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Posted August 25, 2020, by DigitalRoads (roads [at] hsvbypass [dot] com)

Bridge was removed in 2020. It is being replaced with a modern bridge.

Posted August 25, 2020, by DigitalRoads (roads [at] hsvbypass [dot] com)

The Flint River bridge and additional bridges on Old US 431 were removed in spring 2020.

The bridges are being replaced with modern bridges.

Posted August 13, 2020, by Elaine Sartain Spivak (Sartain987 [at] aol [dot] com)

Does anyone know the process or person(s) to contact to get it protected/and preserved?

Posted July 26, 2020, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Good idea Roger!

Posted July 26, 2020, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Good idea Roger!

Posted July 26, 2020, by Roger Deschner (rogerdeschner [at] gmail [dot] com)

As John Lewis is laid to rest, his horse-drawn caisson crossed the Edmund Pettus Bridge for the last time today. Congressman Lewis had said he did not want the bridge to be renamed for him. He felt that would dilute the historic importance of the civil rights movement, and that it should keep the name Edmund Pettus. We should honor John Lewis' wishes.

Instead, I propose that the road crossing it be named for him. It is currently called simply Broad Street. The entire route of his march from Selma to Montgomery, on US 80, should be named the John Lewis Highway. His name would then be on signs at each intersections along his historic march for voting rights, not just one bridge.

Posted July 21, 2020, by Art S. (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Luke,

Wow, Godwin wasn't kidding... :^)

The videos were quite informative, the presenter is good, although a little arrogant (he probably has even more Prussian in him than I do :^) ). While I disagree with many of his interpretations and conclusions, his facts are correct. However, these lectures are created by the informed and presented to the interested. The facts presented can be found if researched. They are merely made less obvious now, only available to those who explicitly seek them. Thus enabling the memory of these things to fade away from the minds of the populace.

As you may be aware, those videos were created in Germany. I know this because the little swirls in the historic footage block certain symbols that remain illegal there. It kind of ties in to my point. The sanitation of past events desensitizes the population to its history more rapidly than time alone. I am concerned that removing Edmund Pettus' name will do the same thing. This is the reason why I am opposed to changing the bridge' name.

Although related to the statues argument, in the sense it was named for for similar reasons that erected the statues. To me, the significance of bridge's name has become very different than that of the statues. The bridge and specifically its name are a direct link to the heroic actions taken by the marchers many years ago. By removing/changing the name, an additional separation from history is added and those events fade just a bit more.

Please note, I am trying to set aside left or right politics from my point about sanitizing history. Obviously, its not easy to do in this time and on a topic as charged as this. I am in favor of honoring Mr. Lewis, just not by renaming this bridge.

Regards,

Art S.

PS. The Japanese case is more striking than the German one.

PPS. I cite your work on this site as evidence of the fading of history via natural benign neglect. With a few significant exceptions, a lot of knowledge of early bridges in America has faded away over the generations to the point where you are putting in a great effort to learn what was and what really is. Just look at the number of bridges, that are still standing, listed on this site where the name of the builder has been 'lost to time.' This phenomenon is bad enough on its own; I'd rather try to slow/reverse the process than speed it up.

Posted July 20, 2020, by Luke

Art, the memories of the atrocities of WW2 are hardly fading from the German mindset. In fact, with the rise of brazen public Neo Nazism here in the US (e.g. the Proud Boys being openly antagonistic in the PNW, the whole Charlottesville Debacle to name a few.) and Conservatives making up things about Hitler/Nazi Germany/etc. (e.g. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gfHXJRqq-qo ; https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hUFvG4RpwJI) Germans are teaching the rest of the world (Especially the US.) what they've clearly forgotten.

I can't speak for the Japanese aside from the fact that I know they don't acknowledged their massacre and raping of Nanjing.

Posted July 20, 2020, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Justin,

I guess Godwin's law is real...

I had considered using an analogy with not removing "Arbeit macht frei" from certain gates but held off...

The point is the bridge was named and the statues were erected by those who Lewis was resisting. Whereas the statues are passive, and therefore have less significance, the bridge itself and in a big way its name were very symbolic to both sides.

The local people/government named this bridge after a grand dragon of the KKK! This in itself teaches what Lewis faced and what he was fighting for and against when he led the march across it. By whitewashing this history it's significance will be diminished. Just like the history of the causes and atrocities of WWII are fading from the collective memories of those in Germany and Japan.

I have no problem with renaming bridges and I agree that Mr. Lewis should be honored. However, I feel strongly that it would be a mistake to honor Mr. Lewis by changing the name of this bridge.

Sincerely,

Art S.

Posted July 19, 2020, by Justin

Removing Pettus' name diminishes the action of Lewis in the same way that removing Confederate statues actually erases history.

It doesn't.

And much in the same way we shouldn't have statues to Hitler, we shouldn't have statues/memorials/etc. to Literal Traitors to the Union, especially when some of those traitors (Lee) expressly said "I don't want no damn statues' (Paraphrasing, of course.)

Posted July 19, 2020, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

George,

I don't know what was in Mr. Lewis's mind, but I strongly suspect that he chose to guide the march over this bridge specifically because of the name and symbolism associated with it.

I don't care about Mr. Pettus. However, to me, removing his name slightly reduces/dilutes the strength, courage and poignancy of Mr. Lewis' decisions and actions.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted July 19, 2020, by George A Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Art,i read the history on Mr Pettus and see that besides being a confederate officer he also was pro slavery and a founding member of the KKK.Mr Lewis fought for equality and has more of a connection with this bridge.Therefore I see no problem in renaming this bridge after Mr Lewis.That is my opinion on this matter.Of course as you know we can't change the name of the bridge.

Posted July 19, 2020, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

While I'm in favor of honoring Lewis, I thing taking Pettus' name from the bridge would be a mistake. Doing so would remove some of the history in the strength of Lewis' message in crossing the bridge.

Art S.

Posted July 18, 2020, by Jason Smith (flensburg [dot] bridgehunter [dot] av [at] googlemail [dot] com)

Rep. John Lewis passes. The fight to rename a bridge in Alabama in his memory/honor is gaining support. Will Edmund Pettus be put aside in favor of Lewis, who fought for equality and voting rights among blacks and minorities? Read more on the bridge in Selma and Lewis' legacy: https://bridgehunterschronicles.wordpress.com/2020/07/18/joh...

Posted July 12, 2020, by James Haughian (j [dot] haughian [at] sbcglobal [dot] net)

There used to be two plaques on the bridge's pier.

One said, "Styx River Bridge".

The other said, "Charon Retired".

This, 1951.

James Haughian

Oakland CA.

Posted June 17, 2020, by Glyn Robinson (contactbluebird [at] hotmail [dot] com )

Pic from today. I made a video of a train passing while I was thee today also.

Posted June 17, 2020, by Glyn Robinson (contactbluebird [at] hotmail [dot] com )

Pics from today

Posted June 17, 2020, by Glyn Robinson (contactbluebird [at] hotmail [dot] com )

Went under this today.

Posted June 17, 2020, by Glyn Robinson (contactbluebird [at] hotmail [dot] com )

Visited today! Pics to follow.

Posted June 17, 2020, by Anonymous

At the bridge now. They have put a guardrail up on the south end where you canít drive to the bridge. Went to the small park on the north end. Pics to follow.

Posted May 25, 2020, by Brian Stewart (bksal69 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Went by yesterday and the bridge is now closed to traffic. Piles of dirt at both ends blocking the road.

Posted May 7, 2020, by Sean Dean

This is an interesting bridge. Tried to get some rough measurements on it, with the approaches in tact this one would've been close to 1000 ft long in service. The main truss span seems to be somewhere between 150-170 ft in length, perspective is a pain for this one but if I had to pin a number on it I'd say 160 ft for the main truss, then 440 ft for the northern approach and about 380-390 ft for the lost southern approach. Southern approach appears to have been removed sometime between the mid 70s to early 80s

Posted May 4, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Already listed in Coffee County...

https://bridgehunter.com/al/coffee/old-pea-river/

Posted April 29, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Those were definitely Champion Bridge Company plaques that once adorned this beauty.

Posted April 29, 2020, by Ed Hollowell (erhollowell [at] aol [dot] com)

Appears to be a pipeline on the bridge. Any idea what it was for?

Posted April 29, 2020, by Ed Hollowell (erhollowell [at] aol [dot] com)

Build date 1925. Calvin Coolidge was president then. Hardly possible for Roosevelt to have a part in it.

Posted April 29, 2020, by Anonymous

This bridge had a plaque attached at the top that displayed the year it was built & the govt. agency ( CCA) or possibly WPA. Built by men hired by the FDR Administration programs during the Great Depression, Photos attached taken by me personally, December, 1957.

credit photos: MJ Lee

We lived in the area for many years and drove over that bridge daily until the early 1990s when we moved away. It was the shorter route to Addison from the Sardis community but I hated getting on that bridge. It certainly has historical significance and itís a shame that itís so derelict today that it wonít be long before it falls into the creek.. Maybe Someone rescued the old plaque or else it has fallen down into the creek at some point but I see it is missing in the recent photos.

Maureen Jones Lee

Posted April 3, 2020, by Nathan Brown (squidskid [at] gmail [dot] com)

The north side is blocked by a heavy gate with a lock. The owners of the surrounding property live next to the bridge and are very friendly though as you mentioned, they are not keen to trespassers. The King's Mill Bridge, as it is known in those parts, used to be a route for the Oakman High School bus and we can imagine how scary that must have been to ride across. Even when open, only one car at a time could use the bridge due to the width. If you have not found it yet, there is another bridge that was recently closed, Brown's Bridge, crosses Lost Creek just a couple of miles downstream, and just down the holler from Tubb's Church of Christ. You can actually see through the decking to the water below as of this writing. It would be wonderful for these bridges to be restored. Not only do they have historic and communal interest value, they were thoroughfares for locals who now have to navigate a complex system of winding backroads to get anywhere. Beautiful area in those Oakman backroads.

Posted March 13, 2020, by Ben Tate (benji5221 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I didnít realize I was driving over an arch bridge today. I snapped some quick pictures because I saw a replacement bridge under construction. It looks like it will also be an open spandrel arch bridge.

Posted March 4, 2020, by Rodney Hall (rod [at] famestudios [dot] com)

This is a photo of my family at Buzzard Roost Bridge circa 1969. I'm the smallest one. The picture was taken by my father Rick Hall, who was a legendary record producer at FAME Studios in Muscle Shoals, Alabama.

Posted March 4, 2020, by Glyn Robinson (contactbluebird [at] hotmail [dot] com )

You are so right, Zachary.

Posted March 2, 2020, by George A Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Nathan the lift points can be on the ends but it isn't recommended but you can use the upper and lower lift points on each end if you know what you're doing.

Posted March 2, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Highways used to use cables for guardrails, anytime I have seen rings like these on a bridge I assume that is what they were for. If they were lift points for a crane pick, wouldn't they be on top? The railings would have to be precast if that was the case too.

Posted March 1, 2020, by George A Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Jim,sounds good to me what you're saying.

Posted March 1, 2020, by JIM STEWART (JAMESEMSTEWART57 [at] GMAIL [dot] COM)

PERHAPS THE HIGHWAY ENGINEER AND THE BRIDGE ENGINEER WERE NOT ON THE SAME PAGE. THERE COULD BE VARIOUS REASONS NOT ALL OF WHICH HAVE TO BE LOGICAL.

Posted March 1, 2020, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Nice old stream gauging station in pictures 8-10.

https://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis/inventory?agency_code=USGS&s...

Posted March 1, 2020, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

I wonder what originally sat atop those stone piers.

Posted March 1, 2020, by George A Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Jim,if that is the reason for the eyebolts then why isn't there guide/guard rails installed?

Posted March 1, 2020, by JIM STEWART (JAMESEMSTEWART57 [at] GMAIL [dot] COM)

THE EYEBOLTS IN THE END OF THE BRIDGE RAIL SEEM TO BE FOR ATTACHING AN APPROACH GUIDE / GUARD RAIL. ONE THAT HAS BEEN REMOVED OR NEVER WAS BUILT.

Posted March 1, 2020, by George A Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Thanks,Luke.I'm familiar with what you call lift points being that I worked in a refinery and also warehouses where I used chains and couplings for lifting.Just didn't think they would leave them in the concrete now that I think about it.

Posted February 29, 2020, by Luke

Lift points.

Posted February 29, 2020, by George A Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Can anyone tell me why there are metal rings in the concrete in picture #6?Do they serve any purpose?

Posted February 29, 2020, by Anonymous

Might be the bridge on the far north end of this road that's slated for replacement instead of this one. Not entirely sure.

Posted February 13, 2020, by Ben Tate (benji5221 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Here it is with the walkway still in place.

Posted February 13, 2020, by Zachary S

Not convinced this one will survive the massive river flooding we've been having since December; might well lose a few across north AL before this is all over.

Posted February 13, 2020, by Glyn Robinson (contactbluebird [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Any photos of the bridge before the walkway was removed?

Posted February 11, 2020, by David Deloney (ddeloney [at] earthlink [dot] net)

I grew up in Dale County, about 14 miles east of the bridge. Back in the late 60's when I was in High School, we'd sometimes forget to go to school and several of us would load up in my old 63 Chevy II and wind up here. This was way back on a dirt road and there were no people for miles around. There used to be a big sand bar just north of the bridge, where we'd swim/picnic, but the river has changed some and the bend where it was, has been straightened out, although you can still see a slight bend in the river. I sure wish I had pictures of all us kids, about 4 guys and 2 girls, fine memories right there.

Posted February 10, 2020, by Pick England (Pick136 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Picture taken February 7th, 2020.

Posted February 7, 2020, by James McCray (jamesinslocomb [at] yahoo [dot] com)

No nbi data. Pic of bridge in link shows that it is an arch structure that has been added on with a slab.

Posted February 2, 2020, by Zachary S

Well that's heartbreaking. Such a shame, it's got such a unique setting and location but there's probably no saving that. Glad I got to document it when I did.

Posted February 1, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

haha Waffle House, the cornerstone of any well-formed bridge trip!

Posted February 1, 2020, by James McCray (jamesinslocomb [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I am from Alabama. Because of that I am an expert on all things Alabama. Roll Tide. Also, the growth in Alabama is pretty much constant, especially in the deep southern half as you get nearer to the Gulf Coast. Auburn sucks. In the northern parts in the hilly parts of the state its easier to visit bridges in the winter, and I use the term "winter" in Alabama loosely. Now poision ivy is an issue year round. If you want the low down on bridges in Alabama, feel free to message me. Waffle House rules.

Posted February 1, 2020, by James McCray (jamesinslocomb [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I am from Alabama. Because of that I am an expert on all things Alabama. Roll Tide. Also, the growth in Alabama is pretty much constant, especially in the deep southern half as you get nearer to the Gulf Coast. Auburn sucks. In the northern parts in the hilly parts of the state its easier to visit bridges in the winter, and I use the term "winter" in Alabama loosely. Now poision ivy is an issue year round. If you want the low down on bridges in Alabama, feel free to message me. Waffle House rules.

Posted February 1, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Usually this time of year is the best to visit a bridge that has been long abandoned... at least that's the case in the Midwest where I live. I'm not sure if the foliage dies off quite the same in Alabama however. It sounds like from a previous comment that the North end might be the best to approach from with this span.

Posted February 1, 2020, by Glyn Robinson (contactbluebird [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Would like to visit this bridge. Since the photos are seven years old, I doubt anyone could get to it due to overgrown vegetation. Thoughts?

Posted January 30, 2020, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Love the vintage photos

Posted January 29, 2020, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

I am Stunned by these photos. They're Beautiful and Heartbreaking at the same time.

Posted January 29, 2020, by Glyn Robinson (contactbluebird [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Pics from yesterday

Posted January 29, 2020, by Glyn Robinson (contactbluebird [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Visited yesterday

Posted January 29, 2020, by Glyn Robinson (contactbluebird [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Any other news?

Posted January 29, 2020, by Luke
Posted January 28, 2020, by Glyn Robinson (contactbluebird [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Any new info about this project?

Posted January 28, 2020, by Glyn Robinson (contactbluebird [at] hotmail [dot] com)

May try to visit this bridge tomorrow. Wonder if you can still get to it?

Posted January 28, 2020, by Glyn Robinson (contactbluebird [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Got to visit this bridge in person today. Sad news to report. It looks like flood waters has separated the truss section from the east end approach. The truss section is still on top of the poles but is leaning terribly. It looks like it would fall if I pushed it with my hands. The water pipe that ran across the bridge was severed and a new water pipe had to be built across the creek on the southern end of the new bridge. . I did take photos and will try to upload a few of them. It looked so sad.

Posted January 22, 2020, by George A Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Clark,sounds good to me the way you explained it.

Posted January 22, 2020, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Without looking at this one I'm just speculating, but there are gauges that sit over a well bored close by the river and connected by a pipe. This allows a float to respond to changes in the level without having to be exposed to the current, debris, icing, etc. The concrete pillar will house the gauge (originally a paper drum recorder read by visiting). Now it usually contains electronics and communication equipment for remote reading.

Posted January 22, 2020, by George A Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Clark,if this is the water gauging station then where is the rest of the equipment for the station unless it's just a height marker for the water.

Posted January 22, 2020, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Probably associated with the stream gauging station shown on the topo map:

https://nwis.waterdata.usgs.gov/al/nwis/inventory/?site_no=0...

Posted January 21, 2020, by George A Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

What is the pointed concrete tower for beside the bridge on street view?Pan around on street view and you will see it.

Posted January 12, 2020, by James Szabo (Ak4za01 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The outlaws name was rube burrow. He was from Lamar county

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rube_Burrow

Posted January 12, 2020, by James Szabo (Ak4za01 [at] gmail [dot] com)

There is also an old cable swinging bridge on the old road across from this trestle. Before the rerouted the road where the big hill is now, the road used to run across the old bridge. Itís still there itís pretty grown up but you can still get to it, either a log truck or spreader truck was going across and broke the one of the main cables. I was just a kid when it happened so I canít remember all of the details. But itís a neat old bridge to look at. Iíll try to get over there to take a picture in the near future

Posted January 10, 2020, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Love it

Posted January 10, 2020, by James McCray (jamesinslocomb [at] yahoo [dot] com)

What is this? On first look its a stringer or beam, but what with the weird truss/ lattice beams in that placement?

Posted December 30, 2019, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Too bad this one was not saved. Alabama has some great historic bridges, but it is not bursting at the seams with rare and unique wrought iron trusses like Pennsylvania is. This bridge would have been a significant structure even in Pennsylvania.

Posted December 29, 2019, by Luke

No problem, Melissa! Unfortunate that it doesn't seem anything regarding the NRHP seemed to have happened, otherwise there would be an informational PDF to help.

Posted December 29, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Luke, Thank You !

Posted December 29, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

I find it intriguing. I'd love to know more about it.

Posted December 29, 2019, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The two spans on this bridge appear to be mismatched. I suspect they were probably built at different locations at different times - unless one of them got a major overhaul. To me, one span looks about two decades older than the other.

Posted December 21, 2019, by Jimmy Emerson (jsedvm [at] charter [dot] net)

Open as of Dec 2019

Posted December 21, 2019, by Jimmy Emerson (jsedvm [at] charter [dot] net)

As of Dec 2019

Posted November 24, 2019, by Jimmy Emerson (jsedvm [at] charter [dot] net)

This bridge is closed to traffic as of Nov 23, 2019.

Posted November 7, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Same Date

Posted November 7, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

The photo Luke added is also from 1961

Posted November 7, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

February 25 1961 The Montgomery Advisor

Posted November 7, 2019, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Melissa, Did you happen to see any reference to flooding in the 1950s of this bridge? I was contacted by someone who grew up near this bridge and they think it had another really bad flood in the 1950s, and were looking for confirmation of that.

Posted August 24, 2019, by Zachary S

Being replaced, unfortunately without documentation. Farewell to an 1898 bridge, hello concrete eyesore.

Posted August 15, 2019, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Some good news, this bridge has been relocated and is being preserved. The TV reports provided some additional history of the bridge and I have estimated the new location based on review of camera shots to be here: 34.896302, -86.445062

https://whnt.com/2019/08/13/historic-bridge-relocated-to-sha...

https://www.waaytv.com/content/news/Historic-Madison-County-...

Posted August 11, 2019, by Zachary S

Unfortunately, being replaced.

Posted July 29, 2019, by Stephen Peifer (sfpeifer [at] gmail [dot] com)

Another photo of O'Neal Bridge construction in 1939.

Posted July 29, 2019, by Stephen Peifer (sfpeifer [at] gmail [dot] com)

My father, F.J. Peifer, was a young civil engineer fresh out of college when he worked on the O'Neal Bridge in 1939. It was constructed by the Virginia Bridge Company, which years later merged with American Bridge of U.S. Steel. Attached is a photo of the bridge under construction in 1939.

Posted July 22, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Thanks Luke. I appreciate your help!

Posted July 5, 2019, by Zachary S

A closer look at recent aerial imagery shows that the south span at least may be partially intact from where it fell when the center pier collapsed, sitting just downstream. The north span not so much.

Posted June 11, 2019, by Daniel

Guardrail support makes sense, although I'm surprised they didn't use the diagonal nearby instead (or maybe they used both).

I wasn't sure what would explain the change from a member that could take compression, some bending, and tension to a tension only member, in the middle of the member. I guess something else (the guardrail) attaching there is about the only option.

Posted June 11, 2019, by Matt Lohry

Itís definitely a good questionó vertical members in a Pratt configuration (or most other configurations for that matter) are normally in compression, which eyebars are definitely not designed for...

Posted June 11, 2019, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Daniel: The member in question is the hip vertical. As such an eyebar is sufficient to handle the tension forces at this location. However they still needed to use a built-up beam with lacing at the bottom to provide a solid post upon which to mount the bridge railing (which no longer exists on the bridge).

Posted June 11, 2019, by Daniel

Can anyone explain why there's a short vertical laced member with a pair of eyebars attached to it, rather than eyebars the full height? 3rd pic.

Good times (Alabama)
Posted June 8, 2019, by Arty (aristontyler [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I remember jumping off of and swimming under this bridge in my youth. I once swung out from the bridge deck on a rope some brave soul had tied to the top rafters. I lost control and landed on my back on the water below. It knocked the breath out of me and scared me to death... I never used the rope again.

It looks like it has really been taken over by nature.

Posted May 28, 2019, by Bob Hobbs (bhobbs [at] hotmail [dot] com)

3 of your 5 photos are the same

Posted May 26, 2019, by Jonathan Rutledge (spuprr [at] aol [dot] com)

The bridge was lost for all time this week. Cut up for scrap and hauled off.

Posted May 21, 2019, by Daniel

That's an unusual design. I don't recall seeing other bridges that gradually transition from a through truss to a deck truss. I wonder why they did it.