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AZCR-Turntable Trestle

Photos 

AZCR-Turntable Trestle

The Verde Canyon RR tourist train crosses the bridge in July 2018.

Frank Proud, used with permission

View this photo at scontent-sjc3-1.xx.fbcdn.net

BH Photo #430152

Map 

Description 

The main span's deck plate girder was originally used as the turntable at the Santa Fe's roundhouse in Prescott, Arizona until reused by the AT&SF for this span ca. 1912.

Access to this bridge is easiest by riding the Verde Canyon RR excursion train out of Clarkdale. Much of surrounding land is private, and hiking is not recommended as a result.

Facts 

Overview
Deck plate girder bridge on Arizona Central/Verde Canyon RR
Location
Yavapai County, Arizona
Status
Open to railroad traffic
Railroads
- Arizona Central Railway (AZCR)
- Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway (ATSF)
- Verde Canyon Railroad (AZCR)
Design
Main deck plate girder was originally used as the turntable bridge in Prescott, Arizona until reused by the AT&SF for this span. Wooden trestle approaches.
Approximate latitude, longitude
+34.80810, -112.05865   (decimal degrees)
34°48'29" N, 112°03'31" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
12/403169/3852273 (zone/easting/northing)
Inventory number
BH 82121 (Bridgehunter.com ID)

Update Log 

  • July 8, 2018: Updated by Alexander D. Mitchell IV: Added categories "Recycled Turntable", "Turntable"
  • July 7, 2018: Added by Alexander D. Mitchell IV

Sources 

  • Alexander D. Mitchell IV

Comments 

AZCR-Turntable Trestle
Posted April 30, 2019, by John Marvig

Iím guessing the 1925 date stamp is from when the bridge was constructed. The turntable probably predates the bridge by 30 years or so. I have some records for the ATSF, so I will check them

AZCR-Turntable Trestle
Posted April 29, 2019, by Ben G (dickbong1944 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Greetings,

This website it great, so much helpful information. I wanted to share some photos that were taken just last week of this bridge. Of note it seems it may have been put in (or at least the concrete was) in 1925.

Cheers,

Ben G