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Posted April 27, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Yes, that document is great. I have made a couple rambling comments in the forum about the evolution of King Bowstrings, (with a Whipple thrown in) but it is nice to see it presented so clearly with photographs. This document really explains it very clearly to those who don't spend as much time looking at bridge components as we do.

Posted April 27, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Awesome stuff! Liked the page and the history document is... As my 18 year old daughter would put it "Dope!".

Nels and the gang got it going on... And yes Juls, keep doin' your Thang!

Posted April 26, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Seriously, folks if you have not liked that page, you need to do so. It has been great to follow the progress on this awesome Bowstring. I wish I could be there in person, but the status updates are the next best thing.

Posted April 26, 2017, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

and a nice picture of the beginning -

Posted April 26, 2017, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

A new Facebook page for photos of the reassembly at Springfield Bridge. Check it out. or more pictures at Bach Steel or Workin' Bridges and anywhere else we can think of.

Fundraiser in place to "Paint the Rail" - looking for naming rights to 8' sections of riveted and laced railing or the riveted vertical posts between - $450 / $50.

Pledges Only Now to see if the goal of $15,000 can be met. The rail arrives tomorrow.

We know (and you all know) that the magic begins with the reassembly, but the hard work that it took from all involved, city, county, state, fed was substantial. (I guess that is my thang Tony).

But, what was started is now on it's way to completion. Here's a glimpse of the history that we compiled and Nathan produced.

Posted April 21, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Great to see this one coming together after all the delays!

Nels and his gang are top notch, and Juls just keeps doin' her thing! ;-)

And Robert we have such a great collaboration of souls here on BH, I like to think it helps bring some of these projects to fruition!

Posted April 20, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Thanks for the feedback. I am always glad to share my observations. Nathan, Tony, and others have given me a lot of good insight as to what to look for.

It is great to have new folks joining this website. We need more folks to see the value in preserving historic bridges of all types. This Bowstring is a great example.

Julie, Nels, and the gang have done so much for us Bridgehunters. Hopefully there will be many more success stories such as this one.

Posted April 20, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

Robert thank you, you have no idea how much some of us learn when you get on a roll! It is much appreciated.

Posted April 20, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Awesome news! I can't wait to see this one in place! Even if I cannot make the dedication, hopefully, I can see the finished product someday. Thanks to Workin' Bridges, some of these great structures have a bright future.

Posted April 20, 2017, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The stage is set. Thank you Faulkner County roaks department. What a crew! We are fortunate.

Posted April 20, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Springfield and Clark's Creek represent a Tale of Two Kings. They both work together to interpret the evolution of King Iron Bridge Co. engineering.

The Springfield Bridge is a great example of an early King Bowstring Bridge. The outriggers are cruciform (star iron), but they contain no lacing. If you look at some of King's later Bowstrings, you will notice that the outriggers feature lacing on the verticals. In addition, many King Bowstring through spans feature unique wrought iron tubes for the sway bracing. You can see these tubes along with the latticed outriggers on the 1878 Old Military Bridge in Bourbon County, Kansas

http://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=ka...

Now, knowing this, we can begin to appreciate the true significance of the 1878 Clarks Creek Whipple Truss in Geary County, Kansas.

http://bridgehunter.com/ks/geary/clarks-creek/

The Clarks Creek Bridge also features those wrought iron tubes, which are again used for sway bracing. It appears that King simply took this Bowstring feature and incorporated it into their early Whipple truss design. These tubes are not found on any other remaining King Whipple trusses, all of which are newer than the Clarks Creek Bridge.

The Clarks Creek Bridge features latticed vertical members which became a standardized feature on truss bridges of all types in the 1870s and 1880s. The vertical members on the Clarks Creek Bridge are exceptionally lightweight. In addition, the Clarks Creek Bridge has other features that are commonly found on very old trusses. These include fishbelly floor beams and somewhat non-standardized connections. While there are other King Whipple trusses still extant, the Clarks Creek Bridge is the oldest of them all. No other King Whipple trusses have even remotely the same appearance.

To summarize, the Springfield Bridge is an example of a very early King Bowstring and the Clarks Creek Bridge is a very early example of a King Whipple. In fact, it is the oldest known non-Bowstring King bridge in existence. The Old Military Bridge helps us to see the continuum of engineering between the two of them. All three of these bridges are of extremely high national significance. One of the three is being restored by Workin' Bridges. Hopefully the other two can be saved as well.

Posted April 20, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

Hard to decide Clarks Creek VS Springfield..... guess the Othmar H Ammann crew already did. Seems like this bridge, and crew should be nominated for best restored when its done. Jason know they aren't open but this is VERY significant bridge, being saved by THE team. What category would you suggest?

Posted April 19, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Yes, definitely. I think that it was a nominee.

Posted April 19, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

HMMM another bridge of the year possibility!

Posted April 19, 2017, by Will

Bridge has been replaced for a couple years now.

Posted April 19, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I wish I was in the area, because I would definitely drop by. This is a great development. I hope to see it someday.

Posted April 19, 2017, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

a Meet n Greet will be held Saturday to go over the craftsman's record on this bridge in conjunction with the Faulkner County Historical Society. If you are in the area, we would love to see you stop by. James Baughn you are not that far away!.

The gangs all here (soon) and the reassembly and reset begins for the final push.

You can order a t-shirt.

Posted April 9, 2017, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Examples of the craftsmans work, we've seen master and apprentice work, pick marks on the side of cruciform, numbers on the trusses. now that w

It is blasted it is easy to see forge c welds too. .... not painting this one.

Posted April 9, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I have seen these types of floorbeams on a very small number of very old truss bridges. I believe that Columbia Bridge Works experimented with them. I can't think of any other Kings off the top of my head that used them. They seem to be an extremely rare find in general.

Posted April 9, 2017, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Agree with tinkering designs. Certainly easier to fabricate angle over extruded star. Worked the same. But what are these floorbeams?

Posted April 9, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Tony' answer certainly seems logical. King had also used simple round stock, ie poles for outriggers as well. The outriggers do not seem to have been quite as standardized as one might expect.

I have seen both cruciform and angle used on outriggers on several pony trusses, so perhaps this experimentation was not limited to King.

Posted April 8, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I have found that many of these firms always seemed to be tinkering with their designs, and this could possibly be an explanation here Julie. To me it would appear that these would be easier to produce than cruciform bars.

Posted April 8, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Interesting...let me think about this...these mysteries are one of my favorite aspects of bridges...

Posted April 8, 2017, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

If McIntyre was cruciform in 1883 why would this one be so different?

Posted April 8, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This may or may not be the right answer...

But I have found that before 1875, King used cruciform iron on just about all verticals and outriggers. It seems to me that they added more lacing later. But, that is purely based on a few that I have looked at.

Was the angle iron a modification? If it was original, perhaps King used it on their later bowstrings. I think that WIBC had similar members, if I recall based on my memories of the Independence Bowstring in Kansas.

Posted April 8, 2017, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge confounds me. The verticle posts are angle, not cruciform. The floor beams are very different, looking towards fishbellies. 1880 vs 1883 McIntyre, just is wierd. Castings are right, trusses and shoes, bottom chord are also right. The sway bracing also is cool yet odd.

Any ideas.

Posted March 31, 2017, by Brad Smith (gaberdine [at] hotmail [dot] com)

In 2017 You still come off the bridge eastbound and have to make a curve that is generously allotted 35 MPH back into the old road. The straight direction would go to a Greenville freeway bypass that has some dirt work done and little more.

Posted March 30, 2017, by Brad Smith (gaberdine [at] hotmail [dot] com)

This picture is of the Southern Pillar (on the right hand side of the picture showing them both.)

Posted March 27, 2017, by Brad Smith (Bwana39 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

2nd picture

Posted March 27, 2017, by Brad Smith (Bwana39 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Picture of the west portal as it exists today

Posted March 22, 2017, by Rene Lovett (rtlovett [at] comcast [dot] net)

Does anyone know the engineer who built Orr Bridge? My husband thinks it might have been his great grandfather.

Posted March 1, 2017, by David Backlin (us71 [at] cox [dot] net)

New bridge opened March 1.

Posted February 27, 2017, by Randy Andrews (Randyland25 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Train tracks are gone now. Someone has bought up Grayson and have ruined what is left of the town.

Posted February 27, 2017, by Randy Andrews (Randyland25 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Train tracks are gone now. Someone has bought up Grayson and have ruined what is left of the town.

Posted February 26, 2017, by David Backlin (us71 [at] cox [dot] net)

Bridge has been fully removed. Replacement bridge under construction

Posted February 7, 2017, by Brandon (bjones [at] fortsmithschools [dot] org)

Ok, thanks. Is it pretty much right off the main road?

Posted January 26, 2017, by Anonymous

My best guess is Oark, Arkansas (Hwy 215 or 103). Once you go past the country store it becomes county maintained CR 5440. Looks like 2 1/2 miles

Posted January 26, 2017, by Brandon

What are the directions to the bridge?

Posted January 24, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Sounds like a Win-win situation... I just hope it's done right!

Posted January 24, 2017, by Michael Miller (michael_a_miller [at] yahoo [dot] com)

NRHP approved move to the city park in West Fork on June 6, 2016, so it will remain on the NRHP after the move is completed.

http://www.nps.gov/nr/feature/places/pdfs/AD_00000637_06_07_...

Posted January 16, 2017, by Dcguess92

Wrong one im sorry :)

Posted January 16, 2017, by Dcguess92

Wrong one im sorry :)

Posted January 16, 2017, by Dcguess92

Unless this bridge was removed in the last couple months its still there

Posted January 9, 2017, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Here are some photos I took in November 2016 showing the replacement arch assembly. They were being put together along the shoreline and will be moved into place.

Posted January 4, 2017, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

The DOT has a bunch of old drawings on its historic bridge website and the attached drawings revealed this was a K-Parker type of truss.

Posted January 2, 2017, by Earl Sinclair (justin [dot] wade [dot] culpepper [at] okstate [dot] edu)

It's up, but you cannot reach the opposite bank. I was out there last year and it's solid about 3/4 of the way across.

Posted December 30, 2016, by Tony Anderson (scout2tony [at] gmail [dot] com)

In the sixties, my Scout troop (Troop 12, Cent. Presb. Ch., Ft. Smith) made an annual hike from this bridge to Devil's Den SP. We were told that this was part of the Butterfield Stage route. The reason I mention this is that, at that time, the west end of the truss was lying in the stream bed. We would scramble over the rocks with our packs, and sometimes bicycles, and climb the very steep roadway to begin our hike (or ride).

This is probably why the pony trusses were added, and why the new bridge was built. They surely knew that this, Hwy 220, the last unpaved state highway would be widened and paved in the future.

It's still a beautiful drive, but I'm going to miss the rocks and the low water bridge. Not the dust, though.

Posted December 13, 2016, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

The vertical lift span has on the southern endpost an American Bridge plaque with 1971 on it. So the approach spans are American Bridge fabricated in 1928, and the lift span was built in 1971.

Posted December 11, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I knew this one was potentially doomed when I crossed it last year. I didn't realize that it would be gone this soon however...

Posted December 9, 2016, by J Lance (bugo73 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This was the first bridge I ever noticed as a kid.

When I was young we would go on Sunday drives and we were in this area I would beg my parents to drive across this bridge and the closer we got to it the more excited I got. I was terrified to cross it but I loved to and it was quite an adrenaline rush. It is the reason I am obsessed with bridges today.

Posted December 9, 2016, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

that bridge is no longer over Cadron Creek. This is noting the new location - the City of Conway uses both names.

Posted December 8, 2016, by Anonymous

Is this the same bridge as http://bridgehunter.com/ar/faulkner/cadron/

Posted November 30, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Well, this is a pleasant surprise. I figured that this one would be gone.

Posted November 29, 2016, by J Lance (bugo [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I visited this bridge on November 29, 2016 and am pleased to report that it is open to traffic! The furthest west approach spans have been replaced and the deck has settled on some of the approaches but the trusses seem to be in excellent shape. Lets hope it stands another 111 years.

Posted November 28, 2016, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Actually, the bridge parts have been sent to Little Rock for blasting off of lead paint and lichen. The bridge will be restored by BACH Steel on site. BACH will be fabricating new caissons at Beaverfork Lake and the lattice and riveted railings in Holt, Michigan in the next month. The lift and disassembly went pretty well. There are several castings and the channel missing where something went through the bridge, there is a fix to a broken shoe that had been repaired very early. There is little pack rust or rivet replacement that is required, although every inch will be inspected. The vertical cruciform is in remarkable condition. The differences in 1871 created parts to 1881 parts is the fun part of the archaeology of the craft. The spacers in the lower chord vary as well. Zenas King...wish I had his journals.

Here are a few pictures that I just downloaded, then I'm off to inspect blasting and meet with the survey crew to mark the spots. The coolest part of this whole thing is the working together between the City, the County, BACH Steel, the crane company and trucking. It's been remarkable and the cost savings with everyone doing their own best things is significant. It's an expensive project at $508,370 but that doesn't include what those other jurisdictions included, road in, tree removal, crane pad, people that cared about their work.

Posted November 28, 2016, by Jeremy Beaird (jerebeaird [at] gmail [dot] com)

Bridge is in the process of being disassembled for replacement.

Posted November 27, 2016, by J Lance (bugo73 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge is described by AHTD as an "Army truss".

Posted November 27, 2016, by J Lance (bugo73 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The pony trusses were added sometime after 1965. They are described in AHTD's minute orders as "Army trusses".

Posted November 27, 2016, by Randy Higgins

The Springfield Bridge has been removed, disassembled, and sent to Little Rock to be refurbished. It will be reassembled and placed across a small cove on Beaverfork Lake outside of Conway in Faulkner County.

Posted November 22, 2016, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Field visit revealed a 1970 American Bridge plaque. Additionally truss spans show built-up design and use of bolted field connections typical of 1970. Clearly all of the superstructure dates to 1970. What is uncertain is whether the piers are concrete dating to 1970, or are the original piers encased in concrete (possible, given unusually high deterioration of concrete).

An interpretive plaque reads only "original construction 1884" which is technically true, but no mention of the total replacement in 1970 is made, which is likely where the confusion originates. As a bridge historian its a pet peeve of mine when interpretive signage is so misleading.

Posted November 20, 2016, by Cyndi Riley (cyndiriley13 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Visited this bridge 18 Nov 2016.

I spoke with a man that knew the history of this bridge.

The bridge deck was rebuilt last year. Heavy trucks use the bridge because it is the only one wide enough. They end up crushing the runners and the deck has holes again from the trucks not being on the runners.

The whole bridge was rebuilt. The abutments are still timber and the piles have been cut with new and fewer piles set.

Posted November 18, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Hi Nathan. I have been following the progress of the Springfield Bridge through Workin' Bridges. That was a last minute save if I have ever seen one. I am amazed that it was able to lean that long.

I certainly didn't mean to single out Arkansas. There have been some great success stories there. When I have driven through the state, I have tended to visit the doomed bridges while I can. I have done the same with Kentucky, Tennessee, West Virginia, Oklahoma, etc.

As you say, it is hard for a small town to save a bridge. I think that whoever can come up with a free market solution will find success. I think that Workin' Bridges is really into something, and I have enjoyed working with them. I wish I could be in Springfield to see the progress in person.

Posted November 18, 2016, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Robert... As a bridge historian I found it interesting to see a cantilever designed by Ira Hedrick. I've previously only seen works by him when he was with the firm Waddell and Hedrick (which only lasted a few years). The bridge has a unique expansion detail at the lower chord interface with the suspended span.

The Springfield Bridge being saved helps balance the loss of this and some other substantial bridges. The city of Conway and Faulkner County truly show the best in bridge preservation by choosing to not only save this bridge but to have the work completed using in-kind restoration by Workin' Bridges and Bach Steel, recognizing the specialty nature of this work.

In contrast, my brief tour of bridges in Arkansas shows the exact opposite is true of the state agency, AHTD. The fate of the Clarendon Bridge reminds me of the Donora Webster Bridge in Pennsylvania. The bridge was bypassed by a new bridge which totally bypasses Clarendon. Clarendon is not a large or wealthy town and likely cannot afford to take ownership of the historic bridge for pedestrians. AHTD apparently won't preserve it for them. This "pay to play" approach to historic bridge preservation clearly is unfair to communities like Clarendon. They deserve to keep their historic bridge.

The Pruitt Bridge in NW Arkansas is equally ridiculous. It is located on what is likely one of the most scenic roads in the entire state. It is located next to a park and series of hiking trails. Yet AHTD refuses to leave this totally unique bridge standing for pedestrian use next to its replacement.

In the interest of fairness I should comment that the Cotter Bridge, the largest Marsh Arch in the country, is beautifully preserved.

Posted November 17, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Nathan, at least you were able to document it. This is an incredible bridge - especially with the approach spans.

Arkansas is losing some good bridges right now. The Pocahontas Bridge was a nice triple span. When I drove across it last October, I did not realize that it would be gone so soon.

Posted November 17, 2016, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

New bridge (ugly slab of concrete) is open to traffic. The historic bridge as of now remains in existence with no demolition work begun. There are Type 3 Barricades, Concrete Barrier, and No Trespassing Signs installed at entrance to historic bridge. However, no cyclone fencing or any other physical barriers to pedestrian access are present at this time however. So its pretty easy to ignore the signs and access the bridge for photos...

Posted November 17, 2016, by Maribeth (miller [dot] maribeth [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Has this bridge been rebuilt again? Is it up now?

Posted November 17, 2016, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Bridge is still being built. Approach spans are well underway, but there are no beams set over the main channel yet.

Posted November 10, 2016, by Charles Hale (chuckchuck [at] conwaycorp [dot] net)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hCjSvXg0Ea0

This is the youtube video of the bridge lifting from the Cadron's banks.

Posted October 25, 2016, by David Backlin (us71 [at] cox [dot] net)

The bridge was originally built in 1914 according to a historical marker

Posted October 16, 2016, by Randy Higgins

Preliminary work by the Faulkner County Road Department has started in preparation to relocate and restore the bridge. Photo taken October 16, 2016

Posted October 12, 2016, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

W'B finds this news thrilling, and can't wait to get to Arkansas. We have the right team with Nels and the Gang from BACH Steel and the locals, Randy at Best Crane, the city and county. This one may be a documentary as well.

http://www.arkansasonline.com/news/2016/oct/06/preliminary-w...

Posted October 11, 2016, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

1974 Tied Arch Span FAIL of DEMOLITION: http://katv.com/news/local/broadway-bridge-still-stands-afte...

Its an ironic contrast to the exactly one century older 1874 Springfield Bridge in Arkansas, which will soon be the exact opposite.. a SUCCESS in PRESERVATION.

http://www.arkansasonline.com/news/2016/oct/06/preliminary-w...

Posted October 5, 2016, by Tre Baker

Open to southbound traffic too, briefly, between 9th and 13th streets. (Note yellow line in photos.)

Posted October 2, 2016, by Dalton Adams (Dalton [dot] adams [at] smail [dot] pocahontaspsd [dot] com)

At 7:32 AM on October 2,2016,the main truss was blown up, falling into the river.

Posted September 18, 2016, by Don Morrison

The bridge that was at 36.389667, -93.659259 looks in Google Earth 2001 imagery to be a multi span through truss. Gone in 2006 imagery.

So no, it's not the swinging bridge, but it may have replaced the swinging bridge.

Posted September 18, 2016, by David Backlin (us71 [at] cox [dot] net)

I found what appears to an abandoned bridge remnant just west of Berryville on old CR 306. Could this be the old swinging bridge?

https://goo.gl/maps/4LiKqaW8sCE2

Posted September 15, 2016, by Cyndi Riley (cyndiriley13 [at] gmail [dot] com)

taken 20160912

Posted September 13, 2016, by David Backlin (us71 [at] cox [dot] net)

Bridge has been permanently closed and will be replaced 2017

http://www.nwaonline.com/news/2016/sep/12/benton-county-to-c...

Posted September 11, 2016, by David Backlin (us71 [at] cox [dot] net)

Looks like two rail cars placed side by side

Posted September 10, 2016, by Cyndi Riley (cyndiriley13 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Photos taken 20160909

Posted September 7, 2016, by Anonymous (Randywhutehurst1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

That span was built in 1935 however the main part was built in 1894.

Posted September 5, 2016, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

That's not considered normal on this site Joseph...

That's considered ugly!!!

Posted September 5, 2016, by Joseph scoggin (joey [dot] thomas189 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The bridge has been worked on the tressles have been taken down and made into a normal bridge the plaque is built into the concrete.

Posted September 2, 2016, by Cyndi Riley (cyndiriley13 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Visited the Old River Bridge on 27 Aug 2016.

These photos are from the Benton and Haskell side.

Shaw Bridge (Arkansas)
Posted September 2, 2016, by Cyndi Riley (cyndiriley13 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Visited the bridge on 27 Aug 2016.

Tried to get a photo of the elevation but it was too grown up.

Posted September 2, 2016, by Cyndi Riley (cyndiriley13 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Visited the Railroad Bridge on 27 Aug 2016. I tried from the Haskell side but could not see the bridge. I did get there from the Benton side.

The Old River Bridge is in the foreground in the photo with 2 bridges showing. You can see the remains of a pier behind the Railroad Bridge of another bridge.

Tull Bridge (Arkansas)
Posted September 2, 2016, by Cyndi Riley (cyndiriley13 [at] gmail [dot] com)

These were taken on 20160827

Posted August 25, 2016, by David Backlin (us71 [at] cox [dot] net)

Bridge scheduled to close permanently on September 28, 2016. Replacement bridge is expected to open within 6 months after old bridge closes.

http://www.arkansashighways.com/news/2016/NR%2016-278.pdf

Bono Bridge (Arkansas)
Posted August 25, 2016, by David Backlin (us71 [at] cox [dot] net)

AHTD and BNSF have announced plans to build a new bridge to be completed in 2017

Posted August 20, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Christopher,

Your first mistake is to think there was thought involved :^)

Regards,

Art S.

Posted August 20, 2016, by Christopher Finigan

What was this truck driver thinking?

Posted August 2, 2016, by Mimi Kallin (Jekallin [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This is more of a wistful comment.....I went to Henderson State there in Arkadelphia from 1980 with a graduation in 1983. There was nothing sweeter than crossing that bridge and getting back to Arkadelphia after a weekend away and I know I speak for generations of Reddies who feel the same sentiment. So so glad we stopped and crossed this bridge 2 years ago. I know time marches on and it's super old and super narrow but it would be so nice if it could be preserved in place. Love bridgehunter and have learned so much!

Posted July 29, 2016, by Carolyn Cox (mccox2 [at] cablelynx [dot] com)

The covered bridge was built in 1879 according to the Arkansas Hwy Dept and early Ouachita County historian Mrs. Dora Sifford. There had been a pre-Civil War bridge near the site, but it was NOT a covered bridge. The sign indicating that the bridge was "built about 1860" is inaccurate. See Ouachita County Historical Quarterly, summer 2015.

Posted July 14, 2016, by Andy Peters (anpete1971 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Beginning in late August, Bell said, the tedious, detailed job of moving the 1874 Springfield-Des Arc bridge to Beaverfork Lake in Conway will begin.

http://www.arkansasonline.com/news/2016/jul/14/august-set-ta...

Posted July 8, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Hopefully we will see more of these success stories. As word gets out about Workin' Bridges, perhaps more communities will want to save their abandoned trusses.

Posted July 8, 2016, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

This truly is an incredible success story, and as Julie notes, so many different people, organizations, and companies played a role in making this happen... this is the way preservation should be! I would like to add one more acknowledgement which is to Preserve Arkansas (Historic Preservation Alliance of Arkansas) who were kind enough to accept my nomination of this bridge and to include it on the 2015 "Most Endangered" list. Please see attached. I believe this listing was/is important to help raise local awareness of the bridge. A final outcome of preservation that averts a potential loss is exactly what these Most Endangered lists are intended to do.

One other thing: This will be the first in-kind restoration of a historic metal bridge in Arkansas!

Posted July 8, 2016, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

We are delighted to take on the restoration of Springfield-Des Arc Bowstring. Nels Raynor and the BACH Steel Rivet Gang will be in charge of the lift, disassembly and putting it all back together again at Lake Beaverfork, just north of Conway. This agreement is with the City of Conway and the new location will be over water with views from Route 25. We appreciate how long this has taken from our first site visit in 2011. Three Judges and the City, Ken Barnes and local preservationists kept this fire alive. Engineering by Jim Schiffer, PE of Schiffer Group has begun and Jim will be on the ground in Arkansas next week.

Posted July 5, 2016, by Sabrina (nakamura [dot] serena [at] gmail [dot] com)

Any updates on if or when they plan on restoring this bridge?

Posted July 2, 2016, by David guess (Dcg [dot] 1380 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Anybody have any word on this bridge and what they are going to do?

Posted July 2, 2016, by Wayne Kizziar (waynekizziar [at] gmail [dot] com)

Click the link to see the latest update on this bridge damage and closure.

http://www.arkansasonline.com/news/2016/jun/28/damage-arkans...