. Access to the road on the South side has been fenced/gated not far from the new bridge, so the only place to see it from is the existing road (and the smaller road between the river and the existing road). I'd been hoping to be able to get closer than there.

Posted August 18, 2019, by Tony Arioli (califtony707 [at] aol [dot] com)

The "west tower and two remaining truss spans" were removed in the summer of 1968, not 1984 - the 1984 date is when the towers and spans of the old Dumbarton Bride to the south were removed.

Posted August 17, 2019, by Don Morrison

Hmmm... that picture got me thinking (not usually a good thing 8^).

Interesting that this appears to be a classic upright pratt truss with floor beams at the top chord, even on the hip joints.

I usually think of a pratt deck truss as an inverted (ie - bottom chord shorter) pratt design, or maybe having vertical ends. Perhaps additional vertical structure at the end has obscured the "prattness" of some to me.

A look thru the bridges in the "pratt deck truss" category shows some more examples and a few that seem not to be.

Maybe a bit of confusion by the person who created a given bridge page or my own confusion, but I would call this a warren with alternating verticals (verticals on the ends as well):

https://bridgehunter.com/ny/erie/bh73483/

This one has that "prattness" with vertical ends and is shown as such under design, but the overview says Warren. I don't see Warren in it.

https://bridgehunter.com/tn/sullivan/bh36804/

One of my favorites since the mid 1980s has a pratt deck truss span, even if obscured somewhat by being subdivided and having vertical ends. It's all in the slope direction of the diagonals:

https://bridgehunter.com/ia/boone/kate-shelly-high/

Posted August 16, 2019, by Cris Alarcon (cris [at] inedc [dot] com)

Opening dedication 1897

Posted August 11, 2019, by Luke
Posted August 11, 2019, by Luke

Give Melissa some time to screencap it:

https://www.newspapers.com/image/47233539/?terms=alderpoint%...

Posted August 11, 2019, by Daniel

Bridgemeister states:

The Sunday November 5, 1972 edition of The Times Standard (Eureka, California) has three photos of the bridge collapsing. The caption is "Old Alderpoint Bridge Crashes into River." It continues: "Cables, securing the old Alderpoint Bridge across the North Fork of the Eel River, were cut Friday to send the structure splashing to the feet of the new concrete span that is replacing it. The $1-million new bridge was dedicated Saturday. The old suspension bridge was constructed in 1917."

does anyone have access to that? Especially the pictures.

Posted August 11, 2019, by Daniel

Does "half through" apply to what, from the top, looks (somewhat) like a pony or (somewhat) like a through? I'd have expected it to only apply to the latter.

Posted August 11, 2019, by Daniel

Just curious, what makes this last of it's kind? Pinned half through?

Posted August 9, 2019, by Daniel

http://bridgereports.com/1702242/ I suspect that was a similar bridge, and it was replaced about the same time.

Posted July 30, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Duplicate entry to BH 86145?

Posted July 29, 2019, by Mark J (Markandconnie [dot] Jones [at] gmail [dot] com )

Seems to be being dismantled as I just purchased a little piece of it. How many board feet of old growth timber do you think were in that bridge (at $12/bf),

Posted July 22, 2019, by Daniel

https://livingnewdeal.org/projects/upper-sacramento-river-si... and I just found that, with photos and a statement that it was to provide fire access.

Posted July 22, 2019, by Daniel

https://binged.it/2SxwzpP Bing has a street view of it, both portal and (limited) from the side. I suspect that it was originally a road bridge, as it's significantly wider than most pedestrian bridges. The SE end of the concrete bridge is marked 1974 so I suspect that's when it was replaced.

Posted July 22, 2019, by Daniel

Are you sure about 80s to 90s? Street View shows it as riveted and laced so it seems awfully unlikely. Do you mean Bend Ferry Road Bridge, several miles south of there? NBI says that was built 1989, which fits your timeline.

https://www.redbluffdailynews.com/2019/06/26/supervisors-rej... apparently it was re-opened after being damaged by the fatal crash, but then closed due to failing an inspection. It's supposed to be replaced but they rejected all the bids a few weeks ago.

Posted July 18, 2019, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I sent an email to city council about the bridge's preservation potential, but sadly have not got a response. They had a meeting last night I was in hopes they would get my email and include it for consideration last night. Not sure if that happened.

Posted July 17, 2019, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Some enterprising group of bridge restoration people should show them how they can have the bridge restored safely and still have money for their midnight basketball programs.

Posted July 17, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I voiced my two-cents worth in the comments section of the recent article.

All this bridge needs is some new stringers and a metal grid deck. It can be done fairly cheap and will provide a nice historic pedestrian bridge. And the open deck won't allow the underneath to be used for a living space anymore.

Posted July 17, 2019, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I hope this isn't a duplicate, I didn't see this bridge listed. Its at risk for demolition and replacement. Newspaper article shown here.

Posted July 13, 2019, by Erik Hoffman (norcalroadswebsite [at] gmail [dot] com)

Yeah I've done a bit more research & a second site visit and you're right about the legs not being bedsteads. Sorry, premature conclusion. I thought maybe they extended down into the concrete abutments, since many bedsteads have their legs encased in concrete, but that's clearly not the case.

Posted July 7, 2019, by Kelli Kallenborn (kellikallenborn [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Part of this bridge was sent to Honduras to replace a bridge there destroyed in a flood or mudslide. https://www.latimes.com/archives/la-xpm-1999-jan-29-me-2804-...

Posted June 28, 2019, by Luke

Leave the date as is, but change the history line ot "Relocated here 1957"

The site really needs a dedicated box for relocation dates due to the prevalence of bridges being relocated, especially the railroad relocations Daniel has shown in CA and John has proven in the Midwest

Posted June 28, 2019, by Daniel

That's what I thought. What's the right thing to do, list it as moved to current location 1957 or remove the date entirely? I have no clue where it came from.

Posted June 27, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

A relocation date? YES... A build date? NO WAY!

Posted June 25, 2019, by Daniel

Given the pinned connections, is 1957 a reasonable date?

The design looks awfully similar to the 3 I looked at this past weekend, East of Merced: Oak Grove Road Bridge (listed as built 1912/rehab'd 1960), Mid Fork Chowchilla River Bridge (listed as built 1956), Speciman Springs Bridge

(listed as built 1958) Some differences are apparent: the ones I looked at have sway bracing at every vertical while this has it only at the portals, and this has more laced members, but I'd have guessed the same era and put it a few decades earlier than late 50s.

Posted June 24, 2019, by Daniel
Posted June 24, 2019, by Daniel

https://fox40.com/2019/06/17/historic-yankee-jims-bridge-in-...

https://www.placer.ca.gov/DocumentCenter/View/37184/11A

sounds like they're moving forward on replacement, for $23M. They say they'll leave it in place, though. My understanding is that it's difficult to do that today, but we'll see.

Posted June 22, 2019, by Daniel

I don't believe the 1958 manufacture date given the connections. Probably a rework or moved date. Reasonably similar to https://bridgehunter.com/ca/mariposa/40C0028/ Oak Grove Road Bridge which is listed as built 1912 and rehab'd 1960. https://bridgehunter.com/ca/madera/41c0165/ Mid Fork Chowchilla River Bridge is nearby and I don't believe it there either.

As usual I forgot to take pictures that don't have my bike in them, but I'll go through them and upload a few anyway.

Posted June 22, 2019, by Daniel

I stopped by today. The woman running it has been there for close to 20 years. She thought that the bridge had been built in 1924 but when shown the picture (and after I pointed out the differences) agreed it wasn't the same bridge.

Posted June 20, 2019, by Luke

Good news: There's a streetcar line being constructed in the area, and the line is going to cross the river on it's own bridge, leaving this nationally notable bridge intact and unmodified.

Posted June 16, 2019, by Everett Watterson (Evwatterson6 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Yes, the bridge was there when I visited yesterday, albeit with some minor sagging when heavy trucks crossed it.

Posted June 16, 2019, by Daniel

Bridge History

The existing Snake Lake (Gopher Hill) bridge was built in 1938 was originally used as the Rock Creek bridge before being moved to its present location in the mid 70's after the Rock Creek bridge was replaced with present concrete structure.

Existing Bridge Information

Snake Lake Bridge over Spanish Creek is a single-lane, clear span steel pony truss with high abutment walls comprised of precast concrete panels with tieback anchors and was constructed in 1969.

that's what the replacement page states, interesting that they don't have an exact year for relocation.

Posted June 16, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Quite possibly a relocation date.

Posted June 16, 2019, by Daniel

I'll add that I was surprised to see that it was riveted. How many bridges were riveted that late?

Posted June 15, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

With the decent ratings and low ADT maybe they realized how stupid it would be to waste money to replace it!

Posted June 15, 2019, by Daniel

As of today the bridge is still there with no signs of construction etc. Not denying that it may be doomed.

Posted June 12, 2019, by Luke

Unfortunately that doesn't appear to be the case.

http://www.biggscardosa.com/home/index.php/projects/transpor...

Posted June 12, 2019, by Erik Hoffman (norcalroadswebsite [at] gmail [dot] com)

Okay, I see now. Sorry, I scrolled through too fast and thought the pictures of the approaches were main spans.

Posted June 11, 2019, by Erik Hoffman (norcalroadswebsite [at] gmail [dot] com)

The bridge still exists and the demolition project page has been taken down, so I'm hoping perhaps that project has been dropped.

Posted June 11, 2019, by Daniel

I agree. Photos also show that at least one end has a straight road for a significant distance, which isn't the case at this location.

Posted June 8, 2019, by Catherine Wieder (cgwieder [at] wieder-law [dot] com)

This bridge is being replaced. Traffic delays June 2019.

Posted June 5, 2019, by Erik Hoffman (norcalroadswebsite [at] gmail [dot] com)

Found what appears to be a twin of this bridge downstream on Bull Creek Road, built in 2000 per NBI.

http://bridgehunter.com/ca/el-dorado/bull-creek-road/

Posted June 1, 2019, by David P Baldwin (Baldwin24 [at] verizon [dot] net)

The Guy West Bridge was built in 1967 to connect the California State University Sacramento to its housing and business center on the other side of the American River. It was named after then University President Guy West. The bridge is not designed for regular motor traffic. It is a foot bridge, bicycle bridge. It can accommodate small motorized vehicles like golf carts and parking shuttles, but these are most likely limited to and by the city university grounds. It is designed as a replica and follower of the much larger and more famous Golden Gate Bridge, and is a true icon of itself. Picture shows original paint. The bridge has since been repainted in bright fire engine red.

Posted June 1, 2019, by David P Baldwin (Baldwin24 [at] verizon [dot] net)

This must have been the tunnel used in the 1971 movie "Duel" The scene when Dennis Weaver-(Mann) meets the school bus with Lou Firestone, and the big gas truck that has been chasing Mann in his red Valiant can be seen at the end of the tunnel.

Posted May 26, 2019, by Erik Hoffman (norcalroadswebsite [at] gmail [dot] com)

Bridge is still standing. I think the Valley Fire, which burned through Middletown and around the bridge immediately before the selected replacement date, may have delayed or cancelled the project. It may have even lowered the traffic over it enough to made replacement unnecessary, or at least less immediate, in the county's eyes.

Posted May 17, 2019, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I've visited this bridge, it functions as a truss. Photo #16 shows the transverse floorbeams which indicate that the trusses are indeed functioning to handle live loads. The longitudinal deck stringers bear on the floorbeams.

Posted May 17, 2019, by Erik Hoffman (norcalroadswebsite [at] gmail [dot] com)

Are the trusses on this even load-bearing? The "floorbeam" system on this looks more like load-bearing stringers to me.

Posted May 11, 2019, by Irvin M. Ferguson (irvman57 [at] gmail [dot] com)

My Father was one of the Foreman who built the Coronado Bridge. He was always proud of that. I was looking for a list of workers for the Bridge. My Dad Oscar C. Ferguson died in 1989 in Arizona here.Miss him every day still...and Im 61. He was a hell of a good man and Dad. One day he brought home a piece of Pile steel which was one foot long and five or so inches wide and weight 80 lbs. he got permission to bring it home as a memento from the steel that was going for the bridge. I think he said they had to cut a pile down to size and he kept the one piece that came off. They said that was fine. I still have it here as a remembrance of Dad and what he helped build. During the 1970 earth quake that dropped bridges in L.A. he helped rebuild those too. Sincerely Irv Ferguson.

Posted May 9, 2019, by Kirk J Poole (kjpportland [at] gmail [dot] com)

Does anyone have the contract details for the 1915? build or the 1924? rebuild? I'm very leery of both dates with a 30' wide deck?? The railings look more like 1930's-era rail. I would supposition that this bridge, in it's current form, was built in the 1930's. In the meantime, I'll keep looking into this bridge.

Posted May 8, 2019, by Kirk J Poole (kjpportland [at] gmail [dot] com)

Does anyone have the contract details for the 1915? build or the 1924? rebuild? I'm very leery of both dates with a 30' wide deck?? The railings look more like 1930's-era rail. I would supposition that this bridge, in it's current form, was built in the 1930's. In the meantime, I'll keep looking into this bridge.

Posted May 8, 2019, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Glad to see this one still exists and has been preserved.

Posted May 8, 2019, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Unfortunate that this one is gone. It appears the trusses date to the mid to late 1880s.

Posted May 8, 2019, by Stephanie van steen (Mustangboss1987 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Leslie i live right by the bridge. Would love to see some photos of it being built.

Posted May 7, 2019, by Rick Donaldson (mgy2 [at] aol [dot] com)

Hello.

I did a little research on the subject viaduct to determine when it was bypassed by the present alignment of Highway 101. Based on a newspaper article in the Ukiah Daily Journal, dated August 17, 1982, the bypass around the old viaduct, sometimes called "the Slab" was scheduled to be completed by August 19, 1982, but was opened to traffic by August 17th that year. I drove on the old viaduct many times while attending Humboldt State University from 1972 to 1974.

Rick Donaldson

Spokane, WA

Posted May 6, 2019, by Craig Philpott (craigphilpott63 [at] gmail [dot] com)

this is such fantastic news on the re-use of the original bridge.

Shelly Bridge (California)
Posted May 6, 2019, by Russell (stun1974 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Apparently this bridge was named after my great grandparents-One of which migrated from the Azores (Portugal). They changed their last name to Shelly while living in America...

Posted May 5, 2019, by Erik Hoffman (norcalroadswebsite [at] gmail [dot] com)

Location is correct. Bridge is called Mono Hot Springs Bridge. In my knowledge, it's just a Bailey pony truss.

Posted May 5, 2019, by Erik Hoffman (edh4801 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This is a beautiful and well-aging span that should be able to go on serving traffic for decades. Does appear to have received an abutment rehab at some point.

Posted May 5, 2019, by Erik Hoffman (edh4801 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I live in the area so you can contact me at norcalroadswebsite@gmail.com if you need any road information. If you're going to visit this bridge, just be advised that Jordan Hill coming from the southern (Concow/Parkhill) end is extremely rough so it's better to visit it via the northern (Paradise/Magalia) end.

Posted April 23, 2019, by Anonymous

"Freeyway"?

Posted April 22, 2019, by Daniel

Wonderful.

I have several bridges I want to look at on/off Quincy-LaPorte, maybe I'll make a longer trip and include this one too, and any others in the region I find.

Posted April 22, 2019, by Daniel

I know it's nothing special, but when I find suspension bridges (even footbridges) in the middle of nowhere I like to add them.

Posted April 22, 2019, by Erik Hoffman (edh4801 [at] gmail [dot] com)

It doesn't "need to get replaced" thank you very much. If it's no longer operated as a moving span, that's because it doesn't need to be. It's still a perfectly useful bridge in good condition.

Posted April 22, 2019, by Erik Hoffman (edh4801 [at] gmail [dot] com)

By the way, I know this is mostly a UCEB, but I figured I'd keep this here to contrast with the pony truss upstream & avoid future confusion.

Posted April 21, 2019, by Erik Hoffman (edh4801 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The location of the primary creek channel under this bridge has shifted since its completion, placing the entire northern span over typically dry floodplain and vegetation, and placing the southern abutment and approach road almost directly in the creek's path. As such, I worry that that 'project' may be a replacement. However, the bridge is well maintained, and recently repaved and redecked, which makes me hope that the project is not a replacement but instead a project to repair erosion to the southern abutment and approaching road, which has to be done by the county every 15 years or so at this point. It's six years after that project was supposedly 'current', and the bridge is still here. Replacements are often delayed, but not by that much - at least not without some sign of progress, which there has not been. So I think it's safe for now, but as the creek keeps moving, its days might be numbered.

Posted April 21, 2019, by Erik Hoffman (edh4801 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Possibly a casualty of the Carr Fire...

Peltier Bridge (California)
Posted April 21, 2019, by Erik Hoffman (edh4801 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Possibly a casualty of the Carr Fire...

Posted April 19, 2019, by Erik Hoffman (edh4801 [at] gmail [dot] com)

UPDATE: Reports of deck being destroyed turned out to be untrue, bridge was confused with a modern pedestrian truss bridge. I genuinely have no idea how it was that wrong, but here we are. Bridge is spared and open to traffic.

Posted April 19, 2019, by Erik Hoffman (edh4801 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Yea, I contacted the webmaster and had it changed.