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Posted January 19, 2021, by my name (email address)

i love old things and this is really good,

i might even hang it up on my wall.

goodbye!

Posted December 28, 2020, by Gordon Osmundson (gordon [at] ihpworkshops [dot] com)

Sunset Feb 5, 2020

Woodson Bridge (California)
Posted December 26, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

...And that's why this entry says "Lost".

Woodson Bridge (California)
Posted December 26, 2020, by Luke

This entry isn't for a concrete bridge.

Woodson Bridge (California)
Posted December 26, 2020, by J Stiles ( Cometboys22 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Wow this wrong. Concrete bridge has been there for years and still is. Picture looks like bridge at Tehama further north on the river.

Posted December 23, 2020, by Bill Eaton

Postcard view of Riverton Bridge c1910.

Posted December 16, 2020, by LeeNemnich (Lugnuty [at] gmail [dot] com)

My father worked on that bridge in 1948 as of the heavy equipment mechanic. That was a year before I was born. He told a story to me of a caterpillar going over the edge into the canyon and the guy jumping off saving his own life.

Posted December 9, 2020, by Roger Deschner (rogerdeschner [at] gmail [dot] com)

The dramatic photo of the Bidwell Bar Bridge, taken in September by AP photographer Noah Berger, of fires raging around the bridge, has now been featured again. In the New York Times "2020 The Year in Pictures", this was the top picture for September. In this article, Noah tells about taking this photo of the bridge, and about covering other aspects of that time for AP.

This photo, taken by a professional photojournalist for AP, could be 2020's most dramatic bridge photo. It captures one of the year's most significant events in a single image. A pity it's too late to enter it into the best bridge photos contest at Bridgehunter Chronicles.

Look at it here at NYTimes, because it's copyrighted. https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2020/world/year-in-pictu...

Posted December 9, 2020, by Craig Philpott (craigphilpott63 [at] gmail [dot] com)
Posted November 20, 2020, by Justin (justingrowe [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Here are some more images

Posted November 8, 2020, by Doug K

From Oct 2017, city planning replacement by Spring 2021:

https://www.chico.ca.us/post/guynn-avenue-bridge-over-lindo-...

Posted November 8, 2020, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

Just watched a 1970 TV Movie called "Weekend of Terror" with Robert Conrad, Lee Majors & Lois Nettleton. The bridge was used as a drop-off point for ransom. Here are a couple of crappy screen shots. Cool bridge!!

Posted November 3, 2020, by Darryl G Noyer (dgnoyer [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I grew up in Paradise in the 60's I loved it there Nelsons Bar and Whiskey Flatts were the 2 main swimming holes my best friend cracked opened his head diving from the bridge . A Jeff Starr used to dive from the top of the bridge. I seen him years later on Wide World of Sport cliff diving in Mexico.

Posted November 3, 2020, by Anonymous

This bridge was seen in the TV series The Fugitive "Devil's Carnival", Season 2, Episode 14, 12/22/64

air date, in addition to buildings just down the road from the bridge.

Posted November 3, 2020, by Bill Eaton

CH&PW cover from 1958 showing original c1937 bridge.

Posted October 30, 2020, by Luke

Last known user of the bridge.

Posted October 30, 2020, by Doug K

So what are the naming conventions? I have submitted questions to the webmaster, but not gotten a response yet.

So, should the naming be defaulted to the railroad that built the bridge or to the last,current user of the bridge?

Guidance would be much appreciated.

Posted October 23, 2020, by Bill Eaton

Came across a photo of the 1921 Cache Creek Bridge (Highway 99W) in the August, 1938 issue of California Highways & Public Works.

Posted October 20, 2020, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Cool bridge! Wood compression, cast portals and wrought tension.

Posted October 20, 2020, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Luke,

RE 1: That does somewhat clarify the matter.

RE 2: In reading the John Stutz material, all I saw was documentation for one bridge from the Galveston, Houston, and San Antonio line. Based on what I read, I can't tell if it ties to a particular span that was shipped in or if it was a surplus set of documents that simply happened to be available and was handed over to Caltrans by SP so they could have a generic spec. on file.

If we can confirm that some or all of the bridges came from Texas, I suspect we can come up with span measurements. How precise do you need?

RE 3: Makes sense.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted October 20, 2020, by Luke

1) Art, the NWP dual-gauged the line from Duncans Mills to Fulton in 1909, so they probably did just yank the narrow gauge trackage and leave the standard gauge track alone.

This line was standard gauged in 1920.

2)The Caltrans stuff John Stutz cited states the Galveston, Houston, and San Antonio line in Texas: https://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth298890/m1/1/

John and I have a document that lists several spans ordered from Phoenix by the GH&SA, but John couldn't find anything conclusive on the Monte Rio trio, and without span measurements of the Keyes Estuary spans, I can't even start looking.

3) As for why they rebuilt a bridge only to tear it down in a few years: I don't think the railroad foresaw the lumber industry switching from their rails to trucking companies. Much like how land developers in the region didn't foresee the railroads failing in the area and taking their fledgling "luxury subdivisions" in Cosmo (Hacienda.) with them.

Posted October 20, 2020, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Luke,

RE 1: I question certain aspects of the Stutz text. I thought the line was re-gauged to standard in 1920. However, he states "the narrow gauge" was lifted rather that 'the track' or 'the rails.' The mixing of terminology is likely a simple mistake but it means we need to tread carefully with his statements even though they are a fantastic resource.

You mention a trail on an ROW, I guess I'm still no clear. Why go through the effort of upgrading a span for such a short term application? I'm not saying they didn't, it just seems odd.

RE 2 & 3: This would suggest that the 6 or more reused spans could come from anywhere on the SP system. One may have come from TX or maybe only the plans did. As the bridges were standard, its possible SP simply passed along a set of plans that were 'appropriate' for the bridge. Without more info, none of the bridges' origins are known, besides stating that it is likely they were repurposed by the SP during the first decade o the twentieth century from elsewhere on the SP system.

To me I would say that they all are from the early 1880s. Does anyone have any info on bridge upgrades by the SP, or its subsidiaries, in the early 1880s?

RE Keyes Estuary span status: long gone...

Regards,

Art S.

Posted October 20, 2020, by Luke

I'm casting doubt on the bridge being a reused railroad span, as it features pinned connections and a diamond date portal style used by Phoenix Bridge Co. on other spans along the SP/Harriman-run lines. Based off Nathan's imagery (https://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=california/riverroadrussianriver/) of the current bridge, the connections are totally different and the extant truss doesn't show (to me at least.) signs of widening.

Caltrans more than likely shipped a bridge in from elsewhere to replace the bridge.

Posted October 20, 2020, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Luke,

Nice find!

I'm quite certain the text in the book is wrong and its the Monte Rio Bridge. I'd post it in the photos of this page. The image is probably pre-1923 but I think 'fair use' would be the safer option if you aren't as confident.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted October 20, 2020, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Luke,

I may be missing your point and I'm not saying you are incorrect, but if the bridge was modified to accommodate two lanes, it was widened - the trusses were placed farther apart. This would require significant modification to, or replacement of, all of the overhead bracing and portals (as well as everything underneath). Theoretically the trusses themselves could be retained. I'm not saying this is what occurred but it would combine your observations with the plaque and the locals opinions.

Just a thought.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted October 20, 2020, by Luke

Locals erroneously believe that the current bridge, which has a 1914 AmBridge plaque, is this bridge modified, whereas this truss has a Harriman-standard Phoenix-built diamond portal a la : http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/ca2466/

http://hacienda-cosmo.com/page-5/

Posted October 19, 2020, by Luke

While looking for info, I came across this picture in https://books.google.com/books?id=r0UqQ4oKpZgC&printsec=fron..., claiming it's a crossing of the Russian River at "Rio Campo"

Rio Campo is now called Northwood.

The SF&NP would've been absorbed by the NWP at the time.

Posted October 19, 2020, by Luke

Art,

1) The text John C Stutz provided says verbatim "Two spans replaced the Howe Trusses at the mouth of Keys Creek in 1906. The steel cylinder piers remain, adjacent to highway 1, two miles south of Tomales. In 1930, as the narrow gauge was lifted, one was re-erected over Lagunitas Creek and Sir Francis Drake Blvd., in what is now Samuel P. Taylor State Park. That one was long since replaced by a modern bridge for the Cross Marin trail."

The modern trail bridge is on the railroad's ROW. Furthermore the highway at the time was being upgraded from wooden trusses (The original Shafter Bridge) to concrete structures (The second Shafter Bridge, a sadly-replaced open-spandrel arch.), so an iron truss wouldn't make sense as a road crossing.

2) Yes, NWP is the appropriate name as the North Pacific Coast, which became the Northwestern Pacific in 1907, built the Shafter Branch.

3) The NWP was partly run by the Southern Pacific (Willits south to Marin and Schellville) and partly run by the Santa Fe (South from Eureka through Humboldt County.)

Further proof that the NWP is an SP-associated line is the fact that both lines diesel locomotives shared the "bloody nose" and "black widow" paint scheme

4) Referencing the text from John C Stutz, the three entries you linked all came from http://bridgehunter.com/ca/sonoma/nwp-monte-rio/

The current status/location of the Keyes Estuary spans are "???¿¿¿⸮⸮⸮"

Posted October 19, 2020, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Luke

Something doesn't doesn't make sense. I'm OK with the bridges being bought used around 1907. But was this bridge relocated for railroad use or road use at this location? If road use, is NWP appropriate in the name? If RR use, why would NWP put up a bridge as they were failing?

John C. Stutz's description for Gualala http://bridgehunter.com/ca/mendocino/10C0046/ has an intriguing insight: "one of at least six that were recycled to minor rail lines in Sonoma and Marin Counties circa 1905-10. A CalTrans bridge report for one of these mentions drawings with the initials “G, H & S A”, suggesting the Galveston, Harrisburg & San Antonio railroad, the Southern Pacific’s subsidiary in Texas."

It would be really nice to determine each of the bridge's original owner, build date and location.

If NWP is not a sub of SP, then its possible the deal was between G, H & S A and NWP and all six bridges came from TX. Otherwise, its likely that SP sold the bridges to secondary lines after upgrading all of their lines prior to 1907 and they may come from all over the SP system. Knowing this may help in clearing up the history of all of these spans and where they came from. Including explaining the 'built in 1909 and relocated here in 1937' signs at Geyers http://bridgehunter.com/ca/sonoma/20C0005/ and Haupt http://bridgehunter.com/ca/sonoma/bh43377/

I'm also curious about the 1920 re-gauging from narrow (probably 3') to standard. Many railroad bridges had under rail stringers tied directly to the floor beams and, depending on how they were originally built, could make re-gauging a challenge. Using the heavy duty stringers under the rails makes sense from an engineering perspective but these 'stringers' are not present on the remaining CA Phoenix Column bridges. Were they lost along the way orr never used in these spans?

Regards,

Art S.

Posted October 19, 2020, by Luke

Art, the text in those three links all mention that the two spans here came in the same batch from the GHSA as the linked spans, and that they were relocated from this location to the Shafter Branchline across Lagunitas/Paper Mill Creek at Irving in 1931 (Newspaper article), which itself only lasted a few more years (1933, per the LoC documentation for Shafter bridge.)

Sadly, I've only been able to find a picture of the Howe at Irving, and only pictures of the Phoenix truss here at the estuary.

Posted October 19, 2020, by Art Suckewer (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Luke,

Whichever is easier. I reworked and moved the relevant post. Hopefully someone will address the images.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted October 19, 2020, by Art Suckewer (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Transferring amended comments from duplicate listing.

These spans are from the 1880s (not certain of exact year but 1879 used arched portal bracing of a very different appearance).

Also, this may be the source for (though unlikely based on Luke's article posting) as they are of the same basic design including portal bracing (where the original portal bracing remains):

http://bridgehunter.com/ca/sonoma/20C0005/

http://bridgehunter.com/ca/sonoma/bh43377/

http://bridgehunter.com/ca/mendocino/10C0046/

Regards,

Art S.

Posted October 19, 2020, by Luke

On the contrary, Art, it would be more arduous to undo all the "related bridge" linking and re-doing all the data entry I've done than for Doug to move the images that would need need to be moved from the duplicate entry.

Posted October 19, 2020, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Luke,

Thanks!

Might I suggest reversing it and making your listing for the original Howe trusses and this one the replacement Phoenix Pratt trusses. Less stuff will need to be moved that way. The pics and comments here relate to the Phoenix Pratt trusses.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted October 19, 2020, by Luke

Art, I'm merging the info into my entry.

Posted October 19, 2020, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Already added and build date is wrong. These spans are from the 1880s. Also, this may be the source for http://bridgehunter.com/ca/sonoma/20C0005/

http://bridgehunter.com/ca/sonoma/bh43377/

http://bridgehunter.com/ca/mendocino/10C0046/

So, its possible they were moved and still exist.

Regards,

Art S.

PS. If merged, please move my info/data to the other listing.

Posted October 19, 2020, by Luke

1) Don't remember the source, it's been 5 years since I made this page.

2) This page, which had gotten lost in the archive pipeline. https://www.sparselysageandtimely.com/blog/?p=13802

Posted October 18, 2020, by Doug Klingerman

Luke,

1) What is the source for the history statement "Removed ca. 1907"? Everything I've seen says the rail service continued until 1930.

2)What is the image/info sourced from Sparsely Sage and Timely? I don't see anything applicable on the cited page.

Posted October 18, 2020, by Luke
Posted October 6, 2020, by Luke

The original turntable isn't a pony truss, hence the two entries.

The later pony truss turntable is likely the more notable of the two, but both deserve an entry, considering John Marvig has proved that railroads liked to reused turntables as bridges, both on their mainlines and as road overpasses.

Posted October 6, 2020, by Doug Klingerman

Was only just now making the other page anew - if you have better info, no need for two different pages for only a difference in turntables. Please just combine the pages.

Platform Bridge (California)
Posted October 5, 2020, by Doug Klingerman

https://www.nps.gov/pore/planyourvisit/roadclosures.htm

"As of January 13, 2020, the bridge known as the Old Tocaloma/Platform Bridge, which runs parallel to Sir Francis Drake Boulevard at its intersection with Platform Bridge Road ~2 miles east of Olema, is closed to all vehicular traffic until further notice. The bridge is being closed to vehicular traffic due to structural deficiencies that make the weight of a vehicle unsafe to cross over the bridge."

Posted October 5, 2020, by Doug Klingerman

https://www.usbr.gov/newsroom/newsrelease/detail.cfm?RecordI...

"The Bureau of Reclamation, in coordination with the California Department of Parks and Recreation, will temporarily close the Ponderosa Way Bridge over the North Fork American River to vehicles for construction beginning July 15 and ending in December 2022."

“In addition to bridge replacement, the project will repair drainage and surfaces on Ponderosa Way leading to the river and bridge. Foundation work will strengthen and stabilize the concrete supports on the edge of the river.”

"The single-lane bridge will be replaced with an updated design using newer construction techniques. The new bridge will have a weight rating sufficient for fire engines, enhancing the area’s fire response."

Posted October 4, 2020, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

I deleted the old link for the (Lake Britton) McCloud River Railroad page since it no longer works; in its place is a link to the main site, which actually continues to be updated even now.

Also added a PDF from 2017 on intended plans for the bridge regarding its use on the rail trail.

Posted September 24, 2020, by Geoff Hubbs (geoffrey [dot] hubbs [at] att [dot] net)

Yes this is the highway bridge but it still says vertical lift bridge.

Posted September 24, 2020, by Michael Taylor (battlebotguy2 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I think I might have some photos of this bridge that I took during Twitchcon 2019 on my computer.

Really is an impressive structure in person, it is a bit out of the way though despite being in the middle of a large city.

Posted September 23, 2020, by Fmiser (fmiser [at] gmail [dot] com)

I was just watching some fun Mark Rober videos on YouTube and one of them is on the science of successful egg drop competition. And he was dropping his eggs from an 1898 Parker truss, pin connected, railroad now trail bridge!!

I tracked it down to this bridge. There are some nice shots of the bridge in the video. Here's the link if anyone else cares.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nsnyl8llfH4

Posted September 22, 2020, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I guess I see this one in a different light...its a trestle. There is really nothing all that historic about it. Even if its 100 years old, can we actually prove that the pilings, caps, stringers, etc are that age? I have doubts, as those often were replaced about every 20-40 years. Meanwhile, bike trails have saved far more historic rail bridges than they have cost. In addition, they open up access to those bridges for us to visit. Farmers refuting rail-trail projects in the midwest have cost us a lot of historic railroad truss bridges. Many of those branch lines ended up with all of the 1870s and 1880s stuff, now all gone. I can think of a good 10+ truss bridges in southeast MN alone that are gone because trail projects got shot down, at least 4 of which old photos show to be 1880s or earlier trusses.

Posted September 22, 2020, by Ed Hollowell (erhollowell [at] aol [dot] com)

First the "Secret Sidewalk" and now this.

Posted September 22, 2020, by Luke

Tell that to all the massive rail-trails built by liberal/blue state conservationists that reuse actually-historic and actually-notable structures.

Or to all the conservatives that decry historic bridge rehabs as "WASTES UH MUH TAXES" and "It'll never get used, so just bulldoze it!"

Or better yet, keep your political whinging to yourself.

Posted September 22, 2020, by anthony noddings (ajnoddings [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Its what happens in this liberal Democrat hellhole state, history isn't relevant to these ignorant idiots who only care about all their stupid trails, and mansions while everyone else barely makes it by. This is one reason Democrat cities suck. Completely disgusted.

Posted September 21, 2020, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

The newspaper suggests the original 1876 bridge was a Howe truss. Thus, likely a wooden, covered truss bridge.

Alternately, its possible the Howe part is wrong but the pictures suggests a slightly later bridge. Probably replacing the 1876 Howe.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted September 12, 2020, by Roger Deschner (rogerdeschner [at] gmail [dot] com)

Despite the raging fires near it, seen in dramatic AP photos, apparently the Bidwell Bar suspension bridge is being protected and carefully kept open, for use by both firefighters and evacuees.

A horrible tragedy is unfolding in CA, OR, WA. Many historic bridges have been lost, but I can't be sad about them yet while so many lives are now endangered. We'll survey and report on the bridges when the fires are out. It's great to hear of one of them, Bidwell Bar Bridge, serving a great purpose and saving lives.

Posted September 9, 2020, by Roger Deschner (rogerdeschner [at] gmail [dot] com)

Dramatic photo of the Bidwell Bar Bridge surrounded by a raging wildfire. https://www.nytimes.com/2020/09/09/us/fires-washington-calif...

Posted September 4, 2020, by Michael Dugger (michaeldugger [at] insightfulimagery [dot] com)

Difficult to access. Modern no trespassing sings. I respected the signs and flew in for photos from public areas nearby. A great looking bridge i would love to get on there and touch the metal and smell the railroad on there haha. I love theses old bridges.

Posted September 1, 2020, by Luke

Judging by the charring, not by choice, but out of necessity.

Posted August 30, 2020, by River Dweller (goldinyou [at] yahoo [dot] com)

There needs to be a correction to the brige information you have on the Stanislaus River Bridge in Oakdale California. Contact me and I will give you the information you need and a bit of history about it.

Posted August 30, 2020, by River Dweller (goldinyou [at] yahoo [dot] com)

There needs to be a correction to the brige information you have on the Stanislaus River Bridge in Oakdale California. Contact me and I will give you the information you need and a bit of history about it.

Dog Bar Road (California)
Posted August 30, 2020, by Doug Klingerman

County has plans to remove this bridge after new one is completed is a few years:

http://dokkenbridges.com/nevada-county/dog-bar-road-over-bea...

Posted August 28, 2020, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

It looks like one of the approaches was removed between 2018 and 2020..

Posted August 28, 2020, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Nice and Abandoned. Just the way I like them LOL

Posted August 28, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Melissa... This one looks right up your alley!

Posted August 27, 2020, by Michael Dugger (michaeldugger [at] insightfulimagery [dot] com)

Revisited this bridge on 8/27/20. Love this old swing bridge. I created some drone video footage as well as some still images. Really had a neat time exploring this old piece of history.

Posted August 26, 2020, by Doug Klingerman

Per the source below, the construction is of a new bridge (spliced precast prestressed concrete girder) parallel to the old one, which will solely handle southbound traffic.

https://confabca.com/confab_services/feather-river-bridge/

Posted August 26, 2020, by Doug Klingerman

Note the info from Yankee Hill Historical Society:

https://yankeehillhistory.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/Con...

"On March 30, 1903, one week after the California Gas and Electric Corporation acquired the Concow Reservoir in the power company consolidations, the dam failed. ... The force of the flooding washed out the wooden covered Nelson Bar Bridge. The bridge was replaced with a steel bridge. (That bridge was torn down when Lake Oroville was filled in 1967)."

Posted August 26, 2020, by Doug Klingerman

Note the info from Yankee Hill Historical Society:

https://yankeehillhistory.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/Con...

"On March 30, 1903, one week after the California Gas and Electric Corporation acquired the Concow Reservoir in the power company consolidations, the dam failed. ... The force of the flooding washed out the wooden covered Nelson Bar Bridge. The bridge was replaced with a steel bridge. (That bridge was torn down when Lake Oroville was filled in 1967)."

Posted August 23, 2020, by DougK (dougbcnu [at] gmail [dot] com)

No eyeballs on bridge, but hopefully helpful info.

See Google Maps StreetView:

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.4166614,-123.9369645,3a,87.4...

Street view dated May 2012

2 "Road Closed" signs in place. View of bridge shows a section apparently missing. Aerial/sat view appears to confirm this.

However, Google still routes across bridge.

Note: Traffic accident on bridge on Sept 30, 2018 (though shown as "Larabee Ranch Rd").

https://lostcoastoutpost.com/chpwatch/2018/sep/30/00053/

Note: CalTrans document noting "2014-15 Federal Funded Projects Lapsing on June 30, 2020"

https://dot.ca.gov/-/media/dot-media/programs/local-assistan...

Posted August 11, 2020, by Tyler

Bridge is in the process of being rehabilitated this year. Of note is the temporary Bailey bridge for pedestrians during construction.

https://www.arroyogrande.org/521/Bridge-Street-Bridge-Projec...

Hammond Bridge (California)
Posted July 20, 2020, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Maybe someone realized a 1920s through truss is not “beyond repair” and it would be a waste of at least $2M to replace this bridge.

Hammond Bridge (California)
Posted July 20, 2020, by Geoff Hubbs (geoffrey [dot] hubbs [at] att [dot] net)

Despite all the predictions, bridge appears to still be in use.

Posted June 30, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I will assume that the salt water air was responsible for roaching out the struts and upper lateral bracing.

Posted June 30, 2020, by Effie McDermott (effie [at] gotopismo [dot] com)

Built in 1913, demolished in 2020.

Steel Truss structure lifted off the base and placed on the ground on June 29, 2020, in process of demolition.

Posted June 25, 2020, by Loren (ksomfg [at] msn [dot] com)

I witnessed the demolition before the re-hab, a crane with concrete crushing jaws started from the east end and backed across the entire bridge, crushing the roadway and most else behind it in single bites as it went. The process took weeks and must have required a brave crane operator, finally there was nothing left except the bare arches with some rebar sticking out. Although it had been closed for years it was heartbreaking to hear it was slated for removal, but then they got the funding together and rebuilt it in the original style, amazing.

Posted May 27, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

It just kills me that the city tried to sue the state, because they didn't want a legitimate historic bridge to be considered historic!

That's the kind of stuff you get from an ignorant over-paid lawyer!

Posted May 23, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

If the last inspection was accurate, then hopefully they're working on the substructure.

A very unique span to say the least!

Posted May 23, 2020, by Will Truax (Bridgewright [at] gmail [dot] com)

Swung by the Purdon again the other day because I’d heard it was scheduled to be closed for the coming month to allow for repairs.

I was both curious about what was in need of repair and to learn a little about the resume of whatever entity was chosen and contracted to execute them.

Though it was a few days into the scheduled closure no one had yet mobilized.

Posted May 23, 2020, by Jerry Hamblen (jhamblen [at] singpraises [dot] com)

The Milky Way over the Anderson-Cottonwood Irrigation District canal this morning at 4 a.m. This 8' X 5' elevated section -- built in 1918 -- is part of a 35 mile long canal that can take a maximum of 125,000 acre feet of water per year from the Sacramento River in Redding for distribution to agricultural users.

Posted May 21, 2020, by D Chesterman (chestermand [at] yahoo [dot] com)

First this is an outstanding site I use often so no disrespect but I believe the span data for this bridge is actually the length of the entire truss/arch. Other sites report the bridge only spans about 527 ft (161 m) between the supports. The truss arch runs about the length mentioned for the span but it runs far beyond each support. I used Google Earth to measure the distance on the ground.

Posted May 6, 2020, by Will Truax (Bridgewright [at] gmail [dot] com)

Thanks so much, Tony!

It's not a mongrel though, such trusses are found in clear span roofs in numbers.

Posted May 6, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Sounds good to me Will!

Although "Multiple King Rod" is kinda catchy! Or perhaps a "Hybrid Mongrel"?

Posted May 6, 2020, by Will Truax (Bridgewright [at] gmail [dot] com)

Okay, let's not compromise.

It is what it is and it isn't what it isn't, and never the twain shall meet.

Posted May 4, 2020, by Peter Arioli (Califtony707 [at] aol [dot] com)

The photo of the two San Mateo-Hayward Bridges was taken in the summer of 1967, not '68 as I stated earlier (the vertical lift span on the old bridge is lowered in the picture.)

Posted May 1, 2020, by BKGuy
Posted May 1, 2020, by BKGuy

Project I saw on channel 3 Sacramento news requires closure of the bridge for this weekend though it is not outlined in the project description here:

https://dot.ca.gov/caltrans-near-me/district-10/district-10-...

Posted April 30, 2020, by Will Truax (Bridgewright [at] gmail [dot] com)

How about we compromise if the multiple panel thing is making it impossible to acknowledge it as a Queen.

And with is not being a Howe, not even a supposed single/singular.

If it defies categorization as things are shared and understood, perhaps we create one that fits?

Could it not reasonably be thought of as a Multiple King Rod?

Posted April 28, 2020, by Will Truax (Bridgewright [at] gmail [dot] com)

Such is where there is a departure in terminology between the worlds of Timberframing and Timber Bridges and later patent trusses typically built with iron or steel.

I've been in dozens of clear-span roof systems in public buildings (Town Houses/Halls, academy buildings & churches) With King and Queen trusses with secondary struts and "Prince & Princess" posts and rods. Though rarely seen by anyone, these trusses exist in large numbers and are incredibly akin to this one

These elements are seen as secondary and as not truly adding panels to the truss and totally redefining it.

As a working Timberframe and Joined Timber Bridge preservationist, I will continue to use the phraseology common to my allied trades. And as someone who has restored (including the current project bridge) and replicated a number of Howes, I see a necessary element in defining a timber example as being the presence of Angle Blocks at the panel points.

Posted April 23, 2020, by Erik Hoffman (norcalroadswebsite [at] gmail [dot] com)

Given the single ties and all of that, I think that it is also possible that this bridge was not built with a specific known design (Howe, Singlar Howe, Multiple Kingpost) in mind, given that it was built by one otherwise-unknown engineer in the mid-1800's. In these cases with older, smaller bridges and less established/formally trained engineers, especially given the nature of the California foothills at the time, bridges were often not built with specific design ideas at play, and were more often than not a hit-or-miss type of operation. This was often due to a lack of knowledge or experience, but also abnormal stipulations during construction, such as a lack of particular materials or fabrication capabilities. This was obviously more the case in the foothills and mountains as opposed to somewhere like Sacramento, and explains why many bridges of the time in the foothills were 1) designed very weirdly and 2) lasted at the latest until the early 1900's (but often much less) before failing. These would be situations where the engineer missed the mark, and there are comparatively few situations where they hit the nail on the head (think this one, Honey Run, Happy Valley Cutoff, Bridgeport, Purdon, Knights Ferry, Old Bidwells Bar, Walker (Folsom), Laytonville Dos Rios, Mosquito Road, Angels Footbridge). Note that nearly all of these bridges above have some sort of weird and very unique feature as a result of this construction process, some of which can be difficult to classify. All of this is to say, this "unclassified" method of designing could have very conceivably given the Oregon Creek Bridge similarly weird features that do not completely match any exact category, and were not built with these categories or models in mind. I do realise this completely goes against my previous comment about "dictionary definition", but you guys brought up some structural points I hadn't considered.

Posted April 22, 2020, by Matt Lohry

The railings look like they were fully replaced; they look very new to me.

Posted April 22, 2020, by Matthew (Mattcappadocia [at] gmail [dot] com)

You can see there were some accent moldings that have since fallen apart or were intentionally removed. Perhaps they were copper brass or cast iron.

Posted April 22, 2020, by Matthew (Mattcappadocia [at] gmail [dot] com)

Love these old bridges

Posted April 16, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I guess it's a rebuttal to Will's previous comment lol.

I would label it as a bit of a "Simple-truss" myself. My only real knowledge of the term "Howe-Single" is from the Bean Blossom Covered Bridge. I guess based on that one could conceivably dub this a "Covered H-S pony truss"... if there is such a thing. I haven't read enough into Mr. Howe to know if he ever actually developed a single version of his truss, or if this was simply a moniker coined by someone else. Of course we well know of his traditional truss featuring counters to form the classic X panel design. The Howe-Single could technically be classified as a Multiple-Kingpost truss using metal rods in place of wood for the verticals. The advantage being the ability to adjust the trusses by tightening the nuts at the ends of said rods.

I would love to hear more from Will on what he would classify this one... He being far more versed on these structures than myself or most anyone else.

Posted April 16, 2020, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

I'm missing something. Why was there a question regarding the truss type?

Posted April 15, 2020, by Erik Hoffman (norcalroadswebsite [at] gmail [dot] com)

It's the dictionary definition of a Howe.

Posted April 2, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

They need to just incorporate it into the trail system and let cars use the I-5 Bridge.

Posted March 31, 2020, by Kris Payne (krispayne999 [at] gmail [dot] com)

FYI. The original P&SV Railroad Trestle was built in ~1886-1887 of wood. Railroad was completed and opened to Placerville in 1888. Old foundations are still visible under 1903 steel girder bridge (trestle).

Posted March 31, 2020, by Kris Payne (krispayne999 [at] gmail [dot] com)

FYI. The Railroad Trestle over Weber Creek was converted into the El Dorado Trail Bridge in 2009. This Trestle section of the EDT was completed on November 21, 2009.

Posted March 30, 2020, by Tony Arioli (Califtony707 [at] aol [dot] com)

One more question - decades ago, I had heard that the original toll booth on the Dumbarton Bridge was on the draw span, not on the Coyote Hills as was later the case. Does anyone know more about this?

Posted March 29, 2020, by Tony Arioli (Califtony707 [at] aol [dot] com)

Photo #3 is of the original San Mateo - Hayward Bridge (1929- 1967), not that of the Dumbarton Bridge. the Dumbarton Bridge didn't have the rise in the truss and draw span section, and had 9 truss spans (6 on the west side of the draw span; the center or lift span; and two to the east of the east tower.) The San Mateo Bridge had a total of 5: 2 on each side of the lift towers, plus the center draw span.

Posted March 24, 2020, by Luke

From the description section: Construction began in 1924 and was completed and dedicated on January 15th 1927

Posted March 24, 2020, by Peter Arioli (Califtony707 [at] aol [dot] com)

Does anyone know when construction commenced on the original Dumbarton Bridge? The only information I'm able to find is just when it opened.